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U.S. REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 23, SOUGY, FRANCE WW1


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U.S. REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 23, SOUGY, FRANCE WW1

REMOUNT DEPOT NO. 23 AT SOUGY FRANCE
Sougy is one of the Intermediate Remount Depots, was established August 2, 1918, and has been unanimously declared the finest campsite in France. Continuing construction as it was needed, the capacity grew to 4,000 and at the time of the Armistice was signed it reported that the Depot could, by using the corrals, accommodate 8,000 animals by the first of January 1919. The construction of the Remount Depot at Sougy was authorized May 10, 1918, and authorization by the French for occupation of the same was given June 30, 1918.

The first troops to arrive were “G” and “H” troops, 3rd Cavalry, August 2, 1918, the date of the opening of the Depot. Those two troops aided in the construction work aside from caring for the animals as they arrived. On September 6, 1918, Remount Squadron No. 317 and 318 arrived and were on duty November 11, 1918 the date of the Armistice.

Construction work at the Depot was slow due to lack of necessary materials. On September 6, 1918, the completion of the dipping vat, the office buildings, quarters and mess hall and the railroad spur were reported. Additional construction of stables were pushed and the necessity of preparation for heavy rainfall during the winter months kept large details at this work up until November 11, 1918. At that time the construction was over 50 per cent complete. The Deport was 100 per cent complete January 1, 1919.

Captain R.R. Allen, Third Cavalry, arrived with “G” and “H” troops of the Third Cavalry August 2, 1918. The personnel was augmented September 6, 1918, by the arrival of Remount Squadrons No. 317 and 318. November 18, 1918 Company “D”, 326th Labor Battalion, arrived for duty at Sougy and December 3, 1918, Company “A”, 513th Engineers, arrived and two days later Company “E” 513th Engineers arrived to aid in construction work. The personnel was augmented further December 16, 1918, by the arrival of Remount Squadron No. 331, and two days later Remount Squadron No. 324 arrived. On February 12, 1919, Remount Squadron No. 317 was ordered from Sougy to Carbon Blanc for duty. On March the 17th, 1919, Company “I”, 801st Pioneer Infantry reported for duty and on March 28, 1919, Pack Train No. 309 arrived at Sougy for duty. On April 7, 1919, Remount Squadron No. 313 arrived from Carbon Blanc for duty. The influx of animals at that time necessitated the procurement of additional personnel. On April 11, 1919, Pack Train No. 307 arrived and the following day Pack Train No. 306 reported. On April 13, 1919, Pack Train No. 327 arrived at Sougy, at the time as did Depot Service Company No. 35. The following day Pack Train No 323 reported for duty. On April 16, 1919, Depot Service Company No. 37 reported for duty, and on April 20, 1919, Pack Train No. 301 arrived and two days later Pack Train No. 318 also reported. On April 24, 1919, Depot Service Company No. 20 arrived and 5 days later Depot Service Company No. 41 reported. On the same date Company “I”, 801st Pioneer Infantry was released from duty from the Remount Service. On April the 28th, 1919, Pack Train No. 330 and detachment Company “E”, 109th Engineer Service Battalion reported for duty. On April 29th, Pack Trains No. 305, 319, 322, 324, and 326 reported. On May 5, 1919, Pack Train No. 308 reported for duty and on May 10, 1919, Pack Train No. 329 arrived. On May 8, 1919, Pack Trains No. 306, 307, and 309 were ordered to Tours for duty in the Headquarters of the S.O.S. (Service of Supply) Stables. On May 19, 1919, Depot Service Companies No. 20, 35, 37 and 41 were released from Remount duty. On the same date Pack Trains No. 301, 305, 308, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, and 330 were released from the Remount Service. On May 21, 1919, Remount Squadrons No. 313, 318, and 321 were placed on the priority list for return to the United States, and on May 27, 1919, Remount Squadrons No. 324 and 331 were placed on the priority list for return to the United States, and on May 28, 1919, Company “D” 326th Service Battalion was released from duty in the Remount Service.

Captain R.R. Allen who assumed command of the Remount Depot at Sougy August 2, 1918, was relieved by Major James Herman, Third Cavalry, November 2, 1918. Major Herman was relieved November 15, 1918, by Colonel Charles B. Amory, Infantry, who remained in command until relieved by Major David T. Dana, Q.M. Corps, December 29, 1918. Major Dana was relieved March the 22nd, 1919, by Lt. Col. C.B. Amory, Infantry. Col. Amory remained in command at Sougy until the Depot was evacuated, June 5th, 1919.

The Remount Depot at Sougy was authorized May 10, 1918, and was ideally situated along the United States main line of communication, 18 miles below Nevers (Nievre). The Depot occupied approximately 100 acres and the soil practically al sand, with excellent drainage and rock quarries in the Depot. The water supply was abundant and was obtained from wells sunk on the edge of the Loire River.

When arrangements were made with the French Government to dispose of several thousands of animals from the U.S. Remount Depots, 825 animals were convoyed to places designated by the French for sale.

The following is a table showing the prices received at Sougy for animals disposed of, both by auction and private sale, in classes, and the average prices received in francs:

A Board of Officers of the Remount Service made a survey of the Depot, and a report made regarding existing conditions. On June 5, 1919, the Depot was officially closed and turned over to the French authorities, through the C.G., Intermediate Section.

Construction of this Depot was well carried out; improved type of stables being installed. A private railroad siding also added to the efficiency of the Depot.

All ground occupied by the Depot was requisitioned and leased by the United States Rents, Requisitions and Claim Service.


YMCA hot chocolatto is handed out to the boys of the 82nd Division. World War 1


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U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country’s history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved “Horse and Mule”. There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

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