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250TH COAST ARTILLERY CAMP MCQUAIDE CALIFORNIA 1941


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250TH COAST ARTILLERY CAMP MCQUAIDE CALIFORNIA 1941

250TH COAST ARTILLERY DISTINCTIVE UNIT INSIGNIA
Design approved March 24, 1925. The Spanish castle is for Philippine service in the Spanish War, the palm tree for the Philippine Insurrection, and the "fleur-de-lis" for World War I. No Motto. Campaigns: War with Spain - Mania; Philippine Insurrection - Manila; World War I - St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne; World War II - North Apennines, PO Valley - Italy; Central Europe.

WE DEFEND THE WESTERN COAST "Oram Occidentalem Defendimus"
California National Guard established the 250th Coast Artillery Regiment in Capitola, California in 1926. The camp is named in honor of Catholic chaplain, Father Joseph P. McQuaide deceased chaplain of the 250th. In 1938 the 250th Coast Artillery Regiment moved to the present location on San Andreas Road. The old camp is located on what is now called the Monterey Bay Academy. It occupies a commanding position, being in practically the center shoreline of Monterey Bay. Off to the northwest lies the city of Santa Cruz, and to the southwest the city of Monterey. There still remains several of the old original buildings included the "camp theater". It is worth taking the time to visit the site.

THE ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES 1941
The Constitution gives Congress the power the power to raise and support armies and designates the President as Commander-in-Chief. By the National Defense Act June 3, 1916, as later amended by other laws, Congress constituted the Army of the United States in six components: The Regular Army, the National Guard of the United States, the National Guard while in the service of the United State, the Officers' Reserve Corps, the Organized Reserves, and the Enlisted Reserve Corps.

Under the President, the Secretary of War is the head of the War Department, the Government department charged with managing the Army. The Assistant Secretary of War has specific duties prescribed by law and assigned to him by the Secretary of War, and acts for the Secretary of War during his absence. The Chief of Staff is the highest-ranking officer of the Army, and the adviser to the Secretary of War on military matters. The War Department not only has charge of the administration and training of the Army in preparation for possible war, but it also has charge of the administration and training of the Army in preparation for possible war, but it also supervises or directs a number of activities not purely military. For example, it has the responsibility of operating the Panama Canal and it directs such public works as the improvement of rivers and harbors.

Each component of the Army consists of officers and enlisted men divided into combat arms, such as Infantry, Air Corps, and Field Artillery, and into services, such as the Medical Department, and the Quartermaster Corps. Each arm, service, and bureau has a "Chief" in Washington. The arms, services, and bureaus are as follows:

ARMS
Infantry, Cavalry, Field Artillery, Coast Artillery, Air Corps, Corps of Engineers, Signal Corps

SERVICE
Adjutant General's Department, Inspector General's Department, Judge Advocate General's Department, Quartermaster Corps, Corps of Chaplains, Finance Department, Medical Department, Ordnance Department, Chemical Warfare Service.

BUREAU
National Guard Bureau: In general the arms do the actual fighting in battle, and the services assist the arms by supplying them with food, clothing, weapons, ammunition, and other supplies, and by furnishing transportation, medical care, and other assistance. Some of the services, however, may come into contact with the enemy and then have to fight for their own protection. On the other hand, a few of the arms, particularly the Corps of Engineers and the Signal Corps, may not only engage in combat with the enemy but also furnish certain special supplies to the other arms.

THE COAST ARTILLERY
With its fixed and mobile guns capable of firing many miles to sea, the Coast Artillery Corps protects important parts of our shores - mainly the entrances to our largest harbors and ports - from approach by hostile landing forces and from the bombardment by hostile navies. In this task of coast defense the Coast Artillery acts in the close cooperation with the United States Navy.

The Coast Artillery also has units with powerful antiaircraft guns whose purpose is to protect our most important centers of population and industry, and the main headquarters and installation of armies in the field, from the warplanes of an enemy.

The Coast Artillery Regiments are of several kinds. Some are organized to man the big fixed guns in our coastal fortifications. Some operate the railway guns, also of large calibers, which can be moved along the coast for any distance on the railroad lines of our country, and set up for firing out over the sea at any suitable point. Other regiments have guns that can be moved from place to place along our coasts towed by fast, heavy trucks. All of these different regiments include within themselves antiaircraft units for their own protection.

Mobile railway and tractor-drawn units of the Coast Artillery are used to defend our shores against landings attempted at points not protected by fixed defense. The motor-drawn units are equipped with the 155-mm gun, which is practically the same as the field artillery gun of the same caliber.

The 250th Coast Artillery Regiment is a tractor-drawn organization equipped with 155-mm. guns. These guns can hurl a 95-pound projectile some 10 miles.


The 250th Coast Artillery Regiment is a tractor-drawn organization equipped with 155-mm. guns, Camp McQuaide 1941


Served as a private, Infantry, April 20, 1914 to April 29, 1915; Second Lieutenant, Infantry, June 3, 1915; Federal Service. Second Lieutenant, June 20, 1916 to October 7, 1916; First Lieutenant Infantry, November 16, 1916; Captain, Coast Artillery December 30, 1916 to August 4, 1917; Federal Service. Captain, Coast Artillery Corps, August 5, 1917 to January 20, 1919; Officers Reserve, Coast Artillery Corps, March 26, 1919 to December 16, 1924. Captain, Coast Artillery, July 15, 1920; Major, October 15, 1921; Lieutenant Colonel, September 15, 1924; Colonel, October 14, 1938; National Guard of the United States, Colonel, December 29, 1938; Graduate of the University of California, Bachelor of Science degree.

HEADQUARTERS 250TH COAST ARTILLERY (155mm GUN)
Office of the Regimental Commander
Camp McQuaide, California

March 24, 1941

GREETINGS
Soldiers of the 250th Coast Artillery, model 1941m whose pictures and names adorn the pages of this book, you have the example of the heroes of the past who have made the supreme sacrifice under it Standards - an ever-present stimulus so conduct yourselves as to be worthy of your noble heritage.

As in the past, so in the future, new weapons, new situations, new dangers, will be but new opportunities for you of the present-day organization to add to her laurels.

The regiment is now ready for front line service, equipped and trained for combat. Undoubtedly, a number of our units will soon be ordered away from Camp McQuaide for such duty.

Let us firmly resolve to apply ourselves in our everyday duties and training that we shall show the way in National Defense! I know that every one of you is exceedingly proud, as I am, of the 250th Coast Artillery, and that your pride will grow with its increasing importance as a front line defender of our nation.

To the other officers and men of Camp McQuaide, my warmest thanks and appreciation for your assistance. Without it, we could not have come so far along the road. Together, we shall make even greater advances.

To all of you, the best of luck and every success.

Sincerely

D.P. Hardy
Colonel, 250th Coast Artillery
Commanding



Colonel G.A. Shastey
First Commanding Officer
First California Coast Defense



Colonel H.G. Mathewson
Second Commanding Officer
First California Coast Defense



Brigadier General Richard E. Mittelstaedt
The Adjutant General, California National Guard 1941
Third Commanding Officer, 250th Coast Artillery, 1921 - 1938


HISTORY OF THE 250TH COAST ARTILLERY 1941
California was rugged, fighting country in the days following the 1849 gold rush, and its people were confronted with the task of maintaining law and order within their own ranks. Under state law, they had the right to form themselves into military companies. They selected their own colorful uniforms; they did their own organizing.

Such were the conditions under which the First Infantry Regiment, Grandsire of the 250th Coast Artillery, was organized on May 8, 1861.

Its batteries themselves point to illustrious histories of their own - to "Shields Guards", the "Germania Rifles", the "San Francisco Light Guard", pioneer organizations from which they sprang.

Oldest single unit of the regiment is Battery C, which traces its lineage back to August 31, 1855. It first came into prominence in 1856 when it was called into duty to maintain law and order in San Francisco. The famed battle of "Fort Gunnybags", in which old Company C showed its prowess, broke up a gang of unscrupulous politicians and removed from the city a ruthless and lawless band of renegade citizenry.

California sent no regularly organized units into the Civil War, but several small detachments of the National Guard found their way into the ranks of both the Confederates and the Unionist.

During the Spanish-American War, and later, during the Philippine Insurrection, several units of the California National Guard again saw action. Old-timers of the Guard, as members of Batteries B, C and D, served the colors at Manila and throughout the Philippine Insurrection. On the Regimental Coat-of-Arms today, the Spanish Castle and the Palm Tree testify that the 250th served notably in that war of 1898 and the insurrection on the islands.

Side by side with General Funston's "Regulars" during the great San Francisco earthquake and the fire of 1906, the 250th Guardsmen fought as heroically as they did during military combat.

In 1909 the 250th was reconstituted as the "First Coast Defense Command" its units being taken from various Infantry, Field Artillery and Coast Artillery organizations.

Twelve units comprised the regiment during World War I days. Mustered into Federal service August 5, 1917, the regiment went through its training at Fort Winfield Scott at San Francisco. Units of the California National Guard Coast Artillery were redesignated by the organization of three Coast Artillery regiments, still in existence.

In April 1918, Batteries A and B sailed for France. They served in the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne Offensives - along with Truck Companies A, B, and C. Battery C and Truck Companies D.E. and F also fought in France.

The 62nd Coast Artillery, Regular Army, now stationed at Fort Totten, New York, was originally formed from Companies 5,6 and 7 of the First California Defense Command, augmented by replacement from the western states. The 67th Coast Artillery, Regular Army, was formed from Companies 8, 9, and 10 of the California Defense Command. Both the 62nd and the 67th Coast Artillery served in France after the Armistice.

The First Anti-Aircraft Battalion, formed from the ranks of the 11th and 12th Companies of the California Coast Defense command, saw service in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive.

AFTER THE WAR
During the years after the war, the regiment came in for changes. In 1921, before peace had been declared officially with Germany, it was organized as a Coast Artillery Harbor Defense Regiment. On October 6, 1923, it was formed into a mobile, tractor-drawn organization and re-designated the 250th Coast Artillery and equipped with 155-millemeter guns. This is the regiment, as it exists today.

CAMP MCQUAIDE 1941
Camp McQuaide, situated six miles from Watsonville, California, in Santa Cruz Valley, is on a sandy palisade overlooking the Pacific Ocean, where the waters of the ocean mingle with the warm depths of Monterey bay.

It occupies a commanding position, being in practically the center shoreline of Monterey Bay. Off to the northwest lies the city of Santa Cruz, and to the southwest the historic city of Monterey glistens along the shores of the Bay.

The Administration Building, or Post Headquarters, is flanked by barracks, comfortable and adequate. Neatly arranged rows of tents accommodate the recently added and increased complement. High atop the hill, the hospital is located, encircled by wind-breaking lines of evergreen trees.

Foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains land-lock the area surrounding Camp McQuaide. Orderly appearing and highly productive farms and orchards make up the back country from the Camp.

Apples - five million boxes a year--are grown in the fertile area beyond Camp McQuaide and Watsonville known as the Parajo Valley.

Camp McQuaide, itself, was established in 1926 at Capitola. The present site was obtained and dedicated in 1938, and was named in memory of Major Joseph P. McQuaide, deceased, Chaplain of the 250th for many years.

Major, then Father McQuaide, was ordained in 1892, and served with the First California Volunteers in the Philippines and the Boxer rebellion in China. Father McQuaide rejoined the National Guard of California in 1917 and was assigned as Post Chaplain at Fort Winfield Scott, San Francisco. He went overseas, to France, with the 62nd Coast Artillery.

Chaplain McQuaide died March 29, 1924.

Through the efforts of the Watsonville Chamber of Commerce and patriotic response of the citizenry, the present site of Camp McQuaide was secured.


VIDEO: 250TH COAST ARTILLERY CAMP MCQUAIDE 1941
Soldiers come out of National Guard Armory in San Francisco; Ca. Soldiers of 250th Coast Artillery traveling down and entering Camp McQuaide. The 155-mm guns parked to the side as men jump from trucks at the new Camp McQuaide site. Shows the tent encampment and men in the foreground setting up the tents.

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Soldiers of 250th Coast Artillery traveling down to Camp McQuaide 1941


250TH COAST ARTILLERY REGIMENT, CAMP MCQUAIDE, CALIFORNIA 1941

HEADQUARTERS BATTERY
Battery G
Band

HEADQUARTERS BATTERY, FIRST BATTALION
Battery A
Battery B

HEADQUARTERS BATTERY, SECOND BATTALION
Battery C
Battery D

HEADQUARTERS BATTERY, THIRD BATTALION
Battery E
Battery F


THE NATIONAL GUARD OF CALIFORNIA IN 1870

THE NATIONAL GUARD OF CALIFORNIA IN 1870
The big lithograph above, portraying the National Guard of California in 1870, in addition to its historical value provides a remarkably good study in military uniforms. In the upper left panel is the First California Guard, Flying Artillery; and it the upper right, the Light Dragoons, Jackson Dragoons, San Francisco Hussars and the Haight Light Dragoons. In the center panel is General John Hewston and staff of the Second Brigade.

The inscription on the scroll reads:

Commander-in-Chief: His Excellency Gov. H.H. Haight; Adj. General Thos. N. Cazneau; Ass't Adj General Maxe Edwards; General Staff: John B. Frisbie, Albert Evans, Cutler McAlister, Jona Letterman; Aids: Wm. Doolan, H. Linden, C.H. King, John Scott, R.H. Lloyd.

The National Guard is divided into six Brigades, under the immediate command of Major General H.A. Cobb, with the following staff: Ass't Adj. General S.P. Middleton; Inspector E.A. Denicke; Engineer A.W. Von Schmidt; Quartermaster E.B. Buffandeau; Commissary Peter Donohue; Paymaster Daniel Norcross; Judge Advocate J.W. Brumagim; Surgeon J.C. Tucker; Ordinance Officer T.W. Mudge; Aids-de-Camp H.A. Cobb Jr., and J.L. Beyer.

About two-thirds of the National Guard of California is comprised in the 2nd Brigade located in San Francisco and towns adjoining the Bay, in all, 2,030 men, 1,800 located in San Francisco. There are nearly forty military companies in the city, but not all included in the Brigade, a few being independent companies. The military of San Francisco is unsurpassed in drill and "esprit de Corps" by any city in the Union, and to them and their efficient officers this picture is respectfully dedicated.

Brigade General John Hewston, Jr.; Staff: George W. Smiley, O. Livermork, C.B. Hinckley; Colonel W.H.L. Barnes, 1st Regiment Infantry, 499 men; Colonel J.W. McKenzie, 2nd, 517 men; Lt. Colonel A. Wason, 1st Bat. Inf., 221 men; Captain Isaac Bluxome, 1st Coast Artillery Guard, 124 men

Various uniforms, depicting many ranks and group, appear in the bottom panel. They include the following: Veteran Guard, S.F. Cadets, Ellsworth Rifles, Hewston Rifles, Garibaldi Guard, Sarsfield Guard, Irish-American Guard, Lafayette Guard, Sapeure Ponpir, Legion of St. Patrick, Germanis Rifles, City Guard, Shields Guard, Union Guard, Black Jager, Sumner Light Guard, McAlister Guard, Light Guard, National Guard, California Rifles, U.S. Infantry, Artillery of the United States, Brannan Guard, San Francisco Jager, Swiss Guard, Meagher Guard, Franklin Light Infantry, Steuben Guard, and Montgomery Guard.



To: the Office of the Adjutant General, State of California
By: Major General D.P. Hardy (Ret.) 1954


The 250th Coast Artillery Regiment is a tractor-drawn organization equipped with 155-mm guns. These guns can hurl a 95-pound projectile some 10 miles " Defenders of the West Coast"


CAMP MCQUAIDE TODAY

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Camp McQuaide Today



SGT JOSEPH STEVEN EORIO BATTERY D 250TH COAST ARTILLERY PICTURES

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Sgt. Joseph Steven Eorio Battery D, 250th Coast Artillery



CAMP MCQUAIDE: HISTORY OF MONTEREY BAY ACADEMY

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Camp McQuaide: History of the Monterey Bay Academy



CALIFORNIA STATE MILITARY MUSEUM IMAGES

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250th Coast Artillery Regiment, 1931

250th Coast Artillery Regiment (1st California)

251st Coast Artillery Regiment, Battery B



Return to the Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2:

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Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2



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11TH CAVALRY PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1919 TO 1940
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11th Cavalry Presidio of Monterey, 1919 to 1940


76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1922 TO 1940
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76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion


THE ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR, WW1
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Veterinary Corps in WW1


SERGEANT LEONARD MURPHY VETERINARY HOSPITAL NO. 18, A.E.F., WW1
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Leonard Murphy in WW1


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