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THE 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY’S ROLE IN CECIL B. DEMILLE’S 1923 MOVIE


This page belongs to greg krenzelok.


THE 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY’S ROLE IN CECIL B. DEMILLE’S 1923 MOVIE:

THE TEN COMMANDMENTS


This film was shot on location on the dunes of California’s central coast. The 76th drove the pharaoh’s chariots in the movie.

Authors note: On May 6, 2012, I received a fascinating email from Peter Brosnan telling me about the role that the 76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion stationed at the Presidio of Monterey played in Cecil B. DeMille’s lavish silent classic movie THE TEN COMMANDMENTS. This film was shot on location on the dunes of California’s central coast. The 76th drove the pharaoh’s chariots in the movie. Cecil B. DeMille also directed the 1956 version of The Ten Commandments starring Charlton Heston, Yul Brynner and a host of other stars.


Greg, these two above segments shows the 76th Field Artillery in action. – Margaret D.


May 6, 2012 – email from Peter Brosnan:

Greg:
Your website on the 76th is fantastic. First class research, and obviously a real work of love. I am working on a documentary film about Cecil B DeMille and the making of the 1923 version of The Ten Commandments" As you may know, he used soldiers from the 11th and the 76th to drive his chariots, as well as to organize and run the logistical operations while they were on location. I've been told that Lt. Anthony McAuliffe was in charge. The 11th and 76th's adventures in The Ten Commandments might pale when compared to their other exploits, but it is still an important part of American film history, and we hope to be able to include that in our film. The 1923 film is available on DVD. Your work on preserving this piece of history is admirable and commendable. Thank you for all you've done. We're fighting the preservation battle here in Hollywood, too, so you have my best wishes on that front. We are searching for photos to use in our film, and need at least one or two of the 76th Field Artillery and the 11th Cavalry can you help us out?

Peter Brosnan
Documentary filmmaker

More info on our project can be found at:
DeMille’s Lost City


Greg
Years ago I did interview two guys who were in 76th and worked on Ten Commandments in 1923. Unfortunately, the interviews were on the fly and I never got to film them -- although I did tape a phone interview with one. Their names were Roy Eargle and Omar Adams. Here is what I have on my Omar Adams interview. it is a very incomplete transcript. He sent me a letter, too, which is not handy at the moment.

Peter Brosnan


1/26/84 – Omar Adams, via telephone

84 years old.

(PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY)
Our whole outfit was recruited. The cavalry didn’t go, it was the artillery. Because our horses were used to pulling equipment like guns and what have you. And so we went down there. It was the Second Battalion of the 76th Field Artillery. And they called us for some reason, he got us assigned down there to work on it. Our horses were the ones that pulled the chariots. We were the chariot drivers. And all of that.

We were down there about 3 weeks. It didn’t take too long.

(DEMILLE'S TENT CTIY?)
We were away from the other main group, because we had our own cooks and everything else, you see. We were assigned just like a military outfit. We went down there and we had our own cooks and we ate separately. That’s why I said, in that letter, that Theodore Roberts came over to our place, walked over to our place at night and gave us cigars. He was a wonderful fella. That’s all there was to it. He always smoked cigars. He used to come over there and just give us cigars to smoke. And some of us still didn’t smoke cigars but, we got so we liked them. We enjoyed it.

(CHARIOTS?)
We drove the chariots and the horses. Didn’t get any training. This was an artillery outfit that was used to driving horses and pulling stuff. So our horses were used to harness and all of that. And that’s why it struck me funny when (newspaper) said the Cavalry was there. The cavalry, you see, they don’t have horses they put harness on. Where artillery they did.

I’ve told people lots of times that I was in the 10-C’s and they laughed at me.

My wife’s a retired University Prof… I was a retired veterans service officer for years.

I was a first WW1 veteran. They sent me out to the Presidio of SF. I was there for a couple of years and got sent down to Monterey. I was Sgt Major of the Second Battalion. Met a Minnesota girl, came back to MN

Out there on that sandy place there wasn’t much to do. At that time we didn’t have tv and all that. We just played cards or something like that.

I can remember the chariot races. Once in a while we used to hook a wheel and pull a wheel off a chariot.

Nobody at all hurt.

I could see myself in it.

There’s no horses in the army any more. That is all a thing of the past.

(TONY MCAULIFFE)
I can tell you about one guy who was there you probably have heard of but didn’t know anything about that was a second lieutenant there. And that was Tony McAulliffe. He’s the guy that told the Germans “nuts” at the Battle of the Bulge. He was a second lieutenant just out of the Point. He was the boss. He didn’t stoop to (chariot driving). The movie people would say what they wanted and he would tell us what to do.

We were going to buy a motor home…

Omar Adams, via telephone


Note: We are seeking more information on the role of the 76th Field Artillery's role in this classic movie and more information on the making of this movie. Please contact Peter Brosnan via his website link above or myself.

Another fascinating story of the 76th Field Artillery with their horse-drawn artillery. I cannot thank Peter enough for contacting us. - Greg Krenzelok


EMPIRE OF DREAMS: The Epic Life of Cecil B. DeMille by Scott Eyman:
Click on the below link:
The Epic Life of Cecil B. DeMille by Scott Eyman


Click on the below links:

76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT, 2ND BATTALION
76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion


AMERICAN IMPRESSIONIST: HOWARD EVERTTT SMITH, 107TH LITHOGRAPHS 1942
American impressionist: Howard Everett Smith, 107th Cavalry lithographs 1942


JO MORA RENOWNED ARTIST: C.M.T.C. CAMP, DEL MONTE, CALIFORNIA 1920'S
Jo Mora Renowned Artist: C.M.T.C. Camp, Del Monte, California 1920’s



Click on the below Homepage links:

11TH CAVALRY PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1919 TO 1940
Click on the below link:
11th Cavalry Presidio of Monterey, 1919 to 1940


FORT ORD U.S. ARMY STATION VETERINARY HOSPITAL (HORSE) WW2
Click on the below link:
Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2


THE ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR, WW1
Click on the below link:
The Army Veterinary Service During the Great War, WW1



U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: “Illic est Vires in Numerus” There is Strength in Numbers

“Working Hard to Preserve Our Country’s History wherever it is being lost”

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country’s history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved “Horse and Mule”. There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
gregkrenzelok@msn.com

FACEBOOK: U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group

Click on the below link:

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group