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76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION FIELD MOVEMENT DURING WW2

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This page belongs to greg krenzelok.


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION FIELD MOVEMENT DURING WW2


*Note: The above silhouette represents a U.S. Army horse-drawn section. The illustrations were originally published in the "The Field Artillery Journal" and created by Mr H.S. Parker, son of Lt. Colonel Edwin P. Parker, FA. (Field Artillery Journal, Jan/Feb 1938, page 78). Source and permission: United States Army Fires Bulletin, Fort Sill, Oklahoma


TIME LINE HISTORY 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION DURING WW2

Note: This is the time line history of the 76th Field Artillery Battalion after the 76th Field Artillery Regiment (Horse-Drawn) was broken into the 74th, 75th and 76th Field Artillery Battalions and at the time still Horse-Drawn at Fort Ord in the early 1940's. Many sources have been used to compile this unit record including the DLIFLC & POM Archives, Personal experiences of men interviewed, Archives in D.C. Washington and many others sources and articles.


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION HISTORY

The 76th Field Artillery Battalion inherited the designation, crest and all the fine traditions of the 76th Field Artillery Regiment (Horse-Drawn) which are embodied in the battalion motto "Duty, the Spirit of 76".

After leaving Fort Ord the 76th Field Artillery Battalion temporary Headquarters became Belmont, California and were stationed in several guard duties protecting the California coast from the anticipated invasion of the Japanese. In July of 1942 official unit paperwork locates them at Bay Meadows Race Track, San Mateo, California. According to Teddy L. Nielson who served with the 76th Field Artillery Battalion from it beginning at Fort Ord to the end of WW2 tell us it was here that they turned there horses and equipment in and became fully mechanized.

Official unit paperwork locates units of the 76th FAB in 1942 at Bay Meadows Race Track Hq., San Mateo, Ca. (July 15, 1942); McLaren Park (Oct. 14, 1942); Bayshore Kennel Club Staging Area, San Francisco (Dec. 16, 1942); and Belmont, Ca, Hq. (Dec. 22, 1942).

Official unit paperwork locates units of the 76th FAB in 1943 at Belmont, Ca, Hq. (March 15, 1943); Camp Pleyte, Bradley, Ca. (July 8, 1943); Belmont, Ca, Hq. (July and August, 1943); Camp Roberts, Ca (Sept. 27, 1943); California - Arizona Maneuver Area (Nov. 24, 1943) and APO 182A, Unit 14, Los Angeles, Ca (Dec. 10, 1943).


HEADQUARTERS 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT
Fort Ord, California
October 30, 1940

Subject: Guard Orders

The 76th Field Artillery Regiment is charged with guarding the entire Camp Clayton Construction Area. The purposes of this guard are: to prevent the entry of any unauthorized person into the area; to check and see that no unauthorized person in within this area; to guard against fires and in case fire to give alarm promptly, and assist in fighting the fire; to prevent the unauthorized removal of property from the area; to promptly discover and report and break in the water lines within the area.

The following are authorized within the area;

a. Officers of the Army, in uniform
b. Soldiers, within the 76th FA camp only
c. Persons having passes signed by any of the following:
Major H. D. Stetson, Q.M.C., . (Harold J. Stetson Construction Quartermaster)
Captain W. N. Gillmore, 76th FA
Captain A. H. Griffin, FA
Mr. R. M. Connor
Mr P. B. Tichenor
Mr A. J. Krechel

W.P.A. workers with WPA time cards

By order of Colonel Sloan:

Signed:
W. N. Gillmore
Captain 76th FA
Adjustant

(Note: 5 pages of orders continue which I have decided not to post because of its length)


Note: Some of the Contractors
Morrison-Knudsen Company, Los Angeles, Ca
Ford J. Twaits Company, Los Angeles, Ca
Barrett and Hilp Company, S.F. Ca. (railroad spurs)


SEVENTY SIXTH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION
Fort Ord, California
January 22, 1941

General Orders No. 1

The 76th Field Artillery Regiment (75mm Horse-Drawn) having been redesignated the 76th Field Artillery Battalion (75mm Horse-Drawn), pursuant to authority contained in letter, War Department, AG 320.2 M (Ret) M-C dated December 16, 1940, and Section II, General Orders No. 2, Headquarters Ninth Corps Area, dated January 20, 1941, the undersigned hereby assumes command.

Signed:
C. B Cole
Lt. Colonel 76th FA
Commanding

Distribution:
Hq. 7th Division
7th Division Arty
C.G. Ft. Ord, Cal.
Ea Org., 76th FA Bn (in turn)
File


HEADQUARTERS 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION
Fort Ord, California
January 21, 1941

Subject: Guard Duty Orders

I. General
1. The 76th FA Bn is charged with guarding the EAST Boundary of the Artillery Area with 1 mounted post (24 hours) and is also charged with furnishing it own stable guard.
2. Individuals discovered tampering with or attempting destruction of post installations or government property will be placed under arrest and the Military Police Company CASC notified immediately.
3. Damage of post installations or disruptions of service will be reported immediately to the Adjutant General's Office, telephone 100.
II. Composition of the Guard
1. The guard will be by detail from this headquarters and will consist of the following:
a. Officer of the day
b. Sergeant of the Guard
c. 3 Corporals of the Guard
d. Bugler of the Guard
e. Commanding Officer's Orderly - To be selected by the Officer of the Day at Guard Mount from the privates of the Guard.

III. Orders for the Guard
1. The provisions of duties prescribed in FM 26-5 "Interior Guard Duty" will be complied with by all members of the Guard.
2. The Officer of the Day
Will be in charge of the reveille and retreat formations of the battalion
Will make an inspection for ventilation and unauthorized lights in the area
Will select the Commanding Officer's Orderly from the privates on the Guard
b. The Sergeant of the Guard - See Par. 15, FM 26-5
c. The Corporal of the Guard will visit the Battalion Motor Pool once during the time their relief is on post and see that all windows of trucks are closed and curtains up. They will visit the transformers in the Battalion area once during the time their relief is on post.

The following sentinels will be posted Day and Night

IV. Post No. 1 (Mounted)
a. During hours of daylight my post extends from the transformer at S.E. corner of I Battery. Gun Park, thence back to starting point.
b. I will not allow any person to cross my post after dark, and in daylight only officers, soldiers, and workers having a pass signed by the Construction Quartermaster, Contractor or W.P.A.
c. I will not allow any materials (lumber, kindling, tent floors etc.) to be moved across my post without written permission of the contractor.
d. After dark, I will allow no one in the gun parks and will patrol thru the gun parks on my return trip back to the starting point.
e. I will observe all transformers (electrical) in my area and report anyone tampering with them.

V. Post No. 2 (Dismounted) - Night only and Holidays, Saturday afternoon and Sundays
a. My post extends in and around the Stable Area of the 76th FA Bn. I will verify the fact that corral gates are securely fastened upon taking my post.
b. I will not permit any animal or equipment to be removed from the corrals without written authority from an Officer of the organization.
In case an animal is taken sick or entangled, I will notify the stable sergeant of the organization concerned.
c. I will challenge suspicious characters at all hours and all persons after 11:00 P.M.

VI. Post No. 3 (Dismounted, 24 Hours Post)
My post is at the transformer; I will allow no one around the transformer. I will immediately arrest any suspicious characters found in the vicinity.
Authorized workmen of the P.G. and E., Company with a key that fits the lock will be authorized to enter the wire enclosure of the transformer.

By order of Lt. Colonel Cole:

Signed:
P. M. Baumgartner
2nd Lt., 76th FA Bn
Adjutant


HEADQUARTERS 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION
Fort Ord, California
April 23, 1941

General Orders No. 4

Subject: Safe Keeping of Small Arms

1. All pistols will be kept locked in arms racks or locked in pistol chest bolted to floor.
2. All automatic rifles will be kept locked in chest bolted to floors or walls.
3. Rifles now held temporarily will be kept locked up with automatic rifles or boxed up and kept in Supply Room.
4. Battery owned rifles, shot guns, etc., will be kept locked in Supply Room in chests, lockers, etc.

By order of Lt. Colonel Cole:

Signed:
William C. Lucas
Major, 76th FA Bn
Executive

Official:
Joseph R. Webb
1st Lt., 76th FA Bn
Adjutant


HORSES TURN IN: (We do not have a documented date for when the 76th FA Bn's horses were turned in. Trooper Teddy Nielson tells us that equipment was turned in and horses sold at Bay Meadows Race Track most likely in the time period of May to July 1942).

He also tells us: At this time a large hole was dug and our saddles, harnesses, which were so old along with two horses that were to old to be sold were buried. The limbers, caissons and 75-mm guns were also turned in but I do not know what became of them. I asked if I could keep my saddle and send it home but I was told no. We were allowed to keep our spurs and cavalry boots. At the time of the sale we were guarding the San Francisco Water Works and did not see the sale of the horses.


HEADQUARTERS 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION
Bay Meadows Race Track, San Mateo, California
July 2, 1942

General Orders No. 19

Subject: Assumption of Command

1. The undersigned hereby assumes Command of the 76th Field Artillery Battalion.

Signed:
Lt. Colonel Edgar J. Boschult
76th FA Bn
Commanding


HEADQUARTERS 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION
Bay Meadows Race Track, San Mateo, California
July 15, 1942

General Orders No. 20

Subject: Good Conduct Ribbon

I. Under the provisions of Section III, Circular No. 104, War Department (WD), April 9, 1942, the following named enlisted men, 76th Field Artillery Battalion have been recommended for the Good Conduct Medal, and pending issue of same are authorized to purchase and wear the Good Conduct Ribbon.

(Note: This is only a roster of men entitled to the Good Conduct Medal and the American Defense Medal)

(Note: I compare the 1941 Battery B, 76th FA Bn roster taken at Ft. Ord to the below roster and I have made a note where I located those men in the below rosters)

HEADQUARTER AND HEADQUARTERS BATTERY
M/sgt Arthur A. Keithley
1st /Sgt Tom W. Bohin
T/Sgt James J. Maloney
T/Sgt John Mason
T/Sgt Herman J. Prahl
S/Sgt Tim M. Carigan
S/Sgt Otto A. Stuart
Sgt Raymond J. Dykhuis
Techn. 4th Grade Clifford M. Greener
Cpl. Davied A. Torres
Techn. 5th Grade Matt D. Moran
Pvt 1cl George G. McNeely


BATTERY A
1st /Sgt Clyde R. Ammons
S/Sgt Roy H. Dougherty
S/Sgt Donald L. Sower
S/Sgt Jerry M. Swanner
Sgt George E. Culberson
Sgt Fred Henson
Sgt Leroy Newton
Sgt James E. Parker
Sgt Bert Reed Jr.

Techn. 4th Grade Bronislaw Pietronik
Note: July 3, 2011 - My name is Cheryl Stanley and I have an incredible story to tell to you. Approximately 30 years ago my uncle came to stay with us in Sacramento for a short time. He was hired to work a job refurbishing a very old home. When they tore out a wall of the home he found a heavy made cardboard tube. The tube had a label that is addressed to “Technician Fourth Grade Bronislaw Pietronik”, 76th Field Artillery, US Army retired. From the War Department, Washington, DC. When I took the contents out of the tube I was very surprised to see all the documents from the U.S. Army for this man. They are dated back beginning with his discharge papers when he was with the 76th Field Artillery Regiment, Battery “C” in France during WW1 and ending with his discharge and re-enlistment papers with the 76th FA dated December 28, 1939 issued at Fort Francis E. Warren, Wyoming. Also included are his: “Certificate of Retirement” from the military approved: June 30, 1941 and dated May 24, 1944, “U.S. Certificate of Naturalization” issued January 2, 1923 when he was residing at Fort D.A. Russell, and two “Special Certificates” one issued 1928 at Fort D.A. Russell and the last one issued June 18, 1942 at Bay Meadows Race Track when the 76th Field Artillery Battalion was stationed there. This is about the time when their horses were turned in. This is an incredible collection of his over 24 years of military service. Many of these years he worked as a blacksmith and horseshoer. In February of 2012, I donated these papers to Greg Krenzelok for safekeeping. Further search shows according to Social Security records Bronislaw died in Sacramento in February 1980, at age 83 and 8 months.

Cpl Robert A. Sunthimer
Cpl Fuller G. Smith
Cpl James B. Dutton


BATTERY B
1st /Sgt George A. Scudder (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
S/Sgt Earl C. Bedwell (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
S/Sgt Gordon C. Crick (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Sgt Nicholas R. Garcia
Sgt Lee R. Young
Techn. 4th Grade Frank R. James
Cpl Leslie G. Rozell
Pvt 1cl Ross D. Jakeway
Pvt 1cl Fredrick R. Thompson (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)


BATTERY C
1st /Sgt Virgil F. Wolferding
S/Sgt James W. Garrett
S/Sgt Eugene Lowery
Sgt Edward G. Meadows Jr.
Sgt Charles F. Clarke
Techn. 4th Grade Sidney J. Barry
Cpl Floyce A. Booker
Techn. 5th Grade Clifford O. Biggs
Techn. 5th Grade Leroy C. Robbins


SERVICE BATTERY
M/sgt Roy R. Ricketts
1st /Sgt Charles G. McHenry
T/Sgt Homer F. Lindsay
S/Sgt Percy T. Harrison
S/Sgt Mike Mahar
S/Sgt Claud F. Sigler
Sgt Dillard Yarbrough


MEDICAL DETACHMENT
S/Sgt Aurther E. Ashley


II. Subject: American Defense Service Ribbon

1. Under the provisions of Section III, Circular No. 104, WD, April 9, 1942, the following named Officers and enlisted men, 76th Field Artillery Battalion are eligible and are authorized to purchase and wear the American Defense Ribbon pending the issue of medal.


OFFICERS
Lt. Colonel Edgar J. Boschult
Major Percy T. Hennigar
Major Joseph P. Fallon Jr.
Capt. Carl Steinhart Jr.
Capt. Thomas T. Lewis
Capt. John J. Kenny
Capt. Bernard J. Gruelich
Capt. Charles E. Welsh
Capt. Charles A. Christin Jr.
1st Lt. Walter R. Lamb
1st Lt. Robert L. Griffith Jr.
1st Lt. Alexander Nisbet
1st Lt. David S. McCurdy
1st Lt. Charles L. Allen Jr.
1st Lt. Grant W. Busell
1st Lt. Herbert R. McClintock Jr
1st Lt. John H. Camp
1st Lt. Charles A. Ott Jr.


HEADQUARTER AND HEADQUARTERS BATTERY
M/sgt Arthur A. Keithley
1st /Sgt Tom W. Bohin
T/Sgt James J. Maloney T/Sgt John Mason
T/Sgt Herman J. Prahl
S/Sgt Tim M. Carigan
S/Sgt Robert S. Hall
S/Sgt Carl E. Malmgren S/Sgt Clyde E. Lamb
S/Sgt James R. Smith
S/Sgt Otto A. Stuart
S/Sgt Jerome L. Sperber
Sgt Darrell E. Ahlstrom
Sgt Raymond J. Dyhuis
Sgt Leonel C. Lourenco
Sgt Daniel B. Neifert
Sgt George W. Spengler
Sgt George P. Stubblefield
Techn. 4th Gr Herbert Ng
Techn. 4th Gr Robert J. Ratigan
Techn. 4th Gr Wallace C. Salisbury
Techn. 4th Gr John S. Sheridan
Techn. 4th Gr Peter J. Strusis
Techn. 4th Gr Paul J. Spackeen
Cpl Darrel W. Beard
Cpl Martin P. Cavazza
Cpl James L. Ferguson
Cpl Leland A. Habernicht
Cpl Percy B. Gormley
Cpl Arnold R. Kuhn
Cpl James L. Michael
Cpl John R. McElvaney
Cpl Norman T. Moore
Cpl Herbert S. Ramsey
Cpl Ernest Rogers
Techn. 4th Gr Harold R. Scott
Techn. 4th Gr James E. Chambers
Techn. 4th Gr Allan M. Farewell
Techn. 4th Gr Clifford M. Greener
Techn. 4th Gr Vernon A Jones
Cpl Davied A. Torres
Cpl Robert L. Vaca
Cpl Charles Wannamaker
Techn. 5th Gr Robert Flohr
Techn. 5th Gr Rex J. Gleason
Techn. 5th Gr William W. Goozee
Techn. 5th Gr Willis J. King
Techn. 5th Gr Daniel A. McAfee Jr.
Techn. 5th Gr Charles B. Melemdrez
Techn. 5th Gr Jean E. Menke
Techn. 5th Gr Matt D. Moran
Techn. 5th Gr Ernest H. Pearson
Techn. 5th Gr Ivan L. Phenis
Techn. 5th Gr Charles M. Pulsipher Jr.
Techn. 5th Gr William R. Rabern
Techn. 5th Gr Albert H. Schroer
Techn. 5th Gr Edward Sifferman
Techn. 5th Gr Carrol L. Wahl
Pvt 1cl James J. Ambrose
Pvt 1cl James W. Belt
Pvt 1cl James A. Bonner
Pvt 1cl Emil C. Brase
Pvt 1cl Wandlen A. Chronister
Pvt 1cl Robert T. Cresswell
Pvt 1cl Joao C. Cupido
Pvt 1cl Joseph L. Dornan
Pvt 1cl Raymond Y. Espinoza
Pvt 1cl Maurice L. Hammill
Pvt 1cl Russell E. Hales
Pvt 1cl James W. Howe
Pvt 1cl Harold A. Johnson
Pvt 1cl James G. Kerhoulas
Pvt 1cl Howard E. Rogers
Pvt 1cl Frank Koltay
Pvt 1cl Carl R. Lease
Pvt 1cl Donald R. MacLaine
Pvt 1cl George G. McNeely
Pvt 1cl James A. Miller
Pvt 1cl Robert B. Mills
Pvt 1cl O. D. Morris
Pvt 1cl Fred K. Musselman
Pvt 1cl James W. Nappier
Pvt 1cl Norman W. Nelson
Pvt 1cl Alvin Ness
Pvt 1cl John H. Owens
Pvt 1cl Louis A. Posz
Pvt 1cl John E. Potter
Pvt 1cl Clayton J. Regan
Pvt 1cl Theodore L. Rose
Pvt 1cl Gerald W. Spaulding
Pvt 1cl Jerome M. Walker
Pvt 1cl Donald M. Wells
Pvt 1cl Frank L. Yocom
Pvt 1cl Robert Ziegler
Pvt Arthur E. Ahern
Pvt Alfred E. Arvonen
Pvt Robert T. Bringhurst
Pvt Gordon W. Bringman
Pvt Michael Egnotovich
Pvt Richard A. LaFayette
Pvt Kenneth R. Lett
Pvt John J. McKay
Pvt Fred Morrison
Pvt Lester O'Rourke
Pvt Manuel C. Reyes
Pvt Elmer Riggs
Pvt David Shulkin
Pvt William O. Stephens
Pvt Dan T. Thompson
Pvt Pete T. Venegas Jr.


BATTERY A
1st /Sgt Clyde R. Ammons
S/Sgt Roy H. Dougherty
S/Sgt Donald L. Sower
S/Sgt Jerry M. Swanner
Sgt George E. Culberson
Sgt Fred Henson
Sgt Leroy Newton
Sgt Bert Reed Jr.
Sgt James E. Parker
Sgt Marion G. Vasser
Techn. 4th Gr Trindad J. Baca
Techn. 4th Gr Grover C. Bowan
Techn. 4th Gr Bronsilaw Pietronik
Techn. 4th Gr Odis P. Powell
Cpl Carroll S. Abbott
Cpl Warren C. Banta
Cpl Joseph A. Bergantino
Cpl William R. Powell
Cpl Frank Riccobono
Cpl Thomas M. Roney Jr.
Cpl Fuller G. Smith
Cpl Robert A. Sunthimer
Cpl James W. Stitley
Cpl Wilbur J. Underwood
Techn. 5th Gr Albert W. Glick
Techn. 5th Gr Oliver N. Purtteman
Techn. 5th Gr Frank Varni
Techn. 5th Gr Lumir F. Stanek
Techn. 5th Gr Lewis C. Billingsey
Techn. 5th Gr Bak G. Quan
Techn. 5th Gr Earl E. Wilson
Techn. 5th Gr Melvin T. Meeks
Pvt. 1cl Fred Bueno
Pvt. 1cl William F. Kindt
Pvt. 1cl Charles L. Mullins
Pvt. 1cl Roy E. Wagnoner
Pvt. 1cl James N. Beatty
Pvt. 1cl Fate Brooks
Pvt. 1cl Nace V. Brooks
Pvt. 1cl Delmar L. Brownfield
Pvt. 1cl Howard R. Delaney
Pvt. 1cl Chester D. Dipp
Pvt. 1cl Ivondale Dohse
Pvt. 1cl Ira H. Douglass
Pvt. 1cl Robert R. Edelstein
Pvt. 1cl Allan L. Kemp
Pvt. 1cl Mahlon E. Lantz
Pvt. 1cl Edwin I. Lavender
Pvt. 1cl Frank Leslie
Pvt. 1cl Lorran O. Lester
Pvt. 1cl Spencer A. Mayhugh
Pvt. 1cl George L Rains
Pvt. 1cl Preston E. Reynolds
Pvt. 1cl John Rygh
Pvt. 1cl Joseph Rosenstein
Pvt. 1cl Joseph G. Seigler
Pvt. 1cl David E. Torno
Pvt. 1cl Robert J. Veatch
Pvt. Felin W. Baxter
Pvt. Edward E. Bennett
Pvt. John P. Caranzi
Pvt. Oscar S. Chavez
Pvt. John A Conti
Pvt. Joe N. Carnavali
Pvt. Quentin E. Collins
Pvt. John H. Darrington
Pvt. Frantz E. DeWillis
Pvt. William V. Flanery
Pvt. Hubert G. Frame
Pvt. Paul E. Freed
Pvt. Raymond W. Flaning
Pvt. Emmett E. Gesy
Pvt. Stanley P. Goleniak
Pvt. Walter F. Gunzel
Pvt. Ora E. Hall
Pvt. John A. Harris
Pvt. Fred M. Heape
Pvt. Thomas J. Hoolan
Pvt. Eugene A. Hunt
Pvt. Kenneth A. Jones
Pvt. Robert L. Kane
Pvt. Edwin W. Karsten
Pvt. Robert Klepesky
Pvt. Allen R. Koistenin
Pvt. Dan Leary
Pvt. Fred W. Lewis
Pvt. James F. Lyall
Pvt. Jesse D. McCowan
Pvt. William J. McFarlene
Pvt. George F. Melrose
Pvt. Roy W. Meyer
Pvt. Henry Mroczyski
Pvt. George E. Myers
Pvt. James P. Navvarro
Pvt. Thomas Newell
Pvt. Teddy Nielson (note: contact with this website)
Pvt. Howard N. Onan
Pvt. Barney B. Ostrowski
Pvt. Emanuel Paternostro
Pvt. Anthony Pescetti
Pvt. Wilbur T. Pherigo
Pvt. Roy E. Pierce
Pvt. Irvin F. Pofahl
Pvt. James B. Ramsey
Pvt. Herman M. Raymond
Pvt. Glen N. Robinson
Pvt. Maxie L. Russell
Pvt. Louis A. Schebaum
Pvt. William A. Schniedermeyer
Pvt. Wilfred W. Scholle
Pvt. Raymond M. Schultz
Pvt. Earl E. Schwabe
Pvt. Johnnie E. Sontag
Pvt. Norman P. Stephens
Pvt. Buck H. Stiffler
Pvt. Owen L Svendby
Pvt. Robert W. Tatroe
Pvt. August F. Trujillo
Pvt. Silas D. Ward
Pvt. Robert F. Williams
Pvt. Mike White
Pvt. Eulugio R. Yanez


BATTERY B
1st /Sgt George A. Scudder
S/Sgt Earl C. Bedwell
S/Sgt Gordon C. Crick
S/Sgt Bernard E. Mullenix
Sgt Walter M. Dooley (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Sgt Nicholas R. Garcia
Sgt James S. Harrison
Sgt Dudley W. Jackson (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Sgt Robert R. Keil (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Sgt Jimmie E. Morten (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Sgt Lee R. Young
Techn. 4th Gr Frank R. James
Techn. 4th Gr Andrew J. Brakke (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Techn. 4th Gr James M. Marr (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Techn. 4th Gr Carman A. Sickles
Cpl Steve E. Barto (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Cpl Sam Ciullo (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Cpl Jefferson R. Crobarger (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Cpl Jack M. English
Cpl Floyd B. Freemyer (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Cpl John W. Hayes (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Cpl James W. Johnston
Cpl Willard L Lutz (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Cpl J. B. Martin (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Cpl William W. Reihl (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Cpl Frank S. Roush
Cpl Leslie G. Rozell
Cpl Samuel B. Woodward
Techn. 5th Gr Lossie Allen (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Techn. 5th Gr James H. Balderston
Techn. 5th Gr John Bauriedl
Techn. 5th Gr Frank H. Hernandez
Techn. 5th Gr Carlyle L. Jorgensen
Techn. 5th Gr Howard E. Kirk (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Techn. 5th Gr Raymond C. Rodriguez
Techn. 5th Gr Ray B. Son (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt 1cl Sterling L. Ballard (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt 1cl Albert J. Bozzi
Pvt 1cl James L. Byrne
Pvt 1cl Bearnie Casey
Pvt 1cl James T. Clark
Pvt 1cl Robert L. Crandall
Pvt 1cl William C. Crowley
Pvt 1cl John Delgardo Jr.
Pvt 1cl Van A. Eaton
Pvt 1cl Reyes E. Guerra
Pvt 1cl James I. Harris (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt 1cl Clinton L. Hays (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt 1cl Ross D. Jakeway (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt 1cl Martin L. Kroshel
Pvt 1cl Algy N. Lawley (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt 1cl Edward H. Ling
Pvt 1cl Joe L. Lucio
Pvt 1cl William A. Martin
Pvt 1cl William G. McArthur
Pvt 1cl Enrico H. Pieretti
Pvt 1cl Albert L. Richardson
Pvt 1cl Harold E. Schoessler
Pvt 1cl William N. Sidebottom (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt 1cl Francis N. Sitz
Pvt 1cl Donald E. Thew (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt 1cl Cortes Thompson (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt 1cl Fredrick R. Thompson
Pvt 1cl Robert S. Tiller
Pvt 1cl Daniel R. Timothy (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt 1cl Lester S. Warnack
Pvt 1cl A. J. Watson
Pvt 1cl Clark Wilcox (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt Limual F. Andrew
Pvt George E. Armstrong
Pvt Ronald E. Barth
Pvt George J. Barry
Pvt Rudolph Bartolowith
Pvt John P. Beale
Pvt Eugene W. Brown
Pvt Walter Burke
Pvt Ray E. Call
Pvt Alve W. Cassity
Pvt Clyde E. Clark
Pvt Cupel W. Clark
Pvt Woodrow M. Delany
Pvt Louis F. Dockery
Pvt Frank A. Doner
Pvt Wallace C. Duncan
Pvt Leonard S. Eichman
Pvt Albert V. Ezell
Pvt Jack J. Foster
Pvt Henry R. Franklin
Pvt Everett G. Garrett
Pvt Pete J. Giraud
Pvt Fred Glass (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt Frank O. Hager
Pvt John E. Hasty
Pvt Lomimer G. Henry
Pvt Floyd M. Higgins
Pvt Andrew C. KahLand
Pvt Henry Klassen - Click on link: Pvt. Henry Klassen 76th Field Artillery WW2
Pvt Joseph Kwosz
Pvt Buck S. Lawson
Pvt Arthur V. Hance
Pvt Wayland M Loar
Pvt Jack Lopez
Pvt Nick Lucero
Pvt Peter T. Lynch (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt Thomas J. Merrill
Pvt Charlie A. Myers
Pvt Vernon P. Nelson
Pvt Matthew P. Netz
Pvt Allen J. Oliver
Pvt Joseph F. Pershern
Pvt Frank E. Rafert
Pvt Floyd Raymond (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Pvt Virgil O. Richards
Pvt Thomas W. Rippon
Pvt John C. Roberts
Pvt Harold T. Roadcap
Pvt Alexander Ross
Pvt Francis E. Sammon
Pvt Lothar J. Schuetzle
Pvt Albert E. Schulte
Pvt Clayton M. Schuster
Pvt Forrest W. Schuttle
Pvt Ralph E. Sells
Pvt John H. Seona
Pvt George L Sieber
Pvt Preston M. Smith
Pvt Rudolph A. Sturtz
Pvt Perer G. Torres
Pvt Eddie R. Van Matre
Pvt Leo L. White
Pvt Kenneth W. Williams
Pvt Emil C. Schulte


BATTERY C
1st /Sgt Virgil F. Wolfording
S/Sgt James W. Garrett
S/Sgt Eugene Lowery
S/Sgt William Monde
Sgt Forrest J. Attaway
Sgt Charles F. Clarke
Sgt John B. Core
Sgt Donald K. Hudson
Sgt Edward G. Meadows Jr.
Sgt Vernon L. Van Sickle
Sgt Thelmer A. Kjersten
Techn. 4th Gr Sidney J. Barry
Techn. 4th Gr Clifford O. Biggs
Techn. 4th Gr Raymond W. Brown
Techn. 4th Gr Albert R. Cordova
Cpl Floyce A. Booker
Cpl Albin E. Hartley
Cpl Delmar E. Hearn
Cpl James T. Horrocks (note: contact with this website)
Cpl Robert J. May
Cpl Wayne C. Popejoy
Cpl Garland W. Rankin
Cpl Clarence Redmond
Cpl Clyde R. Traynor
Cpl Mack B. Thompson
Cpl Fred J. Turney
Cpl Thomas L. White
Techn. 5th Gr Vern C. Bevis
Techn. 5th Gr John T. Griffith
Techn. 5th Gr Haigh E. Chown
Techn. 5th Gr Joseph H. Hible
Techn. 5th Gr Leroy C. Robbins
Techn. 5th Gr Blaine R. Funk
Techn. 5th Gr Woodrow W. Metcalf
Techn. 5th Gr Donald L. Nissen
Pvt 1cl Joseph G. Cruz
Pvt 1cl George V. Kiger
Pvt 1cl Thomas L. Lounderback
Pvt 1cl Prime Jacobs
Pvt 1cl Kenneth L Stahl
Pvt 1cl John T. Bledsoe
Pvt 1cl Wesley L. Christolear
Pvt 1cl Louie De Paoli
Pvt 1cl David L. Evans
Pvt 1cl Raymond E. Evans
Pvt 1cl Raymond L. Ford
Pvt 1cl Santos S. Guardado
Pvt 1cl Andrew P. Brockman
Pvt 1cl Hubert W. Feeler
Pvt 1cl Arthur H. Fox
Pvt 1cl Marvin L. Gantz
Pvt 1cl Raymond C. Hustad
Pvt 1cl Raymond E. Pfander
Pvt 1cl David E. Plasencia
Pvt 1cl Erwin Rosengart
Pvt 1cl Richardt Solbeck
Pvt 1cl Wilford H. Steffen
Pvt 1cl Frank A. K. Tippet
Pvt 1cl Frank Zabaleta
Pvt 1cl George Van Zyl
Pvt Douglas P. Downey
Pvt Ira L Hamman
Pvt Jacob E. Lefthand
Pvt Floyd J. Young
Pvt Lawrence M. Bainbridge
Pvt Emilio T. Bojarano
Pvt Robert E. Bishop
Pvt John Bunyar
Pvt Eugene Bush
Pvt Francis N. Collins
Pvt Francis C. Cusimano
Pvt Norman B. Dillard
Pvt Roy L. Dominguez
Pvt Aloysius J. Dotzler
Pvt Michael Fontilla
Pvt Joseph C. Ford
Pvt Glenn Funk
Pvt Joseph D. Gonzales
Pvt Harvey T. Goodman
Pvt Bernhardt L. Graper
Pvt Elmer G. Hafliger
Pvt Joe F. Havel
Pvt Federico Hernandez
Pvt Russel L. Hillman
Pvt Frederick E. Hohensee
Pvt Floyd H. Huckabee
Pvt George H. Ives
Pvt Albert L. Johnston
Pvt Albert R. Jollet
Pvt Don P. Jones
Pvt Earl R. Karner
Pvt Carl F. Klejeski
Pvt Clarence Konop
Pvt Robert H. Lamp
Pvt Nathan La Venter
Pvt Lester L. Lindsey
Pvt Donato V. Marquez Jr.
Pvt Robert B. Mallison
Pvt Raymond J. McCullough
Pvt William J. Moran
Pvt Albert B. Morrill
Pvt Harvey E. Newman
Pvt Thomas F. Osborne
Pvt Rollin L. Owen
Pvt Henry R. Pape
Pvt Perry W. Pedersen
Pvt Melvin F. Phillips
Pvt Carl H. Randelman
Pvt Bliss R. Roberts
Pvt Jacobo R. Rodriguez
Pvt Philip L. Sapp
Pvt Aloysius F. Sauerwein
Pvt Kenneth J. Sanders
Pvt Herbert A. Schroer
Pvt Ervin K. Scott
Pvt Gomer H. Smith
Pvt Dallas A. Sorg
Pvt Lincoln A. Sprague
Pvt Marinus W. Stolk
Pvt Frank P. Szabo
Pvt Lloyd A. Thompson
Pvt Wilbur R. Turpening
Pvt Fred Tustanowski
Pvt Roy Venegas
Pvt Roland E. Wagner


SERVICE BATTERY
M/sgt Roy R. Ricketts
1st /Sgt Charles G. McHenry
T/Sgt Homer F. Lindsay
S/Sgt Percy T. Harrison
S/Sgt Mike Mahar
S/Sgt Claud F. Sigler
S/Sgt William E. Dunn
Sgt Robert L. Hays
Sgt Percy M. Morris
Sgt Aldo B. Nerelli (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Sgt Raymond W. Schick
Sgt Dillard Yarbrough
Techn. 4th Gr Harold A. Burk
Techn. 4th Gr Lloyd L. Carnagey
Techn. 4th Gr Walter E. Harmon
Techn. 4th Gr Willis Reed
Cpl Donald J. Hatch
Cpl Harold E. Hunt
Cpl Andrew Kermish
Cpl Earl F. Lieberknecht
Cpl Lynn F. McClintock
Cpl Norman M. Miranda (Stationed at Fort Ord 1941)
Cpl George Plowman
Cpl Bernard W. Peterson
Techn. 5th Gr William H. Baker
Techn. 5th Gr Eugene L. Boettger
Techn. 5th Gr Homer E. Casey
Techn. 5th Gr Kenneth C. Cummins
Techn. 5th Gr Clyde O. Firestein
Techn. 5th Gr Philip O. Fladvid
Techn. 5th Gr Leo T. Forsberg
Techn. 5th Gr Loyal J. Myhre
Techn. 5th Gr Alex Schleining
Techn. 5th Gr Rudolph Thompson
Techn. 5th Gr Otis R. Torkelson
Pvt 1cl Earl T. Digel
Pvt 1cl Floyd C. Hooten
Pvt 1cl John F. Horvat
Pvt 1cl John L. Hukill
Pvt 1cl Thomas R. Jeroue
Pvt 1cl Raymond C. McLain
Pvt 1cl Earl F. McNeely
Pvt 1cl Jewell R. McNutt
Pvt 1cl Alex P. Miller
Pvt 1cl Charles S. Mills
Pvt 1cl Elmer A. Moore
Pvt 1cl Joseph L Schrader
Pvt 1cl Floyd C. Schroeder
Pvt 1cl Joseph C. Schmidt
Pvt 1cl Clarence P. Spreigl
Pvt 1cl Alfred J. Stahl
Pvt 1cl Harlan C. Strauser
Pvt 1cl Wilfred A. Thompson
Pvt 1cl Ernest K. Watson
Pvt 1cl Adam E. Yochim
Pvt James R. Darby
Pvt John W. Findlay
Pvt Earl G. Guentzel
Pvt Edward J. Smart
Pvt Richard L. Van Hoet
Pvt Clyde A. Wallace
Pvt Walter Wolak
Pvt Edwin C. Yakush
Pvt Walter L. Foard


MEDICAL DETACHMENT
S/Sgt Aurther E. Ashley
Sgt Howard T. Lee
Cpl Charles B. Yocum
Techn. 5th Gr Kenneth L. Pierce
Pvt 1cl Gloyd L. Anderson
Pvt 1cl Joseph A. Kolski
Pvt 1cl Lester R. Reddig
Pvt 1cl Henry L. Sussman
Pvt Warren L. Gordon
Pvt Fred J. Harang
Pvt Harold H. Halperin
Pvt Jerome S. Nuello
Pvt Raymond A. Rodrigues
Pvt Orrin E. Reed
Pvt Melbourne G. Slade Jr
Pvt Richard N. Schriber
Pvt Hoy L Wong
Pvt Adelbert R. Young

By Order of Lt. Colonel BOSCHULT:

Signed:
Charles L Allen Jr.
1st Lt. 76th FA Bn
Adjutant


HEADQUARTERS 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION
Bay Meadows Race Track, San Mateo, California
September 3, 1942

Subject: Memorandum

To: Officer of the Day, NCO in charge at Bay Meadows Race Track

1. The Guard will be composed of four enlisted men as follows:
a. 1 NCO
b. 3 Privates

2. It shall be the duty of the guard to protect all property located at the Bay Meadows Race Track, the stable area, and the area formerly used as the Battalion Motor Park.

3. In the event of fire call the San Mateo Fire Department; dial operator and report fire.

4. The Non-commissioned Officer will twice daily inspect all building in the area, paying particular attention to any evidence of damage the elements, or entry or attempted entry by unauthorized persons, and any attempted entry will be reported to the local police and to the Battalion Commander.

5. The guard will be supervised and inspected periodically by an officer of this Battalion.

6. Any request for medical attention will be made to this Headquarters (Telephone Sunnyvale 3401 and 3402)

7. All members of the guard will be present in the area from 2300 to 1700 hours (except meal times, minimum of 2 men in area).

14 October 1942 General Orders No. 26 puts the Battalion at Dispersal Area, McLaren Park. (Note: location northeast of Daly City, S.F. Ca., the park is still there. I believe it was from this bivouac camp the that the 76th FA Bn may have crossed the Golden Gate as mentioned by Teddy Nielson.)


McLaren Park is just northeast of Daly City, S.F., California. And the Park is still located there today. To understand the above map easier it needs to be quarter turned to the left so GENEVA AVE is at the bottom of the map running east to west. The roads are a little different today but one can easily see that this is the location of the 76th's Dispersal Area and bivouac area. SANTOS ST. bisects GENEVA AVE. and SUNNYVALE AVE. BRAZIL AVE can be located on the Westside of the Park in about the middle. It should be noted the configuration of streets have change but identification of the site is easily confirmed. Marked on the index is the locations of Batteries A, B, C, Headquarters and Service. This map was found in the archive files of the 76th FA Bn.


HEADQUARTERS 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION
Bayshore Kennel Club Staging Area (Dispersal Area)
San Francisco, California
December 16, 1942

General Orders No. 27

Subject: Service Calls

1. The following list of calls for the 76th Field Artillery Battalion is published, to be effective at 0001 hours, Thursday, December 17, 1942

Reveille;
First Call - 0645 - Sundays and Holiday: 0745 hours
March - 0650 - Sundays and Holiday: 0750 hours
Assembly:
Mess (Breakfast) - 0700 - Sundays and Holiday: 0800 hours

Drill:
1st Call - 0750 hours
Assembly - 0800

Church Call:
Catholic - Sunday - 0900 hours
Protestant - Sunday - 1000

Recall from Drill - 1200
Mess Call (Dinner) - 1215 - Sundays and Holiday: 1215

Drill:
First Call - 1305
Assembly - 1315

Sick Call - 1315 - Sundays and Holiday: 1315

Recall from Drill - 1645

Guard Mount:
Guard Mount - 1720
Assembly - 1730

Retreat:
First Call - 1705
Assembly - 1710
Retreat - 1715

Tattoo - 2130
Call to Quarters 2245
Taps - 2300


22 December 1942 General Orders No. 30 puts the Battalion at Dispersal Area at Headquarters, Belmont, California.

Note: paperwork refers to this location as possibly Camp Belmont located off El Camino Real and Bayshore roads. But it is unclear at this time exactly the purpose of the 76th FA Bn (Batteries A, B, and Service) being stationed here. It is also unclear if this is the Headquarters at Belmont or not. Look at below map.

THE ABOVE MAP:
Headquarters' bivouac area seems to be located at the corner of El Camino Real and Ralston Ave.

Battery "A" bivouac area seems to be located on Ralston Ave up to the corner of Alameda de Las Pulgas on both sides of the street.

Battery "B" bivouac area seems to be located on Alameda de Las Pulgas on both sides of the street.

Service Battery bivouac area seems to be on a narrow strip right next (west) of El Camino Real.

And I am guessing that Headquarters is marked "76th FA Bn" on the corner of Bayshore (now Hwy 101 or Bayshore Fwy) and Ralston Ave which appears to be ramps and exits for the freeway. Note: In the late 1940s Bayshore was a two-lane road.

St. Joseph's Military Academy, Belmont, California, dispersal areas. Research of the St. Joseph's Military Academy, Belmont, California, appears today to be the location of:

Church of the Immaculate Heart of Mary
1040 Alameda de Las Pulgas
Belmont, California 94002

The school's operation was taken over by the Sisters of Mercy in 1932, and the school was renamed St. Joseph's Military Academy. This school lasted until 1952, when the old academy became the parish school of the Immaculate Heart Church.


1943 ACTIVITIES OF THE 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION: JAN. 1 TO DEC. 31:

January 1943 strength of the Battalion: Officers: 43. Warrant Officers: Enlisted men: 598. (This varied over the year)

January 1, 1943 to August 31, 1943 - Battalion permanent station: Fort Ord, Calif. Temporary station: Belmont, Calif.

1. The following beach defense installations were occupied by the 76th F.A. Bn on the dates indicated. These installations were alternately occupied by Headquarters, A, B, and C Batteries.

a. Del Monte, Calif - January 1, 1943 to August 16, 1943, this position was occupied by units as listed below:

C Battery - Jan. 1 to Jan. 8
B Battery - Jan. 8 to Feb 19
A Battery - Feb. 19 to April 13
C Battery - April 13 to June 7
B Battery - June 7 to June 27
Hq. (Det) - June 27 to August 16

b. Davenport, California - January 1, 1943 to August 16, 1943, this position was occupied by units as listed below:

C Battery (Det) - Jan. 1 to Jan. 8
B Battery (Det) - Jan. 8 to Feb 19
A Battery (Det) - Feb. 19 to April 13
C Battery (Det) - April 13 to June 10
Hq. (Det) - June 10 to August 16

c. Purissima, California - January 1, 1943 to August 16, 1943, this position was occupied by units as listed below:

C Battery (Det) - Jan. 1 to Jan. 8
B Battery (Det) - Jan. 8 to Feb 19
A Battery (Det) - Jan. 19 to April 12
C Battery (Det) - April 12 to April 19
Hq. (Det) - April 19 to August 16

d. Half Moon Bay - January 1, 1943 to August 16, 1943, this position was occupied by units as listed below:

C Battery (Det) - Jan. 1 to Jan. 8
B Battery (Det) - Jan. 8 to Feb 19
A Battery (Det) - Feb. 19 to April 12
C Battery (Det) - April 12 to May 3
Hq. (Det) - May 3 to June 10

2. The following listed units were stationed temporarily at Hunter Liggett Military Reservation (HLMR), California for the indicated periods for Field Exercises and problems.

A Battery - April 13 to May 10
Hq. (Det) - April 26 to May 8
B Battery - May 10 to June 7
Hq. (Det) - May 25 to June 5
C Battery - June 7 to July 30
Hq. - June 21 to July 30
B Battery - June 26 to July 30
Serv. Battery - July 1 to July 30
A Battery - July 6 to July 30

3. Battery A was stationed (temporary) at San Rafael, California for one week from August 8, 1943 to August 16, 1943

4. Battalion was stationed at Camp Roberts, California (Permanent station) - September 1, 1943 to November 20, 1943

5. Battalion was stationed at Iron Mountain, California (Permanent station) - November 21, 1943 to December 31, 1943

6. Marches: Marches were made to and from the above Beach Defense positions on the dates indicated above.

Distances:
Belmont to Del Monte - 110 miles
Belmont to Half Moon Bay - 13 miles
Belmont to Purissima - 18 miles
Belmont to Davenport - 45 miles

7. AA M.G. practice (Det Hq. Battery)
Belmont, Ca. to Fort Ord, Ca. - Jan. 3
Fort Ord, Ca. to Belmont, Ca. - Jan. 4
105 miles

8. Service Practice (Battery B)
Belmont, Ca. to Camp McQuaide, Ca. - Jan. 3
65 miles


Note: Little remembered Camp McQuaide, situated six miles from Watsonville, California, in Santa Cruz Valley. Old Camp McQuaide and what is left is located at and on the Monterey Bay Academy overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Camp McQuaide was a Coast Artillery Training Center and the Headquarters of the 250th Coast Artillery. During the early 1940's Camp McQuaide supported a community of 1,900 officers and enlisted men and consisted of 36 permanent buildings and 354 wood framed tents called hutments. A hospital with 100 beds and a fire station which housed three fire engines were also located on the camp. Old Camp McQuaide and what is left is located on the Monterey Bay Academy, 783 San Andreas Road, La Selva Beach, CA. Camp McQuaide was just one of the many satellite installations of Fort Ord. I have visited the site and is worth taking the drive to see the many buildings that are still there.


9. Service Practice (105mm Howitzers)
Battery A, Det. Hq. Battery
Belmont, Ca. to Fort Ord, Ca.- 105 miles

Battery B
Camp McQuaide to Fort Ord, Ca.- 4 miles
January 7, 1943

10. Service Practice (105mm Howitzers)
Hq. A and C Batteries, less Dets
Belmont, Ca. to Camp Hydle
January 13, 1943
Roads: Hard surfaces except Camp Hydle where roads were narrow rutted and had steep grades.
70 miles


Note: Little remembered Camp Hydle is located at Point Reyes National Seashore on the old Murphy Ranch on the ocean. Part of the Beach Defense positions at Drakes Bay consisted of three major facilities: the Camp Hydle Maneuver Area, Wildcat Military Reservation, and the Drakes Bay Dive Bombing Range and Proposed Aerial Mine Laying Area. Camp Hydle Artillery Outpost was located approximately one-half mile east of Limantour Beach, on a hill over looking Drakes Bay. The dive-bombing and mine laying range was located near Chimney Rock in the bay. During World War II, the Camp Hydle Artillery Outpost's guns performed target practice against towed targets in Drakes Bay. Battery C of the 74th Field Artillery Battalion still horse-drawn was headquartered in Santa Rosa at Camp Wikiup and then Camp Hydle during the early part of WW2. They were assigned gun emplacements along the coast. The 107th Cavalry also were stationed in Santa Rosa. I have worked on local research and have visited the site of Camp Hydle (sometimes spelt: Heidle)


11. Service Practice (Direct laying waterborne targets 75mm guns)
Belmont, Ca. to Camp McQuaide, Ca.
January 24

Camp McQuaide, Ca. to Belmont, Ca.
January 26
65 miles

15 March 1943 (Note: Guard duty paperwork puts the Battalion at Belmont, California)

12. Individual and Unit Training (Service practice and preparation for Battery Tests)
Battery A
Del Monte to Hunter Liggett Military Reservation (HLMR), California
90 miles, 180 miles from HLMR to Belmont, Ca
April 13, HLMR to Belmont May 10

13. Service practice and assisting in Battery Tests
Det. Hq. Battery
Belmont to HLMR, April 26
HLMR to Belmont, May 8
180 miles

14. Individual and Unit Training (Service practice and preparation for Battery Tests)
Battery B
Belmont to HLMR, May 10, (180 miles)
HLMR to Del Monte, June 7, (90 miles)

15. Service practice and assisting in Battery Tests
Det. Hq. Battery
Belmont to Pinnacles National Monument, May 24, (105 miles), Pinnacles National Monument to HLMR, May 25, (90 miles)

16. Return from Service practice and Battery Tests
Det. Hq. Battery
HLMR to Belmont, June 5
180 miles

17. Individual and Unit Training (Service practice and preparation for Battery Tests)
Battery C
Del Monte to HLMR, June 7
190 miles

18. Service practice and combined training for Battalion Tests
Hq. Battery
Belmont to HLMR, June 21
180 miles

19. Service practice and combined training for Battalion Tests
Battery B
Del Monte to HLMR, June 26
90 miles

20. Combined training for Battalion
Service Battery
Belmont to HLMR, July 1
180 miles

21. Combined training for Battalion Tests
Battery A, Det. Hq. Battery
Belmont to HLMR, July 6
180 miles

8 July 1943 (Note: Battalion paperwork put them at bivouac area at Bradley, California)

22. Battalion problem with 125th Infantry (Regiment and Amphibious landing forces)
HLMR to Fort Ord, July 19
90 miles

23. Return from field problem (Battalion)
Fort Ord to HLMR, July 22
90 miles

24. Return from field to Garrison at Belmont (Battalion)
HLMR to Belmont, July 30
180 miles

25. Training for Battalion Tests and Service practice (Battalion)
Belmont to Fort Ord, August 5
105 miles


HEADQUARTERS 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION
Belmont, California
August 10, 1943

General Orders No 5

Subject: Good Conduct Ribbon (Roster)

1. Under the provisions of AR 600-68, May 4 1943, the following named enlisted men, 76th Field Artillery Battalion have been recommended for the Good Conduct Medal, and pending issue of same are authorized to purchase and wear the Good Conduct Ribbon.

By order of Lt. Colonel BOSCHULT:

Signed:
John J. Kenny
Major, 76th FA Bn
Ex and Adjutant


(Note: At the bottom of this page you will find a roster of the men authorized to purchase and wear the Good Conduct Ribbon)


26. Training for Battalion Tests and Service practice (Battalion less Battery A)
Belmont to Fort Ord, August 10
Fort Ord to Belmont, August 12
105 miles

27. 74th F.A. Battalion relieved from their mission at San Rafael, California for 1 week by Battery A, 76th F. A. Bn.
Belmont to San Rafael, August 8
San Rafael to Belmont, August 16
40 miles

28. Combined training and training for Battalion Tests (A, B, C, and Det. Hq. Battery)
Belmont to HLMR, August 19
180 miles

29. Combined training and training for Battalion Tests (Service and Det. Hq. Battery)
Belmont to HLMR, August 24
180 miles

30. March to area designed as AGF Test area
HLMR, August 30
10 miles

31. March to Camp Roberts (new permanent station)
HLMR to Camp Roberts, September 4
30 miles

32. Service practice, blackout driving and assisting 3rd Battalion, 1st Filipino Regiment in their Battalion Test (Battalion less Service Battery)
Camp Robert to HLMR, September 13
HLMR to Camp Roberts, September 15
50 miles

28 September 1943 the Battalion reorganized under T/O and E 6-25, dated 15 July 1943. Authority: Letter 321/106 (FA) (R) (14 Sept. 43) GNGCT Hq. AGF, dated 14 Sept. 1943.


HEADQUARTERS 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION
Camp Roberts, California
September 27, 1943
General Orders No. 6

Subject: Reorganization

I. Pursuant to authority contained in 1st Ind HQ II Armored Corps 320.2 - GNPXA (1) - XD (2) 21 Sept. 43 on Ltr. HQ AGF 321/106 (FA) (R) (14 Sept. 43) GNGCT Sub reorganization of Field Artillery Battalions 14 Sept. 43 76th FA Bn will reorganize under T/O and E 6-25 dated 14 July 43 effective 280001 Sept. 43.

By Order of Major KENNY:

Signed:
J. W. Grisard
Capt. 76th FA Bn.
Adjutant


33. Service practice, blackout driving (Battalion less Service Battery)
Camp Roberts to HLMR, Oct. 11
HLMR to Camp Roberts, Oct. 12
50 miles

34. Blackout march, Service practice and night occupation of position (Battalion less Service Battery)
Camp Roberts to HLMR, Oct. 21
HLMR to Camp Roberts, Oct. 22
60 miles

35. Blackout march and Battalion problem (Battalion less Service Battery)
Camp Roberts to HLMR, Oct. 25
HLMR to Camp Roberts, Oct. 26
60 miles

36. Field exercise 1st Filipino Regiment (Battalion less Service Battery)
Camp Roberts to HLMR, Nov. 1
HLMR to Camp Roberts, Nov. 2
60 miles

37. Service practice (Battalion less Service Battery)
Camp Roberts to HLMR, and return Nov. 12
50 miles

38. Move to Iron Mountain, California (permanent change of station) motor movement
Camp Roberts to Palmdale in route to Iron Mountain, Ca., Nov. 20
225 miles

39. Move to Iron Mountain, California (permanent change of station)
Palmdale to Iron Mountain, Nov. 20
230 miles


HEADQUARTERS 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION
California - Arizona Maneuver Area
November 24 1943

Subject: SCHEDULE OF CALLS

1. The following list of calls will govern this command effective Wednesday, 24 November 1943. This list of calls supersedes all previous lists of calls.

1st Call - 0630 - Sunday 0730
Reveille - 0640
Assembly - 0645
Breakfast - 0700 - Sunday 0800
Sick Call - 0720 - Sunday 0845
Drill Call - 0740
Assembly - 0745

Recall - 1200
Mail Call - 1201 - Sunday 1210
Dinner - 1210 - Sunday 1230
Drill Call - 1255
Assembly - 1300

Recall - 1645
Supper - 1730
Mail Call - 1740
Tattoo - 2130 (Tattoo is the longest U.S. Army call, consisting of twenty- eight) measures.
Call to Quarters - 2245
Taps - 2300

By Order of Lt. Colonel BOSCHULT:

Signed;
C. W. Welch
Major, 76th FA Bn
Executive


Note:the common lyrics for Taps are:

Fading light dims the sight,
And a star gems the sky, gleaming bright.
From afar drawing nigh -- Falls the night.

Day is done, gone the sun,
From the lake, from the hills, from the sky;
All is well, safely rest, God is nigh.

Then good night, peaceful night,
Till the light of the dawn shineth bright;
God is near, do not fear -- Friend, good night.


HEADQUARTERS 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION
California - Arizona Maneuver Area
November 24 1943

General Orders No. 7

Subject: Battalion Guard

1. The 76th Field Artillery Battalion will be responsible for the interior guard of the Battalion Area including the Motor Pool, Gun Park, CP, Post Exchange, and the Officer’s Quarters. The Battalion will also provide guards for prisoners when necessary.

(Note: the orders continues but posted here)

Note: conflicting dates show: Battalion attached to 18th Field Artillery Group at Iron Mountain, California and IV Corps Artillery 2 January 1944 (see 1944 activities below)

The cadre listed below was formed by this Battalion and was designed the 262nd F.A. Bn., Feb. 1943 at Camp Swift, Texas.

Officers;
Capt. Alexander Nisbet - Cadre position; Serv. Btry
Capt. Walter R. Lamb - Cadre position; Hq. and Hq. Btry
1st Lt. Grover H. Hahn - Cadre position; Battery C
1st Lt. Robert P. Johnson - Cadre position, Battery A
2nd Lt. Ivor O. Stromberg - Cadre position, Battery B

Battery Hq. and Hq. Battery - 27 enlisted men
Battery A - 16 enlisted men
Battery B - 16 enlisted men
Battery C - 16 enlisted men
Serv. Battery - 15 enlisted men.

Signed:
E. J. Boschult
Lt. Col., 76th FA Bn
Commanding


The 76th Field Artillery Battalion was transferred from assignment to the Fourth Army and was assigned to California-Arizona Maneuver Area on 21 November 1943


1943 Strength of the Battalion:

January 1943 strength of the Battalion: Officers: 43. Warrant Officers: 2. Enlisted men: 598.

February 1943 strength of the Battalion: Officers: 43. Warrant Officers: 2. Enlisted men: 532.

March 1943 strength of the Battalion: Officers: 38. Warrant Officers: 2. Enlisted men: 531.

April 1943 strength of the Battalion: Officers: 37. Warrant Officers: 2. Enlisted men: 543.

May 1943 strength of the Battalion: Officers: 38. Warrant Officers: 2. Enlisted men: 519.

June 1943 strength of the Battalion: Officers: 39. Warrant Officers: 1. Enlisted men: 504.

July 1943 strength of the Battalion: Officers: 39. Warrant Officers: 2. Enlisted men: 523.

August 1943 strength of the Battalion: Officers: 39. Warrant Officers: 2. Enlisted men: 508.

September 1943 strength of the Battalion: Officers: 38. Warrant Officers: 2. Enlisted men: 468.

October 1943 strength of the Battalion: Officers: 41. Warrant Officers: 2. Enlisted men: 458.

November 1943 strength of the Battalion: Officers: 44. Warrant Officers: 2. Enlisted men: 451.

December 1943 strength of the Battalion: Officers: 42. Warrant Officers: 2. Enlisted men: 449.


1944: ACTIVITIES OF THE 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION

Battery Commanders:
Captain Virgil E. Gausman (Killed in action 16 December 1944)
Captain Eldon B. Anderson

Battalion attached to 18th Field Artillery Group at Iron Mountain, California and IV Corps Artillery 2 January 1944.

9 January 1944 Battalion was attached to 11th Armored Division for California-Arizona Maneuver Area maneuvers.

28 January 1944 Battalion was attached to X Corps Artillery after completing maneuvers.

24 February 1944 APO 187, c/o Postmaster, Los Angeles, California

2 March 1944 Battalion was relieved from assignment to Headquarters California-Arizona Maneuver Area and assigned to Fourth Army and XXI Corps.

16 May 1944 General Orders No. 8, Guard duties put the Battalion at Camp Polk, Louisiana. By orders of Lt. Colonel Boschult

13 June 1944 Battalion was relieved from assignment to New York Port of Embarkation and assigned to Third Army and XX Corps and further attached to XX Corps Artillery and to Fifth Field Artillery Group.

14 July 1944 The Grange, Albrighton, Shropshire, England. Albrighton to Sennybridge Artillery Range, Wales, a distance of 90 miles the march was made for the purpose of calibrating the Battalion Howitzers.

18 July 1944 Battalion was relieved from attachment to Fifth Field Artillery Group and attached to 182d Field Artillery Group.

19 July 1944 Battalion was attached to 33d Field Artillery Brigade.

August 1944 strength of the Battalion on 1 August 1944 was 29 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers, and 452 enlisted men. On 31 August the strength was 31 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers, and 457 enlisted men.

August 1944 Unit Transfers: The 76th FA Bn. arrived in France 12 August 1944, as a part of the Third United States Army but was immediately assigned to the First United States Army, effective 8 August 1944. First Army attached the Battalion to V Corps on 14 August 1944. V Corps attached the Battalion to V Corps Artillery and to the 2nd Division on 15 August 1944. The Battalion was detached from 187 FA Gp. 19 August and attached to 80th Division. The Battalion was released from attachment to the 80 Division and again attached to 187 FA Gp. 20 August 1944

4 August 1944 Sennybridge Artillery Range, Wales

8 August 1944 Marshalling Area RCRP C-3 near Southampton, England. Move from Sennybridge Artillery Range, Wales to Marshalling Area, Southampton a distance 104 miles.

8 August 1944 Battalion was assigned to First United States Army.

9 August 1944 on board ship, USS William Pepperell and LST's. The Battalion departed for the Southern Railway Docks at Southampton for shipment to France. Headquarters and Headquarters Battery and Medical Detachment embarked on the USS William Pepperell. The remainder of the Battalion embarked on LST's 10 August. The USS William Pepperell dropped anchor off Utah Beach, France, 10 August and required two days to unload cargo and personnel. Barges were used for unloading. The remainder of the Battalion disembarked from LST's on to Utah Beach on 11 August. The weather was clear and warm and the channel calm.

11 August 1944 Utah Beach, France went to Transit Area "B" near St. Germain this march was made by the A, B, and Service Batteries and Headquarters and C Battery on 12 August. The distance was 30 miles; roads were fair, traffic heavy and the weather clear.

12 August 1944 Transit Area "B", near St. Germain, France.

13 August 1944 Third Army Assembly Area No. 4 near Briquebec, France.

14 August 1944 Battalion was attached to V Corps

15 August 1944 Battle Position south of Vire, France, Third Army Assembly Area No. 4 to Battle Position 4 miles Southeast of Vire, a distance of 80 miles. The roads were good, the traffic heavy and the weather clear. The Battalion was in general support of the Second Infantry Division but was not call to fire.

15 August 1944 Battalion was attached to V Corps Artillery and to 2d Infantry Division.

17 August 1944 Battalion was attached to the 187th Field Artillery Group.

18 August 1944 V Corps Assembly Area, Medavi, France, a distance of 120 miles, roads were hard surfaced, the traffic heavy and weather clear.

19 August 1944 Battalion was attached to the 80th Infantry Division.

19 August 1944 Battle position Southeast of Argentan. From Assembly Area at Medavi to Battle Position 4 and one half miles southeast of Argentan a distance of 6 miles, roads were narrow but adequate; the weather clear. In general support of the 80th Infantry Div. and reinforcing the fires of the 313th Field Artillery Bn. Battery C fired the Battalion's first mission of the war a Base Point Registration, at 1232B, 19 August 1944. The first concentration was an enemy artillery battery in position in the wood north of Argentan. The fire was adjusted by 1st. Lt Thomson from an air OP plane piloted by 1st. Lt Wallace. The concentration was fired by "C" Battery and the enemy battery was neutralized. Shortly thereafter enemy trucks were observed leaving the position. The first Battalion concentration was fired on these trucks at 1315B, 19 August 1944. During this battle, 942 rounds of HE ammunition were fired from 191200 August to 201200 August 1944. No enemy artillery fire was reported in the Battalion area. Battery A reported an enemy sniper firing into their area at dusk, 19 August. The sent out a patrol but could not locate the sniper. Organic air observation was used on battalion concentrations. All other concentrations were fired on Division orders and consisted primarily of unobserved harassing fire.

22 August 1944 Assembly Area at Medavi, France, Battle Positions southeast of Argentan to Medavi, a distance of 6 miles.

25 August 1944 Bivouac Area East of Sees, Medavi to Bivouac Area East of Sees, a distance of 13 miles. The roads were narrow and dusty; the weather clear.

26 August 1944 Bivouac Area East of Sees to Bivouac Area South of Limours; a distance of 101 miles, roads were hard surfaces and good, the weather was clear.

28 August 1944 Bivouac Area near St. Remy Les Chevreuse

30 August 1944 Limours to St. Remy Les Chevreuse, a distance of 10 miles, St. Remy Les Chevreuse to Fontenay En Parisis through Paris, a distance of 35 miles. Roads were hard surface but narrow, traffic was heavy, weather was cloudy with light rain. At Fontenay En Parisis and Chantilly the Battalion was in general support of the 28th Infantry Division but did not fire.

31 August 1944 Fontenay En Parisis to Battle Positions near Chantilly, a distance of 15 miles, the roads were fair and the weather clear and cool. Commanding Officer in August has been Lt. Col. Edgar J. Boschult. There were no Battle Casualties suffered during this period.

September 1944: The 76th Field Artillery Battalion was in battle position North of Chantilly on 1 September in Direct Support of the 28th Infantry Division but was not called upon to fire. Eighteen German soldiers were taken prisoner on 2 Sept. by 1st Lt Francis L. Bond, Assistant S-2 and three enlisted men, three miles northwest of Compiegne, France. At the time of the capture, Lt. Bond and his party were declinating fire control instruments, and were armed with a .50 cal. machine gun on their Jeep, in addition to their side arms. The Battalion was on a artillery combat status, but did not go into position between 1 Sept. and 7 Sept. On 7 September the Battalion was attached to the 32nd Artillery Brigade for the purpose of being formed into a Provisional Truck Battalion. During the remainder of the month, trucks and men were furnished for a Heavy Provisional Truck Battalion (thirty-four 2 and one half ton; 6x6 Trucks), and a Light Provisional Truck Company (Thirteen three-quarter ton 4x4 trucks). One hundred and thirty-four (134) enlisted men and nine ((9) officers were furnished for this trucking duty. Major Herbert R. McClintock, Jr., S-3, 76th FA Bn, was designated Commanding Officer of the First Provisional Truck Battalion (2 and one half ton; 6x6 Trucks), and functioned in that capacity for the balance of the month. Two liaison planes from the 76th FA Bn with pilots and ground crews were attached to the Surgeon, First United States Army, from 12 September through the remainder of the month for medical administration purposes. One Officer Courier with driver and a quarter ton vehicle was attached to First United States Army from 17 Sept. through 30 Sept. One Radio Operator was attached to First United States Army (Engineers) from 20 Sept. through 30 Sept. Commanding Officer: Lt. Col. Edgar J. Boschult. There were no battle casualties suffered during the period.

Unit Transfers: The 76th FA Bn was assigned to the First United States Army, attached to V Corps, and to the 187th Field Artillery Group at the beginning of this period. It was attached to the 32nd Field Artillery Brigade from 7 Sept. to 29 Sept. and to the 422nd Field Artillery Group from 17 Sept. through the remainder of the period of this report. The Battalion strength was 31 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers and 457 enlisted men.

31 August to 1 September Battle Position in woods north of Chantilly, France

1-2 September 1944 Bivouac Area southeast of Senlis, France, moved from the Bivouac Area at Chantilly to Bivouac Area at Senlis a distance of 8 miles. Weather clear and warm, roads hard surface but narrow.

4 September 1944 APO No. 403, c/o Postmaster, New York, New York

2-6 September 1944 Bivouac Area northwest of Longuel-Annel, France moved from Senlis to Longuel-Annel distance of 40 miles, roads good. Oise River Bridge out at Compiegne, France. The Battalion crossed on pontoon bridge, weather fair.

6 September 1944 Longuel-Annel to Signy L'Abbays distance 100 miles, roads narrow, hard surface. Weather cold and raining.

Troop Assignment No. 112, to units concerned, the following units, asgd. First Army, are relieved from attachment and are attached to the 32nd FA Brigade, Hq/Hq Battery effective 6 September 1944. Units: 76th FA Bn relieved from attachment to V Corps. By command of Lt. General HODGES: Signed: A. J. Bochicchio, Major, A.G.D., Asst. Adjutant General.

6-7 September 1944 V Corps Assembly Area southwest of Signy L' Abbaye, France.

7 September 1944 moved from Signy L'Abbays to Bucilly and Hirson a distance of 35 miles. Roads, good, hard surfaces. Weather cool, windy and clear.

17 September 1944 effective 171000 A September 1944, the following units are attached to the 422nd FA Group: 76th FA Bn. By order of Colonel Dasher, signed: Ernest E. Jones, 1st Lt., FA, Adjutant.

19 September 1944 moved from Bucilly and Hirson to Macon, Belgium a distance of 13 miles. Weather cold and raining.

7-19 September 1944 Battalion was attached to 32d Field Artillery Brigade and further attached to 422d Field Artillery Group 17 September 1944. Bivouac Area, Bucilly, France Hq. and C Batteries.

7-19 September 1944 Bivouac Area, Hirson, France, A, B, and Service Batteries.

19-30 September 1944 Bivouac Area near Macon, Belgium

27 September 1944 Troop Assignment No. 121: The following unit assigned to the First Army (76th FA Bn. 105 howitzers) is relieved from attachment to the 32nd FA Brigade reverting to direct control of the Army Artillery Officer effect 291200A Sept. 44 By Command of Lt. General Hodges

30 September 1944 moved from Macon to Clermont Bivouac Area, Belgium a distance of 116 miles. Roads hard surface, weather cold and raining

October 1944 At the beginning of this period the 76th Field Artillery Battalion was in bivouac area at Clermont, Belgium. One hundred and thirty-four men (134) and nine Officers (9) were on detachment service to a heavy provisional truck battalion and a light truck company these vehicles were furnished by the 76th Field Artillery Battalion. These trucks and men were engaged in hauling ammunition and supplies. Two liaison planes from the 76th FA Bn with pilots and ground crews were attached to the Surgeon, First United States Army, from 12 September through the remainder of the month for medical administration purposes. One Officer Courier with driver and a quarter ton vehicle was attached to First United States Army and one Radio Operator was attached to First United States Army Engineers.

Unit Transfers: 76th Field Artillery Battalion was assigned to the First United States Army and attached to 422d Field Artillery Group at the beginning of the period. On 10 October 1944 Battalion was attached to V Corps and also attached to the 102d Cavalry Group. On 28 October 1944 unit was relieved from attachment to the 102d Cavalry Group and attached to the 28th Infantry Division with a mission of general support of the 28th Infantry Division, and to reinforce the fire of the 107th Field Artillery Battalion. Strength of the unit on 1 October 1944 was 32 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers and 456 enlisted men. On 31 October 1944 the strength was 31 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers and 450 enlisted men.

7-9 October 1944 all men and vehicles on detached service were returned to the 76th Field Artillery Battalion and preparations were made to go into combat.

1-10 October 1944 Bivouac Area, Clermont, Belgium.

10 October 1944 Battalion was attached to V Corps and to the 102d Cavalry Group. Battle Position 1 mile north of Kalterherburg, Germany. Moved from Clermont, Belgium to a battle position north Kalterherburg distance: 52 miles, weather: cold and raining, roads: Hard surface. Battalion was in position and ready to fire but was ordered to displace to alternate position southwest of Kalterherburg by Commanding Officer, 102d Cavalry Group. Distance of move: 3 miles. Weather: cold and raining. Roads: Hard surfaces.

15 October 1944 The 1st Platoon, Battery D, 460th AAA was attached to the 76th Field Artillery Battalion for air protection. 10-23 October 1944 Battle Position 500 yards southwest of Kalterherburg, Germany (Battery B and Service Battery in positions in Germany, Hq., A, and C Batteries in position just across the border in Belgium. Positions southwest of Kalterherburg were occupied on the night of 10 Oct. and continuing through 23 Oct. During this period nine hundred thirty-eight (938) missions were fired, five thousand seventy-nine (5079) rounds of 105mm ammunition were expended. The 76th Field Artillery Battalion's mission was general support of the 102d Cavalry Group with priority fires to 1st Battalion, 110th Infantry Regiment, and was also to hold our position against counterattacks at all costs. 22 October 1944 Company B, 801st Tank Destroyer Battalion was attached to the 76th Field Artillery Battalion, and orders were issued for the 76th, with attached units to move to Elsenborn, Belgium. 23 October 1944 One (1) liaison plane crashed on airstrip near Nidrum, Belgium (Coordinates K907055) 23 Oct. Cause: Motor cut out a fifty feet of altitude, no casualties. Battle positions in Elsenborn were occupied by the 76th Field Artillery Battalion and attached units. 24 October 1944 Company A, 893d Tank Destroyer Battalion was attached to the 76th Field Artillery Battalion. Two hundred and ninety-two (292) missions requiring one thousand five hundred and fifty-two (1552) rounds of 105mm ammunition were fired at Elsenborn by the 76th Field Artillery Battalion and thirty-one (31) missions and two hundred and forty-three (243) rounds of 3 inch ammunition, were fired by attached through 76th Field Artillery Battalion Fire Direction Center.

26 October 1944 The 1st Platoon, Battery D, 460th AAA was relieved from attachment to the 76th Field Artillery Battalion and the 1st Platoon, Battery B, 461st AAA was attached to the 76th Field Artillery Battalion.

23-29 October 1944 Battle Positions one and one-half miles east of Zweifall, Germany (9 miles east of Aachen, Germany) 28 October 1944 893d Tank Destroyer Battalion and Company B, 801st Tank Destroyer Battalion were relieved from attachment to the 76th Field Artillery Battalion and orders were received to transferring the 76th Field Artillery Battalion to the 28th Infantry Division, with a mission of general support of the 28th Infantry Division, and to reinforce the fire of the 107th Field Artillery Battalion with a secondary mission of protecting road blocks on the Division and Corps left flank.

29 October 1944 moved from position one and one-half miles east of Elsenborn, Belgium to position east of Zweifall, Germany (9 miles east of Aachen, Germany). Distance: 40 miles. Weather: Cold and clear. Main roads narrow but hard surfaced. Secondary roads: Narrow, muddy and rutted. The Battalion remained in this position for the balance of the month of October and fired fifty-eight (58) missions observed and unobserved, expending three hundred and five (305) rounds of 105mm ammunition. The 1st Platoon, Battery B, 461st AAA went into position with the 76th Field Artillery Battalion. Lt. Col. Edgar J. Boschult was in Command during this period. On 1 Oct. 1944 Battalion S-2 was slightly wounded in the leg by a booby trap grenade while going to OP No. 1 (K004361). Major Charles E. Welsh was Ex. And Adj.


October: Following Short Summary of Effect of Fire Missions for October 1944:

1. The following summary of observed fire missions is not a complete record of fires, but examples are typical of firing done by the 76th Field Artillery Battalion in October.

2. In addition to observed fires, (air and ground observation) unobserved, harassing, and defensive missions were fired on call and intermittently, through the period from 11 October 1944 to 31 October 1944. (No missions fired from 282030 October 1944 to 291700 October 1944 Battalion moving to new positions):

October 13, 1944 - Mission No. 1 - Target: Infantry in open near suspected MG position. Time fire. Estimated Damage: Two German killed (initial rounds landed directly on them) and possible other damage.

October 13, 1944 - Mission No. 1 - Target: Infantry bivouacked in woods adjusted by air observer, estimated as one platoon. Estimated Damage: Five killed and possible other damage

October 13, 1944 - Mission No. 1 - Target: Four vehicles on road, adjusted by air observer. Precision adjustment followed concentration to destroy vehicles. Estimated Damage: Two vehicles and crews positively destroyed.

October 13, 1944 - Mission No. 1 - Target: Unknown enemy position, bivouac and dugouts. Estimated Damage: Excellent effect killed at least 10 men. Enemy dugout containing about 15 men, two known men left wounded, seen being evacuated and roof of dugout blown off.

October 13, 1944 - Mission No. 1 - Target: Surprise fire on infantry in tree line. Mortar suspected in area. Time fire. Estimated Damage: Excellent effect. Five Germans standing in center of concentration other personnel in area at least 5 casualties

October 13, 1944 - Mission No. 1 - Target: House suspected as C.P. enemy activity constantly noted. Adjusted by air.

October 14, 1944 - Mission No. 1 - Target: Trucks in position. Estimated Damage: Three to five visible Germans did not leave area after five trucks dispersed. Many shell holes from night interdiction observed.

October 14, 1944 - Mission No. 2 - Target: Automatic weapons and T. D. Estimated Damage: Three ambulances entered area after fire. Left immediately after. It is believed that this position has now been abandoned. One vehicle seen burning, casualties unknown but probably heavy

October 14, 1944 - Mission No. 2 - Target: House occupied by Germans. Estimated Damage: Building burned by WP when personnel began to move out, HE by Bn was fired. Three men on litters seen carried from building.

October 14, 1944 - Mission No. 2 - Target: WP on Imgenbroich. Estimated Damage: Two large fires started, six buildings in town were observed burning.

October 15, 1944 - Mission No. 1 - Target: Infantry digging in AT Weapons. Estimated Damage: Excellent massing on pre-adjusted concentration. One direct hit on weapons. Time fire (Statement of Infantry)

October 15, 1944 - Mission No. 1 - Target: Personnel chow line. Estimated Damage: Harassing effect, personnel scatted.

October 16, 1944 - Mission No. 1 - Target: Suspected CP. Estimated Damage: Good effect in area, enemy running away.

October 16, 1944 - Mission No. 1 - Target: Preparation for Propaganda. Estimated Damage: All concentrations, observed by both ground and air observers.

October 20, 1944 - Mission No. 2 - Target: Preparation of HE and smoke requested by 102d Cavalry. Estimated Damage: Reports indicates concentration were correct and intense time fire on HE.

October 20, 1944 - Mission No. 2 - Target: Half track with AA MG mounted and AA or AT gun in emplacement with crews. Estimated Damage: Half tracks and AA guns destroyed by precision fire after surprise fire stalled vehicle.

October 20, 1944 - Mission No. 2 - Target: Infantry in open vicinity of house. Estimated Damage: Surprise fire, time, excellent effect. Some men ran into the house. House destroyed by precision fire.

October 20, 1944 - Mission No. 2 - Target: Counter battery. Estimated Damage: Shelling on OP No. 3 effectively stopped.

November 1944 Unit Transfers: The 76th Field Artillery Battalion was assigned to the First United States Army, attached to V Corps Artillery and to the 28th Infantry Division from 1 Nov. to 19 Nov. 1944. On 19 November 1944 the 76th Field Artillery Battalion was attached to the 8th Infantry Division and remained attached to this unit for the balance of the month. The Battalion was located in Battle Position one and one half miles east of Zweifall, Germany from 1 Nov. 1944 to 29 Nov. 1944 (9 miles east of Aachen, Germany). Battle Position 1 mile west of Germeter, Germany and two and one-half miles southwest of Hurtgen, Germany were occupied 29 and 30 November 1944. Strength: The Battalion strength on 1 November 1944 was 31 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers and 448 enlisted men, a decrease of 1 Officer and 2 enlisted men. Marches: 29 Nov. 1944 the Battalion , less detachments, moved from positions one and one-half miles east of Zweifall, Germany to positions one mile west of Germeter, Germany. Distance: 3 miles. Roads: Muddy and narrow, hard surfaced and Corduroy.

1-7 November 1944 General support of the 28th Infantry Division and reinforcing fires of 107th FA Bn.

7 November 1944 General support of the 28th Infantry Division and reinforcing fires of 229th FA Bn.

8 November 1944 General support of the 28th Infantry Division and reinforcing fires of 107th FA Bn.

8 November 1944 Lt. Col. Edgar Boschult killed in action.

10 November 1944 General support of the 28th Infantry Division and reinforcing fires of 42nd FA Bn and further to answer calls from the 109th FA Bn.

14 November 1944 General support of the 28th Infantry Division and reinforcing fires of 107th FA Bn and further to answer calls from the 42nd FA Bn for fires.

19 November 1944 Battalion was attached to the 8th Infantry Division.

20 November 1944 General support of the 8th Infantry Division and reinforcing fires of 56th FA Bn.

23 November 1944 Reinforce fires of 95th Armd. FA Bn in attack by CCR 25 November 1944. After attack revert to general support of the 8th Infantry Division and reinforcing fires of 56th FA Bn.

26 November 1944 Direct support of First Battalion, 13th Infantry Regiment.

27 November 1944) one liaison officer and two forward observers from the 43rd FA Bn attached to the First Battalion, 13th Infantry Regiment, to act through the 76th Field Artillery Battalion Fire Direction Center.

28 November 1944 two batteries reinforced fires of the 95th Armored FA Bn. One battery remain in direct of First Battalion, 13th Infantry Regiment.

29 November 1944 the 76th Field Artillery Battalion displaced to position one mile west of Germeter, Germany. Two batteries in position delivering fires at all times.

30 November 1944 reinforce fires of 45th FA Bn and be prepared to take over direct support of 28th Infantry Regiment when 45th FA Bn displaces. After CCR is committed 76th FA Bn reinforces fires of the 95th Armored FA Bn.

Liaison was maintained with the 107th Field Artillery Battalion, 229th Field Artillery Battalion, 109th Field Artillery Battalion, 42nd Field Artillery Battalion, 56th Field Artillery Battalion, 95th Armored Field Artillery Battalion, 121st Infantry Regiment, First Battalion, 13th Infantry Regiment, and the 45th Field Artillery Battalion, as required by the mission to be accomplished.

Forward observers were attached to the 121st Infantry Regiment and to the First Battalion, 13th Infantry Regiment as required by the situation. Missions were fired on call from all supported units, and preparation and harassing fires were fired throughout the period. Total rounds fired: 50,245, 105mm Howitzers. In addition to fires listed above, 3 OP's with Forward Observers were established for adjustment of observed fires (OP No. 3 abandoned 22 November 1944). Air observation was used whenever possible although this type of observation was often limited by bad weather. Regular patrol missions were flown for Division Artillery. During the entire period of this report operations were hampered by bad roads and unfavorable terrain. Ammunition hauling was difficult due to the mud and rain. Howitzers were difficult to hold in position and trail logs had to be placed and reinforced to prevent trails from jumping excessively. Battery positions were hard to locate due to the hilly terrain and to the lack of fields of fire in the dense woods. However, first wars always delivered when called for. Commanding Officers from 1 November 1944 to 8 November 1944 was Lt. Col. Edgar J. Boschult. From 8 November 1944 to 30 November 1944 Commanding Officer was Major Charles E. Welsh.


Casualties for November 1944: Lt. Col. Edgar J. Boschult, Commanding Officer of the 76th Field Artillery Battalion was killed by a mine 9 November 1944.

Two Officers and six enlisted men were slightly wounded by enemy action during November.

Two enlisted men were severely injured, one by enemy action and one by Howitzer recoil.

LT. COLONEL EDGAR BOSCHULT KILLED IN ACTION
Lt. Col. Edgar Boschult, 45, of Lincoln, Nebraska was killed in action on the Western Front in Germany on November 8, 1944. At the time of his death, he was commanding officer of the 76th Field Artillery Battalion and was with General Courtney Hodge's First Army.


Lieutenant Colonel Edgar Jacob Boschult

On the morning of 8 November 1944 while aggressively pushing reconnaissance forward into Germany in the face of the enemy, Lieutenant Colonel Edgar Jacob Boschult, 0-206 164, hit a series of German Tellermines in his jeep. In the resulting explosion, the Colonel was killed instantly without pain or suffering.

Source: "In Memoriam of Lieutenant Colonel Edgar Jacob Boschult" a 52 page memorial booklet produced in the U.S. for his family's funeral.

Note: Lt. Col. Edgar Boschult is buried at the Henri-Chappelle American Cemetery and Memorial in Belgium.

American War Cemetery Henri-Chapelle
Plot C, Row 3, Grave 42
Click on the below link:
American War Cemetery Henri-Chapelle


December 1944 Unit Transfers: From the beginning of this period the 76th Field Artillery Battalion was assigned to the First United States Army, attached to V Corps and further attached to the 8th Division Artillery. On 19 December 1944 the Battalion was attached to the VII Corps and relieved from the V Corps, other attachments remaining the same. On 21 December 1944 the Battalion was relieved from attachment to the VII and 8th Division, and attached to V Corps. On December 23 1944 the Battalion was attached to the 406th Field Artillery Group with orders to answer calls for fire from 30th Infantry Division Artillery. Strength: the Battalion strength on 1 December 1944 was 31 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers, and 450 enlisted men. At the beginning of this period the 76th Field Artillery Battalion was in position one mile west of Germeter, Germany in the Hurtgen Forrest with a mission of reinforcing fires of the 45th FA Bn and in addition supporting Combat Command Reserve, 5th Armored Division. On 31 December 1944 the strength was 31 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers, and 453 enlisted men.

1-24 December 1944 Battle Position one mile west of Germeter, Germany in the Hurtgen Forrest.

4 December 1944 mission reinforcing fires of the 45th Field Artillery Battalion.

7 December 1944 mission reinforcing fires of the 95th Armored Field Artillery Battalion and to execute fires for Second Ranger Battalion.

8 December 1944 In order to release manpower for V Corps Military Government Police Force, the three (3) four (4) Howitzer Batteries of this Battalion, were consolidated into two (2) six (6) Howitzer Batteries by order of Commanding General, V Corps Artillery.

9 December 1944 thirty-four enlisted men were placed on Detachment Service to V Corps Military Government Police Forces.

10 December 1944 mission of the 76th Field Artillery Battalion Direct support of the 311th Infantry Regiment three Forward Observers and three Liaison Officers to the 311th Infantry Regiment.

12 December 1944 311th Infantry Regiment Cannon Company (105 Infantry Cannon) to function through 76th Field Artillery Battalion Fire Direction Center.

17 December 1944 one Liaison Officer and two Forward Observers, 43rd Field Artillery Battalion, attached to the 76th Field Artillery Battalion, sent to 1st Battalion, 13th Infantry Regiment.

19 December 1944 Battalion was attached to VII Corps but remained attached to 8th Infantry Division.

21 December 1944 Battalion was attached to V Corps and was further attached to 406th Field Artillery Group on 23 December 1944 with orders to answer calls for fire from the 30th Infantry Division.

22 December 1944 Liaison Officer and two Forward Observers returned to their respective units.

24 December 1944 Moved from position west of Germeter, Germany to position north of Mont, Belgium relieved the 18th Field Artillery Battalion. Distance: 36.5 miles. Weather: Cold and very clear. Roads: frozen and narrow.

Mission of the 76th Field Artillery Battalion General support of the 30th Infantry Division Artillery and reinforcing fires of the 230th Field Artillery Battalion. The 76th Field Artillery Battalion will also be prepared to answer calls from the 1st Infantry Division. This mission was not changed for the balance of the period.

24-31 December 1944 Battle Position one-half mile north of Mont, Belgium.

The 2nd Platoon, Battery C, 460th AAA, was attached to the 76th Field Artillery Battalion throughout December. This unit plus added firepower of organic weapons provided adequate AAA protection both in battle position and on marches. Liaison planes were used as often as the weather permitted. This type of observation has proven to be very effective in supplementing normal ground observation under the conditions encountered in this area. Thirty-five thousand six hundred seventy-nine (35,679) rounds of 105 Howitzer ammunition were expended in December 1944. Total ammunition expenditure since arriving on the continent 11 August 1944 has been ninety-three thousand six hundred thirty-two (93,632) rounds of 105mm Howitzer ammunition. Commanding Officer in all engagements during this period has been Lt. Col. Charles E. Welsh.


Casualties for December 1944:
16 December 1944 Battery Commander, Battery C, Captain Virgil E. Gausman and Chief of Detail Staff Sergeant Donald L. Nissen while acting as Liaison Officer and Liaison Sergeant with the 3rd Battalion, 311th Infantry Regiment were killed by enemy shell fire.


1945: ACTIVITIES OF THE 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION

January 1945 Unit Transfers: The 76th Field Artillery Battalion was assigned to the First United States Army, attached to V Corps Artillery and to the 406th Field Artillery Group from 1 January 1945 to 19 January 1945, 19 January 1945 to 31 January 1945 Battalion was attached to the 190th Field Artillery Group. Strength: The Battalion strength on 1 Jan. 1945 was thirty Officers, two Warrant Officers, and 453 enlisted men. On 31 Jan. 1945 strength was twenty-nine Officers, two Warrant Officers, and 452 enlisted men.

Battalion APO 230, c/o Postmaster, New York, New York.

1-16 January 1945 mission general support of the 30th Division Artillery and reinforcing fires of the 230th Field Artillery Battalion.

1-2 January 1945 the 76th Field Artillery Battalion was located at Mont, Belgium.

2 January 1945 Moved from Mont, Belgium to Chodes, Belgium Distance: 7.3 miles. Roads: were covered with snow and frozen and very slick and narrow.

16-19 January 1945 mission direct support of 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment.

16 January 1945 moved from Chodes, Belgium to Geromont, Belgium. Distance: 3.5 miles. Roads: narrow and covered with snow.

19-20 January 1945 mission general support of the 30th Division Artillery and reinforcing fires of the 230th Field Artillery Battalion.

19 January 1945 Battalion was attached to 190th Field Artillery Group and further attached to First Infantry Division Artillery.

20-27 January 1945 mission general support of 1st Division and reinforcing fires of the 37th Field Artillery Battalion.

20 January 1945 moved from Geromont, Belgium to Faymonville, Belgium. Distance: 6.8 miles. Roads: covered with snow and very narrow.

27-31 January 1945 mission general support of 2d Infantry Division and reinforcing the 15th Field Artillery Battalion.

27 January 1945 moved from Faymonville, Belgium to Elsenborn, Belgium. Distance: 7 miles. Roads: fair but covered with snow.

The 76th Field Artillery Battalion was converted from 105mm Howitzers to British QF 25 PDR Guns on 11 January 1945. These British Guns were delivered to this unit in Battle Positions and were immediately put to use. All 105mm Howitzers were turned in 15 January 1945. The elapsed time between receipt of the English QF 25 PDR guns and turning in of the 105mm Howitzers was four days. During this time intensive training was conducted in fire direction procedure and service of the piece. This training was necessary due to the change in fire control equipment, also because of the change from Mill scale to degrees. Ten English Soldiers (enlisted men) from the 46th RHU were attached to the Battalion for three weeks for the purpose of aiding in the conversion to the 25 PDR's. These soldiers performed their duties in an excellent manner. Through their thorough their thorough technical and practical knowledge of the 25 PDR guns they were of invaluable aid to this unit.

Throughout this period (January) fire was delivered as called for and no major problems were encountered because of the new weapons. Air observation was used whenever possible, however, weather conditions were generally unfavorable for this type of observation. Considerable trouble was experienced with power transmission mechanicisms in the 6x6 GMC trucks. This trouble was caused by the added strain on vehicles due to the heavy snow on roads and in positions. Number of rounds fire in this period: 102,545 105mm; 12,675 25 PDR. The 76th Field Artillery Battalion completed 113 consecutive days firing 31 January 1945. Lt. Col. Charles E. Welsh Commanding during this period.


Losses in Action:
Sergeant Delmar E. Hearn and Tec. 5 Thomas F. Osborne were killed by premature burst from the British 25 PDR Gun 22 January 1945.

Members Who Have Distinguishing Themselves in Action:
Lt. Col. Charles E. Welsh was awarded the Bronze Star on 24 December 1944 for meritorious service in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in Germany from 20 November 1944 to 22 December 1944.

Captain Virgil E. Gausman was awarded posthumously the Bronze Star 26 January 1945 for meritorious service in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in France, Belgium and Germany during the period 12 August to 16 December 1944.

Staff Sergeant Donald L. Nissen was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star 26 January 1945 for meritorious service in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in France, Belgium and Germany during the period 12 August to 16 December 1944.

Major Herbert R. McClintock, was awarded the Bronze Star 26 January 1945 for meritorious service in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in France, Belgium and Germany during the period 12 August to 19 December 1944.

Staff Sergeant Ernest H. Pearson, was awarded the Bronze Star 26 January 1945 for meritorious service in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in France, Belgium and Germany during the period 12 August to 19 December 1944.

Staff Sergeant Raymond C. Rodriguez, was awarded the Bronze Star 26 January 1945 for meritorious service in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in France, Belgium and Germany during the period 12 August to 19 December 1944.

Sergeant Juell Solaegiu, was awarded the Bronze Star 26 January 1945 for meritorious service in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in France, Belgium and Germany during the period 12 August to 19 December 1944.

Corporal Mahlon E. Lantz was awarded the Bronze Star 26 January 1945 for meritorious service in connection with military operations against an armed enemy in France, Belgium and Germany during the period 12 August to 19 December 1944.

Sergeant Charles A. Myers was awarded the Bronze Star 26 January 1945 for meritorious service during the period 1 November 1944 to 19 December 1944.

Signed:
C.E. Welsh
Lt. Col., 76th FA Bn.
Commanding


February 1945 The 76th Field Artillery Battalion was in Battle Position near Elsenborn, Belgium 1 February 1945 with a mission of general support of the 2nd Infantry Division and reinforcing fires of the 15th Field Artillery Battalion. Unit Transfers: At the beginning of February this unit was attached to the 2nd Infantry Division. 8 February 1945 the Battalion was attached to the 9th Infantry Division and the same day was reattached to the 2nd Infantry Division. 12 February 1945 the Battalion was again attached to the 9th Infantry Division and remained on this status until 17 February 1945 at which time the Battalion was reverted to attachment to the 2nd Infantry Division. Strength: February 1945 of the Battalion thirty-one Officers, two Warrant Officers and 453 enlisted men. 28 February 1945 strength of the Battalion was thirty-two Officers, two Warrant Officers and 433 enlisted men.

1 February 1945 Battalion was attached to the 2d Infantry Division. Battle Position: Elsenborn, Belgium.

2 February 1945 in Battle Position at Rocherath, Belgium. Battalion moved from Elsenborn, Belgium to Rocherath, Belgium. Roads: Hard surface but partly covered with snow. Distance: 9.1 miles. Weather: Clear and cold.

4 February 1945 in Battle Position near Scheneseiffen, Germany. Battalion moved from Rocherath, Belgium to Scheneseiffen, Germany. Roads: Narrow and frozen. Distance: 6 miles. Weather: Cold and clear.

8 February 1945 Battle Position near Dreiborn, Germany Battalion was attached to the Ninth Infantry Division and the same day was re-attached to the 2nd Infantry Division. Battalion moved from Scheneseiffen, Germany to Dreiborn, Germany. Mission was general support of the 9th Infantry Division and late on 8 February 1945 mission was harassing fires for the V Corps Artillery with a secondary mission of general support of 2nd Infantry Division and direct support of the 2nd Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment. Roads: Narrow and hard surfaced. Distance: 12.2 miles. Weather: Cold and clear.

12 February 1945 Battalion was attached to the Ninth Infantry Division. Mission was general support of the 9th Infantry Division and reinforcing fires of the 84th Field Artillery Battalion.

17 February 1945 Battalion was attached to 2nd Infantry Division. Mission was general support of the 2nd Infantry Division and reinforcing fires of the 15th and 37th Field Artillery Battalions, this mission was unchanged for the remainder of February.

Nineteen thousand eight hundred forty-eight (19,848) rounds of 25 PDR ammunition was expended during February on the above missions. Liaison Officers and observers were furnished when needed to accomplish our mission. Air OP’s were under 2 nd Infantry Division control and their use was limited by the poor flying weather encountered during this month. Enemy forces were generally retreating and fighting a delaying action until 8 February 1945 when position were occupied near Dreiborn, Germany where the Front remained static for the remainder of February. Enemy artillery fire fell in the Battalion area sporadically during the entire period at Dreiborn, but did little damage. Commanding Officer in this period of February 1945 was Lt. Col. Charles E. Welsh.

Losses in Action:
Corporal Emmet E. Gesy and Pvt. First Class George J. Barry who were killed in action when a wall collapsed on them in Champagne, Belgium 9 February 1945.

Members Who Have Distinguishing Themselves in Action:
Technical Sergeant John J. Mckay was awarded the Bronze Star Ribbon by V Corps 10 February 1945.

Signed:
C.E. Welsh
Lt. Col., 76th FA Bn.
Commanding


March 1945 the 76th Field Artillery Battalion was in Battle Position two thousand yards west of the Kall River near Dreiborn, Germany 1 March 1945 with mission of general support of the 2nd Infantry Division. Unit Transfer: from 1 March 1945 to 9 March 1945 this unit was attached to Second Infantry Division and to V Corps. 9 March 1945 Battalion was attached to III Corps and to the 78th Division. 16 March 1945 Battalion was transferred to the VII Corps with the 78th Division. The Battalion strength was thirty Officers, 2 Warrant Officers and 433 enlisted men. On 31 March 1945 the unit strength was twenty-nine Officer, 2 Warrant Officers and 454 enlisted men.

Headquarters V Corps Artillery, APO 305.

1 March 1945 in Battle Position near Dreiborn, Germany.

6 March 1945 in Battle Position at Breitenbenden, Germany. Battalion moved from area near Dreiborn, Germany to Breitenbenden, Germany. Roads: Narrow hard surface. Distance: 22.6 miles. Weather: Cold and cloudy. 6 March 1945 orders were received to move east towards the Rhine River. Four moves were made in the following five days and the Battalion arrived at the Rhine on 10 March 1945 in the vicinity of the Remagen Bridge. The Battalion went into positions 3,000 yards west of the Rhine and Forward Observers crossed the river on the Remagen Railroad Bridge ot adjust fires.

7 March 1945 Battalion moved from Breitenbenden, Germany to Scheuerhek, Germany. Roads: Narrow hard surfaced. Distance: 12.6 miles. Weather: Clear and cool.

9 March 1945 in Battle Position at Holzweiler, Germany. Battalion was attached to III Corps and to the 78th Infantry Division. Battalion moved from Scheuerhek, Germany to Holzweiler, Germany. Roads: Narrow and rutted. Distance: 13 miles. Weather: Clear and cold. Battalion was attached to III Corps and to the 78th Infantry Division with a mission of general support of the 78th Infantry Division.

10 March 1945 in Battle Position at Gimmersdorf, Germany. Battalion moved from Holzweiler, Germany to Gimmersdorf, Germany. Roads: Hard surfaced. Distance: 10 miles. Weather: Cold and raining.

16 March 1945 Battalion was attached to the VII Corps and to the 78th Infantry Division. Battalion attached to VII Corps with a mission of general support of the 78th Infantry Division; in addition the Battalion had a secondary mission of direct support of the 4th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron from 22 March to 25 March. Mission 30 March and 31 March 1945 was changed to direct support of 2nd Battalion, 309th Infantry Regiment and reinforcing the fires of 309th Field Artillery Battalion.

17 March 1945 in Battle Position at Lannesdorf, Germany. Battalion moved from Gimmersdorf, Germany to Lannesdorf, Germany. Roads: Hard surfaced. Distance: 3 miles. Weather: Warm and cloudy.

20 March 1945 in Battle Position at Neiderdollendorf, Germany. Battalion moved from Neiderdollendorf, Germany to Neiderdollendorf, Germany. Roads: Hard surfaced but narrow. Crossed the Rhine River at Konigswinter, Germany on Pontoon Bridge. Distance: 4 miles. Weather: Warm and clear.

22 March 1945 in Battle Position at Holzlar, Germany. Battalion moved from Neiderdollendorf, Germany to Holzlar, Germany. Roads: Hard surface. Distance: 6.4 miles. Weather: Warm and clear.

27 March 1945 in Battle Position near Ukerath, Germany. Battalion moved from Holzlar, Germany to Ukerath, Germany. Roads: Hard surfaced. Distance: 13 miles. Weather: Cool and raining.

29 March 1945 in Battle Position near Mittel Irsen, Germany.

March 1945 the Rhine River was crossed on a Pontoon Bridge at Konigswinter, Germany and the Battalion went into position south of the Sieg River. Three more moves were made during this month, all moves were made to the east as the 78th Division lines were extended, and the Sieg River was generally recognized as the Front line. Enemy artillery fire was light although four vehicles were damaged by the fire. Air OP's were under Division control and were available when the weather permitted. Anti-aircraft protection was provided by the Second Platoon, Battery A, 552nd AAA, which was attached to this unit 27 March 1945, and by organic weapons. Supply was excellent, except that 25 PDR ammunition was sometimes difficult to procure. Twenty-three thousand two hundred ninety-nine (23,299) rounds of 25 PDR ammunition was expended during this month. Twenty-seven (27) prisoners were captured during this period. No difficulty was experienced with German civilians, who were very cooperative. The Commanding Officer on the unit was Lt. Col. Charles E. Welsh during this period.


Losses in Action:
Corporal John Bunyar was killed in action 11 March 1945 by premature muzzle burst.

Tec 5 Willard A. Schuetz was wounded in action by enemy rifle fire at an Observation Post 30 March 1945.

Members Who Have Distinguishing Themselves in Action:
Lt. Col. Edgar J. Boschult was posthumously awarded the Croix de Guerra per Decision No. 343, French Army.

Captain Stephan W. McClure, 1st Lt. Arington C. Thomson Jr., 1st Lt Jacques M. Burghard, and 1st Lt. Floyd D. Wallace were awarded the Oak Leaf Cluster of the Air Metal 19 March 1945 by V Corps.

Corporal Walter J. Sczychulda and Corporal Haigh E. Chown were awarded the Soldier's Medal 24 March 1945 by V Corps.

Signed:
C.E. Welsh
Lt. Col., 76th FA Bn.
Commanding


April 1945 the 76th Field Artillery Battalion was in position 5000 yards south of the Sieg River in Mittle Irsen, Germany 1 April 1945 with a mission of general support of the 78th Infantry Division. 4 April 1945 orders were received to advance across the Sieg River and to assist in wiping out the Ruhr pocket. 7 April 1945 the Sieg was crossed and from that date until the Ruhr mission was accomplished 17 April 1945, 7 moves were made. 76th Field Artillery Battalion did not fire 18 April 1945, ending a record of 189 consecutive days of firing. During the month 138 prisoners, including on General Officer were taken. 13,448 rounds of 25 PDR ammunition and 1,479 rounds of 105mm Howitzer ammunition was expended on 634 missions. Unit Transfers: from 1 April 1945 to 4 April 1945 this unit was attached to the 78th Infantry Division and to the XVIII Corps (Airborne) and from 17 April 1945 to 26 April 1945 to the 18th Field Artillery Group and to the XVIII Corps (Airborne). 27 April 1945 this unit was relieved from attachment to XVIII Corps (Airborne) and was attached to VIII Corps and to the 1st Infantry Division. This attachment continued for the remainder of the period. The strength of the Battalion on 1 April 1945 was 29 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers and 454 enlisted men. On 30 April 1945 the strength was 30 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers and 450 enlisted men.

1 April 1945 in Battle Position at Mittle Irsen, Germany.

4 April 1945 Battalion was attached to XVIII Corps (Airborne) and to the 78th Infantry Division.

4 April 1945 Battalion was attached to XVIII Corps (Airborne) and to the 18th Field Artillery Group.

6 April 1945 in Battle Position at Obersaal, Germany. The Battalion moved from Mittle Irsen, Germany to Obersaal, Germany. Roads: Hard surfaced but narrow. Distance: 4 miles. Weather: cold and raining.

7 April 1945 in Battle Position at Ottershagen, Germany. The Battalion moved from Obersaal, Germany to Ottershagen, Germany. Roads: Main roads hard surfaced. Secondary roads: Narrow and very rutted. Distance: 10.1 miles. Weather: Clear and cool.

9 April 1945 in Battle Position at Waldbrol, Germany. The Battalion moved from Ottershagen, Germany to Waldbrol, Germany. Roads: Main roads hard surfaced. Secondary roads: Narrow and dusty. Distance: 5.1 miles. Weather: Clear and warm.

11 April 1945 in Battle Position at Goderath, Germany. The Battalion moved from Waldbrol, Germany to Goderath, Germany. Roads: Hard surfaced. Distance: 5.6 miles. Weather: Clear and warm.

12 April 1945 in Battle Position at Bielstein, Germany. The Battalion moved from Goderath, Germany to Bielstein, Germany. Roads: Hard surfaced and narrow. Distance: 5.7 miles. Weather: Foggy and warm.

13 April 1945 in Battle Position at Engleskirchen, Germany.

13 April 1945 in Battle Position at Eichef, Germany. The Battalion moved from Bielstein, Germany to Engleskirchen, Germany and from Engleskirchen to Eichef, Germany. Main roads: Hard surfaced. Secondary roads: Narrow and rutted. Distance: Bielstein to Engleskirchen: 11 miles. Distance: Engleskirchen to Eichef, Germany: 20 miles. Weather: Clear and warm. The Battalion converted from 25 PDR QF British guns to U.S. 105mm Howitzers.

15 April 1945 in Battle Position at Grunewald, Germany.

15 April 1945 in Battle Position at Ehringlhausen, Germany. The Battalion moved from Eichef, Germany to Grunewald, Germany and from Grunewald to Ehringlhausen, Germany. Roads: Hard surfaced. Distance: Eichef to Grunewald, Germany 10 miles. Distance: Grunewald to Ehringlhausen, Germany: 8.2 miles. Weather: Clear and warm.

17 April 1945 in Battle Position at Mahle, Germany. The Battalion moved from Ehringlhausen, Germany to Mahle, Germany. Roads: Hard surfaced. Distance: 57.2 miles. Weather: Clear and warm. The Battalion moved to a position near Gummersbach, Germany and was given a mission of guarding the XVIII Corps (Airborne) Prisoner of War Enclosure and of assisting in moving these prisoners to the First Army Prisoner of War Enclosure near Remagen, Germany. The XVIII Corps (Airborne) Enclosure contained approximately 60,000 Prisoners of War when the 76th Field Artillery Battalion arrived and remained at approximately that number for several days, as POW’s were brought in by Front line units almost as fast as they could be hauled out by evacuating units. Approximately 150,000 prisoners were evacuated.

18 April 1945 in Battle Position near Gummersbach, Germany. The Battalion moved from Mahle, Germany to Gummersbach, Germany. Roads: Hard surfaced. Distance: 4.5 miles. Weather: Cool and clear.

25 April 1945 all Prisoners of War had been evacuated to First Army Prisoner of War Enclosure near Remagen, Germany and movement orders were received. Battalion moved from Gummersbach, Germany to Northwestern Czechoslovakia.

27 April 1945 Battalion was attached to VIII Corps and to the First Infantry Division.

28 April 1945 in Battle Position near Gotha, Germany. The Battalion moved from Gummersbach, Germany to Gotha, Germany. Roads: Wide and hard surfaced. Most of the march was on the Autobahn. Distance: 205.2 miles. Weather: Cold and raining. On the night of 28 April 1945 the Battalion bivouacked in the Duke of Saxony's Castle at Gotha, Germany and arrived in Czechoslovakia the following day. Most of the trip from Gummersbach, Germany to Czechoslovakia was traveled on the famed and much publicized Hitler Autobahn, supposedly built for the Hitler Volkswagen, but evidently used for other purposes. These roads were found to be equal to U.S. roads of the same size but were unfinished in many places and had many bridges blown out.

29 April 1945 in Battle Position 100 yards west of Hor Palrimov, Czechoslovakia. The Battalion moved from Gotha, Germany to Hor Palrimov, Czechoslovakia. Roads: Hard surfaced. Most of the march was on the Autobahn. Distance: 139.9 miles. Weather: Cloudy and cold.

30 April 1945 Battalion was attached to V Corps and remained attached to the First Infantry Division.

April 1945 the Commanding Officer during this period was Lt. Col. Charles e. Welsh.


Losses in Action:
Pfc. Robert C. Davis and Pfc. Robert G. Boehme both killed in action on 21 April 1945.

Signed:
C.E. Welsh
Lt. Col., 76th FA Bn.
Commanding


May 1945 Unit Transfers: 1 May 1945 to 5 May 1945 the 76th Field Artillery Battalion was attached to VIII Corps and the 1st Infantry Division, remaining assigned to the First United State Army. On 5 May 1945 the unit was technically attached to the 32nd Field Artillery Battalion. 6 May 1945 the unit was relieved from assignment to the First United State Army and assigned to the Third United State Army. On 16 May 1945 the 76th Field Artillery Battalion was attached to the 406th Field Artillery Group. On 24 May 1945 the unit was relieved from attachment to the 406th Field Artillery Group and attached to the 351st Field Artillery Group. The Battalion strength on 1 May 1945 was 28 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers and 449 enlisted men. On 31 May 1945 the strength was 27 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers and 448 enlisted men.

Battalion APO 230, c/o Postmaster, New York, New York.

1 May 1945 the 76th Field Artillery Battalion was in Battle Position 100 yards west of Hor Palrimov, Czechoslovakia, rendering general support to the 1st Infantry Division, and reinforcing the fires of the 32nd Field Artillery Battalion.

2 May 1945 2 Officers and 4 enlisted men from Fort Sill, Oklahoma visited the Battalion to demonstrate and instruct in firing of rockets.

3 May 1945 in Battle Position 200 yards north of Hundsback, Czechoslovakia. The unit moved from Hor Palrimov, Czechoslovakia to Hundsback, Czechoslovakia. Roads: Main roads narrow and hard surfaced. Secondary roads: Narrow and rutted. Distance: 10 miles. Weather: Cold and clear.

5 May 1945 in Battle Position at Palic, Czechoslovakia. The unit moved from Hundsback, Czechoslovakia to Palic, Czechoslovakia. Roads: Narrow and very rutted. Distance: 10 miles. Weather: Cold and rainy. On 5 May 1945 the rocket guns were fired by members of the Rocket Team and members of this organization. The firing was witnessed by the Staff and Battery Officers.

6 May 1945 in Battle Position at Laznerkynzear, Czechoslovakia. 6 May 1945 Battalion was relieved from assignment to the First United States Army and assigned to the Third United States Army. Battalion remained attached to V Corps Artillery and the First Infantry Division. The unit moved from Palic, Czechoslovakia to Laznerkynzear, Czechoslovakia. Roads: Narrow and very rutted. Distance: 7.5 miles. Weather: Cloudy and cool.

7 May 1945 in Battle Position at Sangerberg, Czechoslovakia. The unit moved from Laznerkynzear, Czechoslovakia to Sangerberg, Czechoslovakia. Roads: Main roads narrow but hard surfaced. Distance: 6.6 miles. Weather: Clear and cool. Up until 7 May 1945 the unit continued to deliver supporting fire for the advancing 1st Infantry Division.

At 071830 May 1945, while in Battle Position at Sangerberg, Czechoslovakia, the Battalion received orders to cease firing and remain in position until further notice. THE END OF THE WAR was officially announced by the Supreme Allied Commander effective 0001 9 May 1945.

From 1 May 1945 to 7 May 1945 749 rounds of 105mm Howitzer ammunition were expended on 41 missions. There was no enemy artillery fire in the Battalion area during this period.

11 May 1945 in Battle Position at Kynsperk, Czechoslovakia. The unit moved from Sangerberg, Czechoslovakia to Kynsperk, Czechoslovakia. Roads: Narrow and dusty. Distance: 20.9 miles. Weather: Clear and warm. On 11 May 1945 the Battalion moved Sangerberg to Kynsperk and was engaged in guarding German prisoners surrendering themselves to the American Armies.

16 May 1945 in Battle Position at Defurovy-Lazany, Czechoslovakia. The unit moved from Kynsperk, Czechoslovakia to Defurovy-Lazany, Czechoslovakia on a mission of security. Roads: Main roads hard surfaced. Secondary roads: Narrow and dusty. Distance: 89.5 miles. Weather: Clear and warm.

18 May 1945 the Battalion was organized from two, six-gun batteries to three, four- gun batteries.

22 May 1945 seven enlisted men departed for shipment to the United States to be redeployed or discharged from the Army under the Readjustment, Redeployed plan.

24 May 1945 in Battle Position at Stachy, Czechoslovakia. The unit moved from Defurovy-Lazany, Czechoslovakia to Stachy, Czechoslovakia. Roads: Narrow and rutted. Distance: 36.3 miles. Weather: Cool and cloudy.

24 May 1945 the Battalion moved to Stachy, Czechoslovakia with a mission of securing the area bounded by the towns of Stachy, Steinberg, Vimperk, Dolony, Vlkon, Rohanon and Varnik. Roadblocks were set up near Dukelstein, Brantelhn (Drantelhn), Nespice and on the outskirts of Stachy. This mission of security continued through the month of May 1945. Commanding Officer during this period was Lt. Col. Charles E. Welsh.


Losses in Action:
There were no losses in action during this month.

Signed:
C.E. Welsh
Lt. Col., 76th FA Bn.
Commanding


17-23 June 1945 the strength of the unit was 24 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers and 448 enlisted men. State of Morale: Excellent. Civilian Population: Friendly. Location possibly: Kanice, Czechoslovakia.


STATIONS AND BIVOUAC AREAS
Iron Mountain, California - From 1 January 1944 to 1 March 1944.

Camp Polk, Louisiana - From 1 March to 13 June 1944.

Camp Shanks, New York, (Point of Embarkation) - 13 June 1944 to 1 July 1944.

On board of U.S. Transport No. 874 (Edmund T. Alexander) (Amerika) - 1 July 1944 to 13 July 1944.

Shropshire, England - 13 July 1944 to 4 August 1944.

Sennybridge Artillery Range, Wales - 4 August 1944 to 8 August 1944.

Marshalling area NCRP C-3 Near Southampton, England - 8 August 1944 to 9 August 1944.

Transit area "B" near St. Germain, France - 12 August 1944 to 13 August 1944.

Third Army Assembly area No. 4 near Briquebec, France - 13 August 1944 to 15 August 1944.

Battle position Southeast of Argentan, France - 19 August 1944 to 22 August 1944.

Assembly area at Medavi, France - 22 August 1944 to 25 August 1944.

Bivouac area East of Sees, France - 25 August 1944 to 26 August 1944.

Bivouac area near Limours, France - 26 August 1944 to 28 August 1944.

Bivouac area near St. Remy Des Chevreuse, France - 28 August 1944 to 30 August 1944.

Battle position near Fontenay En Parisis, France - 30 August 1944 to 31 August 1944.

Battle position in woods North of Chantilly, France - 31 August 1944 to 1 September 1944.

Bivouac area Southeast of Senlis, France - 1 September 1944 to 2 September 1944.

Bivouac area Northwest of Longuel Annel, France - 2 September 1944 to 6 September 1944.

V Corps Assembly area southwest of Signy L'Abbaye, France - 6 September 1944 to 7 September 1944.

Bivouac area, Bucilly, France Hq Btry and Btry C - 7 September 1944 to 19 September 1944.

Bivouac area Macon, Belgium - 19 September 1944 to 30 September 1944.

Bivouac area Clermont, Belgium - 30 September 1944 to 10 October 1944 Battle position Kalterherberg, Germany - 10 October 1944 to 23 October 1944.

Battle position Elsenborn, Belgium - 23 October 1944 to 29 October 1944.

Battle position 1 and one half miles East of Zweifall, Germany (9 miles East of Aachen, Germany) Hurtgen Forest - 29 October 1944 to 29 November 1944.

Battle position 1 mile West of Germeter, Germany in Hurtgen Forrest - 29 November 1944 to 24 December 1944.

Battle position one half mile North of Mont, Belgium - 24 December 1944 to 2 January 1945.

Battle position Chodes, Belgium - 2 January 1945 to 15 January 1945.

Battle position Geromont, Belgium - 15 January 1945 to 20 January 1945.

Battle position Faymonville, Belgium - 20 January 1945 to 27 January 1945.

Battle position Elsenborn, Belgium - 27 January 1945 to 2 February 1945.

Battle position Rocherath, Belgium - 2 February 1945 to 4 February 1945.

Battle position Schonesseiffen, Germany - 4 February 1945 to 8 February 1945.

Battle position near Dreiborn, Germany - 8 February 1945 to 6 March 1945.

Battle position Breitenbenden, Germany - 6 March 1945 to 9 March 1945.

Battle position Holzweiler, Germany - 9 March 1945 to 10 March 1945.

Battle position Gimmersdorf, Germany - 10 March 1945 to 17 March 1945.

Battle position Lannesdorf, Germany - 17 March 1945 to 20 March 1945.

Battle position Neiderdollendorf, Germany - 20 March 1945 to 22 March 1945.

Battle position Holzlar, Germany - 22 March 1945 to 27 March 1945.

Battle position Ukerath, Germany - 27 March 1945 to 29 March 1945.

Battle position Mittel Irsen, Germany - 29 March 1945 to 6 April 1945.

Battle position Obersaal, Germany - 6 April 1945 to 7 April 1945.

Battle position Ottershagen (Ruhr Valley), Germany - 7 April 1945 to 9 April 1945.

Battle position Waldbrol, Germany - 9 April 1945 to 11 April 1945.

Battle position Goderath, Germany - 11 April 1945 to 12 April 1945.

Battle position Bielstein, Germany - 12 April 1945 to 13 April 1945.

Battle position Engleskirchen, Germany - 13 April 1945 to 13 April 1945.

Battle position Eichof, Germany - 13 April 1945 to 15 April 1945.

Battle position Grunewald, Germany - 15 April 1945 to 15 April 1945.

Battle position Ehringlhausen, Germany - 15 April 1945 to 17 April 1945.

Battle position Mahle, Germany - 17 April 1945 to 18 April 1945.

Station Gummersbach, Germany - 18 April 1945 to 28 April 1945.

Overnight camp, Gotha, Germany - 28 April 1945 to 29 April 1945.

Battle position near Hov Palrimov, Czechoslovakia - 29 April 1945 to 3 May 1945.

Battle position Hundback, Czechoslovakia - 3 May 1945 to May 1945.


HEADQUARTERS 76TH FIELD ARTILLERY BATTALION
Belmont, California
August 10, 1943

General Orders No 5

Subject: Good Conduct Ribbon

1. Under the provisions of AR 600-68, May 4 1943, the following named enlisted men, 76th Field Artillery Battalion have been recommended for the Good Conduct Medal, and pending issue of same are authorized to purchase and wear the Good Conduct Ribbon.

HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS BATTERY
M/Sgt Carl E. Malmgren
1st/Sgt Norman Stainback Jr
T/Sgt James L. Ferguson
T/Sgt Robert J. Ratigan
T/Sgt George W. Spengler
T/Sgt Samuel B. Woodward
S/Sgt Wilson A. J. Grillo
S/Sgt Stewart M. MacLure
S/Sgt John R. McElvaney
S/Sgt John J. McKay
S/Sgt Jean E. Menke
S/Sgt Ernest H. Pearson
S/Sgt Jerome L Sperber
Sgt James J. Ambrose
Sgt Robert T. Bringhurst
Sgt Daniel B. Noifert
Sgt Ernest Rogers
Sgt Stanley S. Stoner
Sgt Silas D. Ward Jr
4th Tech Gr Alfred E. Arvonen
4th Tech Gr Maurice L. V. Hammill
4th Tech Gr Lynn F. McClintock
4th Tech Gr Charles B. Melendrez
4th Tech Gr Herbert Ng
4th Tech Gr John E. Potter
4th Tech Gr Peter J. Strusis
4th Tech Gr Carrol L. Wahl
Cpl Daniel W. Beard
Cpl. Gordon W. Bringman
Cpl Donald Casey
Cpl Felix L. Flowerdew
Cpl Aaron H. Frishman
Cpl James G. Kerhoulas
Cpl Richard A. LaFayette
Cpl Daniel A. McAfee Jr.
Cpl Fred Morrison
Cpl Erwin Rosengart
Cpl Wilfred F. Scherbring
Cpl George E. Sears
Cpl Eddie R. Van Matre
5th Tech Gr Kenneth C. Connine
5th Tech Gr Kenneth G. Duncan
5th Tech Gr Vern H. Geiner
5th Tech Gr John J. Hannan
5th Tech Gr Willis J. King
5th Tech Gr Robert B. Mallison
5th Tech Gr Albert B. Morrill
5th Tech Gr Fred K. Muselman
5th Tech Gr James W. Nappier
5th Tech Gr Alvin Ness
5th Tech Gr Ivan L. Phenis
5th Tech Gr Leon W. Pollert
5th Tech Gr David Shulkin
5th Tech Gr Rudolph A Sturtz
Pfc Alfredo Abeyta
Pfc Arthur E. Ahern
Pfc Wesley L. Christolear
Pfc Wandlen A. Chronister
Pfc Gerald T. Davidson
Pfc Robert P. Deering
Pfc Raymond Y. Espinoza
Pfc Raymond E. Evans
Pfc Mac J. George
Pfc Pete J. Giraud
Pfc George T. Groneman
Pfc James W. Howe
Pfc Harold A. Johnson
Pfc Henry Klassen - Click on link: Pvt. Henry Klassen 76th Field Artillery WW2
Pfc Joseph Kwosz
Pfc Kenneth R. Lett
Pfc Thomas L. Louderback
Pfc Justin E. McLallin
Pfc Lowell M. Miller
Pfc O. D Morris
Pfc Clayton J. Regan
Pfc George L. Sieber
Pfc Grover R. Utter
Pvt Daniel Casey
Pvt Martin P. Cavazza
Pvt Van W. Franklin
Pvt Orville C. Johnson
Pvt Carl S. Putney
Pvt Cecil E. Reid
Pvt Glen N. Robinson
Pvt John H. Scona
Pvt William O. Stephens
Pvt Silvester E. Smith
Pvt Frank Zyracki


BATTERY A
1st/Sgt Charles Hammers
S/Sgt Marion T. Boyd Jr.
S/Sgt Wilbur J. Underwood
Sgt Warren C. Banta
Sgt James N. Beatty
Sgt Delmar L. Brownfield
Sgt Hubert F. Lewandowski
Sgt Juell Selaegui
4th Tech Gr George M. Sheetan
4th Tech Gr Earl L. Wilson
Cpl. John P. Caranzi
Cpl Ira H. Douglas
Cpl William F. Flanery
Cpl Emmitt E. Gesy
Cpl Mahlon E. Lantz
Cpl Spencer A. Mayhugh Jr.
Cpl Jesse D. McCowan
Cpl Charles L. Mullins
Cpl Thomas Newell
Cpl Phillip L. Sapp
Cpl Robert W. Tatroc
5th Tech Gr Fate Brooks
5th Tech Gr John H. Darrington
5th Tech Gr Hubert G. Frame
5th Tech Gr Leonard G. Rains
5th Tech Gr Lumiur F. Stanek
5th Tech Gr Chester F. Steger
Pfc Felin W. Baxter
Pfc Roland W. Dale
Pfc Chester D. Dipp
Pfc Ivendale Dehse
Pfc Robert Klepesky
Pfc Dan Leary
Pfc Fred W. Lewis
Pfc Roy W. Myer
Pfc Henry C. Mroczynski
Pfc George E. Meyers
Pfc Teddy L. Nielson
Pfc Howard N. Onan
Pfc Barney B. Ostrowski
Pfc Irvin F. Pofahl
Pfc Maxie L. Russell
Pfc Lewis A. Schebaum
Pfc Willard A. Schuetz
Pfc Raymond M. Schultz
Pfc Norman P. Stephens
Pfc David E. Torno
Pvt John A. Conti
Pvt Stanley P. Goleniak
Pvt Kenneth A. Jones
Pvt Allan L. Kemp
Pvt John Rygh
Pvt Earl E. Schwabe
Pvt Robert J. Veatch
Pvt Roy E. Wagoner
Pvt Mike White


BATTERY B
1st/Sgt Jimmie E. Morten
S/Sgt Robert R. Keil
S/Sgt Willard L. Lutz
S/Sgt James M. Marr
Sgt James W. Johnston
Sgt J. B. Martin
Sgt Thomas J. Merrill
Sgt Charles A. Myers
Sgt Frank S. Reush
4th Tech Gr Andrew J. Brakke
4th Tech Gr Edward H. Ling
4th Tech Gr Carmen A. Sickles
Cpl Sterling L. Ballard
Cpl Ronald E. Barth
Cpl James T. Clark
Cpl Jefferson R. Crobarger
Cpl Alby N. Lawley
Cpl Enrico H. Pieretti Cpl Frank E. Rafert
Cpl Floyd Raymond
Cpl Raymond C. Rodriguez
Cpl Harold E. Schoessler
Cpl Ralph E. Sells
5th Tech Gr George E. Armstrong
5th Tech Gr John Bauriedl
5th Tech Gr Van A. Eaton
5th Tech Gr Frank H. Hernandez
5th Tech Gr Carlyle L Jorgensen
5th Tech Gr Matthew P. Netz
5th Tech Gr Frank E. Sammon
5th Tech Gr A. J. Watson
5th Tech Gr Clark Wilcox
Pfc Lessie Allen
Pfc Limual F. Andrew
Pfc Nickolas J. Appezzato
Pfc Henry F. Baran
Pfc Rudolph Bartolowith
Pfc James L. Byrne
Pfc Ewell J. Combest
Pfc William C. Crewley
Pfc Woodrow M. Delany
Pfc John Delgardo Jr.
Pfc Albert V. Ezell
Pfc Frank O. Hager
Pfc Martin L. Kroshell
Pfc Wayland M. Loar
Pfc William Martin
Pfc Virgil O. Richards
Pfc Thomas W. Rippon
Pfc Harold T. Roadcap
Pfc John C. Roberts
Pfc Albert E. Schulte
Pfc Emil C. Schulte
Pfc Forrest W. Schutte
Pfc Peter C. Torres
Pfc Kenneth W. Williams
Pvt Robert L. Crandall
Pvt William J. Davis
Pvt Arthur A. Johnson
Pvt Jack Lopez


BATTERY C
S/Sgt Francis N. Collins
S/Sgt Albert R. Cordova
S/Sgt Woodrow W. Metcalf
Sgt Delmar E. Hearn
Sgt Thelmer A. Kjersten
Sgt Donald N. Nissen
Sgt Garland W. Rankin
4th Tech Gr Sam M. Fry
4th Tech Gr Raymond C. Hustad
4th Tech Gr David E. Plasencia
Cpl Forrest J. Attaway
Cpl David L. Evans
Cpl Hubert W. Feeler
Cpl Arthur H. Fox
Cpl Joseph D. Gonzales
Cpl Floyd H. Huckabee
Cpl Robert H. Lamb
Cpl Robert J. May
Cpl Gomer H. Smith
Cpl Cylde R. Trayner
Cpl Fred J. Turney
5th Tech Gr Andrew P. Brockman
5th Tech Gr Russell L. Fowler
5th Tech Gr George H. Ives
5th Tech Gr Melvin S. Phillips
5th Tech Gr Richardt Selbeck
5th Tech Gr Frank Zabaleta
Pfc Lawrence M. Bainbridge
Pfc Emilio T. Bejarano
Pfc John Bunyar
Pfc Eugene Bush Jr
Pfc Francis C. Cusimano
Pfc Louie De Paoli
Pfc Norman B. Dillard
Pfc Roy L. Dominguez
Pfc Joseph C. Ford
Pfc Raymond L. Ford
Pfc Glen Funk
Pfc Santos S. Guardado
Pfc Joe F. Havel
Pfc Wesley R. Herron
Pfc Frederick E. Hohensee
Pfc Jack W. Irving
Pfc Carl F. Klesjeski
Pfc Clarence Konop
Pfc Lester L. Lindsey
Pfc Donato V. Marquez Jr.
Pfc Patrick P. Musto
Pfc Thomas F. Osborne
Pfc Henry R. Pape
Pfc Kenneth J. Sanders
Pfc Lincoln A. Sprague
Pfc Wilfred H. Steffen
Pfc Marinus W. Stolk
Pfc Walter J. Szychulda
Pfc Roland E. Wagner
Pvt Elmer G. Haflinger
Pvt George M. McFarland
Pvt Bliss R. Roberts
Pvt Jacabo R. Rodriguez
Pvt Dallas R. Sorg
Pvt Fred Tustanowsky


SERVICE BATTERY
1st/Sgt Leo T. Forsberg
T/Sgt Bernard W. Peterson
S/Sgt William H. Baker Jr
S/Sgt Clyde O. Firestein
S/Sgt Marion G. Vassar
Sgt Elmer A. Moore
Sgt Joseph L. Schrader
Sgt Alfred J. Stahl
Sgt Walter Walak
4th Tech Gr Lloyd L. Carnagey
4th Tech Gr Walter L. Foard
4th Tech Gr John L. Hukill
4th Tech Gr Joseph C. Schmidt
4th Tech Gr Otis R. Torkelson
Cpl Eugene L. Boettger
Cpl Earl G. Guentzel
Cpl Edwin W. Karsten
Cpl Horace D. Lantz
Cpl James F. Lyall
Cpl Clarence P. Spreigl
5th Tech Gr Richard A. Campbell
5th Tech Gr David J. Gano
5th Tech Gr Fred M. Heape
5th Tech Gr Eugene A. Hunt
5th Tech Gr Thomas R. Jeroue
5th Tech Gr William F. Kindt
5th Tech Gr Wilbur T. Pherigo
5th Tech Gr Oliver N. Purtteman
5th Tech Gr Buck H. Stiffler
5th Tech Gr Hoy L. Wong
Pfc Leonard M. Forrest
Pfc Ora E. Hall
Pfc Allen R. Koistinen
Pfc Roy E. Pierce
Pfc Walter A. Stutzback
Pfc George B. Wong


MEDICAL DETACHMENT
S/Sgt Charles B. Yocum
Cpl Lester R. Reddig
5th Tech Gr Gloyd L. Anderson
5th Tech Gr Joseph A. Kloske
Pfc Cupel W. Clark
Pfc Warren L. Gordon
Pfc Harold H. Halperin
Pfc Fred J. Harang
Pfc Jerome S. Nuelle

By order of Lt. Colonel BOSCHULT:

Signed:
John J. Kenny
Major, 76th FA Bn
Ex and Adjutant



Page 1 of the roster at Bay Meadows Race Track on July 15, 1942



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U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: "Illic est Vires in Numerus" There is Strength in Numbers

"Working Hard to Preserve Our Country's History wherever it is being lost"

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country's history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved "Horse and Mule". There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
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