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GRAYSON COUNTY, VIRGINIA

 

Dudley Goin, a free mulatto, was listed in the 1810 tax list of Grayson County.  The list, prepared March 30, 1810, showed that Dudley Goin owned no slaves and no horses, according to "Supplement to 1810 Census of Virginia."

                                               ==O==

Joseph Gowen, "free colored" was enumerated in the 1820 census of Grayson County, page 46 as the head of a house­hold of 19 people.

 

Nancy Gowen, "free colored," was recorded, also on page 46, as the head of a household in the 1820 census composed of 14 people.

 

GREENBRIER COUNTY, VIRGINIA

[Later West Virginia]

 

Elizabeth Goan was married June 15, 1839 to Daniel Salsbury, according to "Greenbrier County, Virginia Marriages, 1700-1850."

                                             ==O==

Susan Goen, "free colored" was recorded as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Greenbrier County, page 74:

 

    "Goen, Susan      free colored female      26-45

                       free colored male     14-26

                       free colored female      0-10

                      free colored male       0-10

                       free colored female        0-10"

 

"Susan Goin, free colored" was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Greenbrier County, page 178:

 

    "Goin, Susan       free colored female  24-36

                       free colored male 36-55

                       free colored male 10-24

                       free colored male   0-10

                       free colored female    0-10

                       free colored male   0-10

                       free colored female    0-10

                       free colored male 0-10"

 

GREENSVILLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA

[See Brunswick County, Virginia]

 

Ann Eliza Gowing was married Januar 4, 1836, according to "Greensville County, Virginia Marriages, 1781-1850."

                                             ==O==

Polly Gowing was married December 24, 1836 to Monroe Dupree, according to "Greensville County, Virginia Marriages, 1781-1850."

                                             ==O==

 

HALIFAX COUNTY, VIRGINIA

Prepared from research developed

By Louise Goins Richardson

Editorial Boardmember

 

William Goings [or Gowan] was born in Virginia in 1764 of parents unknown.  He enlisted in the First Regiment of the Vir­ginia Continental Line in 1780, at the age of 16 and served in the light infantry com­pany commanded by Capt. Tilman Dixon.  The light infantry company was part of a regiment commanded by Col. Henry Dixon and Maj. Doniphan.  In his pension application he stated that he partici­pated in the Battle of Brandywine, but it is likely that his scribe misunderstood. That battle was fought in Pennsylva­nia in 1777 when William Goings was 13 years old.

 

William Goings received his baptism of fire at the second Bat­tle of Camden, earlier called Pine Tree, South Carolina.  Lord Cornwallis had routed Gen. Horatio Gates and the Americans there August 16, 1780.  Four months later, the First Virginia came back to Camden under Gen. Nathanael Greene and this time was suc­cessful against the British De­cember 3, 1780. In this battle William Going received grapeshot wounds in his knee and ankle and carried the ef­fect of them to his grave. 

 

This battle was followed by their victory in the Battle of Cowpens January 17, 1781 in Spartan­burg County under Gen. Daniel Morgan.  The First Vir­ginia was handed back to Gen. Greene for the Battle of Guilford Court House which was fought to a draw March 15, 1781 near pre­sent-day Greensboro, North Car­olina.  Under Greene they were successful in the Battle of Eu­taw Springs, the last battle of the war in South Carolina, September 8, 1781. When Lord Corn­wallis walked into the trap at York­town, the First Vir­ginia was quickly called home to partici­pate in the Battle of Yorktown in October. 

 

After the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown, William Go­ings set out on foot to return to his home in Halifax County, and in his pocket was an honorable discharge, personally signed by Gen. George Wash­ington.  In October 1793, at age 29 he was married in adjoining Caswell County, North Car­olina, wife's name Elizabeth.  She was born in 1769.  Parts of three decades slip by before the couple is again located, ac­cording to research on them to date.

 

On May 25, 1819, at age 56, William Goings appeared before the Hawkins County, Tennessee County Court to file an affi­davit of his Revolutionary service in an application for a pen­sion.  His war wounds had continued to plague him through the years, and combined with advancing age, they had made him unable to continue working as a farmer and a day la­borer.  

 

"State of Tennessee

Hawkins County      May Session, 1819

 

Personally appeared in open court this twenty-fifth day of May 1819 William Going or Gowan, aged about fifty-six years, a citizen of said county & State & being first duly sworn in open Court ac­cording to law maketh the following declaration, viz: That he enlisted in the Regular Service of the United States during the War of the Revolution sometime in the year 1780 in the Spring (of [------] this deponent [------] [----] to oath) at Hali­fax Court House, State of Virginia under Captain Tilman Dixon of the 1st Regiment of Light Infantry commanded by Col. Henry Dixon & Major Doniphan attached to General George Wash­ington's Command for the dura­tion of the War, that this depo­nent served under Col. Dixon in said First Regiment three years of one contin­ued time without leaving said Service any time and that having served his country honorably and faithfully dur­ing said period was hon­orably discharged at York Town, State of Virginia (when Cornwallis was taken in the Year 1781) by his Excellency General George Wash­ington.  This depo­nent further declareth on oath that he was in the fol­lowing battles, viz: at the Bat­tle of Brandywine when he was wounded in his knee and an­kle by Grape Shot thrown by the Enemy, at the Battle of Camden (or Pine Tree) North Car­olina when General Greene commanded, in the Battle of Cowpens, at the Battle of Guilford Court­house, in the Battle of Eutaw Springs and at the Battle of York Town when Cornwal­lis with his army was taken by Grnl. Geo. Washington.  He further saith that he has suffered great hardships, pri­vations and extreme fa­tigue while in said service of which he now feels the effects, that he is in ex­treme poverty & hardship and without the support of his Country he will suffer greatly, that his cir­cumstances are such as having nothing at all to support himself with, that he has never drawn any pension altho he believes he was entitled thereto on account of his wounds, but has hitherto sup­ported himself by his labors, and is now compelled to apply for relief by reason of his further de­bilitated state of health. He further states that his honor­able dis­charge which he received from the commander-in-chief he has lost sometime ago in Vir­ginia.  That he knows of no per­son in this country by whom he could prove his service and that having served faithfully and honorably more than nine months, the period requisite to be placed on the pension list, at one continued time he hopes to re­ceive the benefit of the act passed for the re­lief of the Soldiers of the Revolution whose case is compre­hended by such act.

 

Sworn to & subscribed in open Court the day and date above.

 

P. D. Mitchel, Clk                   William "X" Going

By W. A. Mitchell, his deputy"

 

A pension of $8 per month was granted to him in Washing­ton, D. C. July 16, 1819:

 

"Pension No. 12757: East Tennessee

 

William Goings of Hawkins County in the state of Ten­nessee who was private in the regi­ment com­manded by Colonel Dixon of the Virginia line, for the term of the War.  Inscribed on the Roll of East Ten­nessee at the rate of Eight Dollars per month, to com­mence on the 16 of July 1819 and sent to D. Alexan­der, Esq. Agt, Rogersville, Tennessee."

 

Apparently a review board sought additional information about his financial status in the following year, and William Going had to return to the Rogersville, Tennessee court­house and file an amendment to his earlier affidavit, giving an in­ventory of his property and the number of people living in his household:

 

"On this 29th day of August 1820 personally appeared in open Court, being a court of record in the County of Hawkins in the state of Tennessee, William Going, aged about 56 years [57?], resident of said county of Hawkins and who being first duly sworn according to law did on his oath declare that he served in the revo­lutionary war as follows: Enlisted in Cap­tain Dixon's Company, First Regiment, Virginia Line, that he has received a pension cer­tificate, now in his possession, November 12, 1819, that his first declaration was made out in said County Court of Hawkins County about the 6th day of May 1819, and I do solemnly swear that I was a resident citi­zen of the United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time by Gift, Sale or in any manner dis­posed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby to diminish it or to bring myself within the provi­sions of an Act of Congress entitled An Act to Provide for certain per­sons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States during the Revolu­tionary War passed the 18th of March 1818 and that I have not given to any person in trust for me any prop­erty or securities, con­tracts or notes due to me nor have I any income other than what is contained in the sched­ule herein assessed and by me subscribed, viz: four hogs, 1 pot & one oven, 1 old chair, 1 axe, 1 hoe, four forks, four knives, 2 tin plates. I am by occupa­tion a daily la­borer or farmer, but am frail and not able to support my­self and family which is composed of the following per­sons, viz: my wife aged about 48 years, 1 boy 11 years old, 1 girl 10 years, 1 girl aged 5 years and one boy aged two years and that I stand in great need of the assistance of my country for support. Sworn to & subscribed in open court.

                                      William [X] Going

 

The Court values the property contained in the fore­going schedule to thirteen dollars and thirty cents."

 

William Going wrote his will August 21, 1827 and died two days later.  He named sons, "Sheard Going and Andrew Going" and appointed Nicholas Long to be his executor.  Witnesses were John King, William Willeford.  On December 18, 1847, Elizabeth Long was married to William willeford.

 

William Goings died in Hawkins County August 23, 1827. Elizabeth Goings, at age 70 filed an application for a widow's pension June 8, 1839.  Her affidavit, in part, read:

 

"On this 8th day of June in the year 1839 personally ap­peared before me, the undersigned Justice of the Peace for the County of Hawkins, Elizabeth Goings, a resident of this county & state, age Sev­enty Years, who first be­ing duly sworn according to law, doth on her oath state . . . that she is the widow of William Goings who honor­ably served in Captain Tilmon Dixon's Company in the 1st North Carolina [Virginia] Regi­ment. . . She further declared that she was mar­ried to him in the month of October 1793 in Caswell County, North Carolina and that her said husband died at his residence in Hawkins County on the 23rd day of Au­gust in the year 1827 and since that time she had not been married.  . . .  She has no record of proof of said marriage.

                                      Elizabeth X Go­ings"

 

Elizabeth Going was successful in her application and re­ceived the following pension:

 

"Pension No. W930: Tennessee

 

Elizabeth Goings, widow of William Goings, decd. who was a pensioner under the Act of 1818 and who died on the 23rd Aug. 1827 of Hawkins County in the State of Tennessee who was a private in the company com­manded by Captain Dixon of the regt. com­manded by Col. Dixon in the N. Car­olina. [Virginia] line for 2 years.  Inscribed on the Roll of Tennessee at the rate of 80 Dollars per an­num to commence on the 4th day of March, 1836.  Certifi­cate of Pension issued the 10th day of Feby. 1840."

 

At least four children were born to William Going and Elizabeth Going.

 

    Sherrod Going                       born about 1809

    [daughter]                            born about 1810

    [daughter]                            born about 1815

    Andrew Going                        born about 1818

 

HALIFAX COUNTY, VIRGINIA

 

In the case of "Aron Going vs. Philip Going" held in 1778, the defendant "confessed judgement £100 pounds current money," according to Halifax County Court Minute Book 9, page 304.

                                             ==O==

Mary Going was married July 25, 1842 to Henry Davis, according to "Halifax County, Virginia Marriages, 1781-1850."

 

HAMPTON COUNTY, VIRGINIA

 

Pvt. John Goins, a black Union prison guard, shot a Confed­erate prisoner of war near Newport News, Vir­ginia after the Civil War had been ended, according to an article written by Benjamin Tyree for the March 7, 1992 edition of "The Wash­ington Post."

 

"Confederate war prisons may have a worse reputa­tion than those of the Union, owing partly to the hor­rific Andersonville in Georgia, where 13,000 Union soldiers died.

 

But despite the more ample provision available to the Union, its prisoners often found conditions anything but a picnic. There were many reports of inadequate and tainted food and water, unsanitary conditions and fatal epidemics of smallpox and other diseases. There were many deaths among pris­oners poorly clothed and: shel­tered (often outdoors) in the freezing north­ern winter.

 

Complicating. the treatment of prisoners, and the whole postwar occupation of the South, was the broader con­flict between black Union troops and white Confeder­ates. Southerners deeply resented the Union's arming blacks and putting the defeated Con­federacy under the heel of an army that in­cluded many former slaves. Black soldiers had the bitter memories not only of slavery but also of bloody pur­suits of runaways seeking Union lines and of take no‑prisoners battlefield carnage con­centrated against them at such places as Fort Pillow and the Pe­tersburg Crater. 

 

Perhaps issuing from this poisoned relationship was an episode investigated by the Newport News, Vir­ginia Union Army post headquarters involving a Con­federate prisoner of war and three black Union sen­tries.

 

The prisoner, a Pvt. Thomas Tyree (no known rela­tion to this writer), was shot three times in an al­leged es­cape attempt the night of April 20, 1865. This oc­curred a week and a half after Gen. Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appommattox and the paroling of his army by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant but also less than a week after the as­sassination of Abraham Lincoln had further inflamed anti-Southern feeling.

 

The prisoner said: he was heading "to the sink when the sentinel hailed  me several times and or­dered me to halt.  l did not know at first that he was hailing me.  I halted when ordered.  The sentinel told me to come up to him.  I did so, and when within 15 paces of him, he ordered me to halt again. I halted. He then asked me what l wanted.  I told him I had the diarrhea and was going to do a job.  The sentinel said it was a damned die and that I didn't want to . . . .  He then shot me. I was also shot by the sentinel on each side of me.

 

The sentinel who first fired, John Goins, said, "Tyree didn't halt when ordered to, but turned away from me . . . . I feel certain that the man I shot was trying to es­cape." The sentinels said they had standing orders to shoot prisoners who did not halt on command.  They said Tyree had rushed the post of the first sentry, and was followed by as many as 15 other prisoners. Union Capt. A.D. Clark said he heard the sentinel repeatedly order someone to halt.  "In about 10 seconds, three shots fired in rapid succession."  The official account of the investi­gation was incon­clusive.  But war records at the Na­tional Archives show that the black sentries' company sailed from Newport News that May, bound for new duty in Corpus Christi, Texas. Prisoner of war Thomas Tyree took the oath of alle­giance to the United States and was released in July 1865."

==O==

Phillip Gowen, negro won his freedom in court in June 1675, according to "Judicial Cases Concerning American Slav­ery and the Negro" by Helen Honor Tunnicliff Catterall.  Court records reveal:

 

"Phillip Gowen, negro, Suing Mr. Jno. Lucas . . . for his free­dome.  It is Ordered that the said Phill. Gowen be free from the Said Mr. Lucas, his Service and that the Indenture Ac­knowledg'd in Warwick County be Invallid and that the said Mr. Lucas pay unto the sd. Gowen three Barrels of Corne att the Cropp [harvest time], According to the Will of Mrs. Amy Boa­zlye, deceased with costs."

 

Warwick County, Virginia was merged into the city of War­wick, Virginia and then into the city of Newport News, ac­cording to the research of Virginia Easley De Marce of Ar­lington, Virginia. Surviving records in 1991 were being main­tained by the City of Newport News.

 

Descendant Researchers:

 

    Ethel Louise Goins Dunn, Rt. 1, Box 101D, Crandall, GA, 30711, 706/695-3679

 

HANOVER COUNTY, VIRGINIA

 

Shadrach Going was born about 1725 of parents unknown, probably in Hanover County.  The county was formed in 1720 from New Kent County, the residence of Mihil Gowen when he died.  Shadrach Going was married about 1748, wife unknown, probably in Hanover County.  It is believed that he was married three times.

 

He continued to live in Hanover County in November 1757 and in 1760 when sons David Smith Going and Laban Going were born. By 1765, he had removed to Halifax County, Virginia.  Halifax County was formed in 1752 from Antrim Parish of Lunenburg County.

 

In the May 1765 Court session "Shadrack Going" & Peter Rickman were indicted by the Halifax County grand jury "for concealing each one Tithable."  In the August 1766 Court term charges against "Shadrack Going" were dismissed by the Grand Jury, according to Minute Book 5, [Part 2], page 358.

 

Shadrach Going purchased June 3, 1768 from Lewis Jenkins of adjoining Pittsylvania County, Virginia 387 acres of land located on both sides of Polecat Creek for £35, according to Halifax County Deed Book 7, page 223.  The land was "bounded by Echols, Robert Walton, Anderson and Main Creek. Witnesses to the deed were Thomas Lovelace, George Combs, Bebajah Parker and William [X] Mays.  Shadrack Going had the document recorded August 18, 1768.

 

On October 4, 1780, in Hali­fax County, "Shadrack Going," "David Going" and Peter Wil­son witnessed the will of Stephen Wilson.  The will was proved June 20, 1782 "by two witnesses [unnamed]."  Shadrach Going appeared in the 1782 tax list of Halifax County with 12 in his family.  "Shadrack Going," with 10 members in his household, appeared in the 1785 census of Halifax County, along with John Going, four members and David Going, four members, assumed to be his sons.

 

On a deed recorded November 17, 1785, "Shadrack Going" sold 451 acres on Pole Cat Creek to Henry Hobson.  This may have included the land he purchased from Lewis Jenkins in 1768.

 

Pittsylvania County, Virginia was formed in 1766 with land from Halifax County.  Henry County, Virginia was formed in 1776 with land from Pittsylvania County. Patrick County, Virginia was formed with land from Henry County, Virginia in 1790.

 

Shadrach Going was first men­tioned in Patrick County, Virginia  records when he bought 1,000 acres June 11, 1792 on both sides of the Little Dan River from John Marr for £500 pounds, a lot of money for that time, ac­cording to Donna Gowin Johnston, researcher of Casper, Wyoming.

 

The plantation of Shadrack Going was the scene of a jury in­quest held to determine the cause of death of Nathan Going, believed to be his son, according to Patrick County Will Book 1, page 53. The inquest was dated November 9, 1793, ac­cording to Lela C. Adams in "Abstracts of Wills, Invento­ries and Accounts, Patrick County, Virginia:"

 

"Inquisition taken at the plantation of Shadrack Going before Edward Tatum, a commissioner.  The body of Nathan Going then and there lying dead. One Robert Hall on Saturday, 21 September last, on the plantation of Jacob Lawson mortally wounded the said Going on the head with a weeding hoe and broke the skull of Going through the rage and passion of Robert Hall.

 

Jurors: Jonathan Hanby, foreman, Obadiah Hudson, Isaac Pennington, Aaron Rea, Harberd Smith, War­ham Easley, William Easley, Thomas Collings, Wil­liam Collings, Anthony Collings, John Wil­son and Richard Davidson."

 

Shadrack Going posted bond and was appointed administra­tor of the estate of Nathan Going December 10, 1793, ac­cording to Will Book 1, page 6.  The estate of "Nathan Go­ings" was ap­praised at 25 pounds, 8 shillings and 10 pense" by Obadiah Hudson, John Rea and James Taylor and returned to the court May 23, 1794, according to Will Book 1, page 22.  The estate consisted of "4 notes amounting to £24.2.3, ham­mer, gun and rasp, Total: £5.8.10."

 

On November 4, 1793 Shadrack Going administered the es­tate of Nathan Going who had been "killed by being struck in the head with the eye of a weeding hoe by Robert Hall on the plantation of Jacob Lawson."  Thomas Ward and Joshua Adams were his bondsmen.  Edward Tolman, John Hanby and Nathaniel Smith were appointed to settle the estate.

 

In 1797, "Shadrach Going, Sr, Joseph Going, John Going, James Going, Zeph Going, Shadrack Going, Jr, David Going, Laban Going, William Going and Isaac Going" appeared as taxpayers in Patrick County, Virginia.

 

June Smith, Foundation Member transcribed the Going individuals listed in the early tax lists of Patrick County which was formed in 1790 from Henry County.

 

In 1800, "Shadrach Going, Joseph Going, Isaac Going, Benjamin Going, Labon Going, Caleb Going, William Going, James Going, Martin Going, Obediah Going, Jacob Going and David Going" appeared as taxpayers in Patrick County.

 

In 1801, "Shadrach Going, John Going, Obediah Going, Caleb Going, Laberne Going, Isaac Going, Johnson Going, David Going, James Going, John Going on the Dan River, Benjamin Going, William Going and Joseph Going" was on the Patrick County tax list.

 

In 1802, "Shadrach Going, William Going, Benjamin Going, John Going on Dan River and Benjamin Going appeared on the Patrick County tax list.

 

In 1803, "Shadrach Going, Johnson Going, John Going, William Going, Sr, Laban, Benjamin Going on Dan River" were recorded as taxpayers.

 

In 1804, "Shadrach Going, William Going, William Going, Jr, James Going, Benjamin Going, John Going, Obediah Going and Johnson Going" were taxpayers in Patrick County.

 

In 1805, "Shadrach Going, James Going, John Going, John Going, Jr, William, Abidiah Going, Benjamin Going were taxpayers in Patrick County.

 

In 1806, "William Going, William Going, Jr, John Going, Obadiah Going, Benjamin Going, James Going and Stephen Going appeared on the Patrick County tax rolls.

 

In 1807, "Hezekiah Gowing, Obediah Going, James Going, William K. Going, Stephen Going and Barbrezel Going" appeared as Patrick County taxpayers.

 

In November 1803, "Shadrack Goine" sold 48 acres of his 1,000 acres to his grandson, Shadrack Beazley for a "valuable consideration."

 

The will of Shadrack Going, dated June 4, 1805, was filed in Patrick County Will Book 1, pages 80-81 and abstracted in "Abstracts of Wills, Invento­ries and Accounts, Patrick County, Virginia:"

 

"Will of Shadrack Going, being sick and weak . . .

 

Legatees: to my beloved wife, Hannah one feather bed, furniture, kitchen furniture, 'youse' of one sorrell mare and possession of my house and her support out of my plantation during her natural lifetime and at her death her bed, furniture, etc. to be 'ekwil' divided between Jerushe & Keziah Go­ing.

 

The plantation whereon I now live on both sides of Lit­tle Dan River to my beloved son Obediah, also my hackle and one sorrell stud, mare and colt.  His mother is to have the use of the mare when she wishes.  Also to him bed, furniture, planta­tion working tools, 4 head cattle, all hogs in order to support him­self and mother.

 

To beloved daughter Keziah Going, 1 rone horse, sad­dle, bridle, 1 cow, bed and furniture.

 

To Rebecca Going, daughter of Fanny Going, wife of Edmond Bowlin, one cow.

 

To the following beloved sons, 5 shillings each, to wit: John Going, David Smith Going, James Go­ing, Claborne Going, Solomon Going, Shadrack Going and Caleb Going.

 

To daughter Fanny Bowlin, wife of Edmund Bowlin, 5 shillings.

 

To daughter Hannah Beazley, wife of Thomas Beazley, 5 shillings.

 

My upper plantation on the south side of Little Dan River I have already given to Shadrack Beazley, son of Thomas Beazley, by deed.

 

Executors: William Carter and William Burge.

 

Witnesses: David P----, William Coomer, H--- Adams.

Will returned to December Court, 1805."

 

On March 27, 1806, William Carter posted bond and received the administration of the estate of Shadrack Going.  He made a return to the court in March 1806.  In the May 1806 term of the court he returned the inventory of the deceased: "5 books, household items and livestock, Total: $289.13."  Appraisers were Nathaniel Smith, James L. Gaines and Samuel Hanby, Jr.

 

Quoting from Patrick County Deed Book 3, page 87:

 

"State of Tennessee}

County of Grainger}

 

"Whereas Shadrack Gowing, late of the county of Patrick . . . possessed land in said county lying on Lit­tle Dan River, containing 912 acres and also possessed of a considerable personal estate . . . whereas Shadrick Gowing had the following children, Jerusha, John, David Smith, James, Fanny, Claiborne, Leaborne [Laban], Kesiah, Shadrake [Shadrach], Hannah, Obediah, and Caleb.  . . . sons John, James, Caleb, Claiborne, Shadrick and Leaborne . . . appoint Henry Howell of the County of Grainger . . . their true and lawful at­torney . . . to sue . . . Obediah Gowing for settling the property unfairly and submitting a will which was not Shadrack Gowing's will. 

 

July 24, 1806   John Gowing           James Gowing

               Caleb Gowing     Claiborne Gowing

               Leaborne Gowing    Jerusha Gowing

Witnesses:

    J. J. Jack, Leaborne Gowing, Henry Howell"

 

It is interesting to note that Jerusha Going signed the instru­ment with her brothers, but was not mentioned in the document.  "Shadrack Gowing" was mentioned in the document, but did not sign it.  "Leaborne [Laban] Gowing, one of the plaintiffs, also signed as a witness.

 

On March 31, 1808 "Jerusha Gowing and Kesiah Gowing, heirs of Shadrack Gowing, dec'd, gave a quit claim deed to their in­terest in the estate to Gabriel Hanby, Sr.  On August "Obediah Going of this county sells to Gabriel Hanby 1,200 acres on the Little Dan River for $1,600 whereon Shadrick Going, deceased lived."  The deed was witnessed by William Carter, Thomas [X] Beasley and John Tatum. 

 

Patrick County Deed Book 3, page 83 records an apparent set­tlement of the dispute dated October 30, 1807:

 

"I, Henry Howell, attorney for John Going, James Going and Laborne [no last name] have this day by virtue of my power compromised all manner of dis­pute about the will of Shadrack Going, dec'd and so hereby for the above named persons transfer all their right and rights unto a certain tract of land to Gab'l Hanby and for which land a suit was brought in Patrick Court to set aside a second will, as witness my hand and seal.

 

Witnesses:                  Henry Howell

    Nat'l Claiborne,

    Fleming Saunders"

 

On February 20, 1812, James S. Gains and Obediah Goin, "heir at law of Shadrack Goin, dec'd exchanged land on the west side of the Goin line on Thomas Beazley's corner," ac­cording to Patrick County Deed Book 3, page 530.  Witnesses were John Tatum, Thomas Beazley and William D. Gaines.

 

Following is the list compiled by Donna Gowin Johnston of the known children of Shadrack Go­ing/Gowing:

 

    John Going         born about 1749

    David Smith Going  born November 21, 1751

    Laban Going           born in 1757

    Daniel Going           born about 1760

    Hannah Going     born about 1763

    Caleb Going            born about 1765

    James Going           born about 1769

    Solomon Going       born about 1771

    Claiborne Going      born about 1773

    Shadrack Going, Jr. born about 1775

    Nathan Going          born about 1777

    Obadiah Going        born about 1779

    Fanny Going           born about 1781

    Rebecca Going       born about 1783

    Jerusha Going         born about 1787

    Keziah Going          born about 1789

 

Traces of the descendants of Shadrack Gowing have been found in several counties in Tennessee: Claiborne, Grainger, Hamil­ton, Hancock, Hawkins, Jefferson, Knox, Roane and Wil­son.  The 1810 tax list of Grainger County lists six sons and one son-in-law of Shadrack Gowin/Going of Patrick County, Virginia:

 

    "Bolling,  Edmund   1 white poll

    Goan,    John    1 white poll  90 ac. on Young's Crk

    Goan,    Claiborne 1 white poll  100 ac. on Young's Crk

    Goan,    James      1 white poll

    Goan,    William    1 white poll

    Goan,    Shaderick 1 white poll

    Goan,    Daniel      1 white poll  338 ac, Richland Crk

    Gowin,  Caleb       1 white poll

     *Howell  Henry      1 white poll  900 ac. on Young's Crk

    *Attorney for Going brothers in Patrick County lawsuit.

 

The 1810 census records these families differently:

 

    "Bolen,    Edmund   8 free colored  6 children

    Goan,    John    9 free colored  7 children

    Goan,    Claibourn 8 free colored  6 children

    Goan,    James      3 free colored  1 white fem. 16-26

    Goan,    Shadrach 5 free colored  3 children

    Goan,    Caleb       6 free colored  4 children"

 

    "Goin, Daniel white male       26-45

                       white female    26-45

                       white female    10-16

                       white female    10-16

                       white male       0-10

                       white male       0-10

                       white male       0-10

                       white male       0-10

                       white female    0-10

                       slave"

 

    "Guin,  Joseph     white male                   26-45

                       white female                16-26

                       white male                     0-10

                       white female                  0-10"

 

    "Guin,  William    white male       26-45

                       white female    26-45

                       white female    10-16

                       white female    0-10"

 

Virginia Easley DeMarse, Foundation researcher, compiled a list of the early taxpayers of Grainger County of interest to Gowen chroniclers.  Her account read:

 

"By the provisions of the Act of 1797, the justices were authorized to take lists of taxable property and polls in various captains' companies of the militia.  White polls were "all free males and male servants, between the age of twenty-one and fiftyyears;" slaves, "all slaves male and female, between the age oftwelve and fifty years."  On Monday, November  3, 1809, the Grainger County Court ordered ten justices to take the list of taxable property and make their returns at the next court session. The returns were made February 19, 20, 21, 1810.  The amount of tax was omitted on the copy I abstracted from.

 

The headers for the following list are:

1) on each 100 acres, 12.5 cents

2) each town lot, 25 cents

3) each free poll, 12.5 cents

4) each black poll, 25 cents 5)

5) each retail store, $5.00.

The acreage is listed after item 1.

 

Polls and Taxable property in Captain William Mayses Com­pany of Militia returned by Moses Hodge included:

 

John Goan, 90 acres North Holston, Young's Creek, no polls.

Claiborne Goan, 100 acres North Holston, Young's Creek , 1 free poll.

James Goan, 1 free poll.

 

List of polls and taxable property in the bounds of Captain Elisha Williamson's Company returned by Henry Boatman in­cluded:

 

William Goan, 1 free poll.

Shaderick Goan, 1 free poll.

 

List of polls and taxable property in the bounds of Captain John Bull's Company, returned by John Moffet included:

 

Caleb Gowin, 1 free poll.

 

List of Polls and Taxable Property returned by William Clay in the bounds of Captain Richard Cotses' Company included:

 

Samuel Bunch, 180 acres at Richland, 1 free poll.

Samuel Bunch for John Spencer, 2.

John Bunch, Senr. 187 acres R. C, 2 polls (black?).

John Bunch, Senr. 200 acres R. Knobbs, 6 (black?) polls, 4 other polls.

 

Captain Samuel Richardson's Company returned by David Tate, included:

 

William Guynn, 200 acres, 1 free poll.

 

Captain Thomas Sharp's Company returned by Mathew Campbell included:

 

Daniel Goan, 338 acres R. Creek, 1 free poll.

Robert Gains, 150 acres R. L. McNabbs, 1 free poll.

 

From tax lists it is apparent that six sons of Shadrack Going spent these years in Grainger County:

 

    John Gowin                               1806-1828

    James Going                                  1799-1811

    Claiborne Goins                             1810-1811

    Caleb Gowin                                  1808-1819

    David Smith Goins                         1819-1827

 

Shadrach Go­ing had at least 10 chil­dren born by 1782. The sons in Grainger County at the time of his death in 1805 were at least 18 years old, all born before 1787. Judging from the size of their fami­lies in 1810, they were probably much older.

                                        ==O==

John Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1749 in Hanover County, according to the research of Donna Gowin Johnston. He accompanied his father in his moves across Virginia.  He appeared on the tax lists of Patrick County in 1797, 1801, 1802, 1803, 1804 and 1805.

 

David Smith Goins, son of Shadrach Going and regarded as a Melungeon, was born in Hanover County, Virginia Novem­ber 21, 1757, according to his Revo­lutionary War pension ap­plication abstracted in "Tennessee Heroes of the Revolu­tion" by Zella Armstrong. 

 

"David Going of Halifax County" bought 270 acres for £55  from Joseph Tate of Rowan County, North Carolina, according to Halifax County Deed Book 1759-1767, page 440.

 

Apparently David Smith Goins was married, wife's name unknown, shortly after his re­turn home.  "David Going" was listed in the state census of Virginia of 1782 as the head of a household of two people in Halifax County, according to "Heads of Households, Vir­ginia, 1790," page 24.  He reappeared in the 1785 state cen­sus of Halifax County as the head of a household of "four white souls," ac­cording to the same volume.  In 1787 in Hali­fax County "David Gowin" rendered for taxes "two horses and five head of cattle."  About In the fall of 1787 he removed to Grayson County, Virginia and from there he relocated in adjoining Wythe County about 1791. 

 

"David Going" appeared on the tax lists of Patrick County, Virginia for the years of 1797 and 1800.

 

The case of "Obadiah Going vs David Going" was tried in Patrick County on July 25-26, 1799, according to Patrick County Order Book 0, pages 217 and 218.  Laban Going appeared as a witness on both days.

 

"David Gowin" was listed as the head of a household in the 1810 census of Wythe County, according to "Index to 1810 Virginia Census" by Madeline W. Crickard.  About 1811 he moved again to Grainger County, Tennessee "where he had a brother, La­ban Goin," according to his pension application.

 

The 1820 census of Grainger County [and all but 10 counties of Tennessee] was destroyed by a fire in Washington, and no copy remains.  "David S. Going, free negro" appeared in the 1821 tax list of Grainger County and paid a tax on "one free poll."  "David Goan" reappeared in the 1830 census of Grainger County, page 359, heading a household of "free col­ored per­sons." It is believed that David Smith Goins removed to Hamilton County, Tennessee to join his brother Laban Goins, about 1832.

 

In 1830, the federal census of Grainger County, Tennessee listed him as "David Goan, free colored." In 1832, he applied for his pension at age 76 in Hamilton County, Tennessee.  He died there February 26, 1834.  His pension file states in 1840 that his pension was paid to his children [unnamed]. 

 

During his life he was sometimes enumerated as "white" and sometimes as "free colored."  His family removed to Halifax County prior to the Revolution.  He en­listed there in a militia com­pany commanded by "Capt. Rogers," ac­cording to his pen­sion application:

 

"David Goins, a resident of Hamilton County and State of Tennessee, aged 76 years doth appear in open court be­fore the Worshipful Justices of the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions of Hamilton County now sitting and on his oath make the following Declaration:

 

That he entered the service of the United States as a vol­unteer under Capt. Rogers in Halifax County, State of Vir­ginia and was mustered into service under Col. William Terry at Halifax Courthouse, to Williamsburg, from Williamsburg to Norfolk, and from Norfolk to Portsmouth where he was dis­charged, having served three months.

 

"Six or eight months after his return home, he was drafted, according to his memory under Capt. Bates and joined the regiment at Bibb's Ferry under Maj. Jones.  He was marched from there to Cabbin Point below Peters­burg, Virginia and was stationed there until his term of service expired, having served three months this tour and was dis­charged by Capt. Bates and returned home.

 

About two years after the last mentioned service, this ap­plicant was again drafted, according to his memory un­der Capt. Pregmore in Halifax County.  They marched to join Gen. Washington's army at Portsmouth where this appli­cant remained about two months before the surrender of Corn Wallis. About three days afterward, his term of ser­vice ex­pired, and he was discharged by Capt. Pregmore and re­turned home, having served three months this tour.

 

Four or five years after the termination of the Revolution­ary War [October 1781], he moved from Hali­fax County to Grayson County, Virginia where he resided three years.  From there he moved to Wythe County, Vir­ginia and resided there for 10 years.  From there he moved to Grainger County and resided there for 14 years.  From there he moved to Hamilton County, Tennessee and has resided here twelve months the last day of this month and still re­sides here."

 

"David Goins, age 76" was listed as Revolutionary War Pen­sioner S3406 in Hamilton County in 1834, ac­cording to "Twenty Four Hundred Tennessee Pensioners" by Zella Arm­strong.

 

David Smith Goins died in 1840 in Hamilton County, "his pen­sion then being paid to his children" [unnamed], accord­ing to pen­sion records.  He did not appear in the 1840 census of Hamilton County.

 

Children born to David Smith Goins are unknown.

 

E. Raymond Evans, an anthropologist, made a study of the mysterious Melungeons of Hamilton and Rhea Counties, Tennessee and wrote a report of his findings in "Tennessee Anthropologist,"  Spring 1979.  He wrote:

 

"Located approximately 30 miles north of Chattanooga, the com­munity of Graysville, Tennessee contains one of the most stable Melungeon settlements in the state.  Field work in the community conducted in conjunction with archival research demonstrates that the Melun­geons, who now com­pose more than half of the local population, came from Hamilton County during the lat­ter half of the nineteenth century. 

 

Census records and other archival sources indicate that prior to coming to Hamilton County they had lived in Virginia and North Carolina.  In Graysville, the Melun­geons strongly deny a black heritage and explain their genetic difference by claiming to have had Cherokee grandmothers.

 

Many of the local whites also claim Cherokee ancestry and appear to accept the Melungeon claim.  The racist discrimination common in Hancock County and in most other Melungeon communities is absent in Graysville.  Here, the Melungeons interact in all phases of commu­nity life, and exogamy with local whites is a common practice.  The group is called after the most common surname pre­sent--Goins--and the term 'Melungeon' is not used by the people or by their neighbors.

 

Recent field observations have led to the conclusion that the culture and social activities of the Graysville Melun­geons differs in no way from that of any small Southern Appalachian community.

 

No people in Tennessee have been subjected to more romantic speculation than have the so‑called 'Melungeons.' These dark‑skinned people, living in a white world, have attempted to explain their color by saying they were of Portuguese descent, according to Swan Burnett in  1889 in 'The American Anthropolo­gist.  Popular writers, including Thurston L. Willis in 'The Chesapiean' in 1941 and Leo Zuber in 'The Melun­geons' in 1941, have elaborated on this theme   They have been claimed to be descendants of the 'lost' tribes of Israel as reported by Jean Patterson Bible writ­ing in 1975 in 'Melungeons Yesterday and Today.' and 'old world Gypsies,' 'Welsh Indians,' and Arabs by oth­ers.

 

Others have attempted to link their origin with estab­lished historical events.  Raleigh's 'Lost Colony' and the De Soto expedition are two examples suggested by Mo­zon Peters writing in 1970 in the 'Chattanooga Times.'  In what is probably the least plausible claim, it is a mat­ter of legal record that the Tennessee courts have ac­cepted 'proof' that the Melungeons are descendants of settlers from ancient Carthage propounded by Judge Lewis Shepherd in 1915.

 

The actual ethnic background of the Melungeons and their place of origin is far less dramatic.  Mod­ern genetic studies have demonstrated that Melungeons are a tri‑racial people with Indian, African and European an­cestry.

 

In Tennessee, public attention has usually focused on the Melungeon Communities of upper East Tennessee.  In particular, Hancock and Hawkins counties are usually regarded as the Melungeon homeland.  There are, how­ever, well documented Melungeon communities in Vir­ginia and Kentucky as well as in other parts of Ten­nessee. In addition to the well known Hancock-Hawkins county Melungeons, there are established communities such as Oakdale, Morgan County, Tennessee Bazeltown, Roan County, Tennessee; in the Bell's Bend area of the Cumberland River west of Nashville  and in Graysville, Rhea County, Tennessee.

 

Regarding the Graysville community, Jean Patterson Bible as observed: 'The Graysville aggregate is probably one of the most stable of all Melungeon communities today.'

 

The purpose of this paper is not to perpetuate the popu­lar myth of an exotic Melungeon 'race,' but rather to provide an ethnographic description of the cultural background and contemporary life of the Graysville Melungeons.  The term 'Melungeon' is used solely for the purpose of defining the study group and is not in­tended as a negative reflection on the ethnic background of any member of the community. The data presented herein were obtained by the author during an extended study of the community from November 1976 through August 1977, and are based on personal observations, 83 informal interviews with 36 residents of the community and surrounding areas, and a review of available docu­mentary and published materials.

 

Graysville is a small semi‑urban community similar to the hundreds of other country towns charac­teristic of the Appalachian area.  There are no paved streets, and there is no real business district.  Sprinkled haphazardly among a the fading frame dwelling houses are two gen­eral purpose 'grocery' stores, a TV repair shop, a small community library, a barber shop, three automotive re­pair shops and one service station.  The community has a school and eight Protestant churches‑‑four of which are Baptist.

 

There is no local industry. The economy of the area is geared toward small scale farming, mining, and pulp‑wood cutting, supplemented with sporadic indus­trial employment outside the area.

 

The community is located in the southern part of Rhea County, Tennessee approximately two miles north of the Hamilton County line and one mile west of U.S. High­way 27.  Rugged ridges, typical of the eastern Tennessee Valley surround the town.  Lone Mountain in the north and Black Oak Ridge to the east form two sides of a rough triangle in which Graysville is located.  The third side of the triangle is formed by Walden's Ridge on the west. The Cumberland escarpment, which forms the eastern edge of the ridge, is cut by many streams head­ing directly against the rim.  One of these, Roaring Creek, flows along the southwestern side of Graysville.  The central portion of the commu­nity sprawls between the base of Walden's Ridge on the west and the tracks of the Cincinnati, New Orleans and Texas Railroad to the east.

 

The town takes its name from William Gray, one of its earliest and best­known residents, who arrived after the Civil War. The real beginning of the community, how­ever, is marked by the coming of the railroad.  It then experienced an influx of population from all points of the compass.  The post office was established in 1875 with William Gray as postmaster.  In 1884 Henry and William Fox orga­nized the Fox Coal Company, which opened mines in the side of Walden's Ridge west of the town.  In addition to coal, a large deposit of tile clay was also mined from an adjoining range of hills and shipped to markets in other areas. A bank was organized and two hotels were established.  In 1835, an additional de­mand for coal was created in the area by the establish­ment the Dayton Coal & Iron Company a few miles to the north.  Funded by European investors, the Dayton Coal & Iron Com­pany operated 375 coke ovens in which coke was made from coal to fuel two large blast furnaces with an annual production capacity of 90,000 tons of foundry and forge pigiron.  After 1900 the Fox Coal Company at Graysville was acquired and expanded by the Durham Coal & Iron Company, and a large coke oven complex was established near Roaring Creek.  Af­ter an initial period of intense prosperity, the industrial development of Graysville entered a decline following World War I and was completely crushed by the eco­nomic depression of the 1930's.

 

Most of the mines were closed. The bank was consoli­dated with the Dayton Bank, the hotels were closed, and the people began to leave.  The present population is less than one thousand persons.

 

Ethnically, with the exception of the Melungeon com­ponent, the community is largely composed of persons of Anglo‑Scotch‑Irish descent who have lived in the area for at least three generations.  There are no blacks in the community, and most of the residents, including the Melungeons, tend to express strong racist attitudes in their conversation.  Social cleavage is along religious rather than ethnic lines in Graysville.  In 1891, several families of Seventh Day Adventists settled in Graysville.  A year later a religious academy was estab­lished by the group.  A sanitarium was also set up and enjoyed a wide patronage.  While these facilities were later moved to Collegedale in Hamilton County, many of the people remained in Graysville and still tend to hold themselves apart from the rest of the community.

 

The most common surname among the Graysville Melungeons is Goins, being so prevalent that the whites in the surrounding area call all the Graysville Melun­geons 'Goinses,' rather than Melungeons.  In fact, the term 'Melungeon' is rarely used anywhere in lower East Tennessee. The Goins families are so well known in Rhea County that any dark skinned person, not regarded as a black, is said to 'look like a Goins.'

 

Edward T. Price wrote:

 

'The name Goins seems to be a peculiar marker of these mixed‑bloods. It has already been mentioned in connec­tion with the Melungeons and certain strains in North Carolina.  It is prominent among the mixed­bloods of Darke County, Ohio, and was associated with the Red­bones in what is now Cal­casieu Parish, Louisiana.  It is a minor name among the Croatans and is the chief name among a mixed‑blood group with a special school in Williamsburg County, South Carolina. Further, Goins is an unusual name; though many whites are named Goins.'

 

It occurred with a much greater frequency among free colored persons in 1830 [2.8 per thousand] than among the population at large in 1790 [0.1 per thousand] in six populous Southern and Middle states. Over a hundred free colored families named Goins were well scattered in 1830 through the South and southern parts of the North­ern border states. The two greatest concentrations oc­curred in the Melungeon area and the North Car­olina‑Virginia Piedmont where so many are found to­day.

 

Will Alen Dromgoole states that among the Hancock-Hawkins County Melungeons the first was a man named Goins who entered the area shortly after the formation of the state of Tennessee. Early land records indicate that the Goins mentioned came from North Carolina. Both North Carolina and Virginia had several mulattoes named Goins (spelled Gowen or Goin), who were veter­ans of the American Revolution, and it is possible that the individual in question came to Tennessee as the re­cipient of a land grant for his military service.

 

Colonial records show three men named Gowen serving in a mulatto militia unit in 1754, and land records from 1718 show a Mihil Gowen as a property owner in James City County, Virginia. The same unusual name, Mihil Gowen, was born by a 'colored servant' who gained his freedom in 1657.

 

Both local tradition and documentary sources agree that the Graysville Melungeons entered the community from Hamilton County, Tennessee sometime after 1880.  Census records show that prior to 1880 there were no persons with Melungeon surnames living in Rhea County.

 

There were, however, such persons among the earliest non‑Indian settlers in Hamilton County.  In 1830, when Hamilton County reported less than 400 families total in the census records, there were four Goins [spelled Gowan, Gowin, or Goens] families present.  Each of these families listed colored members [total of 13] and three of them had white members [total of 6]. 

 

The most prominent of these first Melungeon settlers in Hamilton County was David Goens, a vet­eran of the American Revolution.  David Goens was born in Hanover County, Virginia.  During the war he served in the company commanded by a Capt. Rogers of Halifax County, Virginia.  After the close of hostilities, he lived in Wythe and Grayson counties, Virginia, before mov­ing to Grainger County, Tennessee.  From Grainger County, he moved to Hamilton County, where he died in 1834.  His younger brother, Laban Goens preceded him to Hamilton County by a short time.

 

Hamilton County census for 1840 listed 13 'free colored' families as residents of the county. eight of which were named Gowin with a total of 53 persons.  In 1850, there were 16 'mulatto' families named Goins [spelled Goins, Goinz or Gowens].  Of this group two members were born in Virginia and one in North Carolina.  The rest, including some as old as 50, were born in Tennessee.

 

After the 1850 census the Melungeons in Hamilton County are no longer listed as 'free‑colored' or mulattos. A few were regarded as blacks, but most are listed as white.  Other Melungeon names pre­sent in the early records are Bolden [Bolin or Bolton] and Collins.  Fol­lowing 1880 there is a de­crease in Melungeon names listed for Hamilton County, accompanied by the appear­ance of them on the lists from Rhea County.

 

With the exception of David and Laban Goins, there is no record of where the individual Melun­geons who moved to Hamilton County originated.  It is pro­bable, however, that most of them came from the upper East Tennessee area where Melungeons were numerous by the end of the eighteenth century.

 

Most of their members entered Tennessee from the Virginia-North Carolina Piedmont area.  There is no record that the early Melungeon settlers in Hamilton County formed a separate community or re­garded them­selves as a distinct ethnic group.   Many of them settled in the northern end of the county in the Sale Creek area, only about five miles from the present town of Graysville.  Here there was some inter‑marriage with the Hicks and Fields families who were a Euro­pean‑Cherokee mixed‑blood group.  Today Sale Creek has a few families who call themselves 'Black Chero­kees,' but are regarded as blacks by their white neigh­bors. The Graysville Melungeons emphatically deny any relationship with this group, but it is probable that such a relationship does, in fact, exist.

 

Some of the Hamilton County Melungeons seem to have been regarded as Indian.  A newspaper arti­cle. appearing in the 'Chattanooga Times' March 31, 1894, relates to a man named William Bowlen described in the sub‑heading as 'A half‑witted Melungeon,' and in the text as 'a half‑witted Indian.'  Further in the text he is re­ferred to as 'belonging to that peculiar people called the Melungeons.'

 

Also in Chattanooga, in 1872, there was a widely publi­cized court case in­volving a Melungeon.  The case in­volved a lawsuit challenging the inheritance of some property by a girl whose mother had been a Melungeon named Bolton.  The contention was that the girl could not legally inherit the land due to the fact that, as a Melungeon, her mother had been part black and since interracial marriage was illegal in Tennessee, the girl was therefore illegitimate.  Her attorney, S. L. Shepherd, won the case by convincing the court that Melungeons have no black ancestry, but are rather derived from an­cient Carthaginians who came to North America by way of Portugal.

 

The first Melungeon to settle in the Graysville commu­nity was George Goins, who has children still living in the area.  He was born in Hamilton County around 1865.  His wife, Cordie, was born in 1876.  Her maiden name and place of birth are not known, but her children recall that she claimed to be Cherokee. The children of George and Cordie Goins, Alvin [also known as 'Albert'] Goins and Gracie Goins Patton are the oldest Melungeons living in the community today.  Alvin was born in 1903, and his sister was born a few years earlier.

 

A photograph was taken of Alvin Goins preparing roots to be used in a 'blood tonic.'

 

In Graysville, the Melungeons are fully accepted and participate fully in all phases of community life.  When schools were segregated, their children attended white schools without question.  In­termarriage between Melungeon and white non‑Melungeon individuals in the community is a com­mon pattern.  A less tolerant attitude was reported by an earlier observer by Edward T. Price who wrote:

 

'The Melungeons here are characterized by a single sur­name, Goins, though several others have been acquired, apparently by intermarriage with the Goinses. The group consists mostly of miners and farm laborers and forms 30 or 40 percent of the population of the town. These people are grouped under the general term, 'the Goins,' and the better known term Melungeon is applied by the relatively few who link them with the broader group.  Some of these people are distinctly dark in skin and claim Cherokee Indian ancestry.

 

Based on appearance, it appears that the strongest ge­netic factor in the background of the Graysville Melun­geons is northern European.  About half of them have very fair skin, with light brown or blond hair. Some have blue eyes.  This is particularly true of the younger members of the commu­nity.  Some have dark skin, but no more so than many non-Melungeons who spend much of their time out‑of‑doors.  There are a few with slight Negroid features such as wide noses, thick lips, etc., and some who have a somewhat similar appearance to Cherokee‑White mixed‑bloods.

 

The Graysville Melungeons apparently feel no special kinship with other Melungeon groups in the state.  When asked directly if they had relatives in the Han­cock-Hawkins County area, most re­sponded that they did not. 

 

From the beginning, the major occupation in the Graysville area has been coal mining. This was espe­cially true while the big iron works were active here and in near‑by Dayton. With the passing of the major in­dustries, some of the Melungeons left the area to seek work elsewhere.  Others continued to mine coal for which there is still, even today, a moderate demand as a domestic heating fuel."

==O==

Laban Goins, son of Shadrach Going and a younger brother of David Smith Goins, was born in 1760 in Hanover County.  He lived in Halifax County during the Revolution­ary War, but did not serve in the militia with his brother.  He was shown as a taxpayer there, along with "James Goin, Claiborne Goin, Daniel Goin, John Goin and Caleb Goin."

 

He was married about 1787 to Ella Duncan, according to testimony of Sarah Goins, a granddaughter, according to the research of Ethel Louise Goins Dunn of Crandall, Georgia.

 

On July 25 and July 26, 1799, Laban was allowed "one day witness pay in Obadiah Going vs. David Going," according to Patrick County Order Book O, page 217-218.

 

He appeared as a taxpayer in Patrick County, Virginia in 1797.  "Laberne Going" was taxed there in 1801.  "Laban Going" was included among the Going taxpayers in Patrick County for the last time in 1803.

 

About 1803 Laban Goins removed, appar­ently with sev­eral fam­ilies of rela­tives, to Grainger County, Tennessee.  The 1805 tax list of Grainger County included "Laborn Go­ing, Claborn Goins, Daniel Going, Caleb Going, James Goins and John Goins.  A second ver­sion of the "Taxable Inhabitants for the Year 1805" listed "Laban Go­ing, Clai­borne Going, Daniel Goin, Shadrack Goin, James Going, John Going and Calib Go­ing."

 

Although the spelling varies from the first list to the sec­ond, it is obvious that the two lists refer to the same in­dividuals. Of the second group only Shadrack Goin does not appear in the first list.  "Laborn Going" was rendered as "one free poll, ne­gro" in the tax list.

 

Laban Goins preceded his brother in the move to Hamilton County, arriving there about 1829.  He appeared in the 1830 census of that county, page 75, as the head of a "free colored" household.  The enumera­tor obviously had no way to prop­erly record a Melungeon house­hold.  Although he did not record the "free colored" in­dividuals, he did enu­merate in the household "one white fe­male, 5-10" and "one white female, 0-5." 

 

In the 1830 census, Hamilton County reported less than 400 families.  Four of them were headed by "Laban Gowan, Roland Gowin, Sandford Gowin and Dodson Gowin."  Each of these families listed colored members [total of 13] and three of them listed white members [total of 6].  All were listed on Page 75 and were located in the north part of the county, just south of Graysville, Tennessee. 

 

On February 7, 1834 Laban Goins submitted his affidavit to the Hamilton County Court attesting to his brother's Revolu­tionary War service.

 

Laban Goins lived on the land that David Gray, the founder of Graysville, Tennessee, later donated to the Audubon Society.

 

Ethel Louise Goins Dunn, Gowen Research Foundation mem­ber of Crandall, Georgia, wrote an article on Laban Goins and his descendants for "History of Rhea County, Tennessee."  She wrote:

 

"Laborn Goins was the first one of the name in this area. He was born in Hanover County, Virginia in 1760. His brother, David. two years his senior, fought with George Washington in the Revolu­tionary War. In 1802-84, both of these brothers were in Grainger and Jefferson coun­ties tax records.  The 1830 census shows them living in the northern end of Hamilton County."

 

On July 18, 1855, a younger "Laborn Goen" was married to Artine Clark in Cannon County.  Of Laborn Goen and Artine Clark Goen noth­ing more is known.

 

Children born to Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins include:

 

    Carter Goins           born about 1788

    Merilla Goins          born about 1790

    Shadrach Goins      born about 1792

    Tilman Goins          born about 1795

    Thomas Goins    born about 1797

    Preston Goins         born about 1800 

    Harvard Goins     born about 1804

 

Carter Goins, son of Laban Goins was born about 1788 in Vir­ginia, and died in northern Hamilton County in the Graysville area.

 

Children born to Carter Goins include:

 

    Carter Goins, Jr.                 born in 1810

 

Carter Goins, Jr, son of Carter Goins, was born in 1810 in Grainger or Jefferson County, Tennessee.  He was brought to Hamilton County, Tennessee by his father about 1829.  Carter Goins, Jr. was married about 1834 to Cynthia McGill of Graysville, Rhea County, Tennessee.

 

Seven children, four sons and three daughters were born to Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins:

 

    William Goins                        born in 1836

    Francis Marion Goins                 born about 1838

    James Goins                              born about 1840

    Elizabeth Goins                          born in 1842

    Jefferson Goins                          born in 1844

    Vandola Goins                       born in 1848

    Minerva Goins                        born in 1852

 

William Goins, son of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1836 at Graysville.

 

Francis Marion Goins, son of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born about 1838 at Graysville.  He enlisted in the Union Army and was injured in the Cumberland Gap area for which he re­ceived a pension in his older years.

 

He was married about 1865 to Sarah Neely who was born in 1843 in Cannon County, Tennessee.  They continued to live there until about 1871 and then returned to Graysville.  She died there in 1881 and he was remarried to Margaret J. Murphy in Cannon County.  Francis Marion Goins died March 2, 1895 at Burt, Tennessee in Cannon County and was buried on his farm there.

 

Six children, five sons and one daughter, were born to Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins:

 

    James M. Goins                         born in 1867

    William J. Goins                         born in 1870

    Samuel Ulysses S. Grant Goins          born July 29, 1872

    Charley Goins                        born in 1874

    Andrew Goins                        born in 1876

    Lavada Goins                             born in 1880

 

Three children were born to Francis Marion Goins and Mar­garet J. Murphy Goins:

 

    James Robert Goins                   born March 26, 1883

    Ida Jane Goins                    born July 12, 1887

    Maria Elizabeth Goins             born June 10, 1892

 

James M. Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Hamilton County in 1867.

 

William J. Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Hamilton County in August 1871.  He was married about 1890 to Mrs. Maggie E. Merritt. They were recorded living in Cannon County near his brother, Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins in 1900.

 

"William J. Goin, Indian," was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Cannon County, Enumera­tion District 24, page 8, 4th Civil District:

 

    "Goin,     William J.    28, born in TN, August 1871

               Maggie E.        30, born in TN, March 1870

               Sarah F.        9, born in TN, June 1891

               Julia A.          3, born in TN, January 1897

               [son]         3/12, born in TN, February 1900

    Merritt, William F.   15, born TN, Feb. 1885, step-son

                Robert C.       10, born TN, June 1889, step-son"

 

Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Cannon County July 29, 1872. He was married there July 17, 1892 to Mrs. Amanda A. Mooneyham Bar­rett.  She was born there January 16, 1864 to Robert Mooneyham and Mary M. Manus Mooneyham. She had four children, but only one of the four survived.  Her first husband was Albert Barrett of Cannon County.

 

"Samuel U. G. Goin, Indian," was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Cannon County, Enumeration District 24, page 10, 4th Civil District:

 

    "Goin,     Samuel U. G.   26, born in TN, July 1873

               Amanda E. 40, born in TN, July 1870

               John          4, born in TN, October 1895

               Lavada      1, born in TN, August 1898

    Barrett, Maggie    14, born in TN, Sept. 1885,

                                  step-daughter"

 

They removed to Hamilton County and settled at Graysville about 1904.  She died in Chattanooga January 21, 1944 and was buried in Lomineck Cemetery there. He died in Cannon County February 21, 1947 and was buried in Cherry Cemetery at Woodbury, Tennessee.

 

Children were born to Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins:

 

    Maggie Barrett                    born in September 1885

    John Wiley Goins                   born October 18, 1895

    Levada Emiline Goins             born August 13, 1897

    Andrew Jackson Goins               born July 26, 1899

    Ammie Marchell Goins               born November 2, 1903

    Charles W. Goins                       born July 29, 1908

 

Maggie Barrett, daughter of Albert Barrett and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett, was born in September 1885 in Cannon County.  She was married eight or nine times, but had no chil­dren.  She died in Dalton, Georgia.

 

John Wiley Goins, son of Samuel Ulysses Simpsson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born October 18, 1895 at Manchester, Tennessee in Coffee County.  He was brought back to Hamilton County about 1904 by his parents.  He was married December 29, 1916 to Dovie Mae Bedwell, daughter of Jessie Harrison Bedwell and Sarah Doss Bedwell of McMinn County, Tennessee.  They lived on ad­joining farms from 1905 until they were married. 

 

He served in World War I and was buried in the National Cemetery in Chattanooga when he died there Oc­tober 2, 1938. Children born to John Wiley Goins and Dovie Mae Bedwell Goins are unknown.

 

Levada Emilene Goins, daughter of Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born August 13, 1897 in Hamilton County.  She was married about 1918 to Charles Al­bert Leffew who was born at Dayton, Tennessee in 1880.  Four sons and three daughters were born to them.  She died August 18, 1973 in San Bernandino, California.

 

Andrew Jackson Goins, son of Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born July 26, 1899 in Cannon County.  He served in World War I.  He did not marry and for years pushed an ice cream cart around Chattanooga.  He died in 1982 and was buried in the National Cemetery there.

 

Ammie Marshell Goins, daughter of Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born November 2, 1903 in Cannon County.  She was married January 13, 1921 to Floyd Martin Larmon who was born in Dalton, Georgia in 1902.  In 1991 they lived in Etowah, Ten­nessee.  Five children, one son and four daughters, were born to them.

 

Charles W. Goins, son of Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born July 29, 1908 at Graysville.  He was married about 1931 to Beatrice Goins, a second cousin.  She was the daughter of James Granville Goins and Ora Goins.  James Granville Goins was a first cousin to Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins. 

 

One son was born to Charles W. Goins and Beatrice Goins Goins:

 

    Charlie Goins                                 born in 1935

 

Charley Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Cannon County in 1874.

 

Andrew Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in 1876 in Cannon County.  He was married about 1899, wife's name Lizzie.  Children born to Andrew Goins and Lizzie Goins are un­known.

 

Lavada Goins, daughter of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Cannon County in 1880.  She was married about 1898 to William Bolin.

 

James Goins, son of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born about 1840 at Graysville.

 

Elizabeth Goins, daughter of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1842 at Graysville.  She was mar­ried about 1860 to Pleasant Bowling.

 

Jefferson Goins, son of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1844 at Graysville.  He was married about 1867 to Sarah Mooneyham.

 

Vandola Goins, daughter of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1848 at Graysville.

 

Minerva Goins, daughter of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1852 at Graysville.  She was mar­ried to James Goins, her second cousin.

 

Merilla Goins, daughter of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about 1790 in Patrick County. 

 

Shadrach Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about about 1792, probably in Patrick County.

 

Tilman Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about 1795, probably in Patrick County.  He was married about 1818 and lived in Cherokee County, North Carolina, in the extreme western tip of the state, according to Melton E. Gene" Scott, a descendant of Trenton, Georgia.

 

Children born to Tilman Goins include:

 

    Julia Ann Goins                              born about 1820

 

Julia Ann Goins, daughter of Tilman Goins, was born about 1820 in Cherokee County, North Carolina.  She was married about 1836 to John Goins who was born in Bledsoe County, Tennessee, a son of Thomas Goins of Grainger County, according to Melton E. "Gene" Scott, a descendant of Trenton, Georgia.

 

Children born to John Goins and Julia Ann Goins Goins include:

 

    Sarah Isabelle Goins                          born 1860

 

Sarah Isabelle Goins, daughter of John Goins and Julia Ann Goins Goins, was born about 1860.  She was married November 28, 1883 to Columbus Scott at Smithville, Tennessee in DeKalb County, according to Melton E. "Gene" Scott, a grandson.

 

Thomas Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about 1797, probably in Grainger County.  He lived in Bledsoe County about 1820 where a son was born.

 

Children born to him include:

 

    John Goins                             born about 1824

 

John Goins, son of Thomas Goins, was born about 1824 in Bledsoe County.

 

.......

 

Preston Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about about 1800, probably in Patrick County.

 

Harvard Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about 1804, probably in Grainger County.

 

Harvard Goins was enumerated as the head of Household No. 422 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County, Page 796.  The family was rendered September 18, 1850 as:

 

    "Goins,    Harvard   46, farmer, born in Tennessee

               Laborn 16, born in Tennessee, laborer

               William    11, born in Tennessee

               Duncan      9, born in Tennessee

               Jane       7, born in Tennessee"

 

Charlie Goins was enumerated as the head of Household No. 423-423 adjoining Harvard Goins in the 1850 census of Hamilton County:

 

    "Goins,    Charlie 45, born in North Carolina

               Nathan 18, born in Tennessee

               Rhoda     15, born in Tennessee

               Catharin     8, born in Tennessee

               Sarah         5, born in Tennessee"

 

Melton E. "Gene" Scott, Trenton, Georgia wrote December 20, 1993:

 

"My grandmother was born Sarah Isabelle Goins.  Her father was John Goins, born in Bledsoe County, TN.  His father was Thomas Goins, born in Grainger County, TN.  The mother of Sarah Is­abelle Goins was also a Goins.  Julia Ann Goins was her maiden name.  She was the daughter of Tilman Goins, born in Cherokee County, North Carolina.  His father was Laborn Goins, born in Patrick County, VA.  The sister of Tilman Goins, Mar­illa Goins was born in Patrick County also.  His brothers were Preston Goins, Harbard Goins and Shadrack Goins. 

 

My grandmother, Sarah Isabelle Goins was married to my grandfather, Columbus Scott November 28, 1883 at Smithville, TN in DeKalb County.  His brother, James Scott was his bondsman.  I be­lieve that the mother of Columbus and James Scott was a Goins also.  Both were listed as Indian in the 1880 census of DeKalb County.  My grandmother had cousins in Grainger County by the names of Granville Goins and Sanford Goins."

 

Daniel Going, regarded by some researchers as a son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1760, probably in Hanover County and brought to Halifax County by his father. 

 

"Daniel Going, born about 1760," was enlisted in the Virginia Continental Line in February 1777, according to his pension application. He served in the Battle of Germantown and in the Battle of Brandywine.  He was discharged at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.

 

Daniel Going appeared on the 1782 tax list of Halifax County with two in the family.  He began paying taxes in Bedford County in 1783.  He reappeared on the Bedford County tax rolls from 1786 through 1794, according to the research of June A. Smith of Bremerton, Washington.

 

Daniel Going was one of the men who posted bond when items were sold from the estate of Maryann Franklin in Bedford County November 22, 1794.  The bond was "examined by the Bedford County Court September 19, 1797 and returned July 23, 1798," suggesting that Daniel Going remained there at that time.s

 

He was not mentioned in the will of Shadrach Going written in 1805. Daniel Going appeared in the 1805 tax list of Grainger County, Tennessee, but did not join the sons of Shadrach in filing suit against their younger brother, Obadiah Goins, executor of the will of Shadrach Goins, for forging the will of Shadrach Goins.

 

Hannah Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born about 1763 in Hanover County.  She was married to Thomas Beasley about 1881.  She was mentioned in the will of her father written in 1805 as the recipient of "five shillings."

 

Caleb Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1765, probably in Hanover County.  He appeared as a taxpayer in the 1782 tax list of Halifax County.  He was mentioned in the will of his father written in 1805 as the recipient of five shillings.

 

Caleb Going appeared on the 1805 tax list of Grainger County, Tennessee as "one white poll."  In 1806 he joined his brothers in protesting the administration of his father's estate by his brother Obadiah Going.

 

"Caleb Goan" was enumerated in the 1810 census of Grainger County as the head of a household composed of "6 free colored, 4 children."

 

James Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1769, probably in Hanover County.  "James Goin" appeared as a taxpayer in Halifax County along with "Laban Goin, Claiborne Goin, Daniel Goin, John Goin and Caleb Goin."

 

About 1797, James Goin removed, apparently with several fam­ilies of relatives regarded by some re­searchers as Melun­geons, to Grainger County, Tennessee. 

 

On November 27, 1797, James Goin received North Car­olina Land Grant No. 300 for 262 acres on the Tennessee River and 938 acres on the north side of Tennessee River in what is now Grainger County. The 1799 tax list for this county shows "Thomas Goen, James Goen, John Goen, John Gowen, William Gowen and Alexander Gowen," all listed as "white."  Grainger County was formed from Hawkins and Knox Counties in 1796.

 

"James Goin, free colored" ap­peared in the 1799 tax list of Grainger County "in Capt. Mc­Kee's Company." The 1805 tax list of Grainger County in­cluded "James Goins, Laborn Go­ing, Claborn Goins, Daniel Going, Caleb Going and John Goins.  A sec­ond ver­sion of the "Taxable Inhabitants for the Year 1805" listed "James Go­ing, Laban Going, Clai­borne Go­ing, Daniel Goin, Shadrack Goin, John Going and Calib Go­ing."  "James Goin" was shown with "one free poll" in each tax list.

 

"James Goan" was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1810 census of Grainger County as "three free colored and one white female, 16-26."  Enumerators at that time did not record the age of free colored individuals.  A duplicate enumeration for "James Goan" appeared in adjoining Clai­borne County, Ten­nessee in 1810.  Claiborne County was or­ganized in 1801 from land taken from Grainger and Hawkins Counties, perhaps explaining the duplication.

 

"James Goin, Sr." received a deed from Blain Davison in 1815 to land in Claiborne County for $200, ac­cording to Claiborne County Deed Book H, page 14.

 

The 1820 enumeration of James Goin did not survive.  Most of the individual enumeration sheets of the census of 1820 of the state of Tennessee were destroyed by fire in Washington, D. C.  Fragments of the cen­sus for only ten counties and re­caps of others escaped the fire.  No enumer­ation sheets were available for Claiborne or Hawkins County.  Recap sheets showed 310 "free persons of color" in the 1820 census. 

 

In 1825, "James Goin, Sr." deeded land in Claiborne County to John Harris for $200, according to Clai­borne County Deed Book H, page 448.  It is believed that James Goin died before 1830 because he did not appear in the 1830 census of Ten­nessee.

 

It is obvious that the census enumerator in 1830 had difficulty in deciding whether to list the seven Goen and Goin fami­lies as "white" or "free colored people."  In the summary sheet 37 families composed of 331 people were recorded as "free col­ored" in 1830.  White and "free colored" were listed in con­secutive entries which perhaps indicated adjacent locations. 

 

A possible son of James Goin, Sr. is:

 

    James C. Gowan                        born June 1, 1795

 

James C. Gowan, possible son of James Goin, Sr, was born June 1, 1795, probably in Halifax County, ac­cording to Mary Alice Fritch, a descendant of Flat River, Missouri.  He en­listed January 8, 1814 in Capt. George Gregory's company of Ten­nessee militiamen.  He was discharged as a private May 17, 1814.  He reenlisted September 20, 1814 in preparation for a march to New Orleans with Gen. Andrew Jackson.  He was dis­charged May 5, 1815, again a private, according to "War of 1812, Index of Pensioners."

 

James C. Gowan was married May 25, 1824 to Lucinda Mar­garet True at Tazewell, Tennessee.  She was born in Virginia February 12, 1806, according to a letter written August 26, 1991 by Mary Alice Fritch.

 

He was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 cen­sus of Claiborne County, page 106:

 

    "Goin, James          white male       30-40

                           white female    30-40

                           white female      0-5

                           white female    0-5"

 

Some disabling statutes were installed in 1831, 1832 and 1834 in the Tennessee constitution to prevent free colored from cer­tains rights enjoyed by the white citizens.  They could not own land, pay taxes, vote or tes­tify in court in matters in­volving white men.  These discouraging statutes caused many Melun­geons and free colored to leave the state.  However, the census enumerators mitigated some of the injustice by a liberal inter­pretation of who was white and who was free ne­gro or mulatto.

 

James C. Gowan did not reappear in the 1840 census of Clai­borne County.  It is believed that they had re­moved about 1835 to Harrison County, Indiana, perhaps in the expectation of re­ceiving a bounty land grant.  In 1850 James C. Gowan received Bounty Land Grant No. 8904 to 80 acres of land.

 

He was enumerated in the 1850 census of Harrison County, 45th township, page 398 as the head of a household com­posed of:

 

    "Gowan,  James      54, born in Virginia

               Lucinda   46, born in Virginia

               Jahue       20,

               Mary A.   18,

               John    16,

               James E.  13,

               Lucinda   12,

               Levina       9,

               Rezin         7,

               Miriam   5"

 

The sons of James C. Gowan were stonemasons, carpenters and farmers, and all were in Harrison County in 1850, ac­cording to Mary Alice Fritch.

 

In 1855, James C. Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True re­moved to Jefferson County, Missouri, just south of St. Louis. James C. Gowan died there July 28, 1874 at age 79 and was buried in the Gowan Cemetery, ac­cording to Mary Alice Fritch.  Lucinda Margaret True Gowan died there August 3, 1880 and was buried be­side her husband.

 

Children born to James C. Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True Gowan include:

 

    Jehu Gowan                       born about 1830

    Mary A. Gowan                     born about 1832

    John Gowan                           born about 1834

    James E. Gowan                     born August 20, 1836

    Lucinda Gowan                      born about 1838

    Levinia Gowan                   born about 1841

    Rezin Gowan                         born about 1843

    Miriam Gowan                    born about 1845

 

John Gowan, son of James C. Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True Gowan, was born about 1834 in Clai­borne County.  In the 1880 census of Jefferson County "John Gowan" appeared as the head of a household, Enumeration District 190, Vallie town­ship, page 6:

 

    "Gowan,  John        49, born in Tennessee

               Henry          22, born in Indiana, son

               Emma          18, born in Indiana, daughter

               Anna           11, born in Indiana, daughter

               Eliza L.          9, born in Indiana, daughter

               Minnie E.       5, born in Missouri,  daughter"

 

James E. Gowan, son of James C. Gowan and Lucinda Mar­garet True Gowan, was born in Harrison County.  He was married in Jefferson County, Missouri December 27, 1864 to Susan Robertson.

 

They were enumerated as the heads of a household in the 1880 census of Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie Township, page 6:

 

    "Gowan,  James          43, born in Indiana

               Susan          40, born in Missouri

               Lenard A.        14, born in Missouri

               Sarah           12, born in Missouri

               Carry             9, born in Missouri

               Maggie      7, born in Missouri

               Eugene      3, born in Missouri"

 

Children born to James E. Gowan and Susan Robertson Gowan include:

 

    Leonard A. Gowan                 born about 1866

    Sarah Jane Gowan                  born about 1868

    Carrie Gowan                         born about 1871

    Margaret "Maggie" Gowan         born about 1873

    Eugene Gowan [twin]             born about 1877

     [twin]                                born about 1877

    Irene Anna Gowan                  born about 1881

    Sopha Gowan                        born about 1884

 

Irene Anna Gowan, daughter of James E. Gowan and Susan Robertson Gowan, was born about 1881.  She was married in October 1899 to John Ruff, according to Mary Alice Fritch.

 

Rezin Gowan, son of James C. Gowan and Lucinda Mar­garet True Gowan, was born about 1842 in Harri­son County.  He was married about 1867, wife's name Lavonie.

 

They were enumerated in the 1880 census of Jefferson County, Enumerating District 190, Vallie Township, page 1 as:

 

    "Gowan, Rezin        38, born in Indiana

           Lavonie       34, born in Missouri

           Richard A.   12, born in  Missouri

           James T.        6, born in Missouri

           Lovenia         6, born in Missouri

           Rhoda E.           3, born in Missouri

           Nancy        3/12, born in Missouri"

 

Six other Gowan families were recorded in the 1880 census of Jefferson County.

 

James Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie Town­ship, page 18:

 

    "Gowan,  James      29, born in Illinois

               Marthy J. 35, born in Indiana

               Henry A.    6, born in Missouri

               Arther E.    2, born in Missouri"

 

John B. Gowan was reported as the head of a household in Jef­ferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie township, page 3:

 

    "Gowan,  John B.        28, born in Indiana

               Perlina E.     22, born in Missouri

               William E.      2, born in Missouri"

 

Edward F. Gowan was recorded as the head of a household in Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie town­ship, page 1:

 

    "Gowan, Edward F.   26, born in Illinois

               Margery E.  19, born in Missouri

               Frazel E.        3, born in Missouri"

 

Elemael Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie town­ship, page 12:

 

    "Gowan,  Elemael        26, born in Missouri

               Matilda J.     21, born in Indiana

               Malcum L.     5, born in Missouri"

 

Ervin F. Gowan was reported as the head of a household in Jef­ferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie township, page 1:

 

    "Gowan, Ervin F.       24, born in Illinois

               Mary J.        19, born in Indiana

               George   1/12, born in Missouri"

 

Benjamin Gowan was recorded as the head of a household on DeSoto, Missouri, Enumeration District 18, page 14:

 

    "Gowan,  Benjamin         26, born in Indiana

               Kate            24, born in Missouri

               Ida                    4, born in Missouri

               Dora                 2,  born in Missouri

               Benjamin F.    4/12, born in Missouri" 

 

Solomon Going, identified as a son of Shadrach Going by Donna Gowin Johnston, was born about 1771, probably in Halifax County. He was not mentioned in the will of Shadrach Going.

 

Claiborne Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1773, probably in Halifax County.  He was married about 1796, wife's name Sarah.  He was living in Grainger County, Tennessee July 24, 1806 when he joined his brothers in protesting the administration of the estate of his father.  The 1810 tax list of Grainger County showed "Claiborne Goan, 1 white poll" assessed taxes on "100 acres on Young's Creek."  His brother, "John Goan" lived nearby.

 

The 1810 federal census enumerated "Claibourn Goan, 8 free colored, 6 children."

 

Children born to Claiborne Going and Sarah Going are unknown.

 

Shadrach Going, Jr, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1775, probably in Halifax County.

 

Nathan Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1777 in Halifax County.  He accompanied his father in the move to Patrick County.  He was killed there in 1793 with a hoe by Robert Hall on the plantation of Jacob Lawson.  His father administrated his estate which was valued at "£25:8:10."

 

Obadiah Going, son of Shadrach, Going, was born about 1779 in Halifax County.  On June 25-26, 1799, the case of Obadiah Going vs. David Going" was heard by the Patrick County Court.  Laban Going appeared as a witness.

 

Obadiah Going was named administrator of the estate of his father in 1805 in Patrick County.  "Obadiah Gowing" was sued by his brothers in Grainger County, Tennessee in 1806 for settling the property unfairly and submitting a will which was not Shadrack Gowing's will."

 

On August 6, 1808, Obadiah Going of Patrick County sold to Gabriel Hanby 1,200 acres on the Little Dan River for $1,600 whereon Shadrick Going, deceased lived."

 

On February 20, 1812, James S. Gains and "Obediah Goin," "heir at law of Shadrack Goin, dec'd exchanged land on the west side of the Goin line on Thomas Beazley's corner," ac­cording to Patrick County Deed Book 3, page 530.  Witnesses were John Tatum, Thomas Beazley and William D. Gaines.

 

Fanny Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born about 1781, probably in Halifax County.  She was married about 1798 to Edmund Bowlin.  She was mentioned in the will of her father written June 4, 1805 as the recipient of a cow and five shillings.

 

Rebecca Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born about 1783 in Halifax County.  She received a cow by the terms of the will of Shadrach Going.  She was married about 1806 to P. Finley. 

 

Jerusha Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born in Halifax County about 1787.  "Jerusha Gowing" joined five of her brothers in protesting the administration of Obadiah Going of the estate of Shadrach Going, but was not mentioned in the body of the document.  On March 31, 1808 "Jerusha Gowing and Kesiah Gowing, heirs of Shadrack Gowing, dec'd, gave a quit claim deed to their in­terest in the estate to Gabriel Hanby, Sr.

 

Keziah Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born about 1789.  She and her sister, Jerusha Going were named in the will of Shadrach Going to receive the household furnishings of his home upon the death of his widow.  She was also named to receive "1 rone horse, saddle, bridle, 1 cow, bed & furniture."

                                             ==O==

Henry Going, born before 1761, was on the 1782 tax list for Hanover County with eight in his family, pos­sibly six children born before 1782.

 

HALIFAX COUNTY, VIRGINIA

 

Halifax County was formed from Antrim Parish of Lunen­burg County in 1752. 

==O==

Jacob Gowen, in his pension application, stated that he was born in Henry County, Virginia in 1762, how­ever in 1762, that area was in Halifax County.  Henry County was created in 1776, and Jacob Gowen en­listed there in the Virginia Conti­nental Line, according to "Genealogical Abstracts of Revolu­tionary War Pension Files" abstracted by Virgil D. White.

 

"Jacob Goan of Henry County" received compensation of four pounds, six shillings for "150 bundles of fodder which had been taken for public service," according to Henry County records published in "Virginia Magazine of His­tory and Bi­ography," Vol. 10. The compensation was au­thorized by the Quartermaster General's office during or shortly after the Rev­olutionary period.  Jacob Gowen later re­ceived a pension, No. S32273.  His name appeared in "List of Colonial Sol­diers of Virginia" by H. J. Eck­enrode.

 

He lived in Kentucky be­tween 1790 and 1820 and then moved to Vincennes, Indiana.  On June 7, 1832, he was in Vermillion County, Illinois.  From 1826 to 1838, he lived in Lawrence County, Illi­nois, the county where Shadrack Gowin died in 1878.

==O==

William Goings, born 1763, enlisted at Halifax Court House, Virginia for the period of the Revolutionary War.  He was mar­ried in October 1793, wife's name Elizabeth, in Caswell County, North Carolina, adjoin­ing Rockingham on the east.  He applied for a pension in 1819 in Hawkins County, Ten­nessee and men­tioned his wife, two sons, ages 11 and 2 and two daughters, ages 10 and 8.  He died there August 23, 1847.  [See GRF Newsletter, August 1990.]

 

In 1776, Henry County, Virginia was formed from Pittsylva­nia County.  Goin/Going/Gowin individuals appearing in Henry County in­clude; Charles, Clabourn, David, Elizabeth, Jacob, James, John, Josiah, Lit­tleberry "Berry," Nancy, Si­mon, Su­sanna, Zacheriah, Zedekiah and Zephaniah32,33

 

John Goan received land in Pittsylvania County in 1770.34 "John Going" took the oath of allegiance Au­gust 30, 1777.35  Why?  He received a land grant on March 1, 1784 of 374 acres on both sides of Black­berry Creek, adjoining his own land and that of John Witt.  "John Gowin" patented an addi­tional 79 acres on Blackberry Creek April 16, 1788.  In 1795 he pur­chased land from Bartlett Washington.  "John Going" was granted 153 acres on both sides of Little Blackberry Creek.36  Henry County Will Book 2, page 37 records the will of John Going, Sr, proved in 1801.  Heirs named were Clabourn, Eliz­abeth, John, Nancy, Josiah, Littleberry, Su­sanna, Simeon, Zedekiah and Zacheriah.37  Where did these seven sons live?

 

David Goan received land in Pittsylvania County in 1770.34  On March 30, 1789, "David Gowin" was granted 94 acres on Spoon Creek, adjoining the land of John Ward and 185 acres on the south side of Spoon Creek, "adjoining Collier."36  [David Smith Goins was supposedly in Grayson County, Vir­ginia at this time.]

 

HANOVER COUNTY, VIRGINIA, Miscellaneous

 

"John Gowen" leased land in Hanover County 7th, 6th month, 1734, ac­cording to "Valentine Papers," Volume 3.  In the same year he was mentioned as adjoining land that was owned by William Hix.

 

HARDY COUNTY, VIRGINIA

[Later West Virginia]

 

Hardy County was organized in 1785 from Hampshire County. In 1861 it became Hardy  County, West Virgi‑nia when Vir­ginia went with the Confederacy and the western portion of  the state elected to stay with the Union. 

 

Jonas Goings was about 1789 of parents of unknown. He is reported to have 12 brothers, all named for biblical characters, according to Annette Miner, a descendant of McAllen, Texas.  She regards Jonas Goings as a brother to Shadrack Going who was born in Virginia about 1796 and who operated a ferry across the south branch of the Potomac River during the Civil War.

 

Jonas Goings was married about 1811 to Temperance Scott Howie who was born about 1793 in Scotland or Northern Ireland to James Howie and Temperance Scott Howie.  The family, including brothers, James Howie and Mike Howie, emigrated to Philadelphia. Annette Miner has a report that Temperance Scott Howie [Jr.] had been married previously, husband's name also Goings.

 

Jonas Goings died in 1863 in Illinois, and Temperance Scott Howie Goings died about 1875. 

 

Children born to Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings include:

 

    John Wesley Goings                   born about 1813

    Mary Goings                          born about 1815

    Sarah Mandy Goings                  born about 1820

    Charles Goings                       born about 1823

    Catherine Anne Goings               born about 1825

    Elizabeth Almira Goings             born November 4, 1828

    William Goings [twin]             born about 1830

    Caroline Goings [twin]            born about 1830

    James Goings                         born about 1832

    Granville Goings                     born about 1835

 

John Wesley Goings, son of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1813, according to Annette Miner, a descendant.  She is also a descendant, through the marriage of cousins, of Elizabeth Almira Goings, sister to John Wesley Goings.  John Wesley Goings was married about 1836 to Margaret Cox, an only child of her parents. Children born to John Wesley Goings and Margaret Cox Goings are unknown.

 

Mary Goings, daughter of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1815.  She died about 1825.

 

Sarah Mandy Goings, of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1820.

 

Charles Goings, son of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1823.

 

Catherine Anne, daughter of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1825.

 

Elizabeth Almira Goings, daughter of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born November 4, 1828 "on the south branch of the Potomac River" in Hardy County, according to Annette Miner, a descendant.  She was married February 28, 1845 to James Riley Knapp [1821-1892].  Elizabeth Almira Goings Knapp died October 31, 1921 in Winchester, Illinois and was buried there in Young Cemetery.  She provided most of the information on Jonas Goings and descendants in a note written in 1897.  Children born to James Riley Knapp and Elizabeth Almire Goings Knapp are unknown.

 

William Goings, twin son of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1830.  He died about 1ge 19 "on the Plains on the way to the California gold rush," according to Annette Miner.

 

Caroline Goings, twin daughter of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1830.  She died in 1884.

 

James Goings, son of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1832.

 

Granville Goings, son of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1835.  He served in the Civil War, probably in Union service.  Annette Miner retains a daguerrotype of him in his uniform.

                                        ==O==

 

 

 

 

 

 

Descendant Researchers:

 

    Annette Miner, 4809 N. 4th St, McAllen, TX, 210/787-2144, E-Mail: eminer@hiline.net

 

 

HARRISON COUNTY, VIRGINIA

 

John Goowin was listed as the head of a household of three people in the 1785 census of Harrison County which was cre­ated in 1784. In 1861 it became part of West Virginia.


HENRICO COUNTY, VIRGINIA

 

Edmund Goin, living alone, was a resident of King Williams Parish in June 1744, according to a Huguenot census taken in that years, according to "Huguenot Emigration to Virginia."  King Williams Parish was established in 1700 as a sanctuary for the French Huguenots fleeing the religious persecution of Eu­rope.

==O==

Henry J. Going, Esq, "son of Venerable Archdeacon Going of Killaloe County, Tipperary, Ireland, was mar­ried to Mary Bowler, daughter of Henry Bowler of Richmond by the Rev. T. G. Dashiell at Rich­mond November 19, 1874," according to "Index of Marriage Notices in the 'Southern Church­man'" compiled by the Works Progress Administration. Chil­dren born to Henry J. Going and Mary Bowler Going are un­known.

==O==

James Going purchased 100 acres of land for 10 pounds from Abraham Childers of Henrico County April 14, 1736.  In a deed dated May 30, 1737 Abraham Childers conveyed 200 acres, "being part of tract where Childers now lives, granted by patent to him, bounded by land he sold to James Going, according to "Colonial Wills of Henrico County, Vir­ginia."

 

The will of James Going was presented by John Williamson, executor to the county court [date not noted], according to "Colonial Wills of Henrico County, Virginia."  Henry Stokes, John Watson, Robert Sharp and John Watkins were appointed to appraise the estate.

                                               ==O==

Milley Going was married September 21, 1792 to John Harlow, according to "Henrico County, Virginia Marriages, 1682-1850." 

                                             ==O==

William Going of Henrico County was paid £250 [sterling or tobacco?] July 8, 1771 by the church wardens of Henrico Parish & Old St. John's Church for taking Shadrach Vaughan as apprentice "and indemnifying them from any further charge for bringing up the said child," according to the research of Alicia Towster.  She suggested that James Vaughan who appeared in Henrico County 1756-1768 is possibly his father.

                                             ==O==

John Goins was married to Mrs. Mary Hodges December 3, 1779, according to "Henrico County, Virginia Marriages, 1682-1850."  Children born to John Goins and Mary Hodges Goins are unknown.

 

Mrs. Edith Gowen, a clerk for Fireman's Fund Insurance Com­pany, lived at 505 W. Grace in 1963 in Rich­mond, according to the city directory.

                                               ==O==

Mrs. Joyce Gowen, employed by Richmond Ceramic Studio, lived in Henrico County in 1963, according to the city directory of Richmond.

==O==

Mrs. Lillie V. Gowen, an employee of Friedman-Marks Com­pany, lived at 2812 4th Avenue in Rich­mond, according to the 1963 city directory.

==O==

Marzie Gowen, secretary for Virginia State Poultry Association, lived at 1037 W. Grace in 1963, ac­cording to the Richmond city directory.

==O==

Robert L. Gowen lived at 910 Park Avenue in 1963, according to the Richmond city directory.

==O==

Walter P. Gowen and his wife, Willie Gowen, lived at 518 Ban­croft Avenue in Richmond, according to the 1963 city directory of Richmond.  He was listed as an employee of Wilson Paper Box Co.

==O==

William B. Gowen was buried in Shockhoe Hill Cemetery, Richmond, October 5, 1861, according to "Shockhoe Hill Cemetery."

==O==

William Garland L. Gowen and his wife, Katherine M. Gowen lived at 4813 Bromley Lane, according to the 1963 city directory of Richmond.  He was identified as the "superintendent of B&G Olsen.  William Garland L. Gowen, Jr, a student, lived at the same address.

==O==

David Gowin of Henrico County purchased 40 acres in Hen­rico County for 40 pounds from Michael Gowin "of North Carolina," on March 20, 1765, according to Henrico County Court Minutes.  John Gowin was one of the witnesses. Spelling of the surname is uncertain; four different versions have been found in the legal records of the county.

 

David Gowin "of Henrico County" in 1779 turned in $142 in paper money to the Virginia Continental Loan office for new currency, according to "A Short Census of Virginia" pub­lished in the National Genealogi­cal Society Quarterly in 1958. 

 

He was listed as "David Gowine," head of a household was the only person of interest to Gowen chroni­clers in the 1810 census of Henrico County, according to "Index to Virginia Census, 1810" by Made­line W. Crickard.

 

"David Goyne," a farmer, was recorded as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Henrico County, page 101:

 

    "Goyne, David    white male       over 45

                           white female    16-26

                           white male       16-26

                           white male       16-26

                           white female    10-16

                           white male       10-16

                           white male       10-16

                           white female    0-10

                           white male       0-10"

 

"David Going" reappeared as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Henrico County, page 323:

 

    "Going, David     white male       50-60

                           white female    40-50

                           white male       20-30

                           white female    20-30

                           white male       20-30

                           white male       20-30

                           white female    20-30

                           white male       15-20

                           white female    10-15

==O==

Elizabeth Gowin was married to John Vaughan in Henrico County, according to the research of Alicia Towster, aet@usl.edu in an E-mail message written July 17, 1999.

                                        ==O==

James E. Gowing who "died in his 20th year" was buried November 14, 1832 in Shockhoe Hill Ceme­tery, Richmond, ac­cording to "Shockhoe Hill Cemetery" by A. Bohmer Rudd.

==O==

Rap Gowing, also known as "Anthony Gilliat or Anthony" was reported in a Richmond newspaper [date unknown] as "a runaway [slave?] from Alexander Quarrier, Richmond.  He may be on his way to Penn­sylvania."

 

Alexander Gown, a resident of Richmond on January 7, 1835, was a Revolutionary infantry soldier who had not received bounty land for his military services, according to "Revolutionary War Records of Vir­ginia."

==O==

James Gowns, Jr, who lived in Henrico County May 2, 1792, signed a petition to the governor request­ing clemency for Ralph Crawford Anderson, a convicted murderer of Amelia, Virginia, on the grounds of in­sanity, according to the records of the county.

                                             ==O==

Elizabeth Goyne was married January 19, 1787, according to "Henrico County, Virginia Marriages, 1682-1850."

                                             ==O==

Joseph Goyne was a resident of Henrico County in 1865 and was identified as a co-owner of a plantation there with an unnamed brother, according to "Baird's History of Clark County, Indiana." Joseph Goyne was married about 1860 to Martha Vaughn.  She died in childbirth in 1866 with the birth of a son.  Joseph Goyne died in 1869, leaving their two sons orphans.

 

Children born to Joseph Goyne and Martha Vaughn Goyne include:

 

    Allen Goyne                born about 1863

    Jefferson Davis Goyne        born May 15, 1866

 

Allen Goyne, son of Joseph Goyne and Martha Vaughn Goyne, was born in Henrico County about 1863.  After the death of his parents, it is believed that he lived in the home of an uncle, John W. Barnhill of Owensboro, Kentucky.  He was reported "out West" in "Baird's History of Clark County, Indiana" which was published about 1906. 

 

Jefferson Davis Goyne, son of Joseph Goyne, was born May 15, 1866 "near Richmond, Virginia," according to Brenda L. Barnes of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma in a letter dated April 2, 1999.  He was reared by an uncle, John W. Barnhill of Owensboro and was apprenticed to learn the trade of a machinist. 

 

"Baird's History of Clark County, Indiana" reported of him:

 

"As a journeyman, he secured employment at the works of the American Car & Foundry Company in Jeffersonville [Indiana].  He remained there eight years in the tool dressing and saw filing departments. Subsequently he embarked in the mercantile business, but suffered a loss of some $6,000 as the result of a fire that destroyed his entire stock of goods.  After this disaster, he returne to his old home farm in Henrico County, but eventually returned to Indiana to start life over again."

 

Jefferson Davis Goyne was married about 1890 to Alice Eliza White, "a resident of Port Fulton, but a native of New Albany." She was the daughter of William H. White and was graduated from Jeffersonville High School.  

 

Children born to Jefferson Davis Goyne and Alice Eliza White Goyne include:

 

    Arminta Goyne        born April 2, 1892

    Catherine Goyne     born March 3, 1895

    Erol Jefferson Goyne  born April 5, 1899

    William C. Goyne    born March 15, 1904

                                        ==O==

Mary Goyne was married December 23, 1791 to Meredith Childers, according to "Henrico County, Virginia Marriages, 1682-1850." 

                                             ==O==

Nancy Goyne was married December 12, 1797 to Patrick Childers, according to "Henrico County, Virginia Marriages, 1682-1850." 

 

 

Gowen Research Foundation          Phone  806/795-8758

5708 Gary Avenue                             806/795-9694

Lubbock, Texas, 79413-4822         GOWENMS.142, 04/15/99

Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net

 

Descendant Researchers:

 

    Ethel Louise Goins Dunn, 790 Dr. Johnson Road, Crandall, GA, 30711

    Jack Harold Goins, Route 2, Box 275, Rogersville, TN, 37857, 615/272-6132

    Jon Lee Goins, 9404 Hunters Trace, Austin, TX, 78758

    Pamela R. Lawson, Route 1, Box 4955, Rogersville, TN, 38758, 615/272-9847

 

 

Membership Application

 

Gowen Research Foundation          806/795-8758 or 795-9694

5708 Gary Avenue              E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net

Lubbock, Texas, 79413          FAX:   806/795-9694

                                  Internet:

                                  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

I enclose payment as indicated below for [ ] New Membership, [ ] Renewal Membership in Gowen Research Foundation.

 

$15.00 [  ] Member                $25  [  ] Contributing Mem­ber

 

$100    [  ] Sustaining Member        $25  [  ] Overseas Member

                                           [in U.S. dollars only please]

 

[  ] Please send a sample copy of the Foundation Newsletter to the family re­searcher(s) listed on sheet attached.

 

[  ] Please send Gift Mem­bership(s) as indicated above to in­dividual(s) listed on sheet attached.

 

Name(s)_________________________________________

 

Address______________________Phone_______________

 

City________________State_____Zip________[+4]______

 

E-mail Address____________________________________

 

Kevin Edward Smith regards Shadrack Going as the father of James Going who died about 1807 in Patrick County, and the grandfather of Stephen Going.

 

Daniel Gowin, born between 1735 and 1745, died in Jeffer­son County, Tennessee prior to September 1810, the date of his es­tate inventory.  He had a son, Shadrack Gowin who was born in 1790 and who married Syntha Inman January 31, 1809 and who remained in Jefferson County.  Daniel Gowin had a grandson, Drury Goin, born to Fanny Goin out of wedlock. There were two individuals named Drury Gowin/Goans in Grainger County.  One who was born be­fore 1781 was a bondsman for the marriage of Nancy Gowen to James Randolph November 22, 1802.  Drury Goans was born in 1793 in Tennessee and was married to Mary Goans August 23, 1817 in Grainger County.  She was born in Ten­nessee in 1798.  The younger Drury Goans was on the Grainger County tax lists from 1819 to 1828 with Daniel Goan/Gowen.  Daniel Goan and Drury Goans were recorded as "white" on all tax lists and census returns.  Daniel Goan, born between 1755 and 1758, applied for a Revolu­tionary pension in Campbell County, Tennessee in 1818 and make a supple­mental application in 1820. Having reached the age of 65, he was not assessed for his 363 acres in Grainger County after 1824.

 

Appearing in Grainger County records between 1799 and 1834 were: Alexander Gowin, Jeremiah Gowin, Henry Gowin, Riley Gowin, Carson Gowin, Levi Gowin, Nathan Gowin, Preston Gowin, Pryor L. Gowin, William Gowin and Thomas Gowin.

 

Appearing in Grainger County records between 1799 and 1834 were: Alexander Gowin, Jeremiah Gowin, Henry Gowin, Riley Gowin, Carson Gowin, Levi Gowin, Nathan Gowin, Preston Gowin, Pryor L. Gowin, William Gowin and Thomas Gowin.

 

William Goin and Thomas Goin, both born between 1750 and 1760 and both enumerated in the 1830 Clai­borne County cen­sus are the right age to be sons of Shadrack Going.  Zephaniah Gowin, born in 1758 in Halifax County, Virginia, applied for a Revolutionary pension in Hawkins County, Tennessee, is also the right age to be a son of Shadrack Go­ing.  William Going, born in Hawkins County between 1754 and 1764 was also the right age.

                                             ==O==

In the case of "Aron Going vs. Philip Going" held in 1778, the defendant "confessed judgement £100 current money," according to Halifax County Court Minute Book 9, page 304.

                                             ==O==

Zephaniah Gowin, born about 1758 in Halifax County. He enlisted in the Revolution­ary Army in 1779 from Henry County, Virginia.26  In 1810, he was in Rockingham County, North Carolina.21  "Zephamiah Goans, free person of color" was enumerated in the 1830 cen­sus of Roane County, Tennessee [where Nathaniel Gowin was mar­ried in 1813].  On December 18, 1834, he was a justice in Hawkins County, Ten­nessee when he applied for his pension.

==O==

William Goin and Thomas Goin, both born between 1750 and 1760 and both enumerated in the 1830 Clai­borne County cen­sus are the right age to be sons of Shadrack Going.  Zephaniah Gowin, born in 1758 in Halifax County, Virginia, applied for a Revolutionary pension in Hawkins County, Tennessee, is also the right age to be a son of Shadrack Go­ing.  William Going, born in Hawkins County between 1754 and 1764 was also the right age, according to Donna Gowin Johnston.

 

Gowen Research Foundation      Phone:806/795-8758, 795-9694

5708 Gary Avenue                     

Lubbock, Texas, 79413-4822         GOWENMS.142, 07/19/99

Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net

 

 

Membership Application

 

Gowen Research Foundation          806/795-8758 or 795-9694

5708 Gary Avenue              E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net

Lubbock, Texas, 79413         

                                  Internet:

                                  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

I enclose payment as indicated below for [ ] New Membership, [ ] Renewal Membership in Gowen Research Foundation.

 

$15.00 [  ] Member                $25  [  ] Contributing Mem­ber

 

$100    [  ] Sustaining Member        $25  [  ] Overseas Member

                                       [in U.S. dollars only please]

 

[  ] Please send a sample copy of the Foundation Newsletter to the family re­searcher(s) listed on sheet attached.

 

[  ] Please send Gift Mem­bership(s) as indicated above to in­dividual(s) listed on sheet attached.

 

Name(s)_________________________________________

 

 

Address______________________Phone_______________

 

City_________________________State_____Zip________

 

E-Mail Address__________________________________