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11TH CAVALRY PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, CA. 1919 TO 1940



This page belongs to greg krenzelok.


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Presidio of Monterey, April 29, 1932, Soldier Field, left to right: 11th Cavalry, 11 escort wagons, 5 mountain wagons (probably the 76th FA), 5 escort wagons (probably the 76th FA), motor car, 5 motor trucks, more motor vehicles, the 76th Field Artillery in background with a limber and 75mm gun, limber and caisson (a section) and could be pack animals. Escort and mountain wagons mule drawn, horse mounted NCO’s in front of wagons, officer mounted with saber in front of them. North side barracks with officer housing in far background. A great picture and the beginning of mechanization. . Image Source: DLIFLC & POM Archives


BRIEF HISTORY, HISTORICAL NOTES, 11TH CAVALRY
The 11th Cavalry arrived at the Presidio of Monterey in July 1919. From 1916 on through the First World War it had been stationed on the Mexican Border. By 1919 its regimental headquarters and one squadron were stationed at Fort Myer, Virginia, and the other elements were brought together from Georgia, Wyoming, and California-Mexico border.

The Army had reactivated the Presidio of Monterey in 1902, and had built an austere regimental post with wooden barracks and stables. A series of infantry and cavalry units had rotated through during the years before the First World War.

When the regiment arrived at the Presidio, its authorized strength was 26 officers and 661 enlisted men. In 1921 it was reduced to two squadrons of three troops each. In 1922 it was joined by the 2nd Battalion of the 76th Field Artillery from Fort Lewis, Washington. The two units trained at nearby Gigling Reservation, purchased by the War Department in 1917.

The officers and men of the regiment were quickly accepted into the local community. The mounted troopers and horse-drawn artillerymen were the highlight of many community parades. In 1924 an oil tank farm caught fire just off the post. During the three days soldiers and civilians fought the fire, twenty-six people died, including two soldiers. Private Bolio Road is named after one of them.

Regimental life fell into a peacetime routine of limited training and provincial social activities. Polo and riding competitions occupied the officers. One lieutenant won the all-army equestrian championship in 1939. The regimental mascot from 1920 until his death in 1935 was “Sgt. Beans,” whose memorial plague can still be seen, and after whom a street was named. The small post cemetery reveals the names of many of the regiment’s members, and their wives and children.

The regiment gradually transformed the Presidio into a modern Army post, adding a gymnasium, officers club, headquarters building, swimming pool, tennis courts, and quartermasters warehouse (Tin Barn), and reforesting portions of the post. Fitch Avenue is named after Colonel Roger S. Fitch, who was particularly active in post beautification (1928-30).

The regiment was assigned to the 3rd Cavalry Division on 15 August 1927 and relieved on 1 May 1932 and assigned to the 2nd Cavalry Division in April 1933.

The 30th Infantry from the Presidio of San Francisco conducted Civilian Military Training Camps for the reserve officers at the Del Monte Hotel (now the Naval Postgraduate School) in the 1920’s and on the Presidio itself from 1932 until 1940. The 11th Cavalry doubtless lent assistance.

In April 1933, the regiment assumed command and control of the Monterey Civilian Conservation Corps District until mid-1934. The regiment provided cadre for the Civilian Conservation Corps. This includes some improvements to the post, such as cement bleachers facing Soldiers Field. Supported the construction and supervision of CCC camps in Northern California from 1933-39.

The regiment also provided colorful extras for several Hollywood westerns, including “Sergeant Murphy” starring Ronald Reagan. The regiment participated in the opening ceremonies for the Golden Gate Bridge in June 1937.

Maintained habitual summer training relationships with the 162d Cavalry Brigade, 323d Cavalry regiment and the 162d MG Sq. at Del Monte, California. Relieved in 10 October 1940 from the 2nd Cavalry Division and assigned November 1940 to the Fourth Army. As the storm clouds of war gathered, the regiment was mobilized to patrol the Mexican border in Southern California. Transferred 7 November 1941 to Camp Seeley, California and was located there 7 December 1941.

From there it was transferred in 1942 to Fort Benning, Georgia, where it was one of the last two mounted cavalry regiments to be converted to mechanized cavalry. It was never to return to Monterey.

Source: POM Archives, labeled: Historical Notes, 11th Cavalry, ATFL-MH Dec 89


THE 9TH CAVALRY IN MONTEREY 1902-1904
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The 9th Cavalry in Monterey 1902-1904

THE 11TH CAVALRY 1901 TO 1923
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The 11th Cavalry 1901 to 1923

THE PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY IN THE 1920's and 1930’s
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The Presidio of Monterey in the 1920's and 1930’s

THE PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY 1938
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The Presidio of Monterey 1938


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The Presidio of Monterey, Ca. cavalry post as it was in 1936. Adaptation by Greg Krenzelok of a 1936 aerial image located at the POM Archive. I would like to thank Lisa Crunk, Archivist, DLIFLC, POM Archives for her help in putting together so much of the material for this website.


LAYOUT OF THE PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY PRE-1940
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Layout of the Presidio of Monterey Pre-1940


COMMANDERS, 11TH CAVALRY, PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, Ca.


Colonel Ralph M. Parker commanded the 11th Cavalry and post at the Presidio of Monterey from May 29, 1933 to February 15, 1936. Read about him and other 11th Cavalry commanders by clicking on the link below. Source: DLIFLC & POM Archives

Colonel James Lockett – August 1917 to 15 June 1919.

Colonel Nathaniel F. McClure – 19 August 1919 to February 1920.

Colonel James B. Erwin – 16 February 1920 to 11 July 1920.

Lt. Colonel Alvin C. Gillem – 11 July 1920 to 9 December 1920.

Colonel John M. Jenkins – 9 December 1920 to 1 July 1923.

Colonel Joseph E. Cusack – 1 July 1923 to 1 September 1923.

Lt. Colonel Howard C. Tatum – 1 September 1923 to 16 September 1923.

Colonel Herbert J. Brees – 16 September 1923 to 10 June 1925.

Lt. Colonel C. Tatum – 10 June 1925 to 1 July 1925.

Lt. Colonel William W. Gordon – 1 July 1925 to 9 September 1925

Colonel Leon B. Kromer – 9 September 1925 to 2 August 1928.

Lt. Colonel Joseph A. Baer – 2 August 1928 to 8 October 1928.

Colonel Roger S. Fitch – 8 October 1928 to 11 October 1930.

Lt. Colonel Jerome G. Pillow – 11 October 1930 to 3 January 1931.

Colonel Ben Lear – 3 January 1931 to 30 June 1933.

Colonel Ralph M. Parker – 30 June 1933 to 5 February 1936.

Major Richard W. Cooksey – 5 February 1936 to 29 February 1936.

Colonel Troup Miller – 19 February 1936 to 1 May 1938.

Lt. Colonel William H. W. Young – 1 May 1938 to 15 June 1938.

Lt. Colonel James E. Slack – 15 June 1938 to 28 June 1938.

Colonel Homer N. Groninger – 28 June 1938 to 1 November 1940.

Lt. Colonel John T. McLane – 1 November 1940 to 27 November 1940.

Colonel Harold M. Raynor – 27 November 1940 to 31 December 1941.

(Source: United States Army Order of Battle 1919-1941, author: Lt. Col. (Retired) Steven E. Clay, Volume II, page 623)


ELEVENTH CAVALRY COMMANDERS AND HISTORIES 1901 TO 1941
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Commanders 11th Cavalry 1901 to 1941



HABS image:2666-A-15 – NORTHEAST CORNER, SOLDIER FIELD, LOOKING SOUTHEAST TOWARD THE RECREATION HALL AND MONTEREY BAY, SHOWING EAST DITCH AND A SECTION OF LOW WALL. No date, probably ca. 1935. Photographer unknown. Original silver gelatin print measures 13.1 cm by 7.3 cm, flush mounted on mat board. - Presidio of Monterey, Soldier Field, Monterey, Monterey County, CA. Source: HABS No. CA - 2266 - A -15.

HISTORICAL AMERICAN BUILDING SURVEY (HABS)1996, SOLDIER FIELD, POM
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Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), Soldier Field, POM




11th Cavalry: Sid Stark with his horse, El Campo, Camp Lockett 1942. Image Source: DLIFLC & POM Archives

DEFENDING THE BORDER (CAMP LOCKETT)
The 11th Cavalry at Camp Seeley, Camp Morena and Camp Lockett
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Defending the Border


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Fiddler’s Green is the legendary afterlife imagined by Cavalrymen. The story of Fiddler's Green was published in 1923, in the Cavalry Journal. According to the Cavalry Journal, “Fiddler’s Green” was inspired by a story told by Captain “Sammy” Pearson at a campfire in the Medicine Bow Mountains of Wyoming. Having mentioned Fiddler’s Green and found that no one appeared to have heard of it, Pearson indignantly asserted that every good cavalryman ought to know of Fiddler’s Green. We dedicate this space for the memory of all the men of the 11th Cavalry both pass and present. And those that continue carry on the tradition of the 11th Cavalry who have passed on to Fiddler’s Green. We remember and salute you.

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March 26, 2013

Note: I would like to thank Wes Slimmer for contacting me and sharing he’s thoughts with us. We have posted the links to the 11th Cavalry Websites below. We shared your love for the 11th Cavalry pass and present. We have a lot of great things to share in the future on this website. – Thanks Wes – Greg Krenzelok

Greg
I thank you for the in depth information you have supplied. I posted a link on the three 11th CAV sites and people are checking in to see your information. If you're not aware, we are extremely proud of the 11th, and its history. We relish information from our past. If you have time, check in to the 11th ACVVC (11th Armored Cavalry, Vietnam and Cambodia -- 11thcavnam.com) and CavLand.com.

Thanks again for your input to our history. Yours has become one of my very favorite sites.

Wes Slimmer
1-how 11ACR
Vietnam 67 – 68

11th ACVVC Website – The 11th Armored Cavalry’s Veterans of Vietnam and Cambodia:
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11th ACVVC

CavLand.com Website – Dedicated to past and current members of the 11th ACR, Their friends and families.
CavLand.com

The Blackhorse Association - The official Blackhorse Association website
The Blackhorse Association


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76TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, 1922 TO 1940
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76th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Battalion


FORT ORD U.S. ARMY STATION VETERINARY HOSPITAL (HORSE) WW2
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Fort Ord U.S. Army Station Veterinary Hospital (Horse) WW2


THE ARMY VETERINARY SERVICE DURING THE GREAT WAR, WW1
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Veterinary Corps in WW1


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U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS HISTORICAL PRESERVATION GROUP

Motto: “Illic est Vires in Numerus” There is Strength in Numbers

“Working Hard to Preserve Our Country’s History wherever it is being lost”

U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group is a group of individuals that are concerned about the preservation of the History of the Veterinary Corps, Remount Service and Cavalry or wherever our country’s history is being lost in conjunction with our beloved “Horse and Mule”. There is no cost to join and membership is for life. We believe by uniting together in numbers we will be a more powerful force to be heard. Our membership list is private and only used to contact our members. Email us and become a member.

Greg Krenzelok
gregkrenzelok@msn.com

FACEBOOK: U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group

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U.S. Army Veterinary Corps Historical Preservation Group