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U.S. ANIMAL EMBARKATION DEPOT NO 302 WW1 1


This page belongs to greg krenzelok.


U.S. ANIMAL EMBARKATION DEPOT NO 302 WW1


Officers and men at the Animal Embarkation Depot No. 302, North Charleston, S.C. during WW1. I would like to thank Doris Era for making the posting of this picture possible. Doris went through a lot of hardwork to get this picture on the website. Note: due to waves in this picture the scan is not as nice as I would like it to be.


ANIMAL EMBARKATION DEPOT: NORTH CHARLES, S.C. CIRCA 1919


Animal Embarkation Depot: North Charleston, S.C. Note: The picture is not dated, many of the men are wearing overseas chevrons dating it to circa 1919. No Depot number but I presume it is No. 302.

Note: The small building on the far left side of the picture with a sign above the two window reads: HEADQUARTERS ANIMAL EMBARKATION DEPOT.


February 18, 2015

Greg,

The following information was sent to me courtesy of the US Army Office of Medical History:

"This section from the Annual Report of The Surgeon General, US Army, suggests there was an HQ building, but that it wasn't used much if at all.

ANIMAL EMBARKATION DEPOTS
The principal depot was located at Newport News, Va. with a capacity of 10,000 animals and a veterinary detachment of 12 officers and 175 enlisted. The depot at Charleston. S. C, of the same capacity was completed and ready for operation when the armistice was signed. These depots were the normal adjuncts of the ports of embarkation, and the veterinary service thereof was analogous to that of an auxiliary remount depot plus the examination and preparation of animals for embarkation. Sanitary conditions at Newport News were extremely bad much of the time because of the congestion of animals and the mud-infested corrals.

Only one port veterinary service was developed, and that at Newport News.

The Newport News depot was several miles outside the city, and given the acreage required for 10,000 animals I expect the Charleston one was as well.

We don't have any material about it. I suspect information is in the National Archives; RG112 should have a report from the surgeon of the Charleston Port of Embarkation, and there should be some engineers reports too but I don't know how the Corps of Engineers records are organized. I doubt there would be photos of corrals build but never used, but it's possible; again, National Archives (Record Group 111) would be the place to look. It's also worth checking with local historical societies."

The National Archives site is:
http://www.archives.gov/research/search/. I searched and did get a few hits http://tinyurl.com/oujlyrs but it does not look like the documents are digital. The USACE Record Group is 77.

That is all the information that I have for now!

Best,
Dana

Dana K. Johnson
Librarian
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Wilmington District Technical Library
69 Darlington Ave.
Wilmington, NC 28403




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