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76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT, 2ND BATTALION

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Headquarters Battery 76th Field Artillery, 2nd Battalion, Feb. 17, 1925 Presidio of Monterey, California. DLIFLC & POM Archives


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT, 2ND BATTALION

The shield and the motto together form the regimental insignia. The 3rd Division colors, blue and white, form the basis of the shield. The canton (upper left part) is orange, the color of the 2nd Cavalry shield, its parent organization. In the center of the canton is the dragoon hat worn by the 2nd Cavalry when they were known as dragoons. The round symbolizes the motto, which is “Duty the Spirit of 76”
- Col. Albert S. Fuger, U.S.A. Ret.

BRIEF HISTORY OF THE 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY

* Note: The above silhouette represents a U.S. Army horse-drawn section. The illustrations were originally published in the “The Field Artillery Journal” and created by Mr H.S. Parker, son of Lt. Colonel Edwin P. Parker, FA. (Field Artillery Journal, Jan/Feb 1938, page 78). Source and permission: United States Army Fires Bulletin, Fort Sill, Oklahoma


The regiment was constituted July 1, 1916, Regular Army from the 2nd Cavalry, as the 18th Cavalry. Organized June 13, 1917 at Fort Ethan Allen, Vermont. Consolidated, converted, and redesignated November 1, 1917 as the 76th Field Artillery Regiment. The 76th Field Artillery was assigned to the Third Division in December 1917 and sent to France in May 1918. It was under fire for the first time on July 5th near Chateau-Thierry where it supported the 4th and 7th Infantry, Third Division. On July 15, 1918 the Germans started their last great offensive, by which they expected to win the war; but the Allies learned of their plans and orders were so timed that the 76th FA opened fire fifteen minutes before the hour set for the German attack. This was the famous Champagne-Marne Defensive and resulted in a severe defeat for the Germans.

On July 18th the Allies began the great Aisne-Marne Defensive. During the pursuit of the retreating enemy the guns of the 76th FA on July 22, were the first to cross the Marne. This battle lasted until July 30th. On August 1, after practically a month of heavy fighting in which many casualties were suffered, the 76th FA was relieved by the 147th Field Artillery and sent back to rest.

REGIMENT CITED: In recognition of its assistance and cooperation in the Marne campaigns, the regiment was cited orders by General Petain and the Croix de Guerre was pinned to the regimental standard by General Mangin, commanding the Tenth French Army, to which the Third Division was attached. From September 12 to 14 the 76th FA supported the First Division in the great St. Mihiel offensive. From there it moved almost immediately into position for the final Meuse-Argonne drive, in which campaign it participated continuously from September 26 to November 11, the date of the Armistice.

On the morning of November 6, one of the guns of the regiment accompanied some engineer troops across that river, and when the Armistice became effective at 11:00 a.m., November 11, 1918, the guns of the 76th Field Artillery were nearer to Berlin that any other Field Artillery of the Allied forces. The regiment marched to a position near Coblenz Germany as part of the Army of Occupation. It remained there until August 1919, when it entrained for Brest enroute for home. It arrived at Camp Merritt, New Jersey, on August 23rd and was sent to take station at Camp Pike, Arkansas, where it remained for two years. The station of the regiment was changed to Camp Lewis, now Fort Lewis, Washington, in September 1921.

In the summer of 1922 the Regiment, less the second battalion, was moved to Fort D.A. Russell, Wyoming, and the Second Battalion to the Presidio of Monterey, California. In the meantime the 76th was transferred from the Third Division to the G.H.Q. artillery and then to the 7th Division where it is now at Fort Ord, California. During the month of May 1940 the First Battalion, located at Fort Warren, Wyoming, was moved to Camp Clayton, Fort Ord, to join the 76th FA as the Third Battalion. The youngest organization is Battery “F” which joined the 76th FA at Clayton in July after being ordered here from Fort Hoyle, Maryland. So again the 76th FA composed of units from different sections, but of one spirit, stands, again under their regimental standard, ready!

Stationed at the Presidio of Monterey, the 11th Cavalry was soon moved to southern California for duty on the Mexican Border. The 76th Field Artillery moved to Fort Ord in 1940 and was split into the 74th, 75th, and 76th field artillery battalions in January 1941. By December of 1940, Fort Ord had 1,098 buildings finished or in progress. Just under $15 million in contracts had been let for construction at Fort Ord by that time. A 1,500-bed hospital on the new post opened in February 1941 by the 1st Medical Regiment and I am guessing the Veterinary Hospital openned up at this time by the 1st Veterinary Company who was attached to the 1st Medical Regiment. The 76th FA had under it’s command over 1400 horses and the tent camp is complete with a Boxing ring which also serves as a stage for shows.

In 1940 the 76th Field Artillery Regiment moved from the Presidio of Monterey into their new home, a tent city (Where the Dunes shopping center is today) at the new Camp Ord around July of 1940 at the old Camp Clayton site waiting for their new barracks and stables to be completed in the 4th Avenue area. Their duty at this time was policing the construction site against stealing. It became the very first unit to be assigned to the 7th Division and was commanded by Colonel John E. Sloan and was equipped with 75-mm M1897 gun. The 7th Division was under the commanded of General Joseph W. Stilwell at this time.

Fort Ord Panorama, DLIFLC & POM Archives


HISTORY TIMELINE OF THE 76TH ARTILLERY
Source: Taken from the 1967 yearbook "2nd Battalion 76th Artillery, Camp St. Barbara, Korea, 1967"

Constituted 3 June 1916 in the Regular Army as the 18th Cavalry.

Organized 13 June 1917 at Fort Ethan Allen, Vermont.

Converted, reorganized and redesignated 1 November 1917 as the 76th Field Artillery.

Assigned 12 November 1917 to the 3rd Division.

Relieved 16 October 1939 from assignment to the 3rd Division.

Assigned 1 July 1940 to the 7th Division.

Reorganized and redesignated 22 January 1941 as the 76th Field Artillery Battalion.

Relieved June 1941 from assignment to the 7th Division.

Inactivated 27 November 1945 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey.

Redesignated 1 August 1946 as 76th Armored Field Artillery Battalion. Concurrently, activated at Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Inactivated 24 August 1948 at Fort Knox, Kentucky.

(Battery A redesignated 28 August 1953 as 576th Armored Field Artillery Battery.)

Redesignated 8 October 1954 as 76th Field Artillery Battalion, and activated at Fort Devens, Massachusetts. (Concurrently, 576th Armored Field Artillery Battery reorganized and redesignated Battery A, 76th Field Artillery Battalion.

Battalion (less Headquarters and Headquarters Battery) inactivated 15 February 1958 at Fort Devens, Massachusetts. Concurrently Headquarters and Headquarters Battery transferred (less personnel and equipment) to Department of the Army Control.

Battalion reorganized and redesignated 31 July 1959 as 76th Field Artillery, a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regiment System.

CAMPAIGN PARTICIPATION CREDIT

WORLD WAR I
Chateau-Thierry, Champagne
Champagne-Marne
Aisne-Marne
St. Mihiel
Meuse-Argonne

WORLD WAR II
Northern France
Rhineland
Ardennes-Alsace
Central Europe

DECORATIONS
French Croix de Guerre, with Gilt Star, World War I, Streamer embroidered CHAMPAGNE-MARNE AND AISNE-MARNE.

Cited in the Order of the Day of Belgian Army for action in the Ardennes.


THE 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY DURING WORLD WAR I


76th Field Artillery Regiment, B Battery wearing the 3rd Division shoulder patch, somewhere in France or Germany WW1. Photo: G. L. Krenzelok collection

Click on the below link:
76th Field Artillery During World War I

LIST OF BATTLE STREAMERS OF THE 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY WW1
Source: Fort Francis E. Warren, Wyoming, 1930 Booklet

Chateau-Thierry – July 5-14, 1918, Champagne.
Champagne-Marne – July 15-17, 1918.
Aisne-Marne – July 18, August 1, 1918.
St. Mihiel – September 12-15, 1918.
Meuse-Argonne – September 26, November 11, 1918


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY TRAINS AT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA


The complete 76th Field Artillery, 2nd Battalion on Soldier Field, Presidio of Monterey, circa 1930's. On the right background are the officer's club and flagstaff. Officers housing in background. DLIFLC & POM Archives

By DLIFLC Command Historian, Dr. James C. McNaughton

A battalion of the 76th Field Artillery arrived at the Presidio of Monterey on August 22, 1922, for what proved to be an 18-year stay. During the unit’s first two years in Monterey, soldiers of the 76th helped to build stables and gun sheds on the lower Presidio. In 1924, when a fuel-storage tank farm just off the post went up in flames, artillerymen of the 76th and troopers of the 11th Cavalry Regiment joined forces with members of the local community in responding to the emergency. During three days of firefighting 26 people died, including two soldiers. The Presidio’s Private Bolio Road is named after a soldier of the 76th who gave his life.

In 1929 the unit conducted a gun team demonstration, which was marred by an accident in which a soldier of the 76th was killed.

Trooper strength of the 76th stood at about 350 in the late 1920’s. During the 1920’s and 1930’s the 76th trained at the Artillery Field Firing Range at Gigling Reservation (the forerunner of Camp Ord and Fort Ord). Throughout those years artillerymen of the 76th taught soldier skills to ROTC cadets at summer camps there and at the Presidio.

In 1940 the 76th was assigned to the 7th Infantry Division at Fort Ord. Soon after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, soldiers of the 76th set-up gun emplacements on a number of California beaches in preparation for a Japanese attack that never came. Later, during World War II, the 76th was assigned to other units and fought in Europe.

Source: DLIFLC & POM Archives


1ST BATTALION 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY FORT D.A. RUSSELL

After World War 1, in the summer of 1922 the Regiment, less the Second Battalion, was moved to Fort D.A. Russell, Wyoming, and the Second Battalion to the Presidio of Monterey, California.

As a tribute to Senator Francis E. Warren for his gallant services during the Civil War, as an enlisted man, the name of the post was changed from Fort D.A. Russell to Fort Francis E. Warren, on January 1, 1930 by order of the President. He was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and received a citation for "Gallantry on the battlefield at the siege of Port Hudson. Senator Warren died on November 24, 1929.

Note: In the future I will post my very nice collection of the 1st Battalion of the 76th Field Artillery at Fort D. A. Russell (Fort Warren) including a private collection of pictures. – Greg Krenzelok


1930 aerial image of Fort D.A. Russell.


1930 layout map of Fort D.A. Russell.


Gateway to "Hell", Fort D.A. Russell c1938. Source: G.L. Krenzelok Collection.


76th Field Artillery gun shed, with battery in front. The stable can be seen in back of the gun shed on the left. Fort D.A. Russell c1938. Source: G.L. Krenzelok Collection.


Troopers of the 1st Battalion of the 76th Field Artillery grazing horses. Fort D.A. Russell is in the background. Source: G.L. Krenzelok Collection.




Roster Battery "E" 76th Field Artillery Regiment Presidio of Monterey, Calif. December 25th, 1924. DLIFLC & POM Archives

Prize winning Section, Battery "F" Presidio of Monterey And Del Monte Horse Show, California, Apr. 1925, Heidrick photography studio. My grandfather, Master Sargent Harry Morse is the one standing in the above panoramic picture. – Ross Cowart (Ross Cowart Family Image Collection, do not use without permission)


76th Field Artillery Battery “D” passing in review Presidio of Monterey 1920’s. DLIFLC & POM Archives


11th Cavalry passing in review Presidio of Monterey 1920’s. DLIFLC & POM Archives


DLIFLC & POM Archives


Note their barracks in the left background. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Note: The above 3 pictures are three shots that make up a panoramic picture of Battery D 76th Field Infantry taken at the Presidio of Monterey in 1932. DLIFLC & POM Archives


BATTERY “D” 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY CHRISTMAS DINNER ROSTER 1934
Click on the below link:
Battery “D” 76th Field Artillery, Christmas Dinner Roster 1934



76th Field Artillery Battery Detail, stables (stable no. 157) and horses in corrals in the right of picture. Presidio of Monterey 1930’s. DLIFLC & POM Archives


The last of the Presidio of Monterey’s Artillery horse stables, stable no. 157 is located across from the Presidio of Monterey Museum. See above picture of the 76th Field Artillery. Image taken April 2010

Note: These are the last of the remaining horse stables on the Presidio and they need to be saved and preserved.

76TH ARTILLERY STABLES LOWER PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY
Click on the below link:

76th Field Artillery Stables Lower Presidio of Monterey



76th Field Artillery horse picket line, likely taken out on the Gigling Reservation. DLIFLC & POM Archives


An Army trained dog, that’s “Trooper,” part Police and part Terrier and part a few other breeds. Sergeant Carl R. Karr of Troop “E” 11th Cavalry acquired Trooper when he was about a year old in 1932 from Troop F, 11th Cavalry. Sgt. Karr’s patient training brought results. Trooper can stand at attention when an Officer passes, sit on a horse at attention and ride the horse, jump from a 30 feet ladder and other stunts. He has won enough honors and placed in so many shows it would fill this page to list them. Among the leading shows in which he has placed are the Rose Festival at Portland, Oregon; State Fair, Salem, Oregon; Monterey County Fair; San Diego Horse Show and Presidio of Monterey Horse Show. DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th Field Artillery “E” Battery Artillery repair, cleaning a 37mm pack howitzer, stable area, Presidio of Monterey, Ca/ DLIFLC & POM Archives


Captain Russell Dixon, 76th Field Artillery, Presidio of Monterey, Ca. DLIFLC & POM Archives

Notice that Captain Dixon is wearing a 3rd Division shoulder patch. It is important to remember that the 76th Field Artillery Regiment was attached to the 3rd Division during WW1 and until they were moved to Camp Clayton (Fort Ord) in 1940 when they were attached to the 7th Division under General Stilwell. Many times you will see the 3rd Division insignia on their equipment.


2nd Lt. Bernard Thielen, Parade Uniform of the a Battery Officer pre-WW2, Presidio of Monterey, Ca 1933. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Private Kern F.C., 76th Field Artillery, Presidio of Monterey, Ca 1934. DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th AF Trooper and his girl,names unknown. DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th AF Trooper and his girl,names unknown. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Every spring it was out to the Gigling Reservation for maneuvers.

Note: Here’s an interesting observation, the spelling of “Gigling Reservation” seems to be the excepted common spelling but notice how “Gigling” is spelt in the above picture.


76th Field Artillery Battery wagon at full gallop, Camp Ord. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Artillerymen from Headquarters Battery, 76th Field Artillery, relax after setting up a field camp April 27, 1927. The Presidio of Monterey unit often trained at Gigling Reservation (forerunner of Camp Ord and Fort Ord) DLIFLC Command Historian, Dr. James C. McNaughton. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Picket Line 76th Field Artillery and 11th Cavalry Camp Gigling 1920's. DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th Field Artillery Big Sur encampment 1926. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Chow time Battery "E" 76th Field Artillery Big Sur 1926. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Sergeant Campbell and Cook Spencer, Field Kitchen, Gigling Range. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Trooper sleeping, Gigling Reservation 1920's. DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th Field Artillery Big Sur tent camp 1920's. DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th Field Artillery Trooper pup tent and picket line in the background 1920's. DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th Field Artillery full show layout of equipment for mounted drivers 1926. DLIFLC & POM Archives


75-mm Gun Horse Drawn, Fort Ord 1941, DLIFLC & POM Archives


HISTORY OF THE 75-MM GUN, U.S ARMY

Click on the below link

75-mm Gun 1897


DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th Field Artillery gun in recoil. DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th Field Artillery gun in recoil, Gigling Reservation. DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th Field Artillery Platoon in Position, Gigling Range 1924. DLIFLC & POM Archives


DLIFLC & POM Archives


DLIFLC & POM Archives


DLIFLC & POM Archives


DLIFLC & POM Archives


DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th Field Artillery 4th Section observation post, Gigling Range. M1915 Battery Commander’s Binocular telescope and M1916 Range Finder in the background being use to zero in on the target. DLIFLC & POM Archives

Note: I cover the operation of the M1915 and M1916 in the upper above link covering the "History of the 75-mm Gun"


76th Field Artillery Battery Commander’s “Detail” 1920’s Signalman, Drivers and Telephone operators. DLIFLC & POM Archives


DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th Field Artillery dugout for communication men, Gigling Range 1920’s. DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th Field Artillery Camp Ord maneuvers June 30, 1938. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Camp Ord in 1940 today known as East Garrison. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Camp Ord in 1940 today known as East Garrison. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Pass In Review- 3rd Division Camp Ord Magazine 1940. Posted by Dick Randall

Click on the below link to see more of this wonderful magazine posted by Dick Randall:

"Pass In Review- 3rd Division Camp Ord 1940"



Army maneuvers somewhere on the California coast 3rd Division: M1919 .30 Caliber Machine Gun behind brush camouflage and in position to fire on invaders, January 18, 1940. (G.L. Krenzelok Collection)



DLIFLC & POM Archives


PICTURES FROM THE 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY'S KING CITY MARCH 1932

Click on the below link:

Pictures from the 76th Field Artillery’s King City March 1932


HISTORY OF THE 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY 1938

Note: This History of the 76th Field Artillery Regiment is taken from the book: “Presidio of Monterey 1938” A Pictorial Record With Historical Data, Published by the PARKE-HARPER COMPANY, Little Rock, Arkansas. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Major Theodore E. Buechler, , Commanding 2nd Battalion , 76th Field Artillery Regiment 1938


Captain Harry M. Schwarze, Battalion Adjutant, 76th Field Artillery Regiment 1938

The 76th Field Artillery Regiment was formed from a nucleus of trained army men from the old 2nd Cavalry, which had a long history extending back into the nineteenth century. This plan of dividing cavalry regiments was followed when the assembling of America’s army started. From this nucleus the 76th Field was developed, the formation of the new regiment, of course, not displacing the 2nd Cavalry, simply taking part of the regiment’s personnel.

The 76th Field Artillery was assigned to the Third Division in December 1917, and sailed for France early in 1918. Upon its arrival in France the regiment underwent the usual course of instruction at an artillery-firing center, sent various detachments to the Chateau Thierry front in June, and as a complete unit when into action July 5, 1918, supporting the 4th and 7th infantry, 3rd Division, in sector just east of Chateau Thierry. For a week it participated in gas attacks on the enemy on the north side of the Marne. During that time the Germans were preparing for their last offensive, the great Peace Offensive. They planned to pinch out Rheims, and to swing in on Paris from the east. The attack was set for July 15th. This attack was expected by the Allies, and orders were so timed that the 76th Field Artillery opened fire fifteen minutes before the Germans bombardment.

The Third Division held its ground, defeating three German Divisions thrown against it. Some of the French to the east recoiled at first before the shock of the enemy attack, but the army line held; the Germans were defeated in the three day Champaign-Marne battle. Then came the Allies counter stroke at Soissons July 18th, and the German were disastrously defeated and thrown back from the Marne to the Vesle. The 76th supported the 4th and 7th Infantry as they crossed the Marne under heavy fire, then led the way for the artillery, crossing on a pontoon bridge near Blesmes, a mile east of Chateau-Thierry, the first artillery to cross the Marne. The Third Division pursued the retreating enemy, the 76th supporting in the capture of Gland, Brasles, Mont St. Pere, Tuilerie Farm, Le Charmel, Villardelle Farm, Rocheres and Bois de Gunnpettos.

It was July 28, 1918; a golden haze lay lightly over the Charmel-Ronchers road. From the north sounded a sudden barking of machine guns, like dogs in a dooryard disturbed from slumber; then silence.

At 11:45 A.M. Battery “B” of the 76th Field Artillery, swung into the road from its camouflaged position in a dry creek bottom. Orders had come to support an infantry attach at Bois de Grimpette.

The first two carriages had executed a column left, when a low flying Boche plane dropped four bombs on the battery, followed by “confusion and death”. Officers, thirty-two men and twenty-eight horses were down, killed or wounded.

The devastating scene was visible to the entire battalion. Lieutenant Reinburg, Battery C, with all men who could be spared from A and C Batteries, rushed to the spot, and with this aid Battery B, with the assistance of its less severely wounded, went into position.

After practically a month of heavy fighting in which many causalities were suffered the 76th Field Artillery was relieved by the 147th Field Artillery and went back to rest.

The campaigns on the Marne were under French High Command, and the French Government has seen fit to decorate the 76th Field Artillery with the Croix de Guerre, awarded with this citation from General Petain, French Commander-in-Chief: “With the approval of the Commander-in-Chief of the American Expeditionary Forces in France, the Marshal of France, Commander-in-Chief of the French Armies of the East, cites in the order of the Army Corps:

“The 76th American Regiment of Artillery; artillery regiment of the Third Division, at the time of the German attack upon the Marne, has, due to its fire, remarkably planned and brilliantly executed, succeeded in stopping the enemy offensive, and in inflicting bloody losses upon the enemy; during the counter-offensive between the Marne and Vesle, in complete liaison with the Infantry, did not crease in spite of difficulties of supply, and obstacles of the terrain, to harass the enemy and force him to retreat.” “Signed: General Petain”

The Croix de Guerre was pinned on the regimental colors by General Mangin of the French Army.

The next engagement with the enemy was in the battle of St. Mihiel, when 76th supported the 1st Brigade, 1st Division. This was a complete success, at small cost in casualties.

With only forty minutes to the zero hour, data were figured, then, manned by cooks, mechanics, drivers and cannoneers the guns of Battery “B” fired in their place in the barrage. “The 76th had kept faith with the infantry.” This all took place during the St. Mihiel Offensive, when the 76th was in the infantry lines as “sacrifice artillery”.

The barrage covering Mt. Sec, in which this regiment took part, is known as the “million dollar barrage”, for the reason that it cost the government one million dollars a minute while it lasted.

The regiment next joined the Meuse-Argonne offensive, September 26 to November 11th. Artillery was scarce among the Americans, so the 76th stayed in every minute of the forty-seven days of battle, supporting at various times the Infantry of the 3rd, 5th, and 80th Divisions. Casualties were heavy, hardships were severe, but the 76th delivered fire every time it was called upon, joined in the pursuit of the Germans when their defeat became a rout, pushed their guns forward by horsepower, motor power and man power, and when the Armistice was signed at 11:00 A.M., November 11, 1918, were in position at Louppy, southeast of Sedan, with their guns nearer Berlin than any other guns of any of the Allied armies.

The 76th Field Artillery Regiment has five Battles Streamers fastened to its colors, having been in that many engagements:

Chateau-Thierry Sector – July 5th to July 14th, 1918
Champagne-Marne Offensive – July 15th to July 17th, 1918
Aisne-Marne Offensive – July 18th to July 30th, 1918
St. Mihiel Offensive – September 12th to 14th, 1918
Meuse-Argonne Offensive – September 26th to November 11, 1918

The 76th with the rest of the Third Division joined in the Occupation of Germany territory around Coblenz bridgehead, remaining there until after the Germans signed the peace treaty. The regiment returned to the United States in August 1919, taking station at Camp Pike, Arkansas, and after two years at that post, they moved to Camp Lewis, Washington, arriving there September 21, 1921. On June 23, 1922, Battery “C” of the regiment left Camp Lewis by rail for Fort Douglas, Utah, for duty with the Citizens Military Training Camp.

Regimental Headquarters and the first battalion left Camp Lewis by rail for Fort D.A. Russell, Wyoming, arriving there June 28, 1922. Battery “C” joined the regiment at Fort Russell September 27, 1922, having marched overland from Fort Douglas upon completion of duties at Summer Training Camp. Battery “C” has since returned to Fort Douglas twice in connection with the Summer Training Camps held at that Post. In 1923 the trip by this battery was made both ways by marching. In 1924 the trip was made by rail.

The 2nd Battalion was ordered to the Presidio of Monterey, California, as a detached battalion, and left Camp Lewis, August 26, 1922, on the transport “Buford” from Tacoma, Washington, arriving at the Presidio of Monterey on August 31, 1922.

On Sunday morning, September 14, 1924, lighting struck on of the Associated Oil Company’s tanks located just outside the post on Lighthouse Avenue. The entire post turned out to assist the Pacific Grove and Monterey fire departments. Major Charles D. Daly was the Post Fire Marshal and Captain John O. Hoskins was Assistant Fire Marshal. The fire raged all day and got beyond control. At 4:30 o’clock in the afternoon a tank boiled over, igniting the balance of the tanks. The boiling oil poured out in a stream and Private Bolio of the 11th Cavalry and Private Eustace V. Watkins, Battery “E”, 76th Field Artillery, were caught in the stream and burned to death. The fire burned itself after five days, destroying the Associated Oil Company’s wharf and the Post Forage Warehouse, as well as all canneries and dwelling houses for a radius of a block around.

Note: For more on Eustace V. Watkins refer to the email I received from Craig Heberton located at the bottom of this History of the 76th Field Artillery 1938

Letters of commendation for the bravery of the men and promptness and efficiency of the post were received.

Records show that the Battalion had a strength of 354 on December 31, 1927. In July Battery “D” was turned over to the R.O.T.C. on the post, Battery “E” with the C.M.T.C. at Del Monte and Battery “F” became responsible for the Organized Reserves on the post. The training of civilians’ component was the main event with the batteries during the summer of 1927.

Summer training camps during 1928 extended from January 1st to May 12th. During the month of November 1928, Battery “E” competed for the Knox Trophy and the Howland Trophy, the latter Trophy being won by this battery.

During 1929 the Battalion performed the usual garrison duties and the training season was very much the same as during the previous year. The R.O.T.C. unit of Stanford University and one battery of C.M.T.C. students were on hand.

January 1, 1930, the strength of the Battalion was 357,with the authorized strength but 333. The end of the year it dropped to 327. The entire battalion went on a fourteen-day practice march on May 2nd and covered 100 miles. All men and animals reported in excellent condition on May 15th when the march ended. The usual training of Reserve Officers, R.O.T.C. followed, Stanford University furnishing the contingent, thirty-eight in all. C.M.T.C. students numbered fifty-two. The Knox and Howland Trophies were competed for by Battery D.

Events in 1931 and 1932 were very similar to those of 1930, except that Battery “D” was detached from the Battalion for a period of January 8th to March 13th, 1932, in connection with the Grand Joint Army and Navy exercise No. 4, Hawaiian Department. Also a 100-mile march was made in 1932 by the entire Battalion as in 1930.

During 1933 events were much the same as in the pervious year, except that the Battalion assisted in the successful formation of the Civilian Conservation Corps, furnishing officers and enlisted men for duties in connection therewith.

On January 1st, 1934, the strength of the Battalion was 315. The year was uneventful, the usual garrison duties inspections, R.O.T.C. and C.M.T.C. activities, and a practice march to San Francisco.

The same can be said of 1935 except that Battery “D” won the Howland Trophy and the Battalion was inspected on December 12-13, by Secretary of War, the honorable George H. Dern, in addition to the five inspections that took place prior to that date in 1935.

By the end of 1936 the strength of the Battalion reached 370. Events of the year were largely routine, and practically the same as during 1935. This was true in 1937, as well.

Which records the history of the 2nd Battalion of the 76th Field Artillery Regiment up to the present moment, the early Spring of 1938.

END OF HISTORY


August 18, 2010: Email from Craig Heberton regarding Eustace V. Watkins

Greg – You have done a marvelously comprehensive job in creating your website describing the 76th Field Artillery Regiment of the 2nd Battalion. I stumbled upon your site while researching my great-grandmother’s nephew, Eustace V. Watkins. He was the private in the 76th Field Artillery who died fighting the 1924 Monterey oil tank fire and after whom a road in old Fort Ord is named. My interest in Eustce V. Watkins was sparked after my uncle, who was named after him, passed away, and my aunt gave me an old cigar box containing several letters and photos, which had belonged to Private E.V. Watkins. Unfortunately none of the contents of the box relate to his service in the U.S. Army, as none were later than early 1923. According to an obituary published in Vermont near where he was born and raised, Private Watkins enlisted in March of 1924 and was a “first class private, Battery I, 76th Field Artillery, stationed at the Presidio in Monterey” and he “was preparing to enter … West Point” at the time of his death. Several sources online identify him as having been assigned to “E” Battery. There also is a bit of divergence in the account of his death between the newspaper obituary and a source I have read online. The newspaper account states that after ascending a ladder on a tank adjacent to the No.6 tank, which was struck by lightning, he was ordered to retire. When tank No. 6 exploded, Pvt. Watkins was already on the ground and attempting to get to higher ground when he was overtaken by a “sea of burning oil” and killed instantly when he stumbled to the ground, “but his body was immediately recovered.”. An online source states that Pvt. Watkins was on the ladder when tank No. 6 exploded and was knocked off the ladder causing him to fall into one of the tanks.

In short, I’d be mightily obliged if you could point me to any resources/photos/documents which might address Eustace V. Watkins service and/or his death on September 14, 1924. Having received some of his personal effects, I feel an obligation to know more about him and the service he rendered during his short tenure with the 76th Field Artillery Regiment and on behalf of the residents of Monterey.

Thanks,
Craig Heberton




76th Field Artillery Regiment “E” Battery, chow time on a routine march 1926. DLIFLC & POM Archives


Major Charles Daly commands the 2nd Battalion, 76th Field Artillery Regiment during maneuvers near Pebble Beach in 1924. Mounted artillery and 11th Cavalry Regiment soldiers trained all over the Monterey Peninsula area during the 1920’s and 1930’s. They also appeared in several California Rodeos in Salinas. DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th Field Artillery “Army Day” Camp Ord 1940, Gigling Reservation. DLIFLC & POM Archives


76th Field Artillery Regiment, Battery B, France WW1. Photo: Greg Krenzelok collection


74TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION DURING WW2
Note: This is the time line history of the 74th Field Artillery Battalion after the 76th Field Artillery Regiment was broken into the 74th, 75th and 76th Field Artillery Battalions at Fort Ord on 21 January 1941.
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74th Field Artillery Battalion During WW2


75TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION DURING WW2
Note: This is the time line history of the 75th Field Artillery Battalion after the 76th Field Artillery Regiment was broken into the 74th, 75th and 76th Field Artillery Battalions at Fort Ord on 21 January 1941.
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75th Field Artillery Battalion During WW2


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION DURING WW2
Note: This is the time line history of the 76th Field Artillery Battalion after the 76th Field Artillery Regiment was broken into the 74th, 75th and 76th Field Artillery Battalions at Fort Ord on 21 January 1941.
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76th Field Artillery Battalion During WW2


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY 2ND BATTALION KOREA 1967
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76th Field Artillery 2 nd Battalion Korea 1967


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY VIET NAM
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76th Field Artillery Viet Nam


Note: I have been getting requests for information of the 76th Artillery after WW2. I have limited information of these time periods and in the future I hope we can collect their unit histories. If there is an interest we will pursue this avenue. If you would like to post information and pictures please contact me. - Greg Krenzelok



The above images are from the U.S. Army Field Artillery Field Manual, Organization and Drill, 1931


The "Section", 75mm gun battery, horse-drawn


THE 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY’S ROLE IN CECIL B. DEMILLE’S 1923 MOVIE:
“The Ten Commandments”

The 76th drove the pharaoh’s chariots in the movie.


Greg, this segment shows the 76th Field Artillery in action. – Margaret D.

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The 76th Field Artillery’s Role in Cecil B. Demille’s 1923 Move


11TH CAVALRY AT THE PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1919 TO 1940
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11th Cavalry Presidio of Monterey, 1919 to 1940


CITIZEN MILITARY TRAINING CAMP (CMTC), PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY
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Citizen Military Training Camp, Presidio of Monterey


JO MORA RENOWNED ARTIST: C.M.T.C. CAMP, DEL MONTE, CALIFORNIA 1920’S
Citizens Military Training Camp
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Jo Mora Renowned Artist: C.M.T.C. Camp Del Monte, California 1923


FORT ORD U.S. ARMY STATION VETERINARY HOSPITAL (HORSE) WW2
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Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2


ATTENTION: GUESTBOOK IS NOT WORKING
I am so sorry to report that there is a problem with this guestbook and several more of my guestbooks. Rootsweb is trying to resolve the issues. – Greg Krenzelok (10/15/2014)


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If you would like to leave a comment about this Research Website please leave me a post. Please e-mail me with questions. If you do not want to leave your name or e-mail address in the guestbook just make up one. A name and e-mail address must be filled in to leave any comments. We welcome your comments! Greg Krenzelok - Veterinary Corps Website




U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: “Illic est Vires in Numerus” There is Strength in Numbers

“Working Hard to Preserve Our Country’s History wherever it is being lost”

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country’s history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved “Horse and Mule”. There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
gregkrenzelok@msn.com

FACEBOOK: U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group

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U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group