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Sarah Gowen, [John "Buck"6, William5, John4, William3, Thomas2, Mihil1] daughter of John "Buck" Gowen and Lettice "Letty" Winn Bearden Gowen, was born June 5, 1774 in South Carolina. 

 

Sarah Gowen was married March 10, 1789, at the age of 14, to Thomas William Easley, probably against the will of her father.  Thomas William Easley who was born May 8, 1761 [or 1767] in Granville County, North Carolina, was the son of Richard Millington Easley and Elizabeth Easley, according to "DAR Lineage Book," Volume 37.

 

Richard Millington Easley and other members of the Easley family settled in Greenville District in 1783 shortly after the family of John "Buck" Gowen arrived there.  In 1788, Richard Millington Easley was indicted for "raising a riot in the courtyard," according to Greenville County Criminal Court records researched by Virginia Easley DeMarce, a descendant and a Foundation Editorial Boardmember.

 

Richard Millington Easley died there in 1806, and John "Buck" Gowen was mentioned frequently in his estate settlement.  First Lt. John Easley, uncle of Thomas William Easley, had married Anne Gowen, aunt of Sarah Gowen Easley, about 1765.

 

Shortly after his marriage Thomas William Easley removed to Spartanburg District, South Carolina.  In 1790 he received a sheriff's deed of land in District 96, according to Greenville County Deed Book B, page 237.  His father, Richard Millington Easley and his father-in-law, Maj. John "Buck" Gowen were witnesses to the deed.

 

On June 23, 1792 Thomas William Easley "of Greenville County, Washington District" received a deed to land on "the middle Tyger River" from John Clayton, according to Greenville County Deed Book C, page 292.  Witnesses were his father-in-law John "Buck" Gowen, his wife's kinsman, Allen Gowen and V. Anderson.  Allen Gowen had appeared as the head of a household in the 1786 state census of Greenville County:

 

          "Gowen, Allen                                white male  over 16

                                                                   white female"

 

After his wife died, he and Samuel Easley, also a widower, lived together on the South Pacolet River.  He was a taxpayer in the 1793 tax list of Person County, North Carolina.

 

On September 17, 1792 "William Easley" and Benjamin Boyd witnessed a deed from "Levi Goyen," possibly a Melungeon relative of Sarah Gowen, according to the research of Dennis L. Pettit, Gowen family researcher of Dallas, Texas.  The deed was executed by "Levi Goyen, a free mulatto of Fairfield County, South Carolina wherein he sold land [in Davidson County, Tennessee] which he inherited from his brother David Goyen who was killed by Indians in Davidson County, Tennessee."

 

On October 1, 1794 Allan Gowen deeded property on the South Pacolet River to William Easley, his niece's husband, according to Greenville County Deed Book D, page 72.  John "Buck" Gowen, William Gowen and William Anderson were witnesses to the deed.  Thomas William Easley resold the property April 6, 1797 to Merrick Herrington, according to Greenville County Deed Book D, page 349.

 

On October 7, 1797, Thomas William Easley purchased the property of Moses Clayton who had removed to Madison County, Kentucky, according Greenville County Deed Book E, page 162.  William Gowen, Samuel Bell and Isham Clayton witnessed the document.

 

Thomas William Easley was enumerated in the 1800 census of Greenville County as the head of a household.  About the turn of the century he received a grant of 440 acres on Motlow Creek, according to Greenville County Land Grant Book D, page 246.

 

About 1801 Thomas William Easley received a land grant of 610 acres on Beaverdam Creek of the Middle Tyger River, according to Greenville Land Grant Book F, page 111.  Shortly afterward, he and Gabriel Benson received a joint patent to 570 acres on the Tyger River, according to Greenville County Land Grant Book F, page 219.

 

"William Easley, sheriff of Greenville County" gave a sheriff's deed to land of Robert Black to Daniel McMahan in 1801, ac­cording to Greenville County Deed Book F, page 489.

 

Thomas William Easley received a deed to land on Barton's Creek of the South Tyger River from Henry Bates December 29, 1801, according to Greenville County Deed Book F, page 388.  In 1802 Thomas William Easley sold his Barton's Creek land to Laborn Loftis, according to Greenville County Deed Book F, page 389.  Witnesses were Francis Adams, Solomon Loftis and Jesse Allen.

 

In 1808 Thomas William Easley sold the land on Motlow Creek he had purchased from John Clayton to Wiley H. Brown, according to Greenville County Deed Book H, page 116.  Witnesses were Pleasant Easley and Jeremiah Brown.  Later in the year, Thomas William Easley sold his land on the Middle Tyger River to Shields Booker, according to Greenville County Deed Book H, page 453.  James Blassingame, Jeremiah Brown and Rice F. Ross were witnesses.

 

Sarah Gowen Easley was not mentioned in the will of her father written August 20, 1809.  It may have been that he considered her a disobedient daughter.  He may have been disappointed that she would leave him as he faced death.  Or he may have considered it impractical for her in Tennessee to participate in the estate.

 

Before the death of his father-in-law in 1809, Thomas William Easley removed to Hickman County, Tennessee, settling about 30 miles southwest of Nashville along with other members of the Easley family.  He purchased 240 acres on "the west side of Pine River" from William Joslin October 17, 1809, according to Hickman County Deed Book ABC, page 24.  The county court met at his home in 1809.  On July 22, 1811 he bought 153 acres on Duck Creek fork of Pine River from John Gary Blount, according to Hickman County Deed Book ABC, page 95.  In July 1812 Thomas William Easley "of Hickman County" was witness to a deed of Shields Booker.  Elizabeth Easley accompanied her son when he removed to Hickman County and died there June 14, 1814, according to Anita Louise Neilson, a descendant of Oxford, Mississippi.  Thomas William Easley was elected to the Tennessee State Legislature in the 10th, 11th and 12th General Assemblies, 1813-19 as the representative of Hickman and Dickson Counties. 

 

On November 6, 1816 Thomas William Easley received a deed from Joseph Wilson, according to Hickman County Deed Book ABC, page 232.  Witnesses were John G. Easley and Millington Easley.  The family owned considerable land in the 6th Civil District north of Keys Branch. 

 

On July 4, 1819 Thomas William Easley made a gift deed of four Negroes to his daughter, Matilda Easley Estes, according to Hickman County Deed Book E, page 40.  His son, Richard Millington Easley was a witness.

 

In 1820 he was enumerated as the head of a household in Hickman County.  In 1820 he was elected to fill a vacancy and served in the 13th General Assembly from June 26, 1820 until September 16, 1821.  He appeared before a notary public in Hickman County October 7, 1824 and received power of attor­ney for Gabriel Benson, a relative, before Benson removed to Marion, Alabama.

 

Thomas William Easley died in Hickman County May 20, 1826.  Sarah Gowen Easley was recorded as the head of household in the 1830 census of Hickman County:

 

          "Easley, Sarah                                 white female          50-60

                                                                   white male             15-20

                                                                   white female          15-20

                                                                   white female          10-15"

 

Sarah Gowen Easley appeared in the 1850 census of Hickman County at age 76 living in the home of her youngest son.  She died there October 8, 1852.  She and her husband were buried in Easley Cemetery, later called Hardy Petty Cemetery.

 

Children born to Thomas William Easley and Sarah Gowen Easley include:

 

          Richard Millington Easley                         born March 5, 1790

          Kindness B. Easley                                     born September 24, 1792

          Matilda Easley                                             born March 1, 1795

          John Gowen Easley                                     born January 1, 1798

          Mahulda Allen Easley                                 born April 21, 1800

          Alice Letty Gowen Easley                          born August 5, 1802

          Elizabeth Gowen Easley                             born February 23, 1805

          Mary "Polly" Easley                                    born August 6, 1807

          Minerva Easley                                           born January 10, 1810

          Sarah Gowen Easley                                   born August 29, 1812

          William Benson Easley                              born October 29, 1814

          Permelia Easley                                          born June 20, 1817

          Sarah Margaret Easley                                born October 5, 1819

 

Richard Millington Easley, son of Thomas William Easley and Sarah Gowen Easley, was born March 5, 1790 probably in Greenville County, South Carolina. He was brought to Hickman County, Tennessee by his parents in 1809.

 

He was elected a captain in the Hickman County militia at age 20 in 1810, according to "History of Hickman County, Tennessee."  He was married about 1812 to Mary Jones, daughter of Solomon Jones and Chrissie Alston Jones.  On February 6, 1813 he received a deed to 108 acres from Elisha Green, according to Hickman County Deed Book ABC, page 180.  On January 20, 1814 he sold the land to William Phillips, according to Hickman County Deed Book ABC, page 180.  William Easley, his father, and Wallace D. Jones were witnesses.  At the same time he purchased 123 acres on Pine River from William Phoenix, according to Hickman County Deed Book ABC, page 181.

 

He served as a sergeant in Capt. Garrett Lane's militia company in the War of 1812.  Also included in this command were David Easley and Allen Easley.  Willington Easley received a deed August 14, 1816 to 50 acres on Pine River from George Keyes, according to Hickman County Deed Book ABC, page 224.

 

Richard Millington Easley was elected County Court Clerk in 1820.  He was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Hickman County.  He received a land grant in Hickman County in 1825.  He was again captain of the militia in 1827. 

 

He reappeared in the 1830 enumeration:

 

          "Easley, Millington                         white male                     40-50

                                                                   white female                  30-40

                                                                   white male                       5-10

                                                                   white female                    5-10

                                                                   white male                       5-10

                                                                   white female                      0-5

                                                                   white male                         0-5

                                                                   white female                      0-5

                                                                   white male                          0-5

                                                                   white male                     20-30"

 

He was appointed, along with his brother-in-law Robert Sheegog to solicit subscriptions for Planters Bank of Tennessee in 1833.  Martha Jones Easley died in 1830, according to the research of J. Totten, and Richard Millington Easley was remarried about 1832 to Cynthia Barr, daughter of the Rev. James Barr, early Presbyterian preacher of the county.  She was born about 1815.

 

According to "History of Hickman County, Tennessee," "The Easleys owned most of the level bench land north of Key's branch.  On this land a circular racetrack a mile in length was situated.  Here between 1825 and 1840 many dollars, horses and slaves changed hands as the result of bets on the several horses that here contested."

 

Richard Millington Easley appeared as the head of Household 632-89 in the 1850 census of Hickman County.  The family consisted of:

 

          "Easley,               Millington                               60, born in SC

                                       Cinthia                                    45, born in TN

                                       Dennis                                     20, born in TN

                                       Francis                                    17, born in TN

                                       Annah                                      12, born in TN

                                       Rebecca                                     5, born in TN

                                       Lavena                                       2, born in TN"

 

Children born to Richard Millington Easley and Mary Jones Easley include:

 

          Solomon Jones Easley                                               born in 1819

          Millington Easley                                                       born about 1820

          Mary Jones Easley                                                      born about 1822

          Samuel Easley                                                            born about 1828

          Dennis Jones Easley                                                   born in 1830

 

Children born to Richard Millington Easley and Cynthia Barr Easley include:

 

          Francis M. "Frank" Easley                                     born in 1833

              [daughter]                                                           born about 1834

              [daughter]                                                          born about 1836

          Annah Easley                                                          born in 1838

              [daughter]                                                           born about 1840

          Rebecca Easley                                                       born in 1845

          Lavena Easley                                                         born in 1848

 

Solomon Jones Easley, son of Richard Millington Easley and Mary Jones Easley and a namesake of his grandfather, was born about 1816 in Hickman County.  He was married about 1838 to Jane Webb who was born about 1820.  He was elected lieutenant-colonel in 1861 in the 98th Militia, according to "History of Hickman County, Tennessee."

 

Solomon Jones Easley was enumerated as the head of Household No. 629-88 in the 1850 census of Hickman County listed as:

 

          "Easley,               Solomon                                         31, born in TN

                                       Jane                                                29, born in TN

                                       William                                           11, born in TN

                                       Millington                                       10, born in TN

                                       Martha                                              6, born in TN

                                       Robert                                               8, born in TN

                                       Thomas                                            5, born in TN

                                       Samuel                                       5/12, born in TN"

 

Children born to Solomon Jones Easley and Jane Webb Easley include:

 

          William T. Easley                                               born October 4, 1838

          Millington Easley                                               born in 1840

          Robert Easley                                                     born in 1842

          Martha Easley                                                     born in 1844

          Thomas Easley                                                    born in 1845

          Samuel Easley                                                     born in 1850

 

William T. Easley, son of Solomon Jones Easley and Jane Easley, was born October 4, 1838 in Hickman County.  He was married about 1860 to Emily Petty, daughter of Hardy Petty.  William T. Easley was killed in a hunting accident the day after Christmas in 1870, according to "History of Hickman County, Tennessee:"  

 

"On the day of his death he was a guest of Joseph Webb who lived on Pine River below Vernon.  With his uncles, J. T. Webb and D. T. Webb he was engaged in a deer chase.  While they were galloping through the woods a limb struck D. T. Webb's gun, causing a dis­charge.  The contents of the gun struck Easley, killing him."

 

Emily Petty Easley died March 23, 1882.  Children born to them are unknown.

 

Millington Easley, daughter of Solomon Jones Easley and Jane Easley, was born in 1840.  She appeared in the 1850 census of her father's household as a 10-year-old.  She was married as the second wife of a man named Brashear, according to "Ansearching News," Volume 1968.  Virginia Easley DeMarce shows her death on May 17, 1852.

 

Robert Easley, son of Solomon Jones Easley and Jane Easley, was born in 1842.  He appeared as an eight-year-old in the 1850 census of his father's household.  "Robert M. Easley" enlisted in Company G, Tenth Tennessee Cavalry Regiment which was organized in the summer of 1862.

 

Martha Easley, daughter of Solomon Jones Easley and Jane Easley, was born in 1844.  She appeared in her father's household as a six-year-old in the 1850 census of Hickman County.  Of this individual nothing more is known.

 

Thomas Easley, son of Solomon Jones Easley and Jane Easley, was born in 1845.  He appeared in his father's household as a five-year-old in the 1850 census of Hickman County.  Of this individual nothing more is known.

 

Samuel Easley, son of Solomon Jones Easley and Jane Easley, was born in 1850 and appeared in his father's household in the census of that year at age two months.  "Samuel Easley" was married December 10, 1873 to Malinda Harbison, according to Hickman County Marriage Book 2, page 283.

 

Millington Easley, son of Richard Millington Easley and Mary Jones Easley was born about 1820.

 

Mary Jones Easley, daughter of Richard Millington Easley and Mary Jones Easley, was born about 1822.  She was married about 1839 to William Benjamin Wilson.

 

Samuel Easley, son of Richard Millington Easley and Mary Jones Easley, was born about 1828 in Hickman County.

 

"History of Hickman County, Tennessee" reports of him:

 

"In the spring of 1849 Samuel Easley, Ephriam Willey and William C. Thompson entered into an agreement to go to the California gold fields.  If any one of them failed to go he was to forfeit $100 to those who went.  Easley went alone, but never demanded payment of the forfeits."  He amassed a fortune in California and died there a bachelor."

 

The research of Virginia Easley DeMarce shows that Samuel Easley died in 1849 shortly after reaching California, casting some doubt on the "amassed fortune."

 

Dennis Jones Easley, son of Richard Millington Easley and Mary Jones Easley, was born in 1830.  He appeared as a 20-year-old in his father's household in the 1850 census of Hickman County.  He enlisted in Company B, 42nd Tennessee Infantry Regiment which was organized in October 1861 and served as a sharpshooter and quarter-master.  When he died, he was buried in Easley [Hardy Petty] Cemetery near Vernon, Tennessee in an unmarked grave.

 

Francis M. "Frank" Easley, son of Richard Millington Easley and Cynthia Barr Easley, was born in 1833.  He appeared as a 17-year-old in the 1850 census of his father's household.  He became an early-day physician in Hickman County.

 

A daughter [Emeline Easley?] was born about 1834 to Richard Millington Easley and Cynthia Barr Easley, according to the research of Virginia Easley DeMarce.  Of this individual nothing more is known.

 

A daughter [Priscilla Easley?] was born about 1836 to Richard Millington Easley and Cynthia Barr Easley, according to the research of Virginia Easley DeMarce.  Of this individual nothing more is known.

 

Annah Easley, daughter of Richard Millington Easley and Mary Jones Easley, was born in 1838.  She appeared in the 1850 census of her father's household as a 12-year-old.  It is believed that she was married about 1858 to Adam Wilson.

 

A daughter was born about 1840 to Richard Millington Easley and Cynthia Barr Easley, according to the research of Virginia Easley DeMarce.  Of this individual nothing more is known.

 

Rebecca Easley, daughter of Richard Millington Easley and Cynthia Barr Easley, was born in 1845.  She appeared in her father's household in the 1850 census of Hickman County as a five-year-old.  "Rebecca A. Easley," was married September 26, 1866 to John V. Gray, according to "Marriages of Hickman County, Tennessee."

 

Lavena Easley, daughter of Richard Millington Easley and Cynthia Barr Easley, was born in 1848.  She appeared in her father's household in the 1850 census of Hickman County as a two-year-old.  Of this individual nothing more is known.

 

Kindness B. Easley, daughter of Thomas William Easley and Sarah Gowen Easley, was born September 24, 1792 probably in Greeenville District.  Of this individual nothing more is known.

 

Matilda Easley, daughter of Thomas William Easleyand Sarah Gowen Easley, was born March 1, 1795, probably in Greenville District.  She was married about 1813 to Robert Estes who died about 1819.  Her father made a gift deed to her of four negroes July 4, 1819.  She was enumerated in the 1820 census of Hickman County as the head of a household.  She was remarried about 1821 to Robert Totty, Jr. who was born in 1796 in Halifax County, North Carolina.  He died in 1859, and she died in 1862.

 

Children born to Robert Estes and Matilda Easley Estes in­clude:

 

          Mansfield W. Estes                                       born about 1815

          Louisa Estes                                                  born about 1817

 

Children born to Robert Totty and Matilda Easley Estes Totty include:

 

          William C. Totty                                                born about 1823

          Francis M. Totty                                                 born about 1827

          John E. Totty                                                       born in 1830

          Sarah Totty                                                          born in 1832

          Lewis Perkins Totty                                           born in 1835

          Elizabeth Totty                                                   born in 1837

 

Louisa Estes, daughter of Robert Estes and Matilda Easley Estes, was born about 1817 in Hickman County.  She was married about 1836 to James E. Sheegog.  They later lived in Cooke County, Texas, according to Virginia Easley DeMarce.

 

William C. Totty, son of Robert Totty and Matilda Easley Estes Totty, was born about 1823 in Hickman County.  He was married about 1845 to Malena Tucker, according to the research of Dennis L. Pettit.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Sarah Totty                                                          born in 1847

 

Sarah Totty, daughter of William C. Totty and Malena Tucker, was born in 1847.  She was married December 24, 1875 to James A. Mathis.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Robert L. Mathis                                                        born October 30, 1876

 

Robert L. Mathis, son of James A. Mathis and Sarah Totty Mathis, was born October 30, 1876.  He was married in 1912 in Red River County, Texas to Hattie P. Turk. 

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Jimmie E. Mathis                                                        born in 1913

 

Jimmie E. Mathis, daughter of Robert L. Mathis and Hattie P. Turk Mathis, was born in 1913 in Red River County.  She was married to Walter M. Pettit in Red River County about 1933.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Dennis L. Pettit                                         born September 17, 1935

 

Dennis L. Pettit, son of Walter M. Pettit and Jimmie E. Mathis Pettit, was born in Red River County September 17, 1935.  He died unmarried in Dallas, Texas in 1989.  He was a meticulous researcher of the Gowen family history and show a great con­cern for documentation.

 

John Gowen Easley, son of Thomas William Easley and Sarah Gowen Easley and a namesake of his grandfather, was born January 1, 1798 in Spartanburg District. according to the bible of Robert Sheegon reproduced in "Maury County, Tennessee Cousins." "John Easley" received a Tennessee land grant in 1823, according to Tennessee Land Grant Book W, page 208 in Tennessee State Archives.  Another grant was made to "John Easley" in Hickman County, Tennessee in 1824.  He was an early-day hotelkeeper at Centerville, Tennessee, according to "History of Hickman County, Tennessee."

 

He was enumerated in the 1830 census of Hickman County as:

 

          "Easley, John                          white male                               30-40

                                                          white female                            30-40

                                                          white female                            10-15

                                                          white male                                5-10

                                                          white male                                5-10"

         

He was remarried about 1843, wife's name Sarah.  He re­moved in 1846 to Pemiscot County, Missouri in the extreme southeastern portion of the state.  He was killed there in the early stages of the Civil War trying to protect his property from a foraging party.  His family fled to Cairo, Illinois.

 

Children born to John Gowen Easley and Sarah Easley, ac­cording to the family bible, include:

 

          Octavina Easley                                        born September 9, 1845

          Carolina Easley                                        born February 5, 1847

          Josephine Easley                                       born May 1, 1849

          Thomas G. Easley                                     born October 23, 1850

          Peter Easley                                               born August 14, 1852

          Jennie Easley                                             born December 29, 1853

          Elenore Easley [twin]                                born December 5, 1856

          Robert Easley [twin]                                  born December 5, 1856

 

Octavina Easley, daughter of John Gowen Easley and Sarah Easley, was born September 9, 1845 in Hickman County.  She was married about 1867 to D. H. Waters.  She died in 1929.  No children were born to them. 

 

Carolina Easley, daughter of John Gowen Easley and Sarah Easley, was born February 5, 1847 in Pemiscot County, ac­cording to the family bible.

 

Josephine Easley, daughter of John Gowen Easley and Sarah Easley, was born May 1, 1849 in Caddo Parish, Louisiana.  She was married about 1869 to William Mc­Cabe.  She died about 1904.

 

Thomas G. Easley, son of John Gowen Easley and Sarah Easley, was born October 23, 1850 in Pemiscot County, ac­cording to the family bible.  He was married about 1873 to Emma Gunther in Cairo.

 

Peter Easley, son of John Gowen Easley and Sarah Easley, was born August 14, 1852 in Pemiscot County, according to the family bible.  He was married about 1875, wife's name Victoria.

 

Jennie Easley, daughter of John Gowen Easley and Sarah Easley, was born December 29, 1853 in Pemiscot County, ac­cording to the family bible. 

 

Elenore Easley, twin daughter of John Gowen Easley and Sarah Easley, was born December 5, 1856 at Carruthersville in Pemiscot County. 

 

Robert Easley, twin son of John Gowen Easley and Sarah Easley, was born December 5, 1856 at Carruthersville in Pemiscot County.  He removed to Antioch, California about 1904.  He died there in 1916.  He retained the family bible which was made available to Virginia Easley DeMarce for re­search by Mrs. William Easley of Los Angeles in 1973.

 

Mahulda Allen Easley, daughter of Thomas William Easley and Sarah Gowen Easley, was born April 21, 1800 in Greenville District, according to "Southern Lineages."  On October 17, 1817 she was married to Charles Bowen in Hickman County, Tennessee.  He was born in Pendleton District, South Carolina February 17, 1791 to Robert Bowen and Mary Gillespie Bowen who had migrated to Hickman County.

 

Charles Bowen removed his family to Oxford, Mississippi sometime between 1826 and 1843.  He died there in Lafayette County, Mississippi May 3, 1843.  His widow died October 21, 1868 in Tallahatchee County, Mississippi.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Narcissa Bowen                                             born in 1818

          Mary Caroline Bowen                                    born October 8, 1826

          Sarah Bowen                                                   born about 1829

          Rebecca Bowen                                              born about 1831

          Anne Bowen                                                   born about 1834

          William Bolivar Bowen                                born about 1836

          Amanda Josephine Bowen                            born about 1840

 

Narcissa Bowen, daughter of Charles Bowen and Mahulda Allen Easley Bowen, was born in 1818, ac­cording to "DAR Lineage Book," Volume 146, page 146.  She was probably born in Hickman County, Ten­nessee.  About 1835 she was mar­ried to James M. Howry who was born in 1804.  They removed about 1838 to Ox­ford, Mississippi.  She died in 1870, and he died in 1884.  "History of Hickman County, Tennessee" shows Narcissa Bowen to be the daughter of "Charles Bowen and Naomi Carothers Bowen." 

 

Children born to them include:

 

          James Henry Howry                                                                  born in 1842

 

James Henry Howry, son of James M. Howry and Nar­cissa Bowen Howry, was born in 1842.  In 1869 he was married to Mary Buena Vista Burney.  He died in 1900, and she died in 1911.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Corrine Howry                                                             born about 1875

 

Corrine Howry, daughter of James Henry Howry and Mary Buena Vista Burney Howry, was born about 1875.  She was married about 1895, husband's name Causey.  In 1920 Corrine Howry Causey lived in Batesville, Mississippi.

 

Mary Caroline Bowen, daughter of Charles Bowen and Mahulda Allen Easley Bowen, was born October 8, 1826 in Hickman County.  She was married April 14, 1846 to William Smith Neilson who was born in 1813. He died in 1892, and she died November 20, 1902 at Oxford, Missis­sippi.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Francis Alexander Neilson                                   born in 1860

          Mary Evelyn Neilson                                            born about 1862

          Anita Louise Neilson                                            born about 1865

 

Francis Alexander Neilson, son of William Smith Neilson and Mary Caroline Bowen Neilson, was born in 1860, prob­ably at Oxford. He was married in 1888 to Ella May Pratt who was born in 1863 to Lucius Boles Pratt and Nannie Mae Pratt.  Lu­cius Boles Pratt was born in 1841 and died in 1865.  He was the son of John Gill Pratt and Olivia Evans Pratt who were married in 1837.  John Gill Pratt was the son of Aaron Pratt and Silence Beal Pratt, according to "Southern Lineages."

 

Children born to Francis Alexander Neilson and Ella May Pratt Neilson include:

 

          Nonie Neilson                                                             born about 1890

 

Nonie Neilson, daughter of Francis Alexander Neilson and Ella May Pratt Neilson, was born in Rogers County, Indian Terri­tory about 1890.  She was married about 1910 to W. S. Blanton.  Her lineage was recorded in "DAR Lineage Book," Volume 69.

 

Mary Evelyn Neilson, daughter of William Smith Neil­son and Mary Caroline Bowen Neilson, was born about 1862, probably in Oxford.  She was married about 1883 to William H. Delbridge.  She was admitted to DAR membership through Maj. John "Buck" Gowen, according to "DAR Lineage Book," Volume 47.

 

Anita Louise Neilson, daughter of William Smith Neilson and Mary Caroline Bowen Neilson, was born about 1865, probably at Oxford.  She was also admitted to DAR membership through Maj. John "Buck" Gowen.

 

Sarah Bowen, daughter of Charles Bowen and Mahulda Allen Easley Bowen, was born about 1829 in Hickman County.  She was married to Edward Taliaferro.  Later she was remarried to Harvey Carothers.

 

Rebecca Bowen, daughter of Charles Bowen and Mahulda Allen Easley Bowen, was born about 1831 in Hickman County.  She was married about 1850 to Dr. Gar­land Taliaferro and lived in Brownsville, Texas, ac­cording to Virginia Easley DeMarce.

 

Anne Bowen, daughter of Charles Bowen and Mahulda Allen Easley Bowen, was born about 1834 in Hickman County.  She was married about 1852 to William Butler.

 

William Bolivar Bowen, son of Charles Bowen and Mahulda Allen Easley Bowen, was born about 1836.  He was married about 1859 to Emily Butler, believed to be a sister to William Butler.

 

Amanda Josephine Bowen, daughter of Charles Bowen and Mahulda Allen Easley Bowen, was born about 1840.  She was married about 1860, husband's name Keith.  She was remarried to Robert Black.  She was married for a third time to A. A. Barr of Oxford, Mississippi.

 

Alice Letty Gowen Easley, daughter of Thomas William Easley and Sarah Gowen Easley and a namesake of her grand­mother Lettice Winn "Letty" Bearden Gowen, was born August 5, 1802, probably in Greenville District, South Carolina.  She was married about 1820 to Samuel Whitson.

 

Elizabeth Gowen Easley, daughter of Thomas William Easley and Sarah Gowen Easley, was born February 23, 1805, probably in Greenville District. 

 

Mary "Polly" Easley, daughter of Thomas William Easley and Sarah Gowen Easley, was born August 6, 1807 in Spartanburg District, South Carolina.  She was married in Hickman County November 18, 1823 to Robert Sheegog, son of William Shee­gog, according to "Maury County Cousins."

 

Robert Sheegog was born August 31, 1801 in County Down, Ireland.  In 1823 he was appointed entry-taker for Hickman County by the Tennessee State Legislature.  He provided funds for the construction of Montgomery Mill erected near the mouth of Pine River and later sold his interest to John Montgomery, a lawyer, for $3,000.

 

He was appointed along with his brother-in-law Millington Easley to collect subscriptions for Planters Bank of Tennessee in 1833, according to "History of Hickman County, Ten­nessee."  He was a merchant in Vernon, Tennessee from 1830 to 1836 and was elected a commissioner there in 1837.  In 1843 he was appointed a commissioner of Duck River Steam Navi­gation Co.  He died August 27, 1860 in Oxford, Mississippi.  Mary "Polly" Easley Sheegog died there February 27, 1871.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          William Sheegog                                           born August 19, 1826

          Robert White Sheegog                                  born July 6, 1828

          Jane Eliza Sheegog                                        born July 27, 1830

          John Sheegog                                                 born June 27, 1833

          James Gowen Sheegog                                  born April 11, 1836

          Anna Maria Sheegog                                      born October 15, 1838

          Robert Bowen Sheegog                                  born January 19, 1846

          Mary Catherine Sheegog                                born March 10, 1848

 

William Sheegog, son of Robert Sheegog and Mary "Polly" Easley Shee­gog, was born August 19, 1826 in Hickman County.  He died August 3, 1830.

 

Robert White Sheegog, son of Robert Sheegog and Mary "Polly" Easley Sheegog, was born in Hickman County July 6, 1828, according to Dennis L. Pettit. 

 

Jane Eliza Sheegog, daughter of Robert Sheegog and Mary "Polly" Easley Sheegog, was born in Hickman County July 27, 1830, according to Dennis L. Pettit.  She was married Daniel W. Jones in Lafayette County, Mis­sissippi March 26, 1849.

 

John Sheegog, son of Robert Sheegog and Mary "Polly" Easley Sheegog, was born June 27, 1833 in Hickman County, accord­ing to Dennis L. Pettit.

 

James Gowen Sheegog, son of Robert Sheegog and Mary "Polly" Easley Sheegog, was born April 11, 1836 in Hick­man County.  He was married May 24, 1862 to Joella C. Pegues in Lafayette County.  She was born in 1839.  He died in 1869, and she died at the age of 99 in 1938. 

 

Anna Maria Sheegog, daughter of Robert Sheegog and Mary "Polly" Easley Sheegog, was born October 15, 1838.  She died at age 17, August 10, 1855.  "History of Hickman County, Tennessee" describes her as a schoolteacher.  The volume mentions "a sister, Emily Sheegog, also a schoolteacher."

 

Robert Bowen Sheegog, son of Robert Sheegog and Mary "Polly" Easley Sheegog, was born January 19, 1846 in Lafayette County. 

 

Mary Catherine Sheegog, daughter of Robert Sheegog and Mary "Polly" Easley Sheegog, was born March 10, 1848 in Lafayette County.  She was married March 3, 1870 in Oxford to Eugene H. Roberts.

 

Minerva Easley, daughter of William Easley and Sarah Gowen Easley, was born January 1, 1810 in Hickman County.   "Manerva J. Easley" was married to a man by the name of Porter, according to "Marriages of Hickman County, Ten­nessee."

 

Sarah Gowen "Sally" Easley, daughter of William Easley and Sarah Gowen Easley, was born August 29, 1812 in Hickman County.  She was married about 1829 to William Williams, be­lieved to be a son of Gen. William D. Williams of Maury County, Tennessee.  The family of the general and the family of Richard Millington Easleycamped out together at Bon Aqua Springs during the summer of 1827.  William Williams and his brothers, Archibald Williams and Samuel Williams were merchants in Centerville during the decade following 1850.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Joshua Williams                                                           born about 1838

 

Joshua Williams, son of William Williams and Sarah Gowen Easley Williams, was born about 1838.  He later lived in Water Valley, Mississippi in Yalobusha County.

 

William Benson "Long Jaw Bill" Easley, son of Thomas William Easley and Sarah Gowen Easley, was born October 29, 1814 in Hickman County.  He was married about 1834 to Annah Sheegog, daughter of William Sheegog and brother to Robert Sheegog, who married his sister.  At one time he owned and operated Oakland Furnace on Mill Creek, according to "History of Hickman County, Tennessee."

 

William Benson "Long Jaw Bill" Easley was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Hickman County:

 

          "Easley,     William B.                                      35, born in Tennessee

                             Annah                                             35, born in Ireland

          Sheegog,    William                                          75, born in Ireland

          Easley,       Henry                                              15, born in Tennessee

                             Edward                                             3, born in Tennessee

          Easley,       Sarah                                              76, born in SC"

 

William Benson "Long Jaw Bill" Easley was a stockholder in Columbia, Centerville & Pine River Railroad in 1859, ac­cording to "History of Hickman County, Tennessee."

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Henry Easley                                                       born in 1835

          Edward Easley                                                    born in 1847

 

Permelia Easley, daughter of Thomas William Easley and Sarah Gowen Easley, was born June 20, 1817 in Hickman County.  "Permelia Ann Easley" was married to Simeion Carrigan Wright in 1849, according to "Marriages of Hickman County, Tennessee."

 

"History of Hickman County, Tennessee" records that "Anna Easley," a daughter of Thomas William Easley and Sarah Gowen Easley was married to Howell Huddleston, son of John W. Huddleston.  J. D. Easley in "Three Centuries of Easley Genealogy" states that "Anna Easley" was married to Howell Huddleston.  Howell Huddleston, sheriff of Hickman County in 1842, had brothers by the names of Benjamin Huddleston and Jack Huddleston.

 

Howell Huddleston appeared as the head of Household 894-125 in the 1850 census of Hickman County:

 

          "Huddleston,          Howell                                   45, born in Tennessee

                                          Ellenor                                  38, born in Tennessee

                                         James H.                                 14, born in Tennessee

          Wilson,                  Samuel A.                               16, born in Tennessee"

 

Research to date cannot confirm the relationship of "Anna Easley Huddleston" or "Ellenor Easley Huddleston."  Minerva Easley and Sarah Easley were the only two daughters born to William Easley and Sarah Gowen "Sally" Easley that would approximate the age of "Ellenor Easley Huddleston" in the above census enumeration.

 

Minerva Gowen, [John "Buck"6. William5,  John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] daughter of John "Buck" Gowen and Lettice "Letty" Winn Bearden Gowen, was born in Spartanburg District, South Carolina about 1780.

 

Under the terms of her father's will, she inherited "a tract of land lying on the south side of Saluda where my son, James Gowen attended; two negroes named Cresa and Asa, one bed and furniture, $100 to purchase a horsebeast, two cows and calves and her mother's sattle."

 

In January 1813 Minerva Gowen, received $400 from the estate "agreeable to the testator's will."  Since she was about 33 at this time, it is assumed that she did not marry.

 

Winn Bearden Gowen, [John "Buck"6. William5, John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] son of John "Buck" Gowen and Lettice "Letty" Winn Bearden Gowen, was born October 18, 1787, according to the family bible in the possession of William Lister Gowen, a great-grandson, in 1972.  It is be­lieved that he was born in Spartanburg District.

 

According to the will of his father Winn Bearden Gowen re­ceived "a tract of land lying and being in Greenville District on both sides of the Middle Tygar River, the line to begin at the mouth of a branch emptying into the same river on the north side below the mill--thence a direct line to the upper end of a big cover and to the line of my land--thence my line to the opposite, to the beginning.  Also two negros called Zed and Spence, together with a stock of cattle and hogs now on the premises before mentioned, one bed and furniture; also my part of a bay gelding that he rides."

 

The mill referred to in the will is possibly the one built by Prue Benson and P. I. Gowen.

 

Winn Bearden Gowen was qualified as an executor of his fa­ther's estate January 8, 1810, at age 23, and served in that ca­pacity until the estate was finally liquidated January 21, 1813 when he was summoned along with the other legatees.

 

On July 12, 1819, at age 32, he was married to Elizabeth Hunt in Spartanburg County.  She, 29, was born February 27, 1790.  About 1821 Winn Bearden Gowen removed to Alabama and made his home in Talledega and St. Clair Counties.  He did not appear in the 1820 census of St. Clair County.  Talledega County 1820 census has not been searched for him.

 

Winn Bearden Gowen appeared in the 1830 census of St. Clair County, page 225, as the head of a household and the owner of 12 slaves.  The family consisted of:

 

          "Gowen,     Wynn B.                                 white male                     40-50

                                                                             white female                 30-40

                                                                             white male                     30-40

                                                                             white male                     15-20

                                                                             white female                    5-10

                                                                             white male                        0-5

                                                                             white female                     0-5"

 

Winn Bearden Gowen died in 1883 in St. Clair County.  A sale of his estate was held November 28, 1883 at his home three miles northeast of Big Spring, Alabama. William H. Shotwell who administered the estate made a final settlement of the estate April 26, 1886, according to St. Clair Count"South Carolina Historical Magazine," y legal records.

 

In the May 11, 1883 edition of "Greenville [SC] Moun­taineer" there appeared the following item, according to Volume 50, page 104:

 

"May 11, 1883--Died in St. Clair County, Alabama on April 12, 1883, Mr. Winn B. Gowan, formerly a highly respectable citizen of this district."

 

A search of the census reports of the county might reveal more of this individual. Elizabeth Hunt Gowen survived her husband for 10 years and died August 1, 1893, probably in St. Clair County.  The longevity of this couple is remarkable--he lived to be 96, and she lived to be 103, according to the bible record of William Lister Gowen.

 

A discrepancy has appeared which suggests that the longevity of Winn Bearden Gowen is in doubt.  Orphans Court Records, Vol. 1841-1844, page 176 in adjoining Jefferson County, Al­abama records the appointment February 5, 1842 of Carter T. Hamilton, son-in-law, as guardian of the minor orphans of Winn Bearden Gowen:

 

"Know ye that Carter T. Hamilton has this day been duly appointed Guardian of Amanda T. O. Gowen and William B. Gowen, minor orphans of Winn B. Gowen, deceased . . . . "

 

            John F. Forrest, Judge

            County Court, Jefferson County, Alabama

            Issued the 5th day of February A.D. 1842"

 

Children born to Winn Bearden Gowen and Elizabeth Hunt Gowen include:

 

          Elizabeth Gowen                                         born about 1820

          Nancy Gowen                                              born about 1822

          William Bradford Gowen                           born about 1828

          Amanda T. O. Gowen                                  born about 1829

 

Elizabeth Gowen, [Winn Bearden7, John "Buck"6. William5, John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] daughter of Winn Bearden Gowen and Elizabeth Hunt Gowen, was born about 1820, prob­ably in St. Clair County.  On December 27, 1834, at age 14, she was married to James Thompson in St. Clair County.  Of this couple nothing more is known.

 

Nancy Gowen, [Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn "Buck"6. William5,  John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] daughter of Winn Bearden Gowen and Eliz­abeth Hunt Gowen, was born about 1822 probably in St. Clair County.  She was married to Carter T. Hamilton October 1, 1839 in St. Clair County.  Carter T. Hamilton was named guardian to William Bradford Gowen and Amanda T. O. Gowen, "minor orphans of Winn B. Gowen, deceased."

 

William Bradford Gowen, [Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn "Buck"6. William5,  John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] son of Winn Bearden Gowen and Elizabeth Hunt Gowen, was born July 31, 1828, accord­ing to the family bible.  It is believed that he was born in St. Clair County.  He appeared in the 1850 cen­sus of Talledega County, Alabama as "William B. Gowen, age 22, laborer, born in Al­abama." It is unknown in whose house­hold he was residing at that time.  He was married February 1, 1855 at Talledega, Al­abama to Laura Virginia Oden who was born April 19, 1837, accord­ing to the family bible.

 

William Bradford Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Talledega County:

 

          "Gowen,          William B.                             31, born in GA, farmer

                                       L. V.                                   22, born in GA

                                       Mattie                                   1, born in AL"

 

On February 27, 1862 William Bradford Gowen enlisted in the Thirtieth Alabama Infantry Regiment at Syla­cauga, Al­abama.  He was named a sergeant and later second lieu­tenant.  In the Battle of Champion's Hill, just prior to Grant's siege of Vicks­burg in May 1863, Lt. William Bradford Gowen was captured.

 

While languishing in a prison camp on Johnson's Island, Lt. William Bradford Gowen, CSA who had been captured near Vicksburg, recorded his thoughts and fears in his diary.  Much of the journal was addressed to his wife at home.  The open­ing entry expresses the pathos the prisoner felt:

 

"Mournful cries of the wounded and dying which would sometimes rise above the din of battle still ring in my ears and ever and anon the livid countenances and ghastly wounds of the dead whom I passed on the field rise before my mind.  Doubtless many of the poor fel­lows had wives & children at home which a few short hours before had been as precious to them as life itself, and perhaps the hearts of those wives and children were even now, while the Husband and Father lay cold in death, filled with hope that he might soon be permitted to return to the bosom of his family and all the endear­ments of home.

 

But, alas, who can contemplate without tears of anguish the wail of sorrow and disappointed hope that shall rise from the broken hearts of those loved ones when in a few short days the dreadful truth shall become known.  My God; who can describe the desolation of one hard fought battle.

 

I felt a profound sense of gratitude to the God of Mercy for my life preserved and sincere and heartfelt thanks for the kind protecting hand that had brought me safely and unhurt through the dangers of that day.

 

In speaking of my varied thoughts, let me assure you, dear Jennie, that yourself and our precious little Dar­lings, Mat­tie & Willie, occupy by far the largest share.  You are in blissful ignorance of my situation tonight, but I am tor­mented with the thought that in a few days you will hear of the Battle of Champion Hill and hear that our Regiment was in the thickest of it and perhaps will see my name among the Missing, and then you will be tortured with the intolerable suspense of not knowing whether I am killed or captured."

 

The journal, maintained from May 16, 1863 until his release and arrival home in 1865, chronicled his feelings at the time of capture and imprisonment on Johnson's Island in the conflu­ence of Sandusky Bay and Lake Erie, off Sandusky, Ohio.  The jour­nal is now in the care of Lt. Gowen's great-grand­daughter, Mary Carrington Gowen, a Foundation member of Austin, Texas.  Her father, William Lister Gowen, transcribed the diary and placed a typewritten copy in the Texas State Li­brary & Archives before his death in 1972.  Gowen Research Founda­tion Library recently obtained a copy of the 160-page Journal from the state library.

 

William Bradford Gowen, son of Winn Bearden Gowen and Elizabeth Hunt Gowen, was born July 31, 1828, accord­ing to the family bible.  He was a grandson of Maj. John "Buck" Gowen, Revolutionary soldier of Spartanburg County, South Carolina and his wife, Lettice Winn "Letty" Bearden Gowen.

 

He appeared in the 1850 cen­sus of Talledega County, Al­abama as "William B. Gowen, age 22, laborer, born in Al­abama."  He was married February 1, 1855 at Talledega, Al­abama to Laura Virginia "Jennie" Oden who was born April 19, 1837, accord­ing to the family bible.

 

On February 27, 1862 William Bradford Gowen enlisted in the Thirtieth Alabama Infantry Regiment at Syla­cauga, Al­abama.  He was named a sergeant and later second lieu­tenant.  In the Battle of Champion Hill in Mississippi, prior to Grant's siege of Vicks­burg in May 1863, Lt. Gowen was cap­tured.

 

By steamboat he was transported up the Mississippi to Cairo, Illinois and thence over­land by rail to Sandusky.  During his imprisonment he recorded in a journal the fears, the hopes and the frustrations of the Confederate prisoners. 

 

On the first day after his capture, he wrote,

 

"May 17, 1863:    Our breakfast this morning was quite scanty, some received none at all.  The water we get from holes in a branch partly dried up, it be­ing muddy and un­palatable."

 

"May 18:    Saw Capt. Anderson of the 30th, and he ap­peared to be doing well.  I could not find a single man of my company.  It was a sad and sickening sight to look upon some with amputated limbs and others with swollen faces and countenances distorted with pain and one poor fellow who had seemingly just expired; died doubtless without anyone knowing when he drew his last breath, no kind friend to offer a word of consolation or drop a tear of sympathy."

 

"May 29: Our transport Boat lay over at Memphis all day.  The Bar Keeper on the Boat has been doing a thriving business today exchanging money with our men, giving one dollar of Federal for four dollars of Confederate money.  I had no money at all, having given my pocketbook with its contents, $215 to Par­son Underwood, the chaplain of our Regiment for safe keeping the morning before the battle in which I was captured."

 

"June 1:    Arrived at Cairo at the junction of the Mis­sissippi and the Ohio Rivers at 7 a.m.  We were in­formed that we would travel no farther by steamboat, but would travel by railroad to our destination.  I was not sorry of this, for our trip up the river which had lasted nine days & nights was anything but a pleasant one.  Our only chance for sleeping was on our blankets spread down on a filthy floor."

 

"June 5:    Traveled all night and arrived at Sandusky City at 11:00 a.m.  We got off the cars and marched down to San­dusky Bay amidst a crowd of men, women and children who had fathered at the depot to see the Rebels.  I sup­pose they were looking for our horns and tails.  We boarded a steam ferryboat to convey us over to Johnson's Island, three miles out in the Bay."

 

June 7:    This is the holy Sabbath, God's sacred day of rest, how little it is regarded by many here.  Some have been engaged at card playing nearly all day.  I have spent the day principally in my room reading the Testatment which my friend G. M. D. Patterson gave me when I first joined the army."

 

July 4:    This is the 87th Anniversary of American Inde­pendence, a day once hailed with delight and still proudly remembered by every Americn Citizen as the day on which our Patriotic fore-fathers, then citizens of a fee­ble colonial government proclaimed their independence of a great and powerful nation and maintained it through a war of seven years.  And many of these Patriotic Sires lived to see the gov­ernment in whose defense they had struggled to be­come one of the great and powerful nations of the earth.  But now, alas! What is the condition of this once proud and prosperous Nation?  Convulsed with war and drenched in blood!"

 

"July 7:    We have news today that Vicksburg has surren­dered and that Genl. Lee has been signally de­feated in the fight at Gettysburg, neither of which we are willing to be­lieve without confirmation.  The Yankees are jubi­lant."

 

"September 22:    Glorious news in the papers this morning.  They report that Rosencrans is badly beaten and is falling back from Chattanooga and ac­knowledges a loss of 3,000 killed, wounded and missing.  As soon as this news was read, the Rebels on Johnson's Island raised a yell that made the Island tremble under our feet."

 

"October 13:     The best news I have heard for a long time came in a letter which I rec'd from you [his wife] this morning and which gave me joy enough for one day.  Af­ter being deprived of the pleasure of even hearing from you for nearly 5 months to hear that you are well was truly glad tidings of great joy."

 

"October 29:    Our bible class met this morning and after going through the lesson had an interesting dis­cussion, the query being, 'Did Jeptha slay and sacri­fice his daughter, and if so, was he justified in the act?'"

 

"November 29:    Today the ground is covered with snow.  Our rations of wood are quite short, so much so that we do not have enough to keep a fire going in the stove all the time and must therefore suffer with cold."

 

"December 26:    Five prisoners, among them Genl. Archer, got outside the prison wall a few nights ago.  They made their way to the shore of  the Bay and got out some dis­tance on the ice when some of them fell through the ice.  The noise reached the ears of the pickets nearby who came up and gobbled the poor fellows up again.  Another Christmas has passed which makes the second one since I left home."

 

"January 8, 1864:    The weather continues extremely cold.  The ground is covered with snow, and we have to stay in our rooms all the time.  The passing from the Island to Sandusky is done altogether on the ice now.  Some ladies came over from the City on skates today.  It is a very beautiful sight to see them skating on the ice.  Numerous attempts have been made in the last few nights by prison­ers to escape, some of which I suppose were successful."

 

"April 1: A considerable religious feeling has been mani­fested in Prison for some time past and a goodly number have professed religion and joined the church.  I had the pleasure on last Sabbath of wit­nessing the baptism in Lake Erie of 12 Confederate officers."

 

May 24:    Nature is fast becoming clothed in the green ver­due of spring; but what is all this to me, I am still a pris­oner shut up within the walls of this detested old prison.  All that I can do is to look ove the wall at the few green trees left standing on the Island and wish that I was once more at home and free to roam among the old hills over which I have so often fol­lowed the merry yelp of my hounds in the exciting chase after the wild deer."

 

February 19, 1865:    Our rations are so curtailed that we are barely able to sustain life.  I am hungry from one day's end to another.  Many of the prisoners have resorted to catch­ing & eating rats.  I have seen other prisoners picking up crumbs from the ditches & slop barrels and eating them.  The exchange of prisoners for which we have so long & anxiously looked is about to be consumated at last.  Some have already gone, and 100 more officers are to leave here tomor­row, and I am one of that number!"

 

March 22:      "We mounted and started for home some 10 miles distant wher we arrived a little after dark.  Besides the family there was a large crowd of relatives & friends assembled to meet us.  The meeting, after three years absence, I will not try to describe, but will leave it to the imagination of any who may read this."

 

Lt. Gowen very soon after the war removed his family to Lin­dale, Texas.  In 1888 he moved again to Tyler, Texas.  His treasured journal was kept in a safe place in each household.  Once his youngest daughter slipped the book down and in­scribed a poem on its frontispiece:

 

          "Oh, if my heart was made of glass

                             And through its windows you could see

          You'd see your picture painted there

                   And know the one so dear to me."

 

William Bradford Gowen was enumerated in the 1900 census of Trinity County, Texas, Enumeration District 96, page 3, precinct 2 as the head of a household:

 

          "Gowan,              William B.          71, born in AL in July 1828

                                       Laura V.              63, born in GA in April 1837

                                       William A.          38, born in AL in Sept. 1861"

 

On January 19, 1907 William Bradford Gowen filed Con­federate Pension Applica­tion No. 13071.  In the applica­tion he stated that he was 78, totally disabled and had been living at Tyler for 19 years.  The pension was granted by the State of Texas shortly prior to his death Au­gust 8, 1908.

 

On February 3, 1909 Laura Virginia Oden Gowen, at age 70, applied for a wid­ow's pension, stating in her applica­tion that she had lived at Tyler for 30 years. This pension was also granted.  In the 1910 edition of the Tyler city directory Laura Virginia "Jennie" Oden Gowen, "widow of W. B. Gowen," lived at 408 East Line Street.

 

Once on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. H. F. Scheen at Bi­enville, Louisiana, she became ill and extended her visit to one year.  During this period she lost her Texas residency and her pension.  It was later reinstated upon her application.  The pension papers referred to another daughter, Mattie Gowen Ross who also lived in Tyler on January 22, 1919.  The en­dorsement of her son, William Alexander Gowen, also of Tyler, dated January 24, 1919, appeared in the reinstatement application.  Laura Virginia "Jennie" Oden Gowen died at Tyler February 2, 1919 and was buried at Bienville Cemetery, Bienville, Louisiana.

 

Children born to William Bradford Gowen and Laura Vir­ginia "Jennie" Oden Gowen include:

 

          Mattie Gowen                              born about 1860 in AL

          William Alexander Gowen          born Sept. 1861 in AL

          Minnie Estelle Gowen                 born about 1867 in TX"

 

By steamboat he was transported up the Mississippi to Cairo, Illinois and thence over­land by rail to the prisoner of war camp on Johnson's Island near Sandusky, Ohio. Dur­ing his impris­onment he recorded in a journal the fears, the hopes and the frustration of the Johnson Is­land pris­oners.  This journal has been edited and repro­duced in type­written copies by the Texas State Archives in Austin, Texas.  In his journal he fondly refers to his children, "Mattie and Willie."

 

Shortly prior to the end of the Civil War, Lt. William Brad­ford Gowen was ex­changed and returned to his home.  He was paroled February 28, 1865 and very soon re­moved his family to Lindale, Texas.  In 1888 he moved again to Tyler, Texas.

 

William Bradford Gowen received a deed to 2.38 acres of land from J. W. Og­burn about 1920, according to Smith County, Texas Deed Book 87, page 557.  He sold the prop­erty shortly afterward to S. D. Swann, according to Smith County Deed Book 92, page 71.

 

He was enumerated in the 1900 census of Trinity County, Texas, Enumeration District 96, page 3, precinct 2 as the head of a household.  The family was listed as:

 

          "Gowan,          William B.          71, born in AL in July 1828

                                   Laura V.             63, born in GA in April 1837

                                   William A.          38, born in AL in Sept. 1861"

 

On January 19, 1907 William Bradford Gowen filed Con­federate Pension Applica­tion No. 13071.  In the applica­tion he stated that he was 78, totally disabled and had been living at Tyler for 19 years.  The pension was granted by the State of Texas shortly prior to his death Au­gust 8, 1908.

 

On February 3, 1909 Laura Virginia Oden Gowen, at age 70, applied for a wid­ow's pension, stating in her applica­tion that she had lived at Tyler for 30 years. This pension was also granted.  In the 1910 edition of the Tyler city di­rectory Laura Virginia Oden Gowen, "widow of W. B. Gowen," lived at 408 East Line Street.

 

Once on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. H. F. Scheen at Bi­enville, Louisiana, she became ill and extended her visit to one year.  During this period she lost her Texas resi­dency and her pen­sion.  It was later reinstated upon her applica­tion.  The pension pa­pers referred to another daughter, Mattie Gowen Ross who also lived in Tyler on January 22, 1919.  The endorsement of her son, William Alexander Gowen, also of Tyler, dated January 24, 1919, appeared in the reinstatement application.

 

Laura Virginia Oden Gowen died at Tyler February 2, 1919 and was buried at Bienville Cemetery, Bienville, Louisiana.

 

Children born to William Bradford Gowen and Laura Vir­ginia Oden Gowen include:

 

          Mattie Gowen                               born about 1860 in AL

          William Alexander Gowen          born Sept. 1861 in AL

              [daughter]                                 born about 1867 in TX"

 

Mattie Gowen, [William Bradford8, Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn "Buck"6. William5,  John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] daughter of William Bradford Gowen and Laura Virginia Oden Gowen, was born about 1860 in Talledega County, Alabama.  About 1880 she was married to Tom P. Ross, probably at Tyler.  The couple con­tinued to live there in February 1919.

 

William Alexander Gowen, [William Bradford8, Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn "Buck"6. William5,  John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] son of William Bradford Gowen and Laura Virginia Oden Gowen, was born in September 1861 in Talledega County.  Shortly after the Civil War he was brought to Smith County, Texas by his parents. On December 2, 1902 he was married to Fannie Lister at Twitty, Texas.  In 1903 the couple resided at Marlin, Texas.  From 1906 until 1912 they lived at Hearne, Texas, and in 1918 they were living at Tyler.  In that year he was listed as a clerk in the claims department of International & Great Northern Railroad with residence at 115 High Avenue, according to the city directory.  In 1923 he appeared as a cashier for the railroad living at 841 North Bois D'Arc.

 

William Alexander Gowen died at Tyler April 14, 1923, ac­cording to Smith County Probate File 2969.  Fannie Lister Gowen continued to live in Tyler until 1925 at which time she determined to move to Waco, Texas where her children could enter college.

 

On May 15, 1925 she purchased a residence from J. R. Rozell at 719 James Avenue, Waco and traded her home in Tyler to him, according to McLennan County, Texas Deed Book 367, page 579 and Smith County Deed Book 172, page 386.  J. R. Rozell conveyed the Tyler property back to her July 19, 1927, accord­ing to Smith County Deed Book 193, page 324.  She sold the property to W. E. Beaird of Waco, Texas for $2,000 January 25, 1928, according to Smith County Deed Book 206, page 8.

 

Fannie Lister Gowen deeded part of her property on James Av­enue in Waco to Baylor University April 24, 1946, ac­cording to McLennan County deed records.  She was listed in each edition of the Waco city directory from 1926 through 1951 at 7l9 James Avenue.  She died November 28, 1952 at 1009 South 17th Street in Waco, according to McLennan County Deed Book 935, page 563.

 

Children born to William Alexander Gowen and Fannie Lister Gowen include:

 

          William Lister Gowen                         born December 9, 1903

          Emma Virginia Gowen                        born October 17, 1906

          Mary Frances Gowen                           born June 17, 1912

 

William Lister Gowen, [William Alexander9, William Bradford8, Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn "Buck"6. William5,  John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] son of William Alexander Gowen and Fannie Lister Gowen, was born December 9, 1903 at Marlin, Texas.  From 1906 until 1912 his family lived in Hearne, Texas.  In 1919 they had moved to Tyler.  He was listed as a student in the 1923 city directory of Tyler, living at 841 North Bois D'Arc Avenue.  After the death of his father in that year the family moved to Waco.  He was listed in the Waco city directory in editions from 1926 until 1936.

 

In 1926 he was listed as a student at Baylor University and was employed as an assis­tant cleaner at Lone Crow Laun­dry, resid­ing at the home of his mother at 719 James.  He was again listed as a student in the 1928 edi­tion.  In the 1934 edition he was shown as a laborer at Industrial Cotton Oil Mill.  In 1936 he continued to live at the residence of his mother at 719 James Avenue.

 

He was married March 25, 1940 to Dorothy Carrington, ac­cording to Travis County, Texas Marriage Book 38, page 28.  In 1947 William Lister Gowen was listed as a traveling audi­tor for the Texas State Highway Depart­ment, residing at 1108 Neches, according to the Austin, Texas city directory.  He con­tinued at that address with the same employment through 1958.

 

On July 22, 1963 William Lister Gowen and Dorothy Car­rington Gowen gave a deed to W. S. Connor, Jr. to Lot 56, Block 138, Original City Addition, Aus­tin, ac­cording to Travis County Deed Book 2670, page 80.  Dorothy Carrington Gowen received a deed from her mother, Maude C. Carrington to Lot 18, Block G, Allandale Park Addition, Austin, September 19, 1963, according to Travis County Deed Book 2670, page 192.

 

On January 14, 1967 William Lister Gowen and Dorothy Car­rington Gowen deeded their share of his mother's home to his brother-in-law and sister, James A. Muckleroy and Emma Vir­ginia Gowen Muckleroy of Tulsa, Oklahoma.  At that time William Lister Gowen resided at 2713 Greenlawn Parkway, Austin, which continued to be his address in May 1972 after his retirement.

 

William Lister Gowen died in Austin November 18, 1972, ac­cording to Travis County Probate File 34758.  Dorothy Car­rington Gowen gave power of attorney to her daughter, Mary Carrington Gowen December 18, 1973, according to Travis County Deed Book 4900.

 

One daughter was born to William Lister Gowen and Dorothy Carrington Gowen:

 

          Mary Carrington Gowen                 born July 16, 1944

 

Mary Carrington Gowen, daughter of William Lister Gowen and Dorothy Carrington Gowen, was born July 16, 1944 in Austin.  In 1990 she, a member of Gowen Re­search Foun­dation, continued there, living in the home of her parents at 2713 Greenlawn Parkway.

 

Emma Virginia Gowen, [William Alexander9, William Bradford8, Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn "Buck"6. William5,  John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1]daughter of William Alexander Gowen and Fannie Lister Gowen, was born October 27, 1906 at Hearne, Texas.  In 1919 she lived at Tyler with her parents and was a student.  In the 1926 and 1928 editions of the Waco city directory she was listed as a student at Baylor University, living at 719 James, the address of her widowed mother.  In the 1930 and 1931 editions she was listed as a teacher.

 

In 1932 and 1933 she was a teacher at John B. Winn School, Austin and roomed at 300 East 9th Street, accord­ing to the city directory.  She was again listed in the Waco city directory in the 1934 and 1936 editions living with her mother at 719 James Av­enue.

 

In the 1937 edition of the Austin city directory she was shown as a music teacher liv­ing at 306 West 13th Street. She contin­ued as a music teacher in Austin, according to the 1939, 1940 and 1941 editions of the city directory.  In 1939 she lived at 102 West 13th Street, at 1207 San Jacinto in 1940 and at 1105 Enfield Road in 1941.

 

Emma Virginia Gowen was married to James A. Muck­leroy August 2, 1941, according to Travis County Mar­riage Book 39, page 342.  In 1952 they lived at 4431 South Gary Street, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

 

Mary Frances Gowen, [William Alexander9, William Bradford8, Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn "Buck"6. William5,  John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1]daughter of William Alexander Gowen and Fannie Lister Gowen, was born June 17, 1912 at Hearne, Texas.  She lived with her family at Tyler, Texas in 1919.  In 1925 her mother moved her family to Waco, Texas. Mary Frances Gowen appeared in the city directories of Waco from 1926 through 1936 living in the home of her mother.  In the 1932, 1933 and 1934 issues she was listed as a student at Bay­lor Univer­sity.

 

In 1935 Mary Frances Gowen was listed as office secre­tary for Powell, Wirz, Rauhut & Gideon and lived at 1606 Congress Avenue in Austin.  She was married February 6, 1937 to J. D. Hazelwood, according to Travis County Marriage Book 34, page 629.  In 1952 they lived at 4528 West Amherst, Dallas, Texas.

 

Anne Gowen, [William5, John4, William3, Thomas2, Mihil1] daughter of William Gowen and Sarah Allan Gowen, was born about 1742, probably in Granville County, North Carolina.  Her family later lived in Stokes County, North Carolina where she met John Easley who became her husband about 1766.  He was born before 1741, according to the research of Dr. Virginia Easley DeMarce, a descendant. 

 

He was the son of Millington Easley who was a contemporary with William Gowen in Granville County.  Millington Easley moved to Stokes County in the early 1750s.  John Easley ap­peared in Stokes County records in 1764.  Their marriage bond might be recorded there.  Millington Easley was a son of John Easley [1683-1746] and his second wife, Joyce Millington.  John Easley was a son of Robert Easley [1665-1711] and Ann Parker Easley [1668-1720].

 

Millington Easley, son of Millington Easley, apparently fol­lowed the same westward migration because he became a Gowen neighbor in District 96, South Carolina.  His son William Easley was married to Sarah Gowen, daughter of John "Buck" Gowen.  They later moved to Hickman County, Tennessee.  Around 1774 John Easley and made the westward trek to District 96.

 

John Easley served in the South Carolina militia during the Revolutionary War following the fall of Charleston, South Carolina to the British in 1780.  On June 18, 1781 Thomas Farrar, brigade major, gave a receipt to John Easley for "a bay mare imprest for Publick Service--Appraised to forty-five pounds to be paid in gold or silver or the value thereof in Continental money.  By Order of General Pickins."  Miss Miriam Dozier, a descendant of Austin, Texas wrote October 27, 1961 that John Easley was a first lieutenant in Lt. Col. Benjamin Roebuck's Regiment.  Both he and his son, Millington Easley were killed fighting the British, apparently about 1783.

 

On June 29, 1784 Anne Gowen Easley, a widow, was granted land on Reedy River in the Old Indian Apex Cession.  Ac­cording to District 96 Deed Book 2, page 347 her land was bounded on the northwest "by Hawkins."  Later she sold this land to Edmund Bearden.  She was mentioned in the will of her father written March 10, 1785, as the recipient of "two cows and calves" and "275 acres of land, more or less, it being part of a survey of 395 acres run for me on the Sink Pot Fork of Tyger River," according to District 96 will records.

 

On May 28, 1785 Gov. Guerrard of South Carolina granted land in District 96 to Anne Gowen Easley, according to Greenville County Deed Book B, page 28.

 

Anne Gowen Easley appeared in the first state census of South Carolina taken in 1786 as the head of a household in Greenville County.  According to "Heads of Households, South Carolina, 1790," the family was enumerated as:

 

          "Easley, Ann                           white female

                                                          white male over 16

                                                          white female

                                                          white female

                                                          white male under 16"   

 

No slaves were reported.  The enumeration showed her to be a neighbor to Samuel Easley, William Easley, "Allen Gowin" and Gowen Clayton.  Sometime between October 14, 1805 and March 14, 1808 Gowen Clayton of Spartanburg District was witness to a deed of Austin Clayton which transferred 50 acres of land “on both sides of the Tygar River” which had been granted to Augusten Clayton, according to Deed Book L, page 208.

 

In 1786 Ann Gowen Easley petitioned the government for mil­itary pay for her deceased husband and son, requesting that the compensation be tendered to "Capt. John Gowen."  The docu­ment read:

 

"To the Commissioners of the Publick Treasury: Gen­tlemen:  Please to send me by Captain John Gowen In­dent for the amount of the account of John Easely & Millington Easely against the Public of South Carolina, they being both deceased, and I, the administratrix of their estates, being the widow of John Easely and Mother of Millington Easely.  Your Complyance with Much Oblige.

                                                Your humble Servant

                                                Ann Easley

Acknowledged the 24th of May, 1786 before

Bayliss Earle, J.P."

 

Apparently the affidavit was written by Bayliss Earle, an old friend of the Gowen family who should have known how to correctly spell "Easley."  The resulting indents bore the fol­lowing endorsements:

 

"John Easely, Lieutenant for Militia duty in Roebuck's Regiment since the fall of Charleston, £44, 10 shillings.  Received August 5, 1786 Full Satisfaction for interest for the within.

                                                C. C. Schutt"

 

"Millington Easely, £14, 7 shillings and one penny, half penny.  Received September 1, 1786 three years interest on the within Indent.

 

                                                C. C. Schutt"

 

On December 22, 1786 John "Buck" Gowen signed a receipt for full satisfaction for compensation from the Commissioners of the Treasury "in the purchase of land for Ann Easley."  Ap­parently Ann Gowen Easley settled for land, feeling that get­ting payment from the hard-pressed government would be difficult and long in coming.

 

On January 1, 1787 Ann Gowen Easley was granted additional land on Reedy River.  When that area formally became a state May 23, 1788 she and other members of her family had been in residence there for 14 years.

 

On July 16, 1790 Ann Gowen Easley sold land on Reedy River that had been granted to her in 1785 to Edmund Bearden, according to Greenville County Deed Book B, page 253..  About 1790 Edmund Bearden sold the land "to Jamison, land on both sides of George's Creek of Saluda River."  The deed was witnessed by Winn Bearden, son of Edmund Bearden.  This tract of 340 acres in Washington District was afterwards granted to Maj. John "Buck" Gowen of District 96 by Gov. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney who was a brigadier-general in the Continental Army and a delegate to the constitutional convention.

 

Maj. John "Buck" Gowen sold this land July 5, 1792 as recorded in Pendleton County, South Carolina Deed Book D, page 3.  The deed was witnessed by James Easley, son of Ann Gowen Easley and Jesse Moss.  Although Pendleton County no longer exists, its records are maintained by South Carolina Historical Commission, Columbia, South Carolina.

 

On May 2, 1793 Ann Gowen Easley sold the land that had been granted to her in 1785 on Reedy River to Bayliss Earle, according to Greenville County Deed Book C, page 372.  John Easley was a witness to the transaction.

 

On November 24, 1794 Ann Gowen Easley was mentioned as an heir of James I. Hunt whose will was probated on that date.  She received a deed from the Hunt estate in 1798.

 

It is believed that Ann Gowen Easley was the "white female, over 45" living in the household of her son, John Easley in the 1800 census of Greenville County.

 

Anne Gowen Easley deeded January 21, 1801 a slave woman to her daughters, Ann Easley Barton and Mary Easley "for love and affection," according to Greenville County Deed Book F, page 251.  John Easley and William Easley witnessed the deed.  They are believed to be her sons.

 

Anne Gowen Easley "of Greenville County" was referred to as "the widow Easley" in the estate account of her father-in-law Millington Easley in 1806, according to Greenville County records.  She was mentioned in the will of her brother John "Buck" Gowen written August 20, 1809.  It is believed that Anne Gowen Easley died shortly afterward and was buried in Greenville County.

 

Children born to John Easley and Anne Gowen Easley in-clude:

 

          Millington Easley                                               born about 1767

          John Easley                                                        born about 1768

          James Easley                                                      born about 1769

          Virginia Elizabeth "Betsy" Easley                    born in 1770

          Mary Easley                                                       born about 1772

          William Franklin Easley                                   born about 1774

          Ann "Nancy" Easley                                          born in 1778

 

Millington Easley, son of John Easley and Ann Gowen Easley, was born about 1767 probably in Stokes County, North Car­olina.  He was killed at about age 16, along with his father, while serving in Roebuck's Regiment of the South Carolina militia.  His mother received military pay of "14 pounds, 7 shillings, one penny, half penny" for his services September 1, 1786.

 

John Easley, son of John Easley and Ann Gowen Easley, was born about 1768, probably in Stokes County.  He was brought to South Carolina by his parents about 1774.  It is not believed that he was enumerated in the 1786 census of his mother's household.  He was married about 1791 and was enumerated as the head of Household 544 in the 1800 census of Greenville County.  A "white female, over 45" recorded in his household is possibly his mother.  "John Easley" was a witness in 1801 to a deed of his mother in which she gave a slave to her daughters.  John Easley "was temporarily in Warren County and Allen County, Kentucky, but disappears from the record by 1820," according to the research of Virginia Easley DeMarce.

 

James Easley, believed to be a son of John Easley and Ann Gowen Easley, was born about 1769, probably in Stokes County.  He was brought to South Carolina by his parents about 1774.  He is believed to be the "white male, over 16" who appeared in his mother's household in the South Carolina state census of 1786.  "James Easley" was a witness to a deed of Maj. John "Buck" Gowen July 5, 1792 in which he conveyed land that had once been owned by Anne Gowen Easley, according to Pendleton County, South Carolina Deed Book D, page 3. 

 

Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley , daughter of Lt. John Easley and Anne Gowen Easley, was born in 1770 in South Carolina.  She was married October 11, 1786 at age 16 to William [Pleasant?] Anderson of Greenville County.  He was born in 1765 in Augusta County, Virginia to John Anderson and Ann Erwin Anderson, according to a letter written by Miss Miriam Dozier, a descendant of Austin, Texas. 

 

In 1789 William Anderson was living in Newberry County, South Carolina, according to “Newberry County, South Carolina Deed Abstracts, 1751-1794,” Volume A, pages 707-710, by Brent H. Holcomb:

 

“Lease and release.  January 26 & 27, 1789, William Anderson of Newberry County and wife Elizabeth to John Floyd of same, for £300 sterling, 60 acres, part of 100 acres granted to John Lucas September 16, 1774, on a branch of Little River called Sandy Run adjoining Andrew Erwin, Robert Johnston, John Sims, James Goggans, William Anderson, also 150 acres, a part of a tract of 250 acres granted to William Anderson January 10, 1770 on south side of south fork of Sandy Run ad-joining William Pitts, making out 210 acres.

 

William Anderson

Elizabeth [X] Anderson

Witnesses:

John Anderson

William [X] Anderson

George Goggans”

 

Proved in Newberry County by the oath of George Gog -gans March 2, 1789 before Robert Rutherford, J.P. Recorded July 10, 1789.”

 

On October 1, 1794 Allan Gowen deeded property on the South Pacolet River to William Easley, his niece's husband, according to Greenville County Deed Book D, page 72.  John "Buck" Gowen, William Gowen and William Anderson were witnesses to the deed. 

 

In 1811 William Anderson lived in Kentucky.

 

They removed to Sumter County, Alabama.  She died there October 27, 1843, according to her obituary:

 

“Died Mrs Elizabeth Anderson, consort of William Anderson Sr. Esq. in the 73rd year of her age.  She was married to Mr. Anderson at the age of 16, having been born in South  Carolina in 1770.

 

Elizabeth Easley was the daughter of John Easley, 1st Lieutenant in the Revolutionary War and his wife Ann Gowen.  John's father was John Easley and his mother was Joyce Easley; this John's parents were Warham Easley and his wife Sara Barnes; Warham's father and mother were Robert Easley and Ann Parker. Warham Easley's will is in Book 1 page 84 and mentions sons Creed T, Samuel W, Christopher B, daughter Martha Easley Foreman, wife Emily, minor heirs: Catherine, Maria, Elizabeth Jane and Virginia Noble.  Warham Easley lived near Belmont.”

 

 William Easley died February 11, 1848 at age 80.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          John Erwin Anderson                   born in 1796

          Caroline N. Anderson                  born in 1798

          Dorcas Anderson                          born about 1799

          Marian Burns Anderson               born January 28, 1800

          Bailey Washington Anderson      born March 17, 1803

          Huldah Virginia Anderson           born April 19, 1805

          William Gowen Anderson           born in 1811

          Albert Gallatin Anderson             born in 1814

 

John Erwin Anderson, son of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley Anderson, was born in 1796 in Greenville County.  He was married August 10, 1816 in Clark County, Alabama to Cynthia D. Harper.  She was born in 1798 in Georgia.  He died in 1848 in Panola County, Texas and she died after 1870.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Mary Caroline Anderson                                born about 1820

 

Mary Caroline Anderson, daughter of John Erwin Anderson and Cynthia D. Harper Anderson, was born about 1820.  She was married about 1841 to Patrick C. Shahan in Harrison County, Texas.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Michael Lucian Shahan                 born about 1842

 

Michael Lucian Shahan, son of Patrick C. Shahan and Mary Caroline Anderson Shahan, was born about 1842.  He was married about 1866 to Georgia Ann Pyle.

 

Caroline N. Anderson, daughter of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley  Anderson, was born in 1798 in Greenville County. She was married about 1816 to Henry Walker.  She was remarried to Elisha Lacy.

 

Dorcas Anderson, daughter of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley Anderson, was born about 1799 in Greenville County.  She was married September 24, 1819 in Clark County, Alabama to Eli Davis.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Huldah Davis                                           born about 1821

          Amanda Davis                                          born about 1823

          Franklin W. Davis                                    born about 1824

          John E. Davis                                            born about 1826

          Elisha L. Davis                                         born about 1829

          William B. Davis                                     born about 1831

          Jane Davis                                                born about 1834

          Eli Davis                                                  born about 1837

           Dorcas Davis                                          born about 1840

 

Marian Burns Anderson, daughter of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley Anderson, was born January 28, 1800 in Greenville County.  She was married February 18, 1819 in Marengo County, Alabama to Alexander Birdsong.  He was born in 1799 in South Carolina to James Birdsong and Elizabeth Gratsy Birdsong.  She died April 8, 1878 in Hunt County, Texas, and he died there in 1879.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Laura Gratsy Birdsong              born in 1819

 

Laura Gratsy Birdsong, daughter of Alexander Birdsong and Marian Burns Anderson Birdsong, was born in 1819 in Marengo County.  She was married about 1842 to William K. Elliott in Fayette County, Tennessee.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          [daughter]                                                  born about 1848

 

A daughter born about 1848 to William K. Elliott and Laura Gratsy Birdsong Elliott, was married about 1867 to Stephen Bailey Dozier in Panola County, Texas.  He was born in West­moreland County, Virginia. 

 

Children born to them include:

 

          William Allen Ward Dozier                  born about 1870

 

William Allen Ward Dozier, son of Stephen Bailey Dozier, was born about 1870.  He was married about 1893 to Ella Nance who was born in Gainesville, Alabama. 

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Miriam Dozier                                 born about 1900

 

Miriam Dozier, daughter of William Allen Ward Dozier and Ella Nance Dozier, was born about 1900.  In 1961 she lived in Austin, Texas.  She had a great love of her family and spent many years in researching her ancestry.

 

Bailey W. Anderson, son of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley Anderson, was born March 17, 1803 in Greenville County.  He was married January 18, 1823 in Marengo County to Olive Crook.  He was remarried March 17, 1832 in Sumter County, Alabama to Louise Burton.

 

Huldah Virginia Anderson, daughter of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley  Anderson, was born April 19, 1905 in Greenville County.  She was married February 17, 1821 in Marengo County, Alabama to Stephen Lacy Davis.  She died October 10, 1863 in Panola County, Texas.

 

William Gowen Anderson, son of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley Anderson, was born in 1811 in Kentucky.  He became the first probate judge in Sumter County, Alabama, organized in 1832 from the Choctaw Cesssion of 1830, according to a letter written October 27, 1961 by Miss Mariam Dozier.  He was married there August 20, 1833 to Isabel Corlin.  He was remarried about 1846 in Texas to Mrs. Elizabeth Taylor.  He died in Orange County, Texas in 1866.

 

After his death, Elizabeth Taylor Anderson removed to Johnson County, Texas. 

 

Children born to William Gowan Anderson are believed to include:

 

Mary Leona Anderson                                born about 1835

Laura Jane Anderson                                  born about 1837

Isabella H. Anderson                                  born about 1840

Isadora M. Anderson                                  born about 1848

John Erwin Anderson                                born about 1852

 

Mary Leona Anderson, daughter of William Gowen Anderson and Isabel Corlin, was born about 1835.  She was married about 1853 to Preston Floyd.  After their deaths, their fourth children were brought to Johnson County, Texas.

 

Children born to them include:

 

          Richard Erwin Floyd                                       born about 1855

          Matlock Floyd, M.G.                                       born about 1859

          Kate Henrietta Floyd                                       born about 1864

 

Laura Jane Anderson, daughter of William Gowen Anderson and Isabel Corlin, was born about 1837.  She was married about 1857, husband’s name Ramsey.  A daughter of Laura Jane Anderson Ramsey was “married to Dr. Nifong.”

 

Albert Gallatin Anderson, son of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth "Betsy" Easley Anderson, was born in 1814 in Kentucky.  He was elected tax collector in Sumter County.  He was married there July 23, 1834 to Mary Ann More.  He was remarried there February 9, 1844 to Mrs. Mary Devlin Drummond.

 

Mary Easley, daughter of John Easley and Anne Gowen Easley was born about 1772.  She was mentioned in a deed written January 21, 1801 in which her mother conveyed a slave woman to her and her sister Anne Easley Barton, according to Greenville County Deed Book F, page 251. 

 

William Franklin Easley, son of John Easley and Anne Gowen Easley, was born in South Carolina about 1774, according to Sally Ann Easley Boswell, a granddaughter.  He was married about 1799, probably in Greenville County, wife's name Sarah "Dillie" Dillingham]. 

 

On May 6, 1799 "William Easley," Elizabeth Malin, Masse Arrasmith and John Dillingham posted bond as administrators of the estate of John Malin, deceased. 

 

He was enumerated as the head of Household 545 in the 1800 census of Greenville County, adjoining the household of his brother John Easley.  In 1801 he was a witness to the deed of his mother conveying a negro slave woman to his sisters.  He was discharged from the administration of the estate of John Malin January 5, 1807, having "surrendered up the whole of the business unto Elizabeth Malin, executrix of the said estate."  

 

The research of Virginia Easley DeMarce traces the move­ments of William Easley and Sarah "Dillie" Easley from Greenville County to Warren County, Kentucky where he appeared as a taxpayer from 1806 to 1810.  Later they removed to Allen County, Kentucky and thence to Boone County, Missouri.  She stated that he died in 1844 in Boone County or in Barry County where some of their children had removed.

 

Dr. Virginia Easley DeMarce, an accomplished genealogist, in 1990 lived in Arlington, Virginia where she was president of the National Genealogical Society.

 

Children born to William Franklin Easley and Sarah "Dillie" Easley include:

 

          Mahulda "Hulda" Easley                  born about 1801

          Greenberry Easley                            born September 20, 1805

          John Easley                                       born about 1808

          Edward Easley                                  born April 4, 1810

          Elizabeth Easley                               born about 1816

          Mary "Polly" Easley                         born April 12, 1822

 

Greenberry Easley, son of William Franklin Easley and Sarah "Dillie" Dillingham Easley, was born September 20, 1805 in Greenville County, South Carolina.  He was brought by his parents to Warren County, Kentucky in 1806.  Later he lived in Allen County, Kentucky and Boone County, Missouri. 

 

He was married about 1828 to Eveline Johnson, according to the research of Gina Myers Easley. 

 

Children born to Greenberry Easley and Eveline Johnson Easley include:

 

          Robert Easley                                            born about 1831

 

Robert Easley, son of Greenberry Easley and Eveline Johnson Easley, was born about 1831.  He was married about 1856 to Katie Froley, according to Gina Myers Easley.

 

Children born to Robert Easley and Katie Froley Easley include:

 

          John Tim Easley                                                 born about 1860

 

John Tim Easley, son of Robert Easley and Katie Froley Easley, was born about 1860.  He was married about 1890 to Ivonnie Smith. 

 

Children born to John Tim Easley and Ivonnie Smith Easley include:

 

          Ray Easley                                                                  born about 1900

 

Ray Easley, son of John Tim Easley and Ivonnie Smith Easley, was born about 1900.  He was married about 1928 to Opal Cash.

 

Children born to Ray Easley and Opal Cash Easley include:

 

          John Easley                                                                  born about 1932

 

John Easley, son of Ray Easley and Opal Cash Easley, was born about 1932.  He was married about 1956 to Gina Myers.  Children born to John Easley and Gina Myers Easley are unknown.

 

Anne "Nancy" Easley, daughter of John Easley and Anne Gowen Easley, was born in 1778, according to the research of Jason E. Barton, a descendant of Hagerstown, Maryland.  She was married about 1796 to Thomas Barton, son of David and Nancy Barrett Barton.  Anne "Nancy" Easley Barton was the recipient of a slave woman deeded to her by her mother January 21, 1801, according to Greenville County Deed Book F, page 251.  They lived in the area of Gowensville, South Carolina where Thomas Barton was a farmer.

 

Thomas Barton died there about 1862, at age 85, and was buried in Glassy Mountain Baptist Church Cemetery, according to Hope Coslett Pees of Seguin, Texas in a message dated April 12, 2001.  Anne “Nancy” Easley Barton lived to be 88 and died “after May 15, 1866.”  She was buried beside her husband.

 

Children born to Thomas Barton and Ann "Nancy" Easley Barton include:

 

          O'Hara Barton                                 born about 1798

          John Milton Barton                         born about 1799

          Shapley Barton                                born about 1804

          Joseph Barton                                  born about 1807

          Millington Easley Barton               born about 1811

          Kindness Barton [twin]                   born about 1818

          Pleasant Barton [twin]                    born about 1818

          Frank Barton                                   born about 1820

          Rebecca Barton                               born about 1823

 

 

 

  Gowen Research Foundation                        Phone:806/795-8758, 795-9694

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