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TRIBUTE TO DELWIN M. CAMPBELL, LT. COL. VET-RES., 1880-1952


This page belongs to greg krenzelok.


TRIBUTE TO DELWIN M. CAMPBELL, LT. COL. VET-RES., 1880-1952

Co-author of the "Veterinary Military History of the United States, Volume I and II".


Delwin M. Campbell, Lt. Col. in uniform during WW2.


Delwin M. Campbell at a veterinary clinic lecture in 1938.


TRIBUTE TO LT. COL. DELWIN M. CAMPBELL BY HIS GRANDSON DELWIN CAMPBELL (the III)


Lt. Col. Delwin M. Campbell was promoted to full Colonel in 1944 and was retired from the Army when he reached the statutory age limit. He was heartbroken that he was considered too old to serve his country further. He died in 1952 and was buried with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery. He left three children and eleven grandchildren. One son and four grandsons served our country in the military—in WW II and Vietnam. Image on the right: Delwin M. Campbell on horse-back in 1930.


Delwin Campbell Jr - WW2...................... Delwin Campbell (the III) - Vietnam, Field Artillery

Delwin Campbell Jr., my dad, was a Corps of Engineer officer in WWII and I (DMC III) was a Field Artillery officer in Vietnam.



Three Grandsons: Ross Selvidge, USN; Dave Campbell, USMC; Don Campbell, US Army


DELWIN M. CAMPBELL, SR
1880-1952

Delwin Morton Campbell co-authored in 1935 the Veterinary Military History of the United States, the most significant book written about the Veterinary Corps of the U. S. Army. He and his co-author, Louis Merillat, were Lieutenant Colonels in the Army Reserve at the time they wrote the two-volume, 1200-page book.

Dr. Campbell spent most of his time and efforts from World War I through World War II promoting the education of veterinarians and advocating the development of a veterinary organization in the Army, an organization that would have the numbers and the appropriate rank structure to adequately support the armed forces. Lt Col Merillat served as a Division Veterinarian in the 41st Infantry Division and as the Chief Veterinarian for the First Army during WW I.

While the Veterinary Military History of the United States includes the entire history of the military-veterinary service of the United States from the Revolutionary War to 1935, this website focuses on the contributions of Lt Col Delwin M Campbell to veterinary science in the military during WW I, the interim period between the Wars, and WW II.

WORLD WAR I
The United States entered World War I (which has been called ‘the War,’ ‘The Great War,’ and the ‘war to end all wars’) in 1917, three years after the War started. When one realizes that our army increased its forces overseas from 36,000 men in September 1917 to 1,800,000 in October 1918, it’s easy to understand that there were going to be serious organizational and logistical problems.

During the War Dr. Campbell was a contract veterinarian for the Army; most of his duties involved inspecting meat and milk for the army. He gradually moved into teaching and educating veterinary officers and men. When the Army reached 4,000,000 men in 1918 the “daily allowance for meat required 10,000 cattle and 22,000 hogs.” Daily!! In two years the army Veterinary Corps inspected 450 million pounds of beef, 296 million pounds of bacon, not to mention mutton, pork, butter, sausage, turkey, cheese, ham, etc etc – over a billion pounds of meat inspected, packed and shipped. The overwhelming magnitude of the service provided by a new- and fledging- Veterinary Corps was “without a parallel in the history of any country.”

The American Expeditionary Forces in France had an estimated 170,000 horses supporting the troops. To develop the manpower and expertise for a Veterinary Corps to support an army this size required veterinarians with veterinary degrees (initially 1500), 9000 enlisted soldiers with adequate training, schools stateside, veterinary hospitals stateside and in France, surgeons, administrators, units, remount depots stateside and in England and France, supplies, facilities, transportation, medicines, foodstuffs, regulations, and policies, along with all the myriad of administrative details of pay, promotions, assignments, etc., for the personnel. On top of internal veterinary issues, acceptance and understanding the role of veterinarians by the combat commanders was a major issue. (One Division Commander even used his newly arrived veterinary unit as military police, directing traffic.)

The hasty development of educational facilities and the construction of hospitals, etc., are well described in detail in the book. The painful and frustrating build up and introduction of veterinary units into the army in Europe details serious problems, and exposes an army slow to realize the value of taking proper care of its animals. Both in the book, and in his private papers, Campbell expresses frustration and dissatisfaction at the slow progress in the early years of the War, as he brought to light the weakness of the veterinary educational system (“private colleges toppled”).

Both authors felt (remember this was written in 1935) that the American pubic were “…unaware of the part played by its veterinary service in feeding, clothing, and defending the public.” The military and the public were “…unappreciative of veterinary accomplishments….” They even titled two of their chapters “Writing this Book Not a Pleasant Task,” and “Delay and Incompetence in Organizing the Veterinary Service of the World War.”

But this is the reason they spent so long researching and writing this book. The purpose of the book was to provide the records and statistics and history that may be of value to the army in planning future operations. They both were very unhappy with the way the animals (mainly, the horses) were treated during the war; and they were just as unhappy with the way the Army took so long to recognize that the Veterinary Corps needed autonomy, authority, and respect.

BETWEEN THE WARS
In 1922 Dr. Campbell entered the Veterinary Army Reserve Corps with the rank of Major. That year he attended the Medical Field Officers Service School, as the only veterinarian among medical officers, and was the honor graduate of the class. (There is a handwritten note in his private papers that says he was extremely proud of that accomplishment.) He spent the next 19 years not only in his civilian life of writing and teaching, and editing and publishing the Veterinary Medicine publication, where “…he became, as it were, a watchman of the whole veterinary field….” --from an article in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. He wrote some 30 books, and continued as Editor of the Veterinary Medicine until 1949.

In 1930 he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in the Army Reserve. He and Lt Col Merillat published their two-volume work in 1935. A quote from Veterinary Medicine: “Doctor Campbell…earned the distinction of being one of the foremost veterinarians of this period.”

During the 1930s he took more than an average interest in the veterinary military service since the troubled days of WW I, and helped greatly in the development of the Veterinary Officer Reserve Corps.

WORLD WAR II
Lt Col Campbell was called to active duty (actually, he lobbied strongly to get in!) in 1941 at the age of 61, and organized the first Army Veterinary General Hospital at Fort Bliss, Texas. He commanded the hospital until 1942 when he became an instructor in the Medical Field Service School in Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. During 1943-44 he was the Station Veterinarian at Camp Custer, Michigan.

Campbell was promoted to full Colonel in 1944 and was retired from the Army when he reached the statutory age limit. He was heartbroken that he was considered too old to serve his country further. He died in 1952 and was buried with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery. He left three children and eleven grandchildren. One son and four grandsons served our country in the military—in WW II and Vietnam.

His vast library, called “one of the most complete veterinary libraries of historical and scientific interest in this country” by the Journal of the American Veterinary and Medical Association, was divided between the University of Chicago and Kansas State University.

EARLY YEARS OF HIS LIFE
Born January 19, 1880 in Big Spring, Kansas Dr. Campbell received his early schooling in Topeka and Meriden, Kansas. He earned a veterinary degree from Kansas State College (now Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas) and his doctorate of veterinary surgery (D.V.S.) from Kansas City Veterinary College in 1907.

He had a general practice in Shawnee, Oklahoma and Topeka, Kansas, a short time on the faculty at K.C.V.C., an active part in the launching of a milk and dairy inspection program for Topeka and Kansas City, and editorial work for various society bulletins before moving to Evanston, Illinois in 1910. There he founded the American Journal of Veterinary Medicine, now called Veterinary Medicine, where he was the Editor until 1947. He was also employed by Abbott Laboratories of Chicago and introduced the first veterinary products manufactured by that firm.

Perhaps the best way to describe Dr Campbell’s impact on the veterinary practices before, during, and after WW I is to provide a few quotes from several esteemed journals and writers.

“Delwin Campbell was one of the great men of world veterinary science, and the progress of the profession throughout the globe owes much to his genius…His has been essentially a good job well done.” D.D. Ogilvie, The Veterinary Record (British journal.)

“While he (Lt Col Campbell) sometimes sponsored movements which were not popular with his colleagues, time has demonstrated that in most cases his ideas were right, and had they been heeded much dissatisfaction might have been avoided.” Kansas City Veterinary College Alumni Quarterly.

“His life and work developed a power in the profession which resided largely in his independence of surrounding influences.” Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

“He labored with calm dignity among his books and accumulated a fund of knowledge about veterinary medicine…that few have ever possessed.” Veterinary Medicine.

“Perhaps his greatest interest was in promoting veterinary progress on an international basis…He believed deeply and sincerely in the great part which the veterinary profession has to play in world affairs and throughout his life he did all he could to promote…national and international veterinary cooperation.” The Veterinary Record. (British journal)

--Delwin M Campbell III (COL-Ret), April 2012



Return to The Army Veterinary Service During the Great War, WW1 homepage:

THE ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR, WW1
Click on the below link:
The Army Veterinary Service During the Great War, WW1



Click on the below Homepage links:

SERGEANT LEONARD MURPHY VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 18, A.E.F., WW1
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Sergeant Leonard Murphy Veterinary Hospital No. 18, A.E.F., WW1


POLK COUNTY WISCONSIN THOSE THAT SERVED IN WW1
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Polk County Wisconsin in WW1


FORT ORD U.S. ARMY STATION VETERINARY HOSPITAL (HORSE) WW2
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Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2


11TH CAVALRY PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1919 TO 1940
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11th Cavalry Presidio of Monterey, 1919 to 1940


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1922 TO 1940
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76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion




U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: “Illic est Vires in Numerus” There is Strength in Numbers

“Working Hard to Preserve Our Country’s History wherever it is being lost”

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country’s history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved “Horse and Mule”. There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
gregkrenzelok@msn.com

FACEBOOK: U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group

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U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group