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CHOCTAW COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

 

Joseph B. Gowings, a farmer who owned four slaves was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Choctaw County, page 75:

 

    "Gowings, Joseph B.      white male   40-50

                           white female 20-30

                              white male   10-15

                              white female   5-10

                              white female   5-10

                              white male     5-10

                              white female   0-5

                              white female   0-5

                              white male   0-5"

 

CHOCTAW NATION, MISSISSIPPI

 

Phillip Goins, a "three-quarters" Choctaw, was born in Mississippi about 1770 and was a resident of the Choctaw Nation in Mississippi, according to United States Citizenship Court records as transcribed in "The Journal of American Family Research," Volume 3. For Phillip Goins to have been a "three-quarters" Choctaw, his father and his grandfather before him would have had to have married full-blood Choctaw women.  This suggests that the grandfather Goins must have arrived in the Choctaw Nation around 1710 which is regarded as highly unlikely.

 

"Goins" is not a word in the Choctaw language, nor is it found in the "Choctaw Lexicon" compiled by the Rev. Cyrus Byington.  Since the "Goins" name is Caucasian and since blue-eyed individuals have turned up among the Choctaw descendants of Phillip Goins, it is suggested that he was of Melungeon descent.  The names "Goins" and "Gibson" were prominent in the Melungeon communities of Virginia, Tennessee and the Carolinas.

 

It is possible that Phillip and Oti Goins were "invented" by the children of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins to legiti­matize their bid to be enrolled by the Tribal Council of the Choctaw Nation.  Their claims of Choctaw blood were denied by the Tribal Council and the Dawes Commission which investigated the evidence.

 

Jane P. McManus, a Goins researcher of Covington, Louisiana  wrote September 19, 1989:

 

"Several years ago I came across a huge genealogical collection of family group sheets assembled by Curtis Jacobs in a library in southern Louisiana [Beauregard Parish Library].  Included was a sheet on the Goins family.  Listed were John Goins and wife Nancy John­son Goins. Their children were: Benjamin, James, Thomas, Stephen, Jenny [Virginia], Jerry [Jeremiah], William M. and John. ["John Goines, age 42, born in South Carolina" was enumerated as the head of Household 421 in the 1860 census or Rapides Parish, Louisiana.]

 

William M. Goins had a bible record wherein he recorded all his family's dates.  He was born August 22, 1809.  He was married to Charlotte Elizabeth Nelson July 27, 1832 in St. Landry Parish.  She was born December 10, 1808 in Louisiana.  John Drake was bondsman.  He recorded that Stephen Goins was married to Edith Perkins November 14, 1826.  Jenny married Jordan Perkins March 12, 1814.  [Jordan Perkins was the son of Joshua Perkins and Mary Mixon Perkins who migrated west from South Carolina to Mississippi to Louisiana in the early 1800s. They travelled with a group composed of the Willis, Sweat and Johnson families led by Rev. Joseph Willis.] Jerry married Sarafina Drake about 1820.  John Goins was married to Francis 'Fanny' Nash."

 

Joshua Perkins and Jenny Goins Perkins had seven children who lived to adulthood, according to Patricia Ann Waak, Foundation member of Erie, Colorado in a letter dated October 21, 1995.  One of their sons, Jesse Perkins was born about 1816. He was married about 1838, wife's name Cyndelia.  Joshua Perkins and Jesse Perkins took their families westward into Texas about 1840. They appeared on the tax roll of Houston County, Texas in 1846 and were enumerated there in the federal census of 1850.  Both father and son and their families appeared in the 1860 census of Bee County, Texas.  Jesse Perkins and his family were enumerated in the 1870 census of Goliad County, Texas

 

The oldest daughter of Jesse Perkins, Martha Perkins was born about 1845 and was married about 1862, husband's name Quarles. She was remarried in 1870 to Charles Smith in Goliad, Texas.  They were enumerated in Callahan County, Texas in the 1880 census.  Seven children were born to them, including two sets of twins.  In 1887 Charles Smith transferred all of his land to Martha Perkins Quarles Smith, shortly before her death in 1888.

 

Dooley Wirt Smith, son of Charles Smith and Martha Perkins Quarles Smith, was born about 1877.  His father remarried about 1890, and Dooley Wirt Smith disliked his stepmother.  He placed his younger siblings in a wagon, and at the age of 13 fled with them to an older sister's home. He was married about 1898 to Annie Elizabeth Jane Mays.  Ten of their children lived to adulthood, including Anne Nell Smith. 

 

Ann Nell Smith, ninth child, was born about 1919. She was married in 1942 to Boxly William Waak.  Children born to them include Patricia Ann Waak who was born about 1944.  She was married about 1962, husband's name Baldi.  She was remarried in 1994 to Kenneth John Strom.

 

Children born to Patricia Ann Waak Baldi include:

 

    Cinira Anne Baldi                   born about 1965

    Rachel Nell Baldi                        born about 1968

==O==

 

Phillip Goins was married about 1795 to Oti, a full-blood Choctaw woman who was also born in Choctaw Nation, ac­cording to the children of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins.  Margie Bailey of Columbia, Mississippi wrote in October, 1992, "My father spoke many times of Oti Montro, an Indian woman [or princess] as his ancestor."

 

A Phillip Goins did appear in the records of St. Landry Parish, Louisiana.  He was the common law husband of Keziah Nash, daughter of Thomas Nash and Emily Slater Nash.  Keziah Nash was born about 1789 in Mississippi.  Phillip Goins was enumerated as the head of a household of three people in the 1810 census of St. Landry Parish. 

 

They were married in January 1815 at Natchitoches, Louisiana.  At the time they applied for a license to marry, they signed a contract in Natchitoches Parish to legitimize their two children.  James Groves, brother-in-law of Keziah Nash Goins, witnessed the legitimization contract, No. 4415, and Thomas Nash signed as security on the marriage license, No. 4417, bond of $500.  On the same date Elizabeth Nash, sister of Keziah Nash, was married to John Gardner.

 

The contract read:

 

"Be it known that we, Phillip Goins and Keziah Nash have this day with these presents in consideration of a marriage to be this day solemnized between us mutually agreed contract with each other to acknowledge marriage our two children Michael and Rebecca come before the same and they are hereby declared and acknowledged by us as legitimate and entitled to all the rights to which they would have been entitled if born subsequent to said marriage."

                                  Phillip [X] Goins

January 2, 1815                   Keziah [X] Nash

 

Attested: D. Case, James Bloodworth, James Groves"

 

 

Children born to Phillip Goins and Keziah Nash Goins include:

 

    Michael Goins             born about 1808

    Rebecca Goins               born about 1811

 

Michael [Leroy?] Goins, son of Phillip Goins and Keziah Nash Goins, was born in Natchitoches about 1808.  "Micael Gowen and Ardena Taylor, both of this county" were married March 20, 1849 in adjoining Newton County, Texas, accord-ing to Newton County Marriage Book A-1, page 48.  "Har-dienia Taylor, age 7" was enumerated in the household of her parents, William Taylor and Rebecca Nash Taylor in the Mexican census of 1823.

 

Children born to Michael Leroy Goins and Hardinia Taylor Goins include:

 

    Caroline Goins                       born about 1851

    Martha Goins                             born about 1852

    Mary Jane Goins                        born about 1854

 

Martha Goins, daughter of Michael Leroy Goins and Hardenia Taylor Goins, was born about 1852.  During the Civil War her family lived in Atascosa County, Texas. She lived with her mother "near Campbellton while her husband was away fighting in the Civil War." 

 

Rebecca Goins, daughter of Phillip Goins and Keziah Nash Goins, was born about 1811 in Natchitoches.

 

As the pressure of white settlers began to encroach upon the Indians in Mississippi, Phillip Goins reacted by moving to Opelousas, Louisiana.  He was enumerated there in St. Landry Parish in the U. S. census of 1810 as the head of a household composed of "three free colored persons."  The enumerators in 1810 had very little latitude as to how they recorded non-whites. 

 

George Virgil Goins, a descendant of Dibble, Oklahoma, wrote in July 1992 that Benjamin Goins and James Goins, whom he regarded as brothers of Phillip Goins, were also enumerated in the 1810 census of St. Landry Parish.  He wrote:

 

"Benjamin and Phillip purchased land on Bayou Crocodile and Bayou Boeuf in 1808.  Both are listed as land owners.  James Goins lived in the same vicinity in 1810.  In 1804 over 100 Choctaw families lived on Bayou Crocodile.  Benjamin Goins still lived on this land in 1815. In 1819 James Goins owned 320 acres at Chopique on the west side of the Calcasieu River.  "Amos Goines" was enumerated in 1820 on Bayou Boeuf in Rapides Parish."

 

James Goins was married to Elizabeth Perkins, daughter of Joshua Perkins and Elizabeth Mixon Perkins, according to the research of Sandra M. Loridans of Chapala, Jalisco, Mexico.  Virginia "Jenny" Goins was married to Jordan Perkins, son of Joshua Perkins.  Jordan Perkins was born in 1793 in South Carolina.  Joshua Perkins was born about 1765 in Greenwood, South Carolina in District 96.  He was married about 1788 to Mary Mixon, daughter of Micah Mixon and _____ William-son Mixon, according to the research of Sherry Bourn.

 

Stephen Goins was married to Edith "Edie" Perkins, daughter of Joshua Perkins.

 

The Choctaw tribe lived for centuries in southeastern Missis­sippi.  They had not given the Americans any resistance.  In­stead they had aligned themselves with the Americans in their battles.  Several hundred of their braves fought with the Missis­sippians in the Creek War, according to "Rise and Fall of the Choctaw Nation" by Angie Debo.  They fought with Gen. Andrew Jackson in the Battle of Horseshoe Bend and in the Battle of New Orleans in the War of 1812.  They invited American missionaries to establish sta­tions and schools in the Choctaw Nation and gave permission for the construction of the Natchez Trace across their land.

 

Americans had begun flooding into Natchez, Mississippi and the surrounding area even before the Revolutionary War.  From the Spanish Archives, "The Genealogical Helper" ex­tracted the names of 157 Americans who had arrived in 1789.  "Legajo 16" identified the individuals in a "Report on the to­bacco growers at Natchez during the past year" dated March 2, 1790. The white population in Mississippi grew from less than 9,000 in 1800 to over 70,000 in 1830, and the pressure upon the Indians began to increase exponentially.  Phillip Goins had foreseen the gathering storm for the Choctaws and preceded westward.

 

The Choctaws were the first tribe to succumb to the pressure of the encroaching white settlers.  In 1830 they agreed to re­move to Oklahoma and became known as one of the "Five Civilized Tribes."  Almost 7,000,000 acres were ceded to the Choctaws in southeastern Oklahoma, "south of the Canadian River, north of the Red River, from Ft. Smith west." In Oklahoma the Choctaws were settled primarily in Mc­Curtain, Pittsburg, Le Flore, Pushmataha and Choctaw Counties.  Some remained in Mississippi in Neshoba County where a Choctaw reservation is maintained today.  In 1990 about 4,000 of the county's population of 24,000 were Choctaws.  Adjoining Winston County also holds a high concentra­tion of Choctaws.  William Arm­strong undertook a  Choctaw census in 1831 in Mississippi which showed a total of 19,554, according to "The Choctaws" by Jesse O. McKee and Jon A. Schlenker.  Of those 12,500 came to Oklahoma. 

 

The Creeks and Seminoles began arriving in Oklahoma in 1832.  The Cherokees traversed the "Trail of Tears" in 1835.  In 1837 6,070 Chickasaw and their slaves be­gan moving from Chickasaw Bluffs [present site of Memphis, Tennessee] to their new capital at Tish­omingo, Oklahoma.  The territory the Chickasaws gave up was generally the north­ern 1/5 of Miss­issippi. They were transported to an area just west of the Choctaws' new home­land.  Subsequently a portion of 67 Indian tribes were removed to Oklahoma.  In Oklahoma the Choctaws were settled primarily in Mc­Curtain, Pittsburg, Le Flore, Push­mataha and Choctaw Counties.  Some remained in Mississippi in Neshoba County where a Choctaw reservation is maintained today.  In 1990 about 4,000 of the county's popu­lation of 24,000 are Choctaws. Adjoining Winston County also holds a high concentra­tion of Choctaws.  A Choctaw census taken in 1831 in Mississippi showed a total of 19,554. Of those 12,500 came to Oklahoma.

 

The American government showed a very devious nature in dealing with the Choctaw Nation.  It signed 16 different treaties with the tribe and reneged shamefully on com­mitments it had no intention of keeping.  It was easier to sweep the Indians westward than to exterminate them.

 

In the Treaty of Treaty Ground, Mississippi signed October 20, 1820 by Gen. Andrew Jackson and Chief Pushmataha the United States ceded land in southwest Arkansas, the southern half of Oklahoma as well as land in Texas and New Mexico [which of which belonged to Spain.]  The Choctaws gave away still more in the Treaty of Washington January 20, 1825.  Chiefs Mushulatubbe, Pushmataha and Apuckshun­nubbee un­dertook the journey to Washington to sign the agreement.  Apuckshunnubbee died on the way, and Pushmataha died in Washington in December 1824 before the treaty was signed.  It seemed that the Indians suffered in every contact with the whites.

 

In the "Paris News" of Paris, Texas Robert A. Burns wrote:

 

"In 1820 and 1821, when the area which now comprises much of Northeast Texas and Southeast Oklahoma became the vast area known as Miller County, Arkansas, those settlers north of the Red River seemed more enthusiastic about the new country than those located south of the river.

 

The first courthouse was located in the home of Claiborne Wright who lived at the site of an earlier settlement of French and Indians called Shawneetown, located south of present-day Idabel, Oklahoma.

 

Those settlers south of the river at that time exhibited discontent with the idea that they were to become part of Arkansas.. One settler wrote a letter to the governor of Texas, which was at that time ruled by Spain.  The capitol of Texas was located in San Antonio, and the language and the government was Spanish.

 

The author of the letter, William Rabb, wrote in Spanish in the summer of 1821 from "Jonesborough, south side of Red River:"

 

I am a resident of the upper settlement on Red River, having lived there three years.  It is the opinion of the most intelligent men in this section that we are within the limits of the Province of Texas.  An unfortunate experience has proved to us that we do not have the protection of the United States.  The settlement contains about eighty families.  With the exception of a few, they are honorable and industrious people, although they have the misfortune of living under the most depressive and unfavorable conditions.  Up until just recently, the other bank of the Red River has been under the political jurisdiction of the United States.  The authorities have recently sold the region to the Choctaw tribe.  The old-time settlers and former officials continue to live in the county which now belongs to the Indians and not only control their former possessions, but likewise the bank of the river.

 

We are obliged to pay enormous contributions to maintain a bunch of public grafters.  We are almost daily forced to submit to the most terrible insults and injuries, without having any hope of seeing the end to our misfortunes.  The reason for our present situation is that the Choctaws who live on the east side of the Mississippi have not yet come to take over their new possessions.

 

The settlers on the north side of the Red River carry on direct trade with the Comanches, furnishing them with all the munitions of war and receiving in exchange a great number of horses, many of which bear the Spanish brand.  We feel that this selfish and illegal traffic is very injurious to our government.

 

This settlement is located about 300 miles by land above Natchitoches, and this place [Jonesborough] is almost directly north from the place where the road from Bexar crosses the Trinity River. The inhabitants of this unfortunate section of your province would be very happy to be under the protection of your government.  They greatly regret the lack of any civil law, for their guidance. 

 

Many of the settlers will probably leave in consequence of the present situation.  I have planned to locate on the Colorado under the direction of Mr. Austin and expect to move my family and goods during the present autumn.  I hope to be free of the unprincipled creatures who rob me and insult me with impunity.  However, I am anxious for the welfare of my fellow citizens whom I shall leave in this territory.  I hope through your goodness they will find a safe protection against the abusive hands of those miserable rascals who have no compassion and who without any reason whatever destroy our peace and devour our substance.  I do not venture to suggest to you the steps necessary for the protection of this region.  I leave it to God and your great wisdom.  I know that you will extend to us the best possible treatment."

 

At the same time the letter Rabb wrote to Gov. Antonio Martinez was delivered, the same couriers delivered [a letter] from 84 heads of families south of the Red River, asking that they be allowed to elect an alcalde and commandant for a provisional government until the area in which they lived could be properly organized.  Many of these dissidents, including Rabb, later became part of Stephen F. Austin's colony.

 

Events were quickly changing. Mexico declared its independence from Spain.  Within 15 years, Texas declared itself an independent nation.  All that area south of Red River which was for years Miller County, Arkansas came into Texas as old Red River County."

 

The treaty finalizing the Choctaw removal was signed Septem­ber 28, 1830 at the council grounds on Dancing Rab­bit Creek, Mississippi.  This treaty specified that "no part of the land ceded to the Choctaw Nation shall ever be embraced in any ter­ritory or state."  It further provided for a Choctaw delegate in the U. S. Congress, but Con­gress never granted such represen­tation. 

 

The Choctaws gave up 10,000,000 acres of prime Mississippi land in the bargain.  To soothe the ob­jections of the Indians who protested that the land being of­fered in the treaty was al­ready occupied by the whites, An­drew Jackson assured the Choctaws that he would drive out the settlers.  Arkansas Terri­tory which was created in 1819 embraced the land that was be­ing offered.  Old Miller County, Arkansas Territory had been created in 1820 and by 1821 already had a "population of 999 and 84 slaves," ac­cording to the March 3, 1821 edition of the "Arkansas Gazette."  The population of Old Miller County had in­creased to 2,500 in 1825.  Very few of this first settle­ment of "sooners" were ever disturbed by Jackson's promise.

 

The Americans used every means of duplicity to gain the up­per hand.  They freely dis­tributed whiskey among the Indi­ans, un­dermining their will to work and to produce.  They distributed lavish bribes among the chieftains to gain their consent to the treaties and to influence them to "sell out" their people and their heritage.  The In­dians received nothing but misery for their pas­sive resistance.

 

The Choctaws in Jasper and Newton Counties wrote a letter delineating their oppression to George S. Gaines, one of their few trusted friends in Washington:

 

"Our tribe has been woefully imposed upon of late. We have had our habitations torn down and burned; our fences destroyed, cattle turned into our fields and we ourselves have been scourged, manacled, fettered and otherwise personally abused, until by such treat­ment some of our best men have died.  These are the acts of the persons who profess to be the agents of the Govern­ment to procure our removal to Arkansas and who cheat us out of all they can, by the use of fraud, duplicity and even violence." 

 

The treaty of 1830 specified that 7,000 Choctaws were to re­main in east central Missis­sippi, but again the Americans weaseled out.  The white citizens of Alabama and Mississippi maintained a constant clamor for their removal also. Sen. Jef­ferson Davis of Mississippi was foremost among those deter­mined to expel to remaining remnants of the Choctaws from Mississippi.  He wrote, "It is an object of great importance that the Choctaws be completely removed and prevented from re­turning." 

 

American officials circulated reports about the generous conditions given to the Choctaws by the terms of the treaty, but many church officials objected to the bullying of the In­dians.  Mary Elizabeth Young in "Redskins, Ruffleshirts and Rednecks" re­ported on the reaction of the missionary offi­cials:

 

"The missionaries of the American Board, angry be­cause the treaty granted no compensation for their expensive schools and mission stations did not con­sider it gener­ous in any respect.  They regarded the extensive reserves given to In­dian leaders as mere bribes.  They deplored the scanty provision for emi­grating tribesmen whose improvements were small. They bitterly resented the commis­sioners' misrepre­sentation of the way in which the agreement had been negoti­ated."

 

The editor of the "Vicksburg Daily Sentinel" recorded the be­ginning of the exodus:

 

"They are going away!  With a visible reluctance which nothing has overcome but the stern necessity they feel impelling them, they have looked their last on the graves of their sires--the scenes of their youth, and have taken up the slow toilsome march with their household goods among them to their new homes in a strange land.  They leave names to many of our rivers, towns and counties, and so long as our State remains, the Choctaws who once owned most of her soil will be remembered."

 

The horrors of the Choctaw migration were never publicized to the extent as were the Cherokee's "trail of tears," but they were just as devastating.  From 1831 to 1834 forced marches of tribesmen, mostly on foot, in groups of 500 to 1,000 started out for Oklahoma, invariably in the fall and winter months.  The trip of 550 miles passed through unsettled country of dense forests, swamps, thick canebrakes and swollen rivers.  The suf­fering, caused by the mistakes and inefficiency of the War De­partment combined with one of the region's worst blizzards in history was indescribable.

 

Choctaw Agent William S. Colquhoun at Vicksburg, Missis­sippi wrote December 10, 1831 to Brigadier General George Gibson that a party of Choctaws had arrived there after march­ing 24 hours through sleet and snow.  "Their situation is dis­tressing and must get worse, they are often very naked, and few moccasins are seen amongst them." 

 

A party of 2,500 Choctaws traveling by steamboat were dis­embarked at Arkansas Post and kept in open camps through the worst of the blizzard.  Many had to remain for weeks awaiting horses which were being driven overland from Louisiana.  Cholera broke out on a boatload of Indians nearing the Mem­phis transfer station, and many panic-stricken women and chil­dren refused to board another steamboat.  They were ferried across the Mississippi and continued the journey on foot.

 

When he observed the Choctaws crossing the Mississippi at Memphis, Alexis de Tocqueville wrote:

 

"In the whole scene there was an air of ruin and de­struction, something which betrayed a final and irre­vocable adieu; one couldn't watch without feeling one's heart wrung.  The Indians were tranquil, but sombre and taciturn. There was one who could speak English and of whom I asked why the Choctaws were leaving their country.  'To be free,' he answered."

 

Many hundreds fell victim to blizzards and cold weather and all manner of disease.  Epidemics of smallpox, cholera, ty­phoid and "intermittent fever" devastated the tribe en route and in its early years in Oklahoma.

 

No physicians were among the Indians in the initial treks, but many churchpeople became aware of their suffering and vol­unteered to help.  Teachers and preachers were sent.  Dr. Alexander Talley, a Ph.D. and a Methodist missionary, ac­companied the first Choctaw party moving westward.  Soon the War Department elected to have doctors accom­pany them. On the steamboat Reindeer in November 1832

 

Dr. John T. Fulton and a Dr. Rayburn, government agents, re­ported 12 deaths in three days in a party of 445 Choc­taws due to cholera "for which they knew no effective treatment," ac­cording to Indian Agent A. S. Langham.  In a five-week pe­riod ending in September 1833, 600 died of fever alone, ac­cording to "Indian Removal" by Grant Foreman.

 

Cyrus Bynington who was a missionary among the Choctaws before the removal and who traveled to Indian Territory with them estimated that 6,000 died during the migration, according to "History of Choctaw, Chickasaw and Natchez Indians" by H. B. Cushman.  Pres. Andrew Jackson had appointed Maj. Francis W. Armstrong "Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the Choctaw Nation West of the Mississippi" and dispatched him to Ft. Smith, Arkansas Territory.  He arrived at Ft. Smith just ahead of the first Choc­taw contingent and had little time to prepare to assist the Indians, according to "Ft. Smith" by Edwin C. Bearss and A. M. Gibson.

 

Starvation was also a threat in the early years. The U. S. gov­ernment reneged on supplying the steel plows they had con­tracted to supply to the tribe so that they could raise corn on their land.  In June 1833 a 10-foot flood on the Arkansas River washed away all the mills, ferries and improvements that had been built along the river.  Maj. Armstrong wrote, "The Choctaws are dying to an alarming extent.  Near the agency there are 3,000 Indians, and within the hearing of a gun from this spot, 100 have died within five weeks."

 

==O==

Suggested as a kinsman is "Jenny Goen, who was born about 1795.  "Jenny Goen, free colored person" was married in St. Landry Parish March 12, 1814 to Jordan Perkins, according to the research of Leila Raye Perkins Smith, a descendant of Cor­rigan, Texas.  She wrote January 25, 1990, "We have been told that we have a lot of Indian blood.  In some census enumerations my ancestors were recorded as "Indian;" on others they were shown as "white."  Most of the men in my family are dark with blue eyes and straight black hair." 

 

Sandra M. Loridans of Chapala, Jalisco, Mexico wrote July 16, 1994, "I am a descendant of Jinny [Jane] Goen/Goin/-Goings of St. Landry Parish, LA.  Jinny Goen was my g-g-g-grandmother, and I believe she was born about 1795 in South Carolina  She was married March 12, 1814 in St. Landry Parish to Jordan Perkins who was born about 1793 in Aiken, South Carolina.  I do not know who her parents were, but Louisiana census records show them living near Phillip Goen/Goins.  There was also a Thomas Goins who was included in my family line.   Jordan Perkins was enumerated in 1840 in Calcasieu Pa, LA, in 1850 in Houston Co, TX and in 1860 in Bee Co, TX."

 

Children born to Jordan Perkins and Jenny Goins Perkins in­clude

 

    Jacob Perkins                             born about 1815

    Carlotta Perkins                          born about 1816

    Jesse Perkins                              born about 1817

    Hader Perkins                            born about 1827

    Joshua Perkins                       born about 1828

    Washington Perkins                    born about 1835

    Olive Perkins                              born about 1839

 

Jacob Perkins, son of Jordan Perkins and Jenny Goins Perkins, was born about 1815 in Louisiana.  He was married about 1840, wife's name Mary Jane.  She was born in May 1820 in Louisiana.  He died October 27, 1897 in Rapides Parish, Louisiana. She died after 1910 in Montgomery County, Texas.

 

Children born to them include:

 

    Isaac J. Perkins                              born in 1842

    Jincey [Caroline] Perkins                born in 1843

    Sarah Ann Perkins                          born in 1845

    Joshua Perkins                           born in 1849

    Laura Perkins                                 born in 1850

    Jesse F. Perkins                             born in 1853

    Cato A. Perkins                             born in 1858

    Dick Perkins                                  born in 1859

 

Joshua Perkins, son of Jacob Perkins and Mary Ann Perkins, was born in 1849.  He died in 1910.

 

Jesse F. Perkins, son of Jacob Perkins and Mary Ann Perkins, was born in 1853.  He died in 1880.

 

Carlotta Perkins, daughter of Jordan Perkins and Jenny Goins Perkins, was born about 1816.  She was married about 1832 to Frederick Bigner.

 

Jesse Perkins, son of Jordan Perkins and Jenny Goins Perkins, was born about 1817.  He was married about 1840, wife's name Cyndelia.

 

Stephen Goin and Edith Perkins were married in Louisiana November 17, 1826, according to George Virgil Goins who states that Jordan Perkins was the bondsman.  Polly Perkins gives consent for Edith Perkins to marry and states that Steven Goin was "the son of John and Nancy Johnson Goin of South Carolina." Rev. Joseph Willis officiated. Children born to Stephen Goin and Edith Perkins Goin are unknown.

 

Fanny Gowen, age 16 was married to Aaron Burr Nelson in Louisiana in October 1834.  William Gowen was the bonds­man, according to George Virgil Goins.

 

Melinda Goins was married in Louisiana to Gibson Perkins August 14, 1829, according to George Virgil Goins.  Joshua Goins was the bondsman.  The groom's consent was signed by George Perkins, and the bride's consent was signed by Eliza­beth Goins.  Joshua Goins was married November 27, 1862 in adjoining Newton County, Texas, according to Newton County Marriage Book C, page 114.  Children born to Joshua Goins and Sarah Perkins Goins are unknown.

 

"Patrick Goin," a Choctaw Indian was appointed as a scout for a survey party seeking a railroad route from San Antonio to El Paso, Texas March 18, 1849.  Robert S. Neighbors, Indian agent made the appointment in San Antonio.

 

"Anna Goins, Choctaw" who was born about 1790 was married about 1810 in St. Landry Parish to Thomas Nash, as his second wife, according to Della Ford Nash of Oklahoma City.  Thomas Nash was born in 1754 in Chowan County, North Carolina. He was in Mississippi Territory by 1780 where he operated an Indian trading post.  In 1815 they lived in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana.  In 1826 they were in Atascosita District, Tejas y Coahuila.  They were enumerated in the 1830 and 1850 census back in Natchitoches Parish.  Thomas Nash was enumerated as "age 97" and Anna Goins Nash was reported as "age 77."

 

Thomas Nash, Jr, who was born in 1785 to Thomas Nash and his first wife, Emily Slater Nash was married to Sarah "Sally" Drake. 

 

Children born to Thomas Nash and Anna Goins Nash included James Nash who was born in 1813 in Rapides Parish, Louis­iana. Land was taken from Rapides Parish to form St. Landry Parish when it was created in 1807.  James Nash was married in 1834 to Mary Perkins.  He died prior to the 1850 census, but Mary Perkins Nash appeared in Rapides Parish in the enumerations of 1850 and 1860. 

 

Children born to Thomas Nash and Anna Goins Nash include:

 

    James Nash                        born about 1836

 

James Nash, son of Thomas Nash and Anna Goings Nash, was born in Louisiana about 1836.  He was married about 1855 to Elizabeth Goodman, according to Martha Lea Nolan Alexander, a descendant.

 

Children born to James Nash and Elizabeth Goodman Nash include:

 

    Emily Nash                         born about 1857

 

Emily Nash, daughter of James Nash and Elizabeth Goodman Nash, was born about 1857.  She was married about 1875 to Levi “Buck” Allen.  Emily Nash Allen died in 1892.

 

Children born to Levi “Buck” Allen and Emily Nash Allen include:

 

    David Uriah Allen                   born March 12, 1877

 

David Uriah Allen, son of Levi “Buck” Allen and Emily Nash Allen, was born March 12, 1877.  He was married in Vernon Parish May 15, 1902 to Ola Camilla Potter.  She was born December 24, 1877 to John Jahew Watts Potter and Rachel Hilman Potter. 

 

David Uriah Allen died December 10, 1947, and Ola Camilla Potter Allen died July 3, 1950.

 

Children born to them include:

 

    Ethel Emily Allen             born September 23, 1928

 

Ethel Emily Allen, daughter of David Uriah Allen and Ola Camilla Potter Allen, was born September 23, 1928 at Caney, Louisiana. She was married at Lake Charles, Louisiana July 10, 1944 to Earl Nolen.  He was born January 3, 1919 to Simeon Vincent Nolen and Ada Owers Nolen. Earl Nolen died February 23, 1998 at Leesville, Louisiana.  Ethel Emily Allen died on the same day, according to their daughter, Martha Lee Nolen Alexander.

 

Children born to them include:

 

    Martha Lee Nolen               born December 12, 1948

 

Martha Lee Nolen, daughter of Earl Nolen and Ethel Emily Allen Nolen, was born December 12, 1948 at Lake Charles, Louisiana. She was married April 6, 1984 to Gene Hershell Alexander.  In 2000 they lived at Leesville where she, a member of Gowen Research Foundation, was active in the research of her branch of the family.

 

Emanuel Nash, their fourth child, was born in Rapides Parish in 1842.  He was married about 1898 to Sena Goins/Goynes, his third wife.  Eight children were born to them, according to Della Ford Nash.  Their descendants generally settled in Texas.

==O==

Martha "Patsy" Goings was born in Choctaw Nation, Missis­sippi about 1812 of parents unknown.  She was married about 1832 to Eli Crowder, believed to be about 30 years older.  He was born in Spartanburg County, South Carolina in 1781 to James Crowder, Jr. and Lorhamah "Ama" James Crowder, ac­cording to the research of Carlotta Earlene Hollis Bates, a de­scendant of Kensington, California.  Eli Crowder was a veteran of the War of 1812.

 

They escaped the forced move of the Choctaw tribe to Indian Territory in the early 1830s.  In 1842 they lived in Attala County, Mississippi.  Sometime after 1845 they removed to Oklahoma and settled in an area which later was named Choctaw County.  They were accompanied by two of her brothers, Jim Goings and Gibson Goings who settled near Boswell, Oklahoma. 

 

"Gibson Gowen" was enumerated in the 1831 census of Choctaw Nation in Mississippi.  He appears to be a widower:

 

    "Gowen, Gibson             male            over 16

                                  male            0-10

                                  female             0-10

                                  male            0-10"

 

The enumerator noted, "Gibson Gowen admitted that he did not live on his land at the time the treaty was signed, but the logs were cut [in preparation of building a cabin.]"

 

Patsy Hall, a Choctaw, gave an affidavit on August 10, 1896 before the Dawes Commission concerning the Goins family:

 

"Affiant states that among the number who accompanied her father and family from Mississippi to the Kiamichi River was a man named Gip Goins and wife, and a man named James Goin and wife and children; that affiant knows that said Gip and James Goins were half-blood Choctaw Indians; that said Gip and James Goin died near Mayhew in the Choctaw Nation.

 

Affiant further states that while she and her family were living near Mayhew that Jeremiah Goins came from Texas to visit James and Gip Goins and that she was well acquainted with Jeremiah Goins; that he was a half-blood Choctaw Indian and was a first cousin by blood to the said James and Gip Goins; that she is personally ac­quainted with Robert Goins who now lives near Owl in the Choctaw Nation and knows that the said Robert Goins is the legitimate son of said Jeremiah Goin, and knows that the said Robert Goins is a one-fourth Choctaw Indian by blood."

 

On August 31, 1896, Humady Williams another affiant, age about 92, appeared to give sworn testimony concerning the Goins family:

 

"My name is Humady Williams.  I am about 92 years old.  I was borned in old Chickasaw Nation, Mississippi, near Pontotoc town.  I was raised among the Chickasaw and Choctaw Indians and emigrated with them to this country.

 

When I can first remember, I belonged to Mose Perry who was a Chickasaw and Choctaw Indian, about half and half.  I belonged to him until I was about grown.  I had other masters through the years, and I belonged to George James when I was freed.

 

I understood Chickasaw, Choctaw and English and was interpreter for whites and Indians for a good many years in old Chickasaw Nation, Mississippi and after I came to this country.

 

I was acquainted with a family of Indians in Old Choctaw Nation by the name of Goins.  I remember Jeremiah, James and Gip Goins;  James and Gip were brothers and were cousins of Jeremiah.  I remember Jeremiah well, better than any of them.  His father's name was Phillip Goins."

 

Eli Crowder died in 1883 at the age of 102 and was buried at Crowder Prairie, Indian Territory in Jackson County.  It is be­lieved that she died soon after.

 

Children born to them include:

 

    Marion Richard Crowder    born about 1834

    Eli Crowder                    born about 1840

    Van Robert Crowder              born about 1841

    Thomas C. Crowder               born March 10, 1842

    William J. Crowder             born March 1, 1843

    Francis Crowder                 born about 1846

    Joshua Crowder                 born about 1850

    George W. Crowder               born February 5, 1852

    John Crowder             `      born about 1854

 

Marion Richard Crowder, son of Eli Crowder and Martha "Patsy" Goings Crowder, was born in Mississippi [either Pon­totoc or Atalla County,  about 1832. He accompanied his par­ents in a move to Indian Territory after 1845.  He served in a Confederate unit during the Civil War.  He died July 19, 1921 and was buried at Honey Spring Cemetery, south of Soper, Oklahoma.

 

Eli Crowder, son of Eli Crowder and Martha "Patsy" Goings Crowder, was born about 1840 in Mississippi.  He died young.

 

Van Robert Crowder, son of Eli Crowder and Martha "Patsy" Goings Crowder, was born about 1841 in Mississippi.  He was married about 1854 to Luiza Pitchlynn. He died about 1909.

 

Thomas C. Crowder, son of Eli Crowder and Martha "Patsy" Goings Crowder, was born March 10, 1842 in Attala County. He was brought to Indian Territory by his parents.  He served in a Confederate unit during the Civil War.  He was married about 1866 to Flora Alexander.  He died December 16, 1915 at Crowder Prairie, Oklahoma and was buried in Crowder Springs Cemetery near Boswell.

 

William J. Crowder, son of Eli Crowder and Martha "Patsy" Goings Crowder, was born March 1, 1843 in Mississippi.  He was married about 1885 to Josephine Taylor. He died February 25, 1935 and was buried at Boswell.

 

Francis Crowder, son of Eli Crowder and Martha "Patsy" Go­ings Crowder, was born about 1846.  It is believed that he died in childhood.

 

Joshua Crowder, son of Eli Crowder and Martha "Patsy" Go­ings Crowder, was born about 1850 in Indian Territory.  He was married about 1875, wife's name Sophia.

 

George W. Crowder, son of Eli Crowder and Martha "Patsy" Goings Crowder, was born February 5, 1852 in Indian County, Texas.

==O==

Thomas Nash had also emigrated from Louisiana. His family appeared in the Mexican census of 1826:

 

    "Nash,     Thomas       62, born in NC, farmer,

                                  stock raiser

    Going    Anna           56, born in VA, wife

    Nash      Michael       22, born in MS, son

               Benjamin     17, born in LA, son

               James          13, born in LA, son

               Margaret      11, born in LA, daughter

    Nash      William        24. born in MS, son,

                                  farmer

    Smith Polly           27, born in KY, wife

    Nash      Thomas       2, born in LA, son

               Huldah       1, born in TX, daughter"

 

In an adjoining location was the household of William Taylor who also emigrated from Louisiana and who is regarded as the son-in-law of Thomas Nash:

 

    "Taylor,   William    37, born in Virginia, Farmer, stock

                              raiser

    Nash,     Rebecca  25, born in Mississippi, wife

    Taylor   Josiah      9, born in LA, son

               Hardiena    7, born in LA, daughter

               Feliciana    4, born in Texas, daughter

               Catherine   2, born in Texas, daughter

               Lucinda     1, born in Texas, daughter"

 

Also coming from Louisiana and enumerated in an adjacent location was the household of:

 

    "Johnson,    John    28, born in KY, boot &

                              shoemaker

    Going,   Catherine 21, born in LA, wife"

 

Michael Nash, son of Thomas Nash, was born about 1804 in Mississippi.  He was married about 1828, wife's name Letty.  In 1830 they had returned to Natchitoches, Louisiana.  In 1840 they were enumerated in Rapides Parish. Their five children were listed in the 1850 enumeration. 

 

Benjamin Nash, son of Thomas Nash, was born about 1810 in Louisiana.  He was married about 1833 to Hannah Perkins.  She was born about 1811 in Louisiana.  In 1850 they were enumerated in Rapides Parish.  By 1880 Benjamin Nash had returned to Texas to live with his son Calvin Nash in Madison County.  He died there in 1888.

 

Zena Goins was married about 1900 to Emanuel Nash as his third wife probably in Madison County, Texas.  Eight children were born to them. 

 

"Thomas D. Goin" and several members of the Nash family were members of the militia of Atascosita mustered into service January 16, 1827 under the command of Capt. Hugh B. Johnston.  They marched with the militia of the Austin Colony to put down the Fredonian Revolution at Nacogdo-ches.  As the militia approached Nacogdoches on January 31, the rebels fled across the Sabine River, ending the insurrec-tion, according to 'Liberty, Liberty County and Atascosita District' by Miriam Partlow."

 

This service on behalf of Mexico proved to be very helpful to the Atascosita colonists in obtaining approval of their land grant applications.  In addition to Thomas D. Gowen, Jr, the expedition of the 30-man militia included Aaron Drake, John Drake and James Drake.

 

In November 1827 the settlers in Atascosito filed a petition with Don Anastacio Bustamente, Commander General of the Internal Eastern States, regarding their land applications. 

 

Seventy-three signatures were affixed to the petition from "the inhabitants who are settled on the Trinity and San Jacinto Rivers"  Included were "Tomas D. Gewen, Aaron Drak, John Drak, Hugh H. Johnston and Tomas Nash."  Most of the appli­cants received their land grants during the years 1831-1835. Thomas D. Gowen and the Drakes did not receive land grants which may have influenced their decision to return to Louisi-ana. 

==O==

Jeremiah Goins, reported son of Phillip Goins and Oti Goins, was born in Choctaw Nation [Mississippi] in 1798. 

 

When asked his father's name in a Dawes Commission hearing at Colbert, Indian Territory June 21, 1900, Jeremiah Goins, Jr. son of Jeremiah Goins, testified that his father's name was "J. A. Goins." 

 

Questions posed to Jeremiah Goins, Jr. by Acting Chairman Bixby on that date suggest that he and his ancestors may have been Melungeons. From the line of questioning, Bixby obvi­ously regarded him as mulatto by the color of his skins and physical appearance.  His questions were:

 

Question:  "What proportion of Choctaw blood do you

     claim to have?"

Answer:  "I claim to be a half-breed."

Question:  "You must have some other blood besides

     white and Indian, haven't you?"

Answer:  "I don't know."

Question:  "Don't you think you are too dark for a half

    -blood?

Answer:  "I don't know.  I don't think I am."

 

Jeremiah Goins was married about 1820 to Sarafina Drake, probably age 14.  An affidavit filed with the Dawes Commis­sion in 1896 by Robert Goins and Evaline Goins Padier stated that their parents were married in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, but they gave no dates.  Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins continued to live in Louisiana until 1834 when they emigrated to Coahuila y Tejas to become citizens of Mexico. 

 

According to the research of George Virgil Goins of Blanch-ard, Oklahoma, Sarafina Drake was born, about 1804 in south-western Louisiana.  He wrote:

 

"She was baptized October 4, 1804 at the Eglise St. Martin de Tours Catholic Church at St Martinville, Louisiana. Three other siblings were baptized on the same date.  They were Francisco Drake born about 1801, Aaron Drake born about 1802 and Ricardo Drake born about 1803.

 

The father of Sarafina Drake was John Aaron Drake, Jr. who was born in 1774 in North Carolina to John Aaron Drake, Sr. and Elizabeth Charity Crieves Drake.  Both were born in Virginia.

 

Their son John Aaron Drake, Jr, was baptized May 8, 1800 at St Martin de tours Catholic Church and was married to Rosalia Abcher [later Anglicized to Ab­shire]) May 18, 1800 at the same church. Rosalia was born in Louisiana January 15, 1782 in Louisiana to Jean Abcher and Franciscos Hargrave Abcher of Abbeville, Louisiana.

 

The next record shows the Drakes at Camp Orcoquisac November 1, 1807. The following is from the Mexican records at Bexar Archives translated by Elizabeth Shown Mills.  The records were published in "Louisiana Genealogical Register."

 

November 1, 1807‑ Camp of Orcoquisac

The immigrant families who are in this post are unable to proceed because they have no mounts, and so I have permitted them to establish themselves here, also shown are the number of cattle and horses each have.'

 

A total of 11 families were listed. Included were Don Carlos Saliet [Charles Sallier] and wife, Catarina Lebli­uyt [Catherine LeBleu].  Lake Charles, Louisiana was named for him.

 

This camp must have been around the Sabine River. At this time the land between the Sabine and the Calcasieu Rivers were named "No Man's Land."  It was a "haven for thieving and murderous men who prey on one an­other," according to "Sabine to Rio Hondo" by Nola M. Ross.

 

The Drakes listed were: Juan Eromdreque [John Aaron Drake, Sr. and wife Sarafina Smitt [Charity Smith] and daughter, Maria Luysa, age 14 years [she later married Alexandre Boxtin], servant Carlos, age 32 years, 200 cattle, 6 horses.

 

Juan Eromdreque [John Aaron Drake, Jr.] and wife, Rosalia Apser [Rosalia Absher] with children; Fran­cisco, age 6, Erom [Aaron] age 5 years, Ricardo, age 4 years, Sarafina, age 3 years, Juan [John] age 1 1/2 years, Maria [Marie Rachel], age 11 months, servant Cirildo Lamdrey.

 

The families of Pedro Fruched [Peter Fruge] and Fran­cisco Marcantel who were here, were forced by me to return to the place they came from because I noticed that they conducted themselves very badly, and that Daniel Boom and his family are enroute to San Antonio de Bexar with a petition to settle there.

 

Camp at Orcoquisac, November 1, 1807

                           Geronimo de Herrera"

 

George Virgil Goins wrote:

 

"On August 16, 1811, Aaron Drake was awarded a land grant, No. B-1297.  The 'B' indicated a claim based on imperfect title.  The land was described as Section 41, Township 13 South, Range 4 East.  It was located six miles southeast of Abbeville, Louisiana in present-day Vermilion Parish.  The claim was founded on an order of survey  of 1,000 arpants in favor of Aaron Drake at Grosse Isle, according to 'Land Records of the Attakapas District,' Volume 1 compiled by Glenn R. Conrad.  By 1827 the group had removed to Atascosita District in Mexico [later Liberty County, Texas].

 

Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins settled in Bevil Mu­nicipal District, named for John R. Bevil, located between the Neches and Sabine Rivers in what was later Newton and Jasper Counties.  Bevil Fort was lo­cated at a bend in the Neches River just south of present-day Zavala, Texas.  There were 23 mu­nicipal districts in Texas at the time of the Declaration of Inde­pendence.  On March 17, 1836, two weeks afterward, each be­came one of the original 23 Texas counties.

 

The household of Jeremiah Goins was enumerated in the Mexican census of Bevil District in 1835.  The census was compiled by Marion Day Mullins and published by the Na­tional Ge­nealogical Society as "First Census of Texas 1829-1836."  They were recorded as:

 

    "Goin, Jerry        37, farmer

      Drake,   Sarafina       28, wife

    Goin,     Henry          13

               Ransom       11

               Eveline       9

               Sybrant         7

               Caroline         5

               Robert           3

               James            1"

 

Fortunately for genealogists, it was the custom of Spanish enumerators to record married women by their maiden names.  There is no record of military service on the part of Jeremiah Goins in the Texas Revolution which was to erupt in the fol­lowing spring.  However, Gen. Sam Houston had exempted Melungeon William Goyen of Nacogdoches from military ser­vice so he could be a liaison and an interpreter with the Texas Indians to keep them on friendly terms with the Anglos.  Dawes Commission records show that Jeremiah Goins had also acted as an interpreter, and it possible that he had rendered such a service for Texas in its struggle for in­dependence.

 

In a small, aging book in the office of the County Clerk of Jef­ferson County are found the names and the dates of arrival in Texas of the population of the Beaumont area who applied in 1838 for land grants.  It was written with pen and ink primarily in the handwriting of Col. Henry Millard, one of the heroes of the Battle of San Jacinto.  Col. Millard, one of Gen. Houston's staff, named the town of Beaumont and the county of Jefferson for his brother-in-law Jefferson Beaumont of Natchez.

 

In 1838 Jeremiah Goins made an application to the Board of Land Commissioners of Jefferson County, Texas for a land grant which was accepted and forwarded to the State Land Of­fice in Austin where the originals on crisp, yellowing old paper may be found today.  The application read:

 

"I do solemnly swear that I was a resident of Texas at the date of the Declaration of Independence, that I did not leave the country during the campaign of the spring of 1836 to avoid a participation in the struggle, that I did not refuse to participate in the war and that I did not aid or assist the enemy, that I have not previously received a title to my quantity of land and that I conceive myself justly entitled under the constitution and laws to the quantity of land for which I now apply.

 

                   Jeremiah [X] Going"

 

Anglo citizens were entitled to "a league and a labor," 4,605 acres, if they could sign the above oath.  Free Negros, mu­lattos, Melungeons and Indians were generally passed over.  Jeremiah Goins may have received his land grant and sold his patent.  In any event, when he appeared in Limestone County, Texas in 1850, he was not recorded as a land owner. 

 

On October 16, 1850 his household was enumerated in Lime­stone County in the federal census, page 759 as Household 163-163:

 

    "Goins,    Jeremiah      58, born in Mississippi, farmer,

                                  illiterate, mulatto

               Charity    58, born in Louisiana

               Ransom       24, born in Louisiana

               Sebern         22, born in Louisiana

               Caroline       20, born in Louisiana

                Robert         19, born in Louisiana

               James          16, born in Texas

               Robert         14, born in Texas

               Reuben        13, born in Texas

               Adaline        15, born in Texas

               Emily             9, born in Texas

               Jeremiah        5, born in Texas

               Mary             2, born in Texas"

 

In an adjoining household, No. 164-164, was enumerated the family of Henry Goins, son of Jeremiah Goins.

 

"Jeremiah Goens of Hays County, Texas" received a deed June 26, 1856 to "530 acres in Hays and Burnet Counties on the south prong of the Cypress fork of the Pedernales River" from Robert Mays, according to the Hays County Deed Book L, page 419.  The land had been patented to Robert Mays September 26, 1845 by the state. 

 

Jeremiah Goins was a resident of San Saba County, Texas May 21, 1857 when his daughter Adeline Goins was married to Lewis A. Mulkey.

 

Jeremiah Goins does not appear as the head of a household in the index of the 1860 census of Texas compiled by Accelerated Indexing Systems.  "Jerry Goins, Sr." was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1870 census of Atascosa County, page 171, living near Pleasanton, Texas.  Other Goins households in the 1870 census of Atascosa County included R. G. Goins, page 171; Ransom Goins, page 194; Sarah Goins, page 202; Rayborn Goins, page 204; Hardinia Goins, page 199; James Goins, page 204 and Josephine Goins, page 194.

 

It is believed that Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Goins removed to San Antonio, Texas about 1873.  "Jerry" Goins received a deed to Lots 37, 38, 39 and 40 in San Antonio from Juan Jose Flores September 18, 1873 for $1,500, according to Bexar County Deed Book 1, page 116. 

 

Jeremiah Goins appeared as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Bexar County, Enumeration District 22, page 17 on June 11, 1880:

 

    "Goins,    Johan       80, born in MS, father born in MS,

                              mother born in MS, mulatto,

                              farmer

               Charity 70, born in MS, father born in MS,

                              mother born in MS, wife

    Morris, Lisie    16, born in TX, father born in

                           TX, mother born in TX, niece"

 

The household of Lewis A. Mulkey, his son-in-law, was also enumerated nearby June 10, 1880 in Enumeration District 22, page 16.

 

Jeremiah Goins died July 22, 1883, according to his headstone in Oakley Cemetery. "Jeremiah Goins, Sr." [probably his estate] received a deed February 12, 1884 to 160 acres in Survey 14, located on Atascosa Creek 19 miles southeast of San Antonio for $140 from Lewis A. Mulkey and Adeline Goins Mulkey, his daughter, according to Bexar County Deed Book 33, page 149.  The will of Jeremiah Goins, written November 2, 1882 and was filed for probate August 14, 1883 and was recorded in Bexar County Probate Book J, pages 176-178. The document has been transferred to the archives of the Bexar County Clerk's office.

 

A deed and a release dated June 30, 1886 signed by Jeremiah Goins, Jr. "son of Jerry Goins" and Alice Goins, his wife, recorded in Bexar County Deed Book 48, page 380 mentions that "my mother and father are buried here."  Consideration for the 160 acres of land was $800.  Apparently this was the land purchased from the Mulkeys in 1884.  This burial ground in 1992 was known as Oakley Cemetery.  Sarafina Drake Goins died May 21, 1881, according to her headstone in Oakley Cemetery. The descendants of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Goins gathered there annually for a family reunion.

 

Early day range men in Texas classified three kinds of soil in the state--Bowie soil which would support 20 cows to the acre, Travis soil which would support 10 cows and Gowen soil which would support only five cows.  It is speculated that since Jeremiah Goins was the only member of the family contemporary with Travis and Bowie in Texas, Gowen soil was named for him.  [Col. William Barrett Travis and Col. Jim Bowie died in the Battle of the Alamo.]

 

On September 9, 1896 evidence was introduced in United States Citizenship Court in Indian Territory that the names of Henry Goins, William Goins and James Goins together with their children [unnamed] appeared on the 1874 census roll of Kiamitia County, Indian Territory.  An application was made for the enrollment as Choctaws by blood "Robert Goins and 99 others, all claiming to be children and grandchildren of Jeremiah Goins, a half-blood Choctaw and a recognized mem­ber of the Choctaw Nation in Mississippi" was filed with the Dawes Commission and evidence in support thereof, consisting of numerous affidavits, submitted.  The record shows:

 

"Jeremiah Goins was a mixed-blood Choctaw, possess­ing somewhere between one-half and seven-eighths Choctaw blood; that his father was Philip Goins, his mother Oti.  Philip Goins was about three-quarters Choctaw, while Oti was a full blood.  Jeremiah Goins and his family were members of the Choctaw Nation in Mississippi.  The record shows that he was one of the frontiersmen alternating between the Choctaw Nation and Texas; that he was always acknowledged by those who knew him to be a Choctaw Indian; that he acted as an interpreter in proceedings in which Choctaws ap­peared."

 

The Dawes Commission on December 1, 1896 denied the re­quest of the applicants stating that "a Choctaw Indian, to be entitled to enrollment should have at some time prior to the act of 1898 established a residence in the Choctaw Nation."  Additionally the Commission stated that the names of the descendants of Jeremiah Goins did not appear on the tribal rolls. 

 

The family appealed the decision.  On December 1, 1896 its attorneys presented the appeal to the United States Court for the Southern District, Indian Territory at Ardmore, Oklahoma for the family members to be admitted to the Choctaw rolls. The attorneys introduced over 50 pages of typewritten material in evidence of blood, residence and tribal affiliation.  They were successful on this occasion:

 

"Decree entered admitting the following persons: Robert Goins, Elizabeth Goins, Seaborn Goins, Calvin Goins, Caroline Goins, John Goins, Elizabeth Goins, Minerva Goins, William Henry Goins, Samantha Goins, James Goins, James Goins, Jr, Randolph Goins, Lizzie Goins, Rayborn Goins, Thomas L. Goins, William Goins, Collin Goins, Eli Goins, Rayborn Goins, Campbell Goins, Martha Margaret Goins, Missouri E. Goins, Amanda May Goins, Dinkey Goins, Reuben Goins, Mary Goins, Cordelia Goins, Jeremiah Goins, Jr, Mon­roe Goins, William Goins, Frank Goins, Leonard Goins, Mrs. Evaline Paddieo [Padier], Reuben Paddieo, John Paddieo, Evaline Paddieo, Martha Paddieo, W. C. Tasso Paddieo, James Paddieo, Amanda Paddieo, Jerry M. Morris, G. W. Morris, Spencer W. Morris, Jr, Sarah Morris, Kansas Morris, Mrs. Emily Perrice [Peres], G. W. Nevils, Ike Perice, Josephine Perrice, Mary Perrice, Anna Perrice, Alonza Perrice, Caroline Perrice, Mrs. Mary Southward, W. C. Southward, William Southward, Elizabeth Southward, John F. Southward, James Marion Southward, Jessie Myrtle Southward, Maggie May Southward, James Melton Gardner, Margaret Lugene Gardner, Manda Eldora Gardner, Cora Lee Gardner, J. M. Gardner, Ebenezer S. Morris, Gertrude E. Morris, Jesse W. Morris, Jesse Coleman Morris, Augusta B. Morris, Wilmuth Morris, Nora Lee Morris, Mollie Morris, Cora May Morris, Kansas Viola Morris, Frank C. Jones, James Jones, Jesse Jones, Gypsie Jones, Frank C. Jones, Ignathia Marjories, Susie Marjories, Reams Marjories, Joe Perrice, Ignathia Peres, Jr. Eugene Dias, Albert Dias, Clara Androda [Andrade], Christoval Androda, Mrs. Josephine Priest, Adella Taylor, Pearline Taylor, Anzo Taylor, William Martin Taylor, Josephine Taylor and Clara Taylor."

 

A judgment was rendered in favor of the family December 21, 1897:

 

"In the United States court in the Indian Territory, Southern District at a term begun and held at Ardmore, in the Indian Territory, on the 15th day of November, A.D. 1897.  The Hon. Hosea Townsend, judge.  The following order was made and entered of record, to wit:

 

Robert Goins et al vs. The Choctaw Nation, No. 127 Judgement

 

At this time came on to be heard the report of the master in chancery, filed herein June 23, 1897, and at the same time came the applicants by their attorneys; and it appearing to the court that the applicants herein through their attorneys have excepted to the report of said Master in chancery, wherein he recommends that those of the applicants who are nonresidents of the Indian Territory be denied the right to have their names enrolled as members of the tribe of Choctaw Indians, and the court, after hearing said exceptions and being fully advised in the premises, is of the opinion that said exceptions be, and the same are hereby, sustained; and it appearing to the court from the report of said master and from the evidence filed herein that all of the applicants are mem­bers of the tribe of Choctaw Indians:

 

It is therefore considered, adjudged and decreed by the court that Robert Goins and his wife, Elizabeth Goins and Seaborn Goins, Calvin Goins, Caroline Goins, John Goins, Elizabeth Goins, Minerva Goins, William Henry Goins and Samontha Goins, the children of Henry Goins, deceased and James Goins and his children, James Goins, Jr. and Randolph Goins and Lizzie Goins; and Rayborn Goins and children, Thomas L. Goins, William Goins, Collin Goins, Eli Goins, Rayborn Goins, Campbell Goins, Martha Margaret Goins, Missouri E. Goins, Amanda May Goins and Dinkey Goins; and Reuben Goins and children, Mary Goins, Cordelia Goins; and Jeremiah Goins, Jr. and children, Monroe Goins, William Goins, Frank Goins, and Leonard Goins; and Mrs. Evaline Paddieo [Padier] and her children, Reuben Paddieo, Tasso Paddieo, John Paddieo, Evaline Paddieo, Martha Paddieo, James Paddieo and Amanda Paddieo; and the children of Caroline Morris whose name was Caroline Goins, to wit: Jerry M. Morris, G. W. Morris, Spencer W. Morris, Jr. Sarah Morris and Kansas Morris; and Mrs. Emily Perrice [Peres] and G. W. Nevils, her son by her first husband, William M. Nevils, and her children by her second hus­band, Antonio Perrice, to wit, Ike Perrice, Josephine Perrice, Mary Perrice, Anna Perrice, Alzona Perrice, and Caroline Perrice; and Mrs. Mary Southward and her husband, W. C. Southward and their children, William M. Southward, Elizabeth Southward, John F. Southward, James Marion Southward, Jessie Myrtle Southward, and Maggie May Southward; and the children of Sallie Goins who married J. M. Gardner, viz. James Melton Gardner, Margaret Lugene Gardner, Manda Eldora Gardner and Cora Lee Gardner, and the said J. M. Gardner; and the children of J. M. Morris, who was a son of Caroline Morris, viz, Ebenezer S. Morris, Gertrude E. Morris, Jesse W. Morris, Jesse Coleman Morris and Augusta B. Morris; and the children of G. W. Morris, viz, Wilmuth Morris, Nora Lee Morris, Mollie Morris, Cora May Morris and Kansas Viola Mor­ris; and the children of Sallie Morris who married Frank C. Jones, viz, Frank C. Jones, James Jones, Jesse Jones and Gypsie Jones and the said Frank C. Jones; and the children of Josephine Marjories, who was a daughter of the said Emily Perrice, viz, Ignathia Marjories, Susie Marjories and Reams Marjories; and the children of Ike Perrice, who was son of Emily Perrice, viz, Joe Perrice and Ignatia Perrice, Jr; and the children of Mary Dias, who was a daughter of Emily Perrice, to wit, Eugene Dias and Albert Dias; and the children of Anna Androda [Andrade], a daughter of Emily Perrice, to wit: Clara Androda and Christoval Androda; and the grandchildren of Jeremiah Goins, to wit, Mrs. Josephine Priest and her children by her former husband, namely, Adella Taylor, Pearline Taylor, Anzo Taylor, William Martin Taylor, Josephine Taylor and Clara Taylor are all members of the Choctaw Tribe of Indians and as such are entitled to have their names enrolled as members of said tribe of Choctaw Indians by blood, except as to the said W. C. Southward, who is a member of said tribe by intermar­riage, and Elizabeth Goins, the wife of Robert Goins, who is a member of said tribe by intermarriage.

 

It is further considered, adjudged and decreed by the court that the Choctaw Nation, the defendant, pay all costs in this behalf expended and incurred, for which execution may issue.

 

It is further considered, adjudged and decreed by the court that the clerk of this court certify this judgment to the Commission of the United States to the Five Civi­lized Tribes for its observance. To which judgment of the court the defendant, the Choctaw Nation, in open court duly excepted."

 

Mary Harmon Wallace of Ratliff City, Oklahoma, a descendant of Jeremiah Goins and a member of the Editorial Board of Gowen Research Foundation, wrote an explanation of the difficulty that faced the Choctaw Goins individuals in being enrolled as members of the tribe in Oklahoma:

 

"A question often asked, 'If Jeremiah Goins was half or more Choctaw Indian, why wasn't the Goins family ad­mitted to the Choctaw Indian Rolls?'

 

The general public has never understood and most do not now understand that Indian descent, Indian blood of any tribe, no matter how well authenticated, did not entitle one to tribal citizenship.

 

During the enrollment period many applications were presented by people claiming to have Indian blood, others who had lived outside the Nation and had never been recognized as citizen of any tribe. Having Indian blood did not of itself confer citizenship.  The claimants continued, however to harass the Dawes Commission until 1902, when Congress settled the matter by a law stating that no application would be received from any person who was not a recognized citizen of a tribe.

 

The Citizenship Court set up under the terms of the compact in existence from 1902 to the end of 1904. It rendered a decision the 17th day of December 1902, in the case styled, The Choctaw and Chickasaw Nation of Tribes vs J.T. Riddle, et al. Their decision was, that the Federal Courts of the Indian Territory had not followed the correct procedure, by allowing suit to be brought against each tribe separately, and by trying the cases, de nove, instead of admitting only the evidence submitted to the Dawes Commission.

 

This ruling gave the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nation the desired opportunity for rehearing of their cases before the Citizenship Court, and they secured an almost complete reversal, the claims of about 3,400 persons for citizenship in the five tribes were rejected and about 156 were sustained. [Ref. Report Select Commission, I, Report of Commission of Indian Affairs, 1903, Commission of the Five Civilized Tribes annual paper, 1904, and in Angie Debo's "The Rise and Fall of the Choctaw Republic" University of Oklahoma, Norman: 1961.]

 

In the case of Robert Goins et al. vs The Choctaw Na­tion, No. 127 Robert Goins listed 98 other Goins family members, the judgement dated 21st day of December 1897, stated the listed members 'were members of the Tribe of Choctaws.

 

On the 17th day of December 1902, the decree of the United States Court was 'vacated' by a decree of the Citizenship Court.  On March 3, 1903, the family was to get a new trial, then on 29 July 1904 a decree was entered denying all claimants. In September 1904, 47 children's application was denied by the commission

 

The case was closed 15 September 1904. The case was reviewed the 22nd day of April 1909.  The matter was terminated 3 June 1909.  'The Indian Office Secretary could find no evidence that the family had established residence in the Choctaw Nation in Indian Territory.'

 

Robert Goins and some family members were awarded land in the vicinity of Ada, Indian Territory, but had to give the land up in 1904. Caroline [Callie] had land at Ireton [Alex], Indian Territory.

 

Ransom and Reuben Goins were the smart ones, they just married full blood Indians and became members of the tribe by intermarriage. [Ref. Court Records from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Muskogee, Oklahoma, Records of The Citizenship Courts at Tishomingo, Ok­lahoma]."

 

On December 17, 1902 the decree of the United States Court was "vacated" by a decree of the Citizenship Court in a "test case."  On March 3, 1903 it was announced that the family was to get a new trial.  On July 29, 1904 a decree was entered denying all claimants.

 

In September 1904 applications for enrollment of children listed below was denied by the Commission.  One of the opin­ions read:

 

"The right of the applicants' father, John H. Goins, to citizenship in the Choctaw Nation having been ad­versely determined by a decree of the Choctaw and Chickasaw citizenship court, it is hereby ordered that the application for enrollment as citizens by blood of the Choctaw Nation be dismissed:

 

Leroy Goins, Albert Goins, Georgia Goins, Paul Goins, Minneola Goins, Henry Goins, Jewel Goins, Starley May Goins, Jesse Goins, Tomer A. Goins, Henry A. Goins, William B. Goins, Allie May Goins, General Jackson Hinkle, Bessie M. Jones, Flora Leona Jones, Buel Bradford Jones, Frank Delmer Jones, James I. Pad­dieo, John L. S. Cox, Eva Paddieo, Josie Paddieo, William Adolphus Ramsey, Effie S. Southward, Susan Southward, Edith Southward, William W. Morris, Lula Mamie Morris, Andrew J. Dorn, Tommy O. Dorn, Robert A. Dorn, Lenora May Laxton, Maggie Edwards, Roy Edwards, Elizabeth Martinez, Alzina Martinez, Ida Padier, Seborn Goins, Nellie Marjories, Manuel Marjories, Jr, Fred Lee Marjories, Ida Goins, Ruby Viola Goins, Joseph Goins, Conception Perrice [Peres], Ella Perrice and Stella Perrice."

 

The case was closed September 15, 1904.  The Indian Office reviewed the case April 22, 1909.  The matter was finally laid to rest June 3, 1909.  The Indian Office Secretary could find no evidence that the family had established residence in Choctaw Nation in Indian Territory.  Eighty-one years later genealogists are just as hard-pressed to find evidence of residence.

 

Jeremiah Goins wrote his will November 2, 1882, and it was filed for record August 14, 1883 in the office of the Bexar County Clerk.

 

"Last Will and Testament of Jeremiah Goins to be opened only after his death by Capt. John Tom, Execu­tor in whose hand this is deposited.

 

State of Texas, County of Bexar

 

In the Name of God, Amen

 

I, Jeremiah Goins of said County and State being of sound and disposing mind and memory considering the uncertainty of life and the certainty of death to make and ordain this my last Will and Testament, following:

 

Item 1st.  I will my body to be decently buried and that the expenses thereof be paid out of any money on hand at the time of my death by my executor hereinafter named.

 

Item 2nd.  I devise and bequeath to my daughter Evaline Peres, wife of Henry Peres, one hundred acres of land in the form of an ell off of the Southern part of my home tract in Said County.

 

Item 3rd.  I devise and bequeath to my son James Goins one hundred and sixty acres of land in the Said County patented by the State of Texas to Lewis A. Mulkey and by him deeded to me November 28, 1880.

 

Item 4th.  I will and bequeath to my son Ike [Rayborn] Goins all my stock of horses wherever they may be, except my mules and my jack.

 

Item 5th.  I will and devise to my son Jerry Goins my homestead tract of land in Said County except the one hundred acres herein before devised to my daughter Evaeline Peres.

 

Item 6th.  I will and devise to Mary Southward, wife of William Southward, one town lot in the city of San An­tonio known as Lot. No. 36 with house & all improve­ments thereon.  Said lot being one of a number of lots conveyed to me by Juan Jose Flores & his wife, Ufemia Biabando de Flores by deed dated on the 18th day of September 1873.

 

Item 7th.  I will and devise to my daughter Caroline Morris, wife of Spencer Morris three hundred head of Sheep.

 

Item 8th.  I will and bequeath, in addition to the bequest of one hundred acres of land above, 4 cows & calves to my said daughter Evaline Peres, and also 4 cows & calves to my son James Goins.

 

Item 9th.  I will and bequeath to my son Jerry Goins, in addition to the previous bequest to him, all the rest and residue of my cattle of every kind whatsoever.

 

Item 10th.  I will and devise to my son Jerry Goins, in addition to the former devise herein to him Lots No. 37 and 38 in the City of San Antonio, Said lots being two lots of four lots conveyed to me by Juan Jose Flores & his wife Uphemia Biabanda de Flores by deed dated September 18th, A.D. 1873.

 

Item 11th.  I devise and will to my granddaughter Sarah Morris daughter of Spencer Morris, Lot No. 39 with all improvements thereon in the City of San Antonio, Said lot being one of a number of lots conveyed to me by Juan Jose Flores and his wife Ufemia Biabanda de Flo­res by deed dated September 18th, A.D. 1873.

 

I hereby nominate and appoint Capt. John Tom of Atas­cosa Executor of this my last will and testament, and I hereby will and direct that no other action in relation to my estate or the settlement of the same, shall be had in any court of this State, except that I request my said executor to probate this my last will and testament, and return an inventory, appraisement thereof & list of claims against the same should there be any such claims.

 

In witness whereof I have herewith set my hand this second day of November in the year of our Lord Eigh­teen Hundred and Eighty two.

                                  Jeremiah [X] Goins"

 

On August 18, 1896, David Reynolds, 78 years old and a resi­dent of Atascosa County, Texas gave an affidavit to the Dawes Commission:

 

"I was present when he [Jeremiah Goins] proved himself by white men and Indians that he was a Choctaw Indian at Nacog­doches County in 1848 in the latter part of August."

 

"I knew Jeremiah Goins and his wife, Sharofine during their lifetime . . . the wife died first . . . they both died in Bexar County near the line with Atascosa County, about 12 miles from Pleasanton, the county seat of Atascosa County.  During my acquaintance with the Goins, we were separated a considerable distance at times, some times we were 300 miles apart and sometimes we were neighbors.  My acquaintance with them extended for about sixty years."

 

"Jeremiah Goins proved that he was a Choctaw Indian at Nacogdoches.  He told me himself that he was a Choctaw and that he came from Mississippi near the In­dian Nation.  I knew that he talked the Choctaw lan­guage because I understood and could talk some Choctaw myself.  My father was an agent for the Choctaws to sell cattle on the line of the Choctaw Na­tion.  Goins took a great liking to me because I could speak Choctaw. 

 

Jeremiah Goins was a large, square-built man, with high cheek bones.  Sharofine was a rather small woman with high cheek bones.  I am an old Texas veteran, and Jeremiah Goins was a good trailer and interpreter for us." 

 

It is believed that children born to Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins include:

 

    Henry Goins                           born in 1824

    Ransom "Rance" Goins             born in 1825

    Evaline Goins                         born in 1826

    Seaborn Goins                   born in 1828

    Rayborn A[lbert?] Goins            born in 1829  [1826?]

    Caroline Goins                   born in 1830

    James C. Goins                      born in 1834

    Adeline Goins                     born in 1835

    Robert Goins                         born in 1836

    Reuben Calvin Goins                  born August 8, 1837

    Emily Goins                       born in 1841

    Jeremiah Goins, Jr.                 born in 1845

    Mary Elizabeth Goins             born in 1848

 

Family Researchers:

 

    Carlotta Earlene Hollis Bates, 301 Berkeley Park Blvd, Kensington CA, 94707

    Pamela Harle Dillard, Box 50742, Amarillo, TX, 79159, 806/355-7505

    Daniel Lee Gabehart, 306 Bloomfield Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78228, 512/615-8733

    Howard Goins, 109 E. Church Ave, Mena, AR, 71953

    Brenda Thornburg Legrand, Box 505, Panhandle, TX, 79068

    Sandra M. Loridans, Apartado Postal 844, 45900 Chapala, Jalisco, Mexico.

    Jane P. McManus, 68 Hyacinth Drive, Covington, LA, 70433

    Della Ford Nash, 2515 NW 26th, Okla. City, OK, 73107

    Leila Ray Perkins Smith, 1180 Kenley Rd, Corrigan, TX, 75939, 409/829-4576

    Hazel G. Standley, 308 Old River Rd, Starks, LA, 70661, 428/743-5521

    Juanita Thornburg Southerland, 9156 Sawyer Brown Rd, Nashville, TN, 37221

    Linda Rapp Vickers, Box 312, Poteau, OK, 74953

    Patricia Ann Waak, 4225 Weld County Rd. 1½, Erie, CO, 80516

    Mary Harmon Wallace, Box 237 Ratliff City, OK, 73081.

    Jane J. Williams, 60 Porters Chapel Rd, Vicksburg, MS, 39180

 

Henry Goins, son of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins, was born in 1824 in Louisiana.  He appeared as a 13-year-old in the 1835 Spanish census of Bevil District. He was married about 1848 to Sarah Ann Simmons, according to the research of Howard Goins, a descendant of Mena, Arkansas.

 

The household of Henry Goins, No. 164-164 was enumerated in an adjoining location with his that of his father in the 1850 census of Limestone County October 16, 1850:

 

    "Goins,    Henry          25, born in Louisiana, farmer,

                                  mulatto

               Sarah Ann       20, born in Alabama

               Mary             1, born in Texas

    Padia,      Antona    50, born in Louisiana, farmer

               Evaline     20, born in Texas"

 

He died February 28, 1870 in Alex, Oklahoma, according to Howard Goins.  The estate of "Henry Goins, deceased" was probated February 28, 1870, according to Atascosa County Case 11. 

 

Children born to Henry Goins and Sarah Ann Simmons Goins include:

 

    Mary Goins                    born in 1848

    Seaborn Goins                born about 1851

    Joseph Calvin Goins               born in July 1852

    Caroline Goins                born about 1855

    John Goins                     born about 1858

    Elizabeth Goins                  born about 1861

    Minerva Goins                born about 1862

    William Lewis Goins               born January 1, 1864

    Samantha Goins                 born about 1869

 

Mary Goins, daughter of Henry Goins and Sarah Ann Simmons Goins, was born in 1848.  She appeared in the 1850 census of Limestone County as a one-year-old. 

 

Seaborn Goins, son of Henry Goings and Sarah Ann Simmons Goins, was born about 1851.  He was married about 1870, wife's name Mahala.

 

"Seeborn Goins,"  was enumerated in the 1880 census of Atas­cosa County, Enumeration District 22, page 11 as the head of a household:

 

    "Goins,    Seeborn       35, born in TX, father born in

                                  AR, mother born in Ireland,

                                  laborer, illiterate, white male

               Mahlila     30, born in AR, father born in,

`                                 AR, mother born in AR,

                                  illiterate

               William          9, born in TX, father born in

                                  TX,  mother born in TX

               John Henry    5, born in TX, father born in

                                  TX, mother born in TX

               Hennita          3, born in TX, father born in

                                  TX, mother born in TX

               Danial            1, born in TX, father born in TX

                                  mother born in TX"

 

He was mentioned in court records June 23, 1897 as being a son of Henry Goin.

 

Joseph Calvin Goins, son of Henry Goins Sarah Ann Simmons Goins, was born in July 1852, according to George Virgil Goins. He was married about 1880 to Laura Shaw who was born September 28, 1858.  "Calvin Goins" was mentioned June 23, 1897 in court records as being a son of Henry Goins.  Joseph Calvin Goins died September 14, 1932 at age 80.  Laura Shaw Goins died five days later September 19, 1932.  They were buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery, Alex, Oklahoma.

 

Children born to Joseph Calvin Goins and Laura Shaw Goins include:

 

    William Rice Goins born in April 1885

    Ida Mae Goins    born May 18, 1897

 

William Rice Goins, son of Joseph Calvin Goins and Laura Shaw Goins, was born in April 1885.  He died in 1948 and was buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery.

 

Ida Mae Goins, daughter of Joseph Calvin Goins and Laura Shaw Goins, was born May 18, 1897.  She was married about 1920 to Roy Love Holder who was born February 7, 1897. She died January 5, 1976, and he died January 5, 1985

 

Children born to them include:

 

    Roy Allen Holder born March 1, 1926

 

Roy Allen Holder, son of Roy Love Holder and Ida Mae Goins Holder, was born March 1, 1926.  He was killed December 10, 1974 in Korea.  He and his parents were buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery.

 

Caroline Goins, daughter of Henry Goins and Sarah Ann Sim­mons Goins, was born about 1855.  She was mentioned June 23, 1897 in court records as being a daughter of Henry Goins.

 

John Henry Goins, son of Henry Goins and Sarah Ann Sim­mons Goins, was born about 1858.  "John Goins" was married March 9, 1876 to Bettie Monger, according to Atascosa County marriage records  He was mentioned June 23, 1897 in court records as a son of Henry Goins. George Virgil Goins identifies John Henry Goins as his grandfather.

 

Children born to John Henry Goins and Bettie Monger Goins include:

 

    Robert Goins                  born about 1879

 

Robert Goins, son of John Henry Goins and Bettie Monger, was born about 1879.  He was the father of twins, according to George Virgil Goins:

 

    Pearl Goins                 born about 1904

    Earl Goins                      born about 1906

 

Elizabeth Goins, daughter of Henry Goins and Sarah Ann Simmons Goins, was born about 1861.  She was mentioned June 23, 1897 in court records as the daughter of Henry Goins.

 

Minerva Goins, daughter of Henry Goins and Sarah Ann Sim­mons Goins, was born about 1863.  She was mentioned June 23, 1897 in court records as the daughter of Henry Goins.  Au­drey Palmer Griego, a resident of Midlothian, Texas in 1992, was a descendant of Minerva Goins.

 

William Lewis "Bud" Goins, son of Henry Goins and Sarah Ann Simmons Goins, was born June 1, 1864, according to George Virgil Goins.  He was married about 1884 to Margaret Elizabeth "Lizzie" Allison who was born September 19, 1868.  He was mentioned as a son of Henry Goins in court records dated June 23, 1897. Margaret Elizabeth "Lizzie Allison Goins died February 20, 1908 and was buried in Loflin Creek Ceme­tery. He died June 21, 1931 and was buried beside his wife.

 

Children born to them include:

 

    Sarah Weynona Goins born about 1886

    Allie Mae Goins          born about 1900

 

Sarah Weynona Goins, daughter of William Lewis "Bud" Goins and Margaret Elizabeth "Lizzie" Allison Goins, was born about 1886.  She was married about 1902 to a cousin, Charles Calvin "Cal" Goins. For details of their family, see his section.

 

Allie Mae Goins, daughter of William Lewis "Bud" Goins and Margaret Elizabeth "Lizzie" Allison Goins, was born about 1900.  She died about 1902 and was buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery.

 

Samantha Goins, daughter of Henry Goins and Sarah Ann Simmons Goins, was born about 1869.  She was mentioned as a daughter of Henry Goins in court records dated June 23, 1897.

 

Ransom "Rance" Goins, son of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins, was born in Louisiana in 1825.  His death certifi­cate [erroneously] showed his date of birth as July 4, 1802 at Natchez, Mississippi and his age as "113 years, 6 months, 8 days" at his death.

 

He appeared as an 11-year-old in the 1835 census of Bevil Dis­trict in his fa­ther's household.  He reappeared as a 24-year-old living with his parents in the 1850 census of Limestone County.  He re­ceived a land grant in Atascosa County of 160 acres from the State of Texas.  He was married about 1854 to Emily Hardin, according to George Virgil Goins of Dibble, Okla­homa. 

 

Ransom "Rance" Goins died January 12, 1916 and was buried Ireton Cemetery, later called Loflin Creek Cemetery, at Alex, Oklahoma, according to George Virgil Goins.  He reported that other members of the family buried there include Joe Calvin Goins and his wife Laura Shaw Goins, Reuben Goins and his wife Susan Thomas Goins and William Louis Goins and his wife Allison Goins.

 

He died in Turnbull township in McClain County, according to Oklahoma BVS File C-384.  The estate of "R. A. Goins, de­ceased" was probated in Atascosa County as Case No. 306.

 

Children born to Ransom "Rance" Goins and Emily Hardin Goins include:

 

    Sarah M. "Sally" Goins              born about 1855

    Nancy Goins                  .       born October 7, 1857

    Ransom "Rance" Goins, Jr.            born July 4, 1868

 

Sarah M. "Sally" Goins, daughter of Ransom "Rance" Goins and Emily Hardin Goins, was born about 1854, according to the research of Mary Evelyn Harmon Wallace, Foundation member of Ratliff City, Oklahoma.  She was married in 1879 at Stonewall, Indian Territory to James Melton Gardner who was born in February 1854.  In 1881 they lived at Purcell, OklahomA.  She died about February 10, 1888.

 

Children born to them include:

 

    James Melton Gardner, Jr.   born March 4, 1881

    Margaret Lugene Gardner    born about 1884

    Maude Eldora Gardner        born in February 1886

    Cora Lee Gardner               born February 7, 1888

 

James Melton Gardner, Jr, son of James Melton Gardner and Sarah M. "Sally" Gardner, was born March 4, 1881 at Purcell. He was married September 10, 1905 in Stephens County, Oklahoma to Mary Ann [Alice?] Jones.  He died March 22, 1944 and was buried in Claude Cemetery in Stephens County..

 

Cora Lee Gardner, daughter of James Melton Gardner, Jr. and Sarah M. "Sally" Gardner, was born February 7, 1888.  She was married June 6, 1906 to William H. Vanhoozer at Tishomingo, Oklahoma.  She died October 5, 1971 at McAlester, Oklahoma and was buried at Wardville, Oklahoma in Atoka County.=

 

 

 

Nancy Goins, daughter of Ransom "Rance" Goins and Emily Hardin Goins, was born October 7, 1857 in Indian Territory. Linda Rapp suggests that her birthyear was 1865.  She was mar­ried there in 1883 to Charles Thomas who was born July 5, 1855.  He died April 13, 1904.  She was remarried to J. P. White.  Later she was married a third time to Joseph L. Carmichael.  She died July 26, 1941.  They were buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery at Alex, Oklahoma.

 

Children born to them include:

 

    William Montgomery Thomas     born in June 1884

    Lillie Aisley Thomas                   born February 7, 1887

    Willie Jefferson Thomas             born in December 1889

    Jessie Mae Thomas                born March 7, 1891

    Callie Ray Thomas                 born April 11, 1893

    Doanie Evelyn Thomas               born in February 1896

    Charlie Nelson Dewey Thomas       born in April 1899

    Alpha Thomas [twin]                  born March 15, 1904

    Alma N. Thomas [twin]              born March 15, 1904

 

William Montgomery Thomas, son of Charles Thomas and Nancy Goins Thomas, was born in June 1884 in Indian Terri­tory, according to George Virgil Goins.  He was married about 1915 to Delia Ann Rice who was born about 1897.  He died in 1969, and she died in 1983.  They were buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery.

 

Lillie Aisley Thomas, daughter of Charles Thomas and Nancy Goins Thomas, was born February 7, 1887 in Indian Territory. She was married about 1917 to William M. Dare who was born January 1, 1880.  She died March 8, 1927, and he died March 2, 1936.

 

Children born to them include:

 

    Richard H. Dare  born August 21, 1932--died June 1, 1965

 

Willie Jefferson Thomas, son of Charles Thomas and Nancy Goins Thomas, was born in December 1889 in Indian Territory.

 

Jessie Mae Thomas, daughter of Charles Thomas and Nancy Goins Thomas, was born in Lindsay, Indian Territory March 7, 1891. She was married December 15, 1906 to Joseph Andrew Gabehart.  She died in August 1968.

 

Callie Ray Thomas, daughter of Charles Thomas and Nancy Goins Thomas, was born in Purcell, Indian Territory April 11, 1893. She was married June 29, 1907 to Willie Ray Horton.  She died September 17, 1979.

 

Doanie Evelyn Thomas, daughter of Charles Thomas and Nancy Goins Thomas, was born in February 1896 in Indian Territory.  She was married about 1914 to Benjamin Harrison Gabehart.

 

Charlie Nelson Dewey Thomas, son of Charles Thomas and Nancy Goins Thomas, was born in April 1899 in Indian Terri­tory.  He was married about 1922 to Ethel Simonds.

 

Alpha Thomas, twin daughter of Charles Thomas and Nancy Goins Thomas, was born in Lindsay March 15, 1904.  She was married to Fred Lawson about 1922.

 

Alma N. Thomas, twin daughter of Charles Thomas and Nancy Goins Thomas, was born in Lindsay March 15, 1904.  She was married September 4, 1922 to George Riley Lawson. She died May 19, 1986.

 

Ransom "Rance" Goins, Jr, son of Ransom "Rance" Goins and Emily Hardin Goins, was born July 4, 1868 at Pleasanton, Texas, according to a letter written February 14, 1991 by Linda Rapp, a great-granddaughter of Red Oak, Oklahoma. 

 

"Rance Goins of Dibble, age 35" was married July 8, 1904 to "Miss Edna Bassham of Dibble, age 19," according to the county's marriage records.  Cora Edna Bassham, daughter of Fountain Fletcher Bassham and Luiza Angelina Howard, was born in Rocky Comfort, Missouri October 16, 1884.

 

Ransom "Rance" Goins died August 28. 1929 at Red Oak and was buried there the following day.  Cora Edna Bassham Goins was remarried to Oscar Loveless. She died at Paradise, Califor­nia on September 27, 1977.  She was buried in Sunset Lawn Memorial Park at Sacramento, California.

 

Children born to Ransom "Rance" Goins, Jr. and Cora Edna Bassham Goins include:

 

    Beulah Fontella Goins             born March 31, 1905

    Lonnis Cloman Goins             born April 1, 1908

    Lois Carol Goins                    born April 9, 1910

    Homer Lee "Larry" Goins           born about 1912

    Mildred Dawn "Mae" Goins           born about 1915

    Mary Louise Goins                 born April 6, 1918

 

Beulah Fontella Goins, daughter of Ransom "Rance" Goins, Jr. and Cora Edna Bassham Goins, was born March 31, 1905 in Missouri.  She was married about 1923 to Harrison Moore.  She died in May 1986.

 

Lonnie Cloman Goins, son of Ransom "Rance" Goins, Jr. and Cora Edna Bassham Goins, was born April 1, 1908 in Missouri. He was married about 1931, wife's name Opal.  Later he was remarried, wife's name Helen.  Children born to Lonnie Clo­man, Goins, Opal Goins and Helen Goins are unknown.

 

Lois Carol Goins, daughter of Ransom "Rance" Goins, Jr. and Cora Edna Bassham Goins, was born April 9, 1910 at Dibble.  She was married August 23, 1929 to George Dewey Wilburn. 

 

Homer Lee "Larry" Goins, son of Ransom "Rance" Goins, Jr. and Cora Edna Bassham Goins, was born about 1912.

 

Mildred Dawn "Mae" Goins, daughter of Ransom "Rance" Goins, Jr. and Cora Edna Bassham Goins, was born about 1915.

 

Mary Louise Goins, daughter of Ransom "Rance" Goins, Jr. and Cora Edna Bassham Goins, was born about 1918.

 

Evaline Goins, daughter of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafine Drake Goins, was born in 1826 in Louisiana.  She appeared as a nine-year-old in the 1835 census of Bevil District.  She was married about 1846 to Antona Padier.  The Padier [French, pronounced "Pod-e-yea"] family was associated with the Goins family in later years.  In the 1850 census they were living in the household of her brother, Henry Goins.

 

    "Padia,    Antona        50, born in Louisiana, farmer

               Evaline        20, born in Texas"

 

Evelyn Goins Padier gave an affidavit August 1, 1896 to be introduced into the evidence presented in a case tried October 1, 1898 in Federal Court in Indian Territory. The case was described as Case No. 17,173:“Choctaw Nation vs. Robert L. Goins” dated October 31, 1898,

 

“State of Texas       }

County of Atascosa }

 

I, Evelyn Padillo, of the county and state aforesaid, being sworn, say: That my name is Eveline Paddillo; I am seventy-one years old; my occupation is farming.  I know Jerry Goins; he is 86 years old; I am a sister to Jerry Goins; I live in Atas-cosa County, Texas;  Jerry Goins greatgrandfather's name was Philip Goins; his grandmother's name was an Indian name, Oti; I am not certain the name is spelled right; I cannot spell, and the man writing this affidavit does not know how to spell Indian names; the Indian blood came from the mother; she was an Indian squaw; they were Choctaw Indian, and of course have Choctaw Indian blood in them; Jerry Goins is my brother.  And we both of course have same grandfather and grandmother; my father was an only child; my mother died shortly after he was born; my grandfather had Choctaw blood in him, but what amount I do not know; my grandmother was a full blood Choctaw Indian.  Jerry Goins' father's name was Jeremiah Goins; his mother's name was Sharofina Goins; his father was about three-fourths Choctaw Indian; his mother was a full blooded Choctaw and his father was about half breed Choctaw Indian. Jerry Goins had the following brothers and sisters:  Henry Goins, now dead, but left a large family; Ransom Goins, lives in the Indian Nation, near the Arkansas line; Eveline Padillo, lives in Atascosa County, Texas; Caro-line Morris, dead, but left a large family; Robert Goins, lives in Coleman County, Texas; James Goins, lives in Bexar County, Texas, Rayborn Goins, lives in Atascosa County, Texas; Adaline Mulkey, lives in Cherokee Nation, she married a Cherokee Indian by the name of Louis Mulkey; Ruben Goins, lives in Chickasaw nation, Emily Perez, lives in Bexar County, Texas; Mary Southward, lives in the Chickasaw Na-tion; she married W.C. Southward.

 

David Reynolds is a good witness; he knew my father in his early days; his post office address is Pleasanton, Atascosa County, Texas.

 

Jerry Goins mother was a descendant of Pocahontas; her father's name was John Drake; she was half Indian and half French; her father was Indian and her mother French.  I do not know Jerry Goin's great father or mother's name; I was told by my father that they were Indians; my recollection is that my father told me that his great father was named Stephen Goins.

 

Eveline [X] Padillo.

 

The State of Texas Atascosa County:  This day personally ap-peared before me, being sworn, Evaline Paddillo, to me well known and having the above and foregoing affidavit read over to her, signed the name and declared under oath that the above and foregoing affidavit is correct.  So help her God; witness my hand and seal of office in Pleasanton, August 1, 1896.

 

W. H. Smith, Notary Public

Atascosa County, Texas [Seal]

My commission expires June 1, 1897”

==========

Also, the Robert Goins, son of Jeremiah & Sharofina you referred to in your

letter to Dennis Hursman April 24 was married to Elizabeth Williams and they

had no issue.

=======

Later she was remarried, husband's name Peres. Evaline Goins Padier Peres signed a bill of sale to her brother, Robert Goins September 29, 1883.  She and her Padier children were mentioned as Choctaws in court records dated June 23, 1897

 

Children born to Antona Padier and Evaline Goins Padier in­clude:

 

    Reuben Padier                born about 1852

    Tasso Padier                      born about 1854

    John Padier                     born about 1856

    Evaline Padier                 born about 1859

    Martha Padier                     born about 1862

    James Padier                      born about 1864

    Amanda Padier                   born about 1867

 

Seaborn "Cebe" Goins, son of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins, was born in Louisiana in 1828.  His parents, who had Choctaw blood, had left Choctaw Nation when the white settlers of Mississippi began to pressure Pres. Andrew Jackson to remove the tribe to Indian Territory.  Mexico placed no such stigma upon the Choctaws and welcomed them to Tejas y Coahuila with the promise of free land.

 

Jeremiah Goins made the short move from Calcasieu Parish across the Sabine River to freedom in Texas just as the colonists there began to yearn for a separate nation.  He joined in the struggle and served as an interpreter for Gen. Sam Houston and assisted to keep the other Indians in Texas friendly to the Revolutionary cause.

 

"Sybrant Goins" appeared as a seven-year-old in the 1835 Mexican census of Bevil District.  "Sebern Goins" reappeared at age 22 in the 1850 census of Limestone County, living in his parents' home.  He received a land grant of 160 acres in Atas­cosa County from the State of Texas shortly afterward.

 

Later he acquired land in McCullough County, Texas which was organized in 1856 from Bexar County.  His land was lo­cated on the frontier which was still disputed by the Coman-ches.  While on an expedition to the west side of the county to capture wild horses, he received a arrow in his heart and died instantly.

 

A. B. Reagan of McCullough County wrote an account of his death which was published in 1936 in "Handbook of McCul­loch County, Texas."  His narrative follows:

 

Cebe Goins Killed by Indians

At Salt Gap, Texas in 1861

 

By A. B. Reagan

Brady, Texas, July 15, 1936

 

Cebe Goins was the first white man killed by Indians in what is now McCulloch County.  This happened in May 1861 while camped in Salt Gap, and his body was buried on the spot where he was killed.  

 

During the spring of 1861, Cebe Goins who ranched on Richland Creek, some five miles west of the present town of Richland Springs went with neighbors, Nabors and Hysaw, to the prairies lying immediately north of the Brady Mountains for the purpose of catching wild horses.  It seems they were very desirous of catching two beautiful stallions which had been spotted and were known to range in that vicinity.  The trip was made more for the sport of catching these two horses than for the necessity of owning them.

 

The hunt for the horses was made on a misty, rainy day.  Visibility was bad that day, and the men failed to find the horses.  They rode back into Salt Gap and camped for the night under a forked liveoak tree which stood near the little creek which wormed its way northward between the two mountains.

 

Near the camp was a bunch of smaller trees, 40 or 50 yards away where the men tied their horses for the night.  Near the camp was a little spring coming from under a rock which afforded water for camping purposes.  After supper, they spread their blankets on the wet ground under the liveoak tree, and all lay down to sleep for the night on one pallet, all three sleeping in the same bed.  Being tired, they soon dropped off to sleep without the slightest knowledge that they had been watched from the mountain peaks above them by a ruthless savage foe who sought only such an opportunity to murder them while they slept.

 

During the night, a band of Indians had stealthily crept into camp, untied their saddle horses and led them out into the dark­ness.  After this was done, the Indians then crept up the little branch to a point within 40 feet of the camp where the men slept in the quietude and shot a volley of arrows into the sleeping forms.  Cebe Goins happened to be sleeping on the side nearer the attackers, lying on his back with his arm thrown over his head.  An arrow was shot through his body, under his arm.  The man sleeping next to Cebe was sorely wounded, but not fatally, and the third man was not hurt.  He immediately jumped behind the liveoak tree and attempted to return the fire with his pistol, but the gun misfired.

 

He helped his wounded companion flee into the darkness which was their only shield.  They immediately began their return to the home of Cebe Goins where they made their report after three days on foot.

 

There was at that time in San Saba County a company of 25 men under the command of Capt. W. R. Woods known as "Minute Men."  They were men who were obligated to rush at a minute's notice to rendezvous in case of an Indian attack. A portion of this company had their meeting place at Richland Springs.  When it was reported that Cebe Goins had been killed, 10 of these rangers were immediately into the saddle. 

 

The distance to be traveled was about 50 miles, through the wilderness and without a road to travel.  The men approached the Gap from the north side of the mountain where they turned south into the Gap.  In the company was Cal Montgomery and 19-year-old Warren Hudson. 

 

"When we rode in, the sun was reflecting off a bright object about a half mile away," recalled Montgomery, "and we rode straight to it."  "It was a tin cup sitting on a rock just above the little spring.  There we found the camp and the body of Cebe Goins lying on the pallet with an arrow shot through his body, pinning the blanket to his side.  The body was so badly decomposed that it could not be moved, and we dug a shallow grave beside the body.  We rolled the blanket around the body and placed it in the grave."

 

Forty-eight years later, in 1909, Cal Montgomery made an appeal to the citizens of McCulloch County to place a marker over the grave of Cebe Goins.  Several search parties went to the location, but the landmarks could not be located after a half century.  Even Warren Hudson, a member of the burial party, went along on one search with Jack and John Beasley, Newt Craig and A. B. Reagan, but it, too was unsuccessful. Hudson, at that time old and nearly blind, gave a minute description of the site, but the search ended in failure. He recalled that he cut an arrowhead out of the forked liveoak tree where one of the men took refuge behind when his pistol failed to fire.  The arrowhead had been driven into the tree so deep that Hudson had to dig into it the full length of his pocket knife blade before he could extract the arrowhead.

 

Mrs. Kate Gammel of Chickasha Nation, wrote August 18, 1896, "Seaborn Goins was killed at Concho Gap, now called Gow Gap, in the state of Texas."

 

Rayborn A[lbert?] "Ike" Goins, son of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins, was born about 1836.  He was married January 6, 1863 in Atascosa County to a cousin, Caroline Goins by J. S. Ridgway, Justice of the Peace.  James McDonald and William Nevils, a brother-in-law were witnesses.  Caroline Goins is regarded as a daughter of Michael Leroy Goins and wife Hardina Taylor Goins.  Their marriage license was issued to "Raburn Goins and Carline Goins."

 

Raburn A. Goins had settled in Atascosa County before 1863, but was not enumerated in the 1860 census

 

They were enumerated in the 1870 census of Atascosa County, page 204.

 

    "Goins,    Rayborn  30, born in Texas, Stock Raiser,

                              Indian

               Caroline   20, born in Texas

               Thomas    6, born in Texas

               William      4, born in Texas

               Collin    1, born in Texas"

 

In the 1870 census Ransom Goins, Jeremiah Goins, Robert G. Goins and James Goins were also recorded  as "Indian."  The only Goins that did not list "Indian" as race on that census were Sarah Goins, widow of Henry Goins and Hardina Goins, wife of Michael Leroy Goins, according to the research of Joe Lorenz, family researcher of San Antonio, Texas. 

 

Rayburn A. Goins received a patent for 160 acres November 13, 1874 in Atascosa County.  The patent was signed by Gov. Richard Cook.  This was not, however his homestead, accord­ing to Joe Lorenz.

 

He was enumerated in the 1880 census of Atascosa County, Enumeration District 3, page 12, Precinct 1:

 

    "Goins,    Rabian A.        45, born in Texas, farmer, white

               Caroline       35, born in Texas

               Thomas L.   17, born in Texas

               William        15, born in Texas

               Collin          13, born in Texas

               Eli               11, born in Texas

               Raborn          5, born in Texas

               Campbell       3. born in Texas

               Martha       1, born in Texas"

 

Rayborn A. “Ike” Goins was a resident of Atascosa County in 1896, according to an affidavit made by his sister, Emeline Goins Padier.

 

Court records dated June 23, 1897 identify him as a Choctaw, along with his children:

 

    "Thomas L. Goins                  born about 1862

    William Goins                     born about 1865

    Collin Goins                           born about 1867

    Eli Goins                            born about 1869

    Rayborn Goins                       born about 1875

    Campbell Goins                     born about 1877

    Martha Margaret "Maude" Goins born about 1879

    Cordelia Goins                       born January 1, 1887

 

Rayborn A. "Ike" Goins died February 5, 1906 in Atascosa County and was buried in Bonita Cemetery in Pleasanton. In 1954, it was renamed San Ysidro Cemetery.  It is the oldest cemetery in the Pleasanton area.

 

His will was filed for probate February 12, 1906. Included in his estate accounting were debts including a note for $50.00 payable to Caroline Goins, regarded as his wife, and a note for $116.00 payable to Frank Goins due October 15, 1906. His re­ceivables included an indebtedness from H. F. Smith in the amount of $123.00.

 

Real estate listed in his estate included the following

 

    315 Acres, J. Poitevent grant       $  1,880.00

    640 Acres, G. Fuqua grant          1,920.00

    160 Acres, R. A. Goins grant      800.00

    190 Acres, C.E.P. Irg. Co.         570.00

    492 Acres, G. Fuqua grant          1,476.00

 

His livestock was itemized as eight head of cattle, $96; two horses, $100 and sic hogs, $18.

 

Children mentioned in his will include; T. L. Goins [Thomas Leroy], William Goins, Collin Goins, Raburn Goins Campbell Goins, Missouri Eli Simms Goins, Maud May Goins and Dink Goins.

 

Three of the land holdings listed on his will are in the area of the current Imogene Oil Field, about four miles southeast of Jourdanton, Texas, and the two others one mile southeast Jour­danton.  None were adjoining.  It is noted in his will, that he left his "homestead upon which I now reside consisting of 315 acres" to his two daughters, Maude Mary Goins and Dink Goins.  This section of his land was the closest of his 5 proper­ties to the city of Jourdanton.

 

Caroline Goins Goins died February 20, 1908 in Jourdanton and was buried beside her husband.  Other family members buried there include Caroline Goins Morris, wife of Spencer Morris who died May 6, 1889; Delany Pullin Askins Goins, Mollie Goins, mother-in-law of Joe Collins Goin; wife of Raborn Goins, Jr. and Maude Mary Goins, daughter of Rayborn A. "Ike" Goins.

 

Children born to Rayborn A. "Ike" Goins and Caroline Goins Goins include:

 

    Thomas Leroy Goins              born about 1862

    William Goins                 born about 1864

    Collin Goins                       born August 31, 1865

    Missouri Eli Simms Goins       born in May 1875

    Rayborn A[lbert?] Goins, Jr.       born about 1876

    Campbell Goins                  born about 1877

    Mary Margaret Goins          born about 1879

    Cordelia "Dink" Goins        born January 1, 1887

 

Thomas Leroy Goins, son of Rayborn A. "Ike" Goins and Car­oline Goins Goins, was born in Atascosa County in February 1863. He appeared as a 17-year-old in the 1880 census of Atas­cosa County.  He was married to Yrena Sendejo November 5, 1907 in Atascosa County.

 

Thomas Leroy Goins appeared in the 1900 Atascosa County census as the head of a household adjoining that of James Padier. His brother Eli Goins appeared as a boarder.  Thomas Leroy Goins died March 24, 1937 in Atascosa County, accord­ing to BVS File 12774.

 

Children born to Thomas L. Goins and Yrena Sendejo Goins include:

 

    Leroy Goins        born about 1907

    Leona Goins       born about 1908

    Hardina Goins born about 1909

    Rosie Goins    born about 1910

    Maggie Goins      born about 1914

    Aline Goins     born about 1917

    Ike Goins        born February 12, 1919

 

William Goins, son of Rayborn A. "Ike" Goins and Caroline Goins Goins, was born about 1865 in Atascosa County.  He ap­peared in the 1870 census of his father's household as a four-year-old.  He reappeared in 1880 as a 15-year-old.  "Will Goins" died June 19, 1918  in Atascosa County, according to BVS File 23231.

 

Collin Goins, son of Rayborn A. "Ike" Goins and Caroline Goins Goins, was born August 31, 1865 in Atascosa County. He was reported as a 13-year-old in the 1880 census of his fa­ther's household.  He was married there to Mrs. Mary Elizabeth "Mollie" Askins Fitch August 31, 1912 in Atascosa County.  She was a widow with four daughters. 

 

Collin Goins died August 13, 1944 in Atascosa County and was buried in San Ysidro Cemetery in Pleasanton between his par­ents.

 

Mary Elizabeth Pullin Askins Goins died in Bexar County Au­gust 1, 1950.  She, a widow lived on Route 7, Jourdanton, Texas, according to Bexar County Death Book 15, page 508.  She was a daughter of William Askins and DeLaney Pullins Askins.  She was born August 22, 1871.  She died at age 78 years, 11 months, 9 days and was buried in Jourdanton Cemetery.  Prior to her death she was declared a lunatic by Bexar County Probate Court, according to Probate File 62459.

 

Children reared by Collin Goins and Mary Elizabeth "Mollie" Askins Fitch Goins include:

 

    Nora Fitch              born in 1906

    Sally Fitch           born about 1908

    Leila Fitch           born about 1909

    Willie Fitch          born in 1910

    Joe Collin Goins      born October 4, 1913

 

Joe Collin Goins, son of Collin Goins and Mary Elizabeth "Molly" Askins Fitch Goins, was born October 4, 1913 in Atascosa County, according to BVS File 32430.. He was mar­ried there to Dorothy Pearl Vance August 10, 1936.  Joe Collin Goins died August 13, 1944 in Atascosa County, according to BVS File 36315 and was buried in Jourdanton Cemetery in the Goins plot.

 

Children born to Joe Collin Goins and Dorothy Pearl Vance Goins include:

 

    Virginia Ann Goins      born about 1938

    Alice Faye Goins        born February 4, 1939

    Robert Lee Goins           born about 1940

    Claude Wayne Goins      born about 1942

    Joe Collin Goins, Jr.        born January 8, 1943

    Albert Rayburn Goins born about 1946

    Floyd Goins               born April 14, 1949

    Marie Lou Goins         born about 1952

    David Ray Goins        born about 1956

 

Alice Fay Goins, daughter of Joe Collin Goins and Dorothy Pearl Vance Goins, was born February 4, 1939, according to BVS File 10750.

 

Joe Collin Goins, Jr, son of Joe Collin Goins and Dorothy Pearl Vance Goins, was born January 8, 1943, according to BVS File 141.

 

Floyd Goins, son of Joe Collin Goins and Dorothy Pearl Vance Goins, was born April 14, 1949, according to BVS File 44639.

 

Missouri Eli Simms Goins, son of Rayborn A. "Ike" Goins and Caroline Goins Goins, was born in May 1875, according to his 1900 census enumeration.  He was enumerated as an 11-year-old in the 1880 census of Atascosa County.  He was recorded in 1900 as a boarder in the home of his brother, Thomas Leroy Goins.  He removed to McClain County, Oklahoma, perhaps in­fluenced there by his uncle, Ransom Goins.  He died there Au­gust 19, 1903 and was buried in Musgrove Cemetery, according to "McClain County, Oklahoma Death Records, 1882-1984."

 

Rayborn A. Goins, Jr, son of Rayborn A. "Ike" Goins and Car­oline Goins Goins, was born about 1876 in Atascosa County. He was married to Mrs. Delany Pullin Askins, according to Bexar County Marriage Book P, page 598. She was a widow with 14 children, who was born in Mississippi November 22, 1855. 

 

At age 13, she was married to her first husband, Charles M. Askins who was born about 1845 in Shelby County, Texas.  He had enlisted in March 1862 in Company E, 32nd Texas Cavalry [Wood's] Regiment and served until the conclusion of the Civil War, being discharged in June 1865.  They were married May 13, 1868 in Karnes County, Texas.  Her father, Levin S. Pullin signed as a witness.

 

In 1898 they were living in Lampasas County, Texas where he was a farmer. 

 

"Delaney Goins" died February 8, 1934 at age 78, according to BVS File 5444 and was buried in an unmarked grave in the Goins family plot in the Jourdanton Cemetery. 

 

"Rabern Goins" gave a warranty deed to Herman G. Molina July 10, 1947, according to Bexar County Deed Book 2402, page 515.

 

On October 25, 1955 Rayborn A. Goins, Jr. lived in McMullen County and received his mail on Route 5, San Antonio.  At that time he and Walter Byrne of McMullen County signed affi­davits attesting to the birth of Olivia Goins. 

 

On September 27, 1956, "Rayborn Goins, age 82," gave an af­fidavit to the public regarding 95 acres of land in Bexar County, according to Bexar County Deed Book 3927, page 163.  He was a resident of Palo Alto, Texas in Bexar County at that time.

 

"Albert Rayborn Goins" died in Atascosa County July 15, 1959, according to Bureau of Vital Statistics File 36105.

 

Children born to Rayborn A. Goins, Jr. and Laney Pullin Goins in­clude:

 

    Olivia Goins                born September 18, 1898

 

Olivia Goins, daughter of Raborn Goins and Laney Pullin Goins, was born September 18, 1898 in Lampasas County.  Two other children of the couple were living at that time.  "Mrs. Olivia Goins" was married to Elsworth Eliott December 11, 1924, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 34, page 227.

 

Campbell Goins, son of Rayborn A. "Ike" Goins and Caroline Goins Goins, was born about 1877 in Atascosa County.  He ap­peared in the 1880 census as a three-year-old.  He was married to his cousin, Julia Etter Padier July 29, 1908 in Bexar County Texas, according to Bexar County Marriage Book W, page 216.  She was born in 1891 in Texas and was 14 years his junior.  Willie Padier and M. E. Donohoo were witnesses to the wed­ding.

 

In 1913 and 1914 they were living at Kempner, Texas where Campbell Goins was listed as a laborer.  Pendleton Herbert Goins, described in his birth certificate as "an Indian" was born to them there January 3, 1914.  She was shown as the mother of four other children at that time.

 

Campbell Goins later removed to Oklahoma, according to Aline Goins Amador. 

 

Julia Etter Padier Goins was remarried to T. A. Winters March 25, 1922, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 26, page 606. On January 29, Julia Etter Padier Goins Winters signed a receipt for their 1908 marriage license and picked up the docu­ment from the Bexar County Clerk's office.  On May 17, 1952 she, a resident of Somerset, Texas in Bexar County attested to the delayed birth certificate of her son Pendleton Herbert Goins.

 

Two children were born to Campbell Goins and Julia Etter Padier Goins:

 

    Pendleton Herbert Goins         born January 13, 1914

    James Hardie Goins            born January 14, 1915

 

Pendleton Herbert Goins, son of Campbell Goins and Julia Et­ter Padier Goins, was born January 13, 1914 "eight miles south of Kempner" where his father was employed as a laborer, ac­cording to Lampasas County Birth Book 8, page 135.  Four other children of the mother was living at that time.

 

James Hardie Goins, son of Campbell Goins and Julia Etter Padier Goins, was born January 14, 1915 at Burnet, Texas, ac­cording to Burnet County Birth Book 2, page 148.  His birth record described him as an "Indian."

 

Mary Maude Goins, daughter of Rayborn A. "Ike" Goins and Caroline Goins Goins, was born about 1879 in Atascosa County. "Marcha Goins" appeared as a one-year-old in the 1880 census.  She was married July 31, 1909 to Cecil Claude Askins  as his third wife.  He was born April 22, 1890 in Mc­Mullen  County to Delany Pullin Askins Goins.  He died September 25, 1964 in Hamilton County, Texas.

 

Cordelia "Dink" Goins, daughter of Rayborn A. "Ike" Goins and Caroline Goins Goins, was born January 1, 1887 in Atas­cosa County.  She was married there to Amos M. King December 24, 1908.  They were enumerated there in the 1910 census, but removed shortly afterward to Shelby County, Texas.  She died there August 22, 1912 and was buried there in Johnson Cemetery.

 

Children born to Amos M. King and Dink Goins King include:

 

    George Henry King     born about 1910

 

Caroline Goins, daughter of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins, was born in 1830 in Louisiana.  She appeared in the 1835 census of Bevil District as a five-year-old. In the 1850 census of Limestone County she was recorded in her parents' house­hold as a 20-year-old.  She was married August 28, 1851 in Bexar County to Spencer W. Morris as his second wife.  He was born June 2, 1817 in South Carolina.  "Henry Gowens" was a witness to the ceremony performed by Chief Justice John D. McLeodin.

 

"Caroline Goins, one of the heirs of Jeremiah Goins, Sr." signed a bill of sale to her brother Robert Goins September 29, 1883, according to Bexar County Deed Book 34, page 28.  Caroline Goins Morris died in 1889 and was buried in San Ysidro Cemetery in Pleasanton, Texas.  Spencer W. Morris was remarried to July 18, 1894 to Mrs. Ruth E. Dunkin.

 

Children born to Spencer W. Morris and Caroline Goins Mor­ris, according to court records dated June 23, 1897 include:

 

    Jeremiah "Jerry M." Morris             born about 1853

    George Washington Morris            born about 1855

    Spencer W. Morris, Jr.                   born about 1858

    Sarah "Sallie" Morris                      born about 1861

    Kansas Morris                        born about 1864

 

Jeremiah "Jerry M." Morris, son of Spencer W. Morris and Caroline Goins Morris, was born about 1853.  According to court records dated June 23, 1897, children born to him in­clude:

 

    Ebenezer S. Morris                     born about 1876

    Gertrude E. Morris                     born about 1877

    Jesse W. Morris                         born about 1879

    Jesse Coleman Morris                born about 1881

    Augusta B. Morris                      born about 1885

 

George Washington Morris, son of Spencer W. Morris and Caroline Goins Morris, was born about 1855 in San Marcos, Texas.  He was married about 1877 to Annie Elnora Gill. He was remarried about 1897, wife's name Nancy E.

 

George Washington Morris and his children were denied citi­zenship in the Choctaw Nation by the Choctaw and Chickasaw Citizenship Court September 20, 1904 while living at Palmer, Indian Territory, according to "Morris/Goins, An Early Texas Pioneer Family" by Bishop Vladyka Makarios of Houston, Texas.  George Washington Morris died in 1938.

 

Children born to George Washington Morris and Annie Elnora Gill Morris include:

 

    Wilmuth Morris                  born December 10, 1877

    Charles Coleman Morris         born December 3, 1879

    Jessie Mabel Morris            born August 15, 1881

    Thomas Leroy Morris         born April 20, 1883

    Nora Lee Morris                 born September 7, 1884

    Mollie Morris                      born about 1892

 

Children born to George Washington Morris and Nancy Elnora Gill Morris include:

 

    Cora May Morris                born about 1899

    Kansas Viola Morris               born about 1901

    William W. Morris              born in 1903

    L. Mamie Morris                 born in August 1904

 

Wilmuth Morris, son of George Washington Morris and Annie Elnora Gill Morris, was  born December 18, 1877.  He died January 23, 1916. 

 

Charles Coleman Morris, son of George Washington Morris and Annie Elnora Gill Morris, was born December 3, 1879.  He died in February 1880 and was buried at Davis, Oklahoma.

 

Jessie Mabel Morris, daughter of George Washington Morris and Annie Elnora Gill Morris, was born August 15, 1881.  She died later the same year and was buried at Davis.

 

Thomas Leroy Morris, son of George Washington Morris and Annie Elnora Gill Morris, was born April 10, 1883.  He died September 20, 1883 and was buried at Davis.

 

Kansas Morris, daughter of Spencer W. Morris and Caroline Goins Morris, was born about 1864.  She was married about 1882 to her first cousin, Monroe Goins.  Later she was remar­ried to George Hinkle.  Seven children were born to them.

 

Mary Ann Morris, age 68, of Spring, Texas died September 25, 1996 in Houston, Texas and was buried in Champion Forest Cemetery, according to her obituary in the September 26, 1996 edition of the "Houston Chronicle."  The obituary was submitted by Bishop Makarios.

 

Robert L. Goins, son of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins, was born in Louisiana in 1831.  He appeared as a three-year-old in the 1835 census of Bevil District and as a 19-year-old in the 1850 census of his father's household in Limestone County.  He was married about 1854 to Elizabeth Williams, according to the research of Mary Evely Harmon Wallace.  He received a bill of sale for "one mule" September 29, 1883 signed by other heirs of Jeremiah Goins, Sr.  It was signed by Jeremiah Goins, Jr, James Goins, R. A. Goins, Mary South-ward, W. C. Southward, R. G. Goins, Emily Peres, Ignacio Peres, Caroline Morris and Evaline Peres. 

 

In 1896, Robert L. Goins lived in Coleman County, Texas.

Robert L. Goins was the principal litigant in the family's suit against the Choctaw Nation June 23, 1897.  Elizabeth Wil-liams Goins was declared a member of the Choctaw tribe "by intermarriage."

 

No children were born to Robert L. Goins and Elizabeth Williams Goins.

 

James C. Goins, son of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins, was born in Texas in 1834.  He appeared as a one-year-old in the 1835 census of Bevil District and as a 16-year-old in his father's household in the 1850 census of Limestone County.  He was married about 1855, wife's name Harriett Adeline Dykes.  James C. Goins and Harriett Adeline Dykes Goins gave a deed to William R. Priest February 12, 1884 to 160 acres in Survey 14, located on Atascosa Creek, 19 miles southeast of San Antonio for $215, according to Bexar County Deed Book 33, page 150.

 

On June 30, 1886 they received a deed from Talmond H. Hobbs and Nancy Hobbs to 160 acres in Survey 357, located 20 miles southeast of San Antonio on Luna Creek, a tributary of Atascosa Creek, according to Bexar County Deed Book 49, page 525.  At the same time they purchased 100 acres of land from Hobbs located on Gallinas Creek, 12 miles south of Pleasanton, Texas, according to Bexar County Deed Book 48, page 378.  On the same day they deeded both tracts to Jeremiah Goins, [Jr?] for $1,000 according to Bexar County Deed Book 49, page 523.  They received 160 acres under the terms of the will of Jeremiah Goins.

 

In 1896 they lived in Bexar County, according to an affidavit by his sister, Eveline Goins Padier.

 

Children born to James C. Goins and Harriett Adeline Dykes Goins, according to court records dated June 23, 1897, include:

 

    James C. Goins, Jr. born about 1856

    Randolph Goins      born about 1859

    Lizzie Goins        born about 1863

 

Adeline Goins, believed to be a daughter of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins, was born in Texas in 1835.  She appeared in her father's household in the 1850 census of Lime­stone County as a 15-year-old.  She and Louis A. Mulkey, "both of San Saba County, Texas" were married May 21, 1857, according to San Saba County Bond Book D, page A-9.

 

They were enumerated in the 1880 census of Atascosa County, Enumeration District 22, page 16 June 10, 1880:

 

    "Mulky,   Louis       48, born in TX, father born in

                              TX, mother born in TX,

                              farmer, white male

               Adline      42, born in TX, father born in LA

                              mother born in LA,

                              white female

               John    17, born in TX, father born in

                              TX, mother born in TX, white

               Isabella    14, born in TX, father born in

                              TX, mother born in TX, white

               Julia       8, born in TX, father born in

                              TX, mother born in TX, white

               Lula       6, born in TX, father born in

                              TX, mother born in TX, white

               James        3, born in TX, father born in

                              TX, mother born in TX, white

               Edward    11, born in TX, father born in

                              TX, mother born in TX, white"

 

He received a patent in Survey 14 to 160 acres on Atascosa Creek, according to Bexar County deed records.  On February 12, 1884 Louis A. Mulkey and Adeline Goins Mulkey sold this 160 acres located 19 miles southeast of San Antonio to Jeremiah Goins for $140, according to Bexar County Deed Book 33, page 149. This land later contained Oakley Ceme-tery where Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Goins were buried.

 

Louis A. Mulkey and Adeline Goins Mulkey walked to Indian Territory from central Texas in 1887.  They settled 18 miles northeast of Checotah, Indian Territory. In 1896 they lived in Cherokee Nation, according to an affidavit signed by her sister, Eveline Goins Padier.

 

Children born to Louis A. Mulkey and Adeline Goins Mulkey include:

 

    John Mulkey                   born in 1863

    Isabella Mulkey               born in 1866

    Edward Mulkey              born in 1869

    Julia Mulkey                born in 1872

    Lula Mulkey                born in 1874

    James Mulkey             born in 1877

 

Vida Mulkey, a descendant of Louis A. Mulkey and Adeline Goins Mulkey, was born December 5, 1900 at Eufaula.  She was married to William Carr, son of Albert Carr and Susan E. Carr about 1918.

 

Robert Goins, believed to be a step-son of Jeremiah Goins and a child of Charity Goins, was born in Texas in 1836.  He ap­peared as a 14-year-old in the 1850 census of his parents' household.

 

Reuben Calvin Goins, son of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins, was born near Nacogdoches, Texas August 8, 1837.  He appeared in the 1850 census of Limestone County as a 13-year-old.  He enlisted in the summer of 1863 as a cavalryman in Eighth Texas Cavalry Regiment, Company H. 

 

In his Confederate pension application submitted about 1914 he stated [erroneously?] that he was born in Louisiana.  He made reference to Atascosa County which is believed to be his place of residence when he enlisted.  He reenlisted in May 1864 at San Antonio in the Eighth [Hobby's/Benavides] Texas Cavalry Regiment.

 

"I was on sick list at Brownsville, Texas at the time of the sur­render," he wrote in his pension application. Official military records show that Company E, his unit at the end of the war, was surrendered at New Orleans and paroled. 

 

He was married about 1866 to Matilda Pope, according to George Virgil Goins.  It is believed that she died about 1870.  In 1871 he removed to Purcell, Oklahoma in McClain County.  He was married June 12, 1877 to Susan "Sookie" Thomas, a Chickasaw who was born in 1857, according to George Virgil Goins.

 

In 1896 Reuben Calvin Goins lived in Chickasaw Nation.  Susan “Sookie” Thomas Goins She died February 14, 1913 in Grady County, Oklahoma and was buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery at Alex, Oklahoma. Eight of her children were buried there.

 

On July 2, 1915 Reuben Calvin Goins was living at Chickasha, Oklahoma.  In his Confederate pension application that year he stated that he had come to Indian Territory in 1874 and had lived in Oklahoma for 41 years.  "Ruben Goins of Purcell, Ok­lahoma" began to draw a pension from the State of Oklahoma March 31, 1920.  His pension, No. 334, continued until January 2, 1925 and was sent to various places of residence--Ardmore, Elmore City, Fairfax, Eola and Chickasha, Oklahoma.

 

Reuben Calvin Goins entered the Confederate Veterans Home at Ardmore September 18, 1928, left briefly and returned there December 26, 1928.  His wife, "Ella Goins" showed her address as Stockyards Station, Oklahoma City at that time.  He died at the Confederate Veterans Home July 17, 1930. 

 

Children born to Reuben Calvin Goins and Matilda Pope Goins include:

 

    Mary Goins                            born about 1868

    Cordelia Goins                           born about 1870

 

Children born to Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins include:

 

    Thomas Henry Goins             born July 4, 1876

    Lula Mae Goins                  born in July 1879

    Charles Calvin "Cal" Goins     born June 21, 1882

    Reuben O. Goins                born December 16, 1883

    Malinda Alzina Goins          born December 19, 1885

    Vaney Dixon "Dick" Goins     born in January 1887

    Caroline Goins                born August 16, 1888

    Ludie Napoleon Goins        born October 30, 1890

    Walter Goins                      born March 15, 1891

    Andrew Goins                born December 16, 1893

    [son]                            born December 12, 1894

    Susie Alice Goins               born June 4, 1896

    [son]                            born September 12, 1898

 

Mary Goins, daughter of Reuben Calvin Goins and Matilda Pope Goins, was born about 1868.  Of this individual nothing more is known.

 

Cordelia Goins, daughter of Reuben Calvin Goins and Matilda Pope Goins, was born about 1870.  Of this individual nothing more is known.

 

Thomas Henry Goins, son of Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins, was born July 4, 1876, according to George Virgil Goins.  He died October 8, 1889 and was buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery.

 

Lula Mae Goins, daughter of Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins, was born in July 1879.  She was mar­ried about 1896 to Newt Casey. Eight children were born to them, and three died in infancy, according to George Virgil Goins:

 

    Andrew Casey            born March 1, 1896

                                      died August 7, 1896

    Charley G. Casey               born June 6, 1897

                                      died August 7, 1900

    Effie Mae Casey             born December 22, 1899

                                      died July 19, 1990

 

The three children above were buried in Loflin Creek Ceme­tery.

 

Charles Calvin "Cal" Goins, son of Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins, was born June 21, 1882.  He was married about 1902 to Sarah Weynona Goins, a cousin, daughter of William Lewis "Bud" Goins and Margaret Eliza­beth "Lizzie" Allison Goins.

 

Four children were born to them before they were divorced.  Sarah Wynonona Goins Goins was remarried to Robert Gray Upon her death, she was buried at Pawnee, Oklahoma. Charles Calvin "Cal" Goins was married second to Maggie Lee Walker who was born in 1880.  One daughter was born to them before they were divorced.  He was then married for the third time to Letha Viola Green.  When he died he was buried in Washington Cemetery, Washington, Oklahoma.  Names of children born to Charles Calvin "Cal" Goins, Sarah Wynona Goins Goins, Maggie Lee Walker Goins and Letha Viola Green Goins are unknown.

 

Reuben O. Goins, son of Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins, was born December 16, 1883.  He died December 30, 1883 and was buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery.

 

Malinda Alzina Goins, daughter of Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins, was born December 19, 1885 She was married September 23, 1902 at Purcell, Oklahoma to John True.  Ten children were born to them.

 

Vaney Dixon "Dick" Goins, son of Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins, was born in January 1887.  He was married about 1910, wife's name Ella.  He died June 28, 1931 in an automobile accident in Henderson, Texas and was buried in the Canton, Texas Cemetery, according to a letter written October 2, 1991 by Mary Harmon Wallace.  Children born to Vaney Dixon "Dick" Goins and Ella Goins are un­known.

 

Caroline Goins, daughter of Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins, was born August 16, 1888.  She died November 6, 1888 and was buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery.

 

Ludie Napoleon Goins, son of Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins, was born October 30, 1890.  He was married about 1913 to Eva Scoggins. Three children were born to Ludie Napoleon Goins and Eva Scoggins Goins.

 

Walter Goins, son of Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins, was born March 15, 1891.  He died November 15, 1891 and was buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery.

 

Andrew Goins, son of Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins, was born December 16, 1893.  He died December 20, 1894 and was buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery.

 

A son was born to Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins December 12, 1894.  He died eight days later and was buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery.

 

Susie Alice Goins, daughter of Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins, was born June 4, 1896. She was married about 1914 to George Washington Wallace.  She died January 14, 1979 and was buried in Hillside Cemetery at Purcell.

 

Children born to them include:

 

    Lula Mabel Wallace                born May 27, 1914

    Robert Wallace                      born about 1915

    Ella Wallace                        born about 1916

    Clarence L. Wallace                born about 1917

    Velda Wallace                    born about 1918

    Ludy Vanie Wallace                born April 22, 1921

    Velda Wallace                    born about 1924

    Shirley Wallace                       born about 1926

 

Lula Mabel Wallace, daughter of George Washington Wallace and Susie Alice Goins Wallace, was born May 27, 1914 at Purcell, Oklahoma.  She was married in Norman, Oklahoma in 1941 to Wayne Thomas Wilkerson, according to Mary Evelyn Harman Wallace.  He died September 26, 1990, and she died at her home in Oklahoma City February 10, 1993, according to her obituary in the "Healdton Herald."  She was buried in Hillside Cemetery in Purcell.

 

Children born to them include:

 

    Henry Tracy Wilkerson                  born about 1944

    Jerry Wayne Wilkerson                  born about 1947

 

Robert Wallace, son of George Washington Wallace and Susie Alice Goins Wallace, was born about 1915.  He was married about 1940, wife's name Rose.  In 1993 they lived in Desert Hot Springs, California.

 

Ella Wallace, daughter of George Washington Wallace and Susie Alice Goins Wallace, was born about 1916.  She was married about 1942 to Carl Hall.  In 1993 they lived in Okla­homa City.

 

Clarence L. Wallace, son of George Washington Wallace and Susie Alice Goins Wallace, was born about 1917.  He was married about 1941, wife's name Chiquita.  In 1993 they lived at Moore, Oklahoma.

h

Velda Wallace, daughter of George Washington Wallace and Susie Alice Goins Wallace, was born about 1918.  She was married about 1940 to Don Graham.  In 1993 they lived at Broken Bow, Oklahoma.

 

Ludy Vanie Wallace, son of George Washington Wallace and Susie Alice Goins Wallace, was born April 22, 1921.  He was married January 11, 1947 to Mary Evelyn Harmon. In 1994 they lived in Ratliff City, Oklahoma where Mary Evelyn Har­mon Wallace, a member of Gowen Research Foundation. was active in researching the Goins family history.

 

Shirley Wallace, daughter of George Washington Wallace and Susie Alice Goins Wallace, was born about 1926.  She was married about 1947, husband's name Duncan.

 

A son was born to Reuben Calvin Goins and Susan "Sookie" Thomas Goins September 12, 1898.  He died the following day and was buried in Loflin Creek Cemetery.

 

Emily Goins, daughter of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins, was born in Texas in 1841.  She appeared as a nine-year-old in the 1850 census of Limestone County.  She was married August 9, 1860 to "William G. Nevills," according to Atascosa County marriage records transcribed by Margaret Frances Goynes Olson.  She was remarried about 1865 to Ignatio Peres.  She received a deed to 11 acres in Atascosa County "on the Atascosa Creek, northeast of Pleasanton, Texas" from the other heirs of the estate of Jeremiah Goins, according to Bexar County Deed Book 34, page 28.  Those who conveyed their interest in the land included "Jeremiah Goins, Jr, James Goins, R. A. Goins, Mary Southward, W. C. Southward, R. G. Goins, Caroline Morris and Evaline Peres."

 

In 1896 Emily Goins Nevils Peres lived in Bexar County.

 

A son was born to William M. Nevils and Emily Goins Nevils, according to court records dated June 23, 1897:

 

    G. W. Nevils           born about 1863

 

Children born to Antonio Peres and Emily Goins Nevils Peres include:

 

    Ike Peres                        born about 1866

    Josephine Peres                  born about 1869

    Mary Peres                     born about 1871

    Anna Peres                     born about 1874

    Alzona Peres                      born about 1877

    Caroline Peres                born about 1881

 

Ike Peres, son of Antonio Peres and Emily Goins Nevils Peres, was born about 1866.  Children born to him, according to court records dated June 23, 1897 include:

 

    Joe Peres                        born about 1890

    Ignatia Peres, Jr.                 born about 1892

 

Josephine Peres, daughter of Antonio Peres and Emily Goins Nevils Peres, was born about 1869.  She was married about 1886, husband's name Marjories.

 

Children born to Josephine Peres Marjories, according to court records dated June 23, 1897 include:

 

    Ignathia Marjories               born about 1888

    Susie Marjories                   born about 1889

    Reams Marjories                 born about 1892

 

Mary Peres, daughter of Antonio Peres and Emily Goins Nevils Peres, was born about 1871.  She was married about 1888, hus­band's name Dias. 

 

Children born to Mary Peres Dias, according to court records dated June 23, 1897 include:

 

    Eugene Dias        born about 1892

    Albert Dias              born about 1895

 

Anna Peres, daughter of Antonio Peres and Emily Goins Nevils Peres, was born about 1874.  She was married about 1891, hus­band's name Andrade.

 

Children born to Anna Peres Andrade, according to court records dated June 23, 1897 include:

 

    Clara Andrade                    born about 1894

    Christoval Andrade                 born about 1896

 

Jeremiah Goins, Jr, a son of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafina Drake Goins, was born in 1845, probably in Limestone County, Texas.  He appeared as a five-year-old in the 1850 census.  He was married September 4, 1874 to Alice Smith, according to Atascosa County marriage records.  On June 30, 1886 Jeremiah Goins, Jr. and Alice Smith Goins gave a deed to B. F. Shields to 160 acres in Bexar County for $800, ac-cording to Bexar County Deed Book 48, page 380.

 

On September 9, 1883 Jeremiah Goins, Jr. joined his siblings in giving a bill of sale to a mule to Robert L. Goins, according to Bexar County Deed Book 34, page 28.  At the same time he joined the other heirs in giving a deed to 11 acres to Evaline Goins Peres.  At the same time he joined Evaline Goins Peres, possibly the former Evaline Goins Padier who appeared in the 1850 census in the household of Henry Goins in Limestone county, in giving a quit claim deed to the heirs of Jeremiah Goins, according to Bexar County Deed Book 34, page 28. 

 

Children born to Jeremiah Goins, Jr. and Alice Smith Goins, according to court records dated June 23, 1897 include:

 

    Monroe Goins                born about 1872

    William Goins                 born about 1875

    Frank Goins                   born about 1878

    Leonard Goins                born about 1881

 

Monroe Goins, son of Jeremiah Goins, Jr. and Alice Smith Goins, was born about 1872.  He was married about 1895 to his cousin, Kansas Morris.  They were divorced.  In 1943 he was living at 619 S. Lee, Oklahoma City.

 

Mary Elizabeth Goins, daughter of Jeremiah Goins and Sarafine Drake Goins, was born in 1848, probably in Limestone County, Texas. She appeared in the 1850 census there as a two-year-old.  She was married September 18, 1867 to "W. C. Southwood," according to Atascosa County marriage records transcribed by Margaret Frances Goynes Olson. Witnesses were Spencer Morris and John Padier.

 

In 1879 they lived in Bandera County, Texas. They joined her siblings September 29, 1883 in deeding her interest in inher-ited property to Robert L. Goins, according to Bexar County Deed Book 34, page 28.  In 1896 they lived in Chickasaw Nation, according to an affidavit signed by her sister, Emeline Goins Padier.

 

She died in 1940.  Both she and her husband were buried in Dibble, Oklahoma, according to George Virgil Goins.

 

Children born to them, according to court records dated June 23, 1897 include:

 

    William M. "Buddy" Southward  born October 25, 1869

    Mary Elizabeth Southward          born August 27, 1879

    John F. Southward                 born March 3, 1881

    James Marion Southward            born in August 1884

    Jessie Myrtle Southward             born in March 1889

    Maggie May Southward              born in March 1891

 

William M. "Buddy" Southward, son of W. C. Southward and Mary Elizabeth Goins Southward, was born October 25, 1869. He was married about 1887 to Mahala Jones who was born August 31, 1871. 

 

Mary Elizabeth Southward, daughter of W. C. Southward and Mary Elizabeth Goins Southward, was born August 27, 1879 in Bandera, Texas.  She was married December 25, 1900 to Wes W. Ramsey.  She died August 1, 1970.

 

John F. Southward, son of W. C. Southward and Mary Eliza­beth Goins Southward, was born March 3, 1881.  He was mar­ried about 1904 to Della Mae Black who was born March 15, 1883.  He died July 26, 1953.

 

James Marion Southward, son W. C. Southward and Mary Eliz­abeth Goins Southward, was born in August 1884.

 

Jessie Myrtle Southward, daughter W. C. Southward and Mary Elizabeth Goins Southward, was born in March 1889.

 

Maggie Mae Southward, daughter W. C. Southward and Mary Elizabeth Goins Southward, was born in March 1891.  She was married about 1907 to Dan C. Roath who was born in 1874.  She died in 1967.  Both are buried at Dibble, Oklahoma.

 

Mrs. Josephine Goins Taylor Priest was identified as a grand­daughter of Jeremiah Goins in court records dated December 1, 1896.

 

"Josephine Goins, colored" was married to Josiah Taylor De­cember 29, 1881, according to Bexar County Marriage Book G, page 378. A great-grandaughter, Pamela H. Dillard of College Station, Texas wrote August 11, 1989 that "Josephine Goins Taylor later lived in Taylor County, Texas.  She was remarried, husband's name Priest.  They removed to White Deer, Texas."

 

Children born to Josiah Taylor and Josephine Goins Taylor in­clude:

 

    Adella Taylor                      born about 1883

    Pearline Taylor                born about 1885

    Anzo Taylor                       born about 1887

    William Martin Taylor         born about 1890

    Josephine Taylor                born about 1892

    Clara Taylor                   born about 1894

==O==

Elizabeth Goings was enumerated in 1880 in Atascosa County, Enumeration District 5, page 12, Precinct 3 as the head of a household:

 

    "Goings,  Elizabeth         19, born in Texas

               Rannel               2, born in Texas"

==O==

Albert Goins was born in Atascosa County August 11, 1944, according to BVS File 86937.

==O==

Amanda Goins was born in Atascosa County July, 11, 1960, according to BVS File 132180.

                                              ==O==

Anthony Rayborn Goins was born in Atascosa County Novem­ber 21, 1963, according to BVS File 213389.

==O==

Bart Wayne Goins was born in Atascosa County April 11, 1962, according to BVS File 55154.

==O==

Claude Goins was born in Atascosa County October 15, 1941, according to BVS File 94359.

==O==

Claude Wayne Goins died in Atascosa County July 16, 1959, according to BVS File 36099.

==O==

David Ray Goins was born in Atascosa County April 17, 1957, according to BVS File 55884.

==O==

Della Goins was born in Atascosa County May 10, 1957, ac­cording to BVS File 74168.

==O==

Dolores Goins was born in Atascosa County December 4, 1948, according to BVS File 148995.

==O==

Helen Goins was born in Atascosa County December 5, 1946, according to BVS File 156405.

==O==

Jeffery Allan Goins was born June 10, 1965 in Atascosa County, according to BVS File 80761.

                                              ==O==

Joe Albert Goins died in Atascosa County August 7, 1951, ac­cording to BVS File 38959.

==O==

Joe Richard Goins was born in Atascosa County November 7, 1942, according to BVS File 111588.

                                              ==O==

John Henry Goins was born in Pleasanton, Atascosa County in 1867.  He was married September 3, 1886 to Frances Coquella Shaw who was born in 1872 in Atlanta, Georgia, ac­cording to Wilbarger County, Texas Marriage Book 1, page 33. In 1982 John Henry Goins was a rancher in Randall County, Texas.  He operated 640 acres on which he had received a patent from the State of Texas July 16, 1892.  On September 2, 1892 he gave a quit claim deed to the property to John W. Hardy, for $250, according to Randall County Deed Book 4, page 335.

 

It is possible that John Henry Goins and Frances Coquella Shaw Goins removed to Oklahoma after that time.  Dr. James A. Goins, Rt. 2, Blanchard, Oklahoma and Ellen Welliver, who lived in Canadian County, Oklahoma in 1957 are believed to be descendants of John Henry Goins.

 

Children known to have been born to John Henry Goins and Frances Coquella Shaw Goins include:

 

    Dorothy Mae Goins            born September 6, 1892

 

Dorothy Mae Goins, daughter of John Henry Goins and Frances Coquella Shaw Goins, was born September 6, 1892 near Canyon, Texas, according to Randall County Probate Birth Book 3, page 278.  The birth certificate states that she was the tenth child and that eight were still living.  Dr. James A. Goins, Rt. 2, Blanchard, Oklahoma and Ellen Welliver, Canadian County, Oklahoma, attested to the birth certificate.

==O==

Joseph Allan Goins was born in Atascosa County February 16, 1933, according to BVS File 9284.

==O==

Kathryn Goins was born in Atascosa County December 10, 1958, according to BVS File 219588.

==O==

Manuel Lee Goins was born in Atascosa County December 7, 1938, according to BVS File 104515.

==O==

Mary Lou Goins was born in Atascosa County October 21, 1946, according to  BVS File 118434.

==O==

Racheal Goins was born in Atascosa County December 28, 1965, according to BVS File 211525.

==O==

Robert Goins was born in Atascosa County August 28, 1956, according to BVS File 131068.

                                              ==O==

Robbie Lee Goins was born in Atascosa County September 26, 1960, according to BVS File 178218.

==O==

Sara Goins received 66 acres in a land grant from the State of Texas.  The land was located in Atascosa County.

==O==

Seaburn Buchanan Goins was born in Atascosa County April 28, 1896, according to BVS File 627811.  He was married about 1918, wife's name Bessie Irene.

 

On December 16, 1921 Seaburn Buchanan Goins and Bessie Irene Goins gave a deed to J. E. Blythe to a lot in Barnes Addi­tion, Lampasas, Texas, according to Lampasas County Deed Book 32, page 566. On January 3, 1924 they gave a deed to A. J. Chambers to a lot in Barnes Addition.  Consid­eration was $725, according to Lampasas County Deed Book 47, page 403.

 

Bessie Irene Goins and an infant died April 13, 1928 in child­birth in Lampasas County, according to BVS File 17677.

 

Seaburn Buchanan Goins was married to Lovie Gober Bur­well January 28, 1935, according to Lampasas County Mar­riage Book L, page 206. Her previous husband was Halbert Burwell.  Lovie Gober was born in Texas February 19, 1880, the daugh­ter of J. L. Gober and Littie Melvinia Gober, his second wife.  Littie Melvinia Gober died about 1885 and J. L. Gober died at Coleman, Texas October 25, 1922.

 

Seaburn Buchanan Goins received a warranty deed from Mrs. Julia Blythe, a femme sole, May 1, 1940 to a lot in Lam­pasas Springs Addition, Lampasas, according to Lampasas County Deed Book 68, page 120. Consideration was $75.

 

Seaburn Buchanan Goins and Lovie Gober Burwell Goins gave power of attorney to Elijah W. Gober, believed to be her brother, May 6, 1942, according to Coleman County Deed Book 241, page 20.  On September 12, 1942 Lovie Gober Bur­well Goins joined the other heirs of J. L. Gober in giving a deed to J. L. P. Baker to 341.6 acres of land in the Byrum Survey near Santa Anna, Texas, according to Coleman County Deed Book 241, page 285.

 

On March 3, 1944 Seaburn Buchanan Goins and Lovie Gober Burwell Goins gave a warranty deed to Quentin B. Biggs to 160 acres, according to Lampasas County Deed Book 76, page 487.  Seaburn Buchanan Goins gave a war­ranty deed to Sam D. Moore March 28, 1944 to lots in Lam­pasas Springs Addition for $1,700, according to Lampasas County Deed Book 78, page 350.

 

Lovie Gober Burwell Goins died of carcinoma of the ovary October 23, 1944, according to Lampasas County Death Book 5, page 245. At the time of her death she was an em­ployee of Goins Tailor Shop.  She was buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lampasas.

 

On October 25, 1944 Seaburn Buchanan Goins made a trans­fer of property to Mrs. Emma J. Cauthen, according to Lam­pasas County Deed book 78, page 155.  On May 2, 1945 Seaburn B. Goins gave a warranty deed confirmation to R. S. Dunigan et al, according to Lampasas County Deed Book 80, page 282.

 

Seaburn Buchanan Goins, "a single man", gave a warranty deed to Edward Parsons April 3, 1945 for $1,100, according to Lam­pasas County Deed Book 80, pages 31 and 32.  Seaburn Buchanan Goins, "a single man", gave a warranty to Dunigan & Smith June 14, 1945 for $2,500, according to Lampasas County Deed Book 79, page 397.

 

On July 8, 1945 Seaburn Buchanan Goins was married to Mrs. Nora E. Lamb at Lampasas, according to Lampasas County Marriage Book N, page 237.

 

Seaburn Buchanan Goins gave a transfer of property to Mrs. J. J. Byrne August 8, 1945, according to Lampasas County Deed Book 80, page 32 and 33.  Seaburn Buchanan Goins re­ceived a warranty deed from Clifton Lee April 9, 1947, ac­cording to Lampasas County Deed Book 84, page 493.

 

Seaburn Buchanan Goins and Nora E. Lamb Goins gave a war­ranty deed to Clifton Lee April 9, 1947, according to Lampasas County Deed Book 84, page 492.

 

They gave a warranty deed to Pat Malone February 5, 1948 for $9,479, according to Lampasas County Deed Book 86, page 500. In exchange they received a deed from Malone to lots in Llano Improvement & Furnace Addition, Llano, Texas, ac­cording to Llano County Deed Book 77, page 179.

 

Seaburn Buchanan Goins of 805 West Young Street, Llano, Texas died from a cerebral hemorrhage resulting from an auto­mobile accident February 14, 1950, according to Llano County death records.  He, 53, was a hatter by profession.  He was buried in Llano Cemetery.

 

He left a $3,000 estate to Nora E. Lamb Goins, according to Llano County Probate Book 14, pages 332 and 336.  A step-son, Richard R. Shipp, son of Nora E. Lamb Goins, was named alternate executor.

 

Nora E. Lamb Goins received a release from T. J. Moore on the Llano Improvement & Furnace Addition Property Au­gust 3, 1950, according to Llano County Deed Book 79, page 616.  She sold the property to Vance Walton for $4,000 in August 1950, according to Llano County Deed Book 79, page 617.

 

On April 6, 1951 she gave a deed to Bennie Polk to lots in Llano for $2,900, according to Llano County Deed Book 80, page 417.  The transaction was acknowledged in McLennan County, Texas.  She received a release on the property from Mrs. Louise Moore April 11, 1951, according to Llano County Deed Book, page 415.

==O==

Thomas Leroy Goins was born in Atascosa County Septem­ber 10, 1941, according to BVS File 83304.

==O==

Thomas Raymond Goins was born in Atascosa County May 2, 1944, according to BVS File 49014.

==O==

Robert Wayne Goin was born in Bexar County September 12, 1948, according to BVS File 104425.

                                              ==O==

Aaron Goins was married to Elnor Colligan April 11, 1934, ac­cording to Bexar County Marriage Book 57, page 61.  In 1953 Aaron Goings and Elnor Colligan Goins lived at 223 Estrella Street, San Antonio.  They gave a mechanic's lien to Federal Lumber Company August 19, 1955, according to Bexar County Lien Book 434, page 132.

==O==

Albert Goins died in Bexar County June 1, 1917, according to BVS File 15277.

                                              ==O==

Alice Ann Goins was born October 30, 1943 in Bexar County according to BVS File 116506.  She was married to Clarence DeVille, age 23, November 4, 1961, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 136, page 332.

                                              ==O==

Anna Laura Goins was born in Bexar County July 2, 1916, ac­cording to BVS File 26064.

==O==

Audrey Louise Goins who was born in 1904, was married April 24, 1946, to Homer Adrain DeFore, who was born in 1909, ac­cording to Bexar County Marriage Book 95, page 27.  Homer Adrain DeFore lived in Hot Springs, Arkansas.

==O==

Barbara Ruth Goins was born in Bexar County May 9, 1935, according to BVS File 35976.  She was married, at age 16, in 1951 to Walter Talmadge Miller, age 18, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 112, page 439.  J. E. Goins was a wit­ness to the ceremony.

==O==

Betty Goins who was born in 1861, was married to Alick Mc­Graw February 19, 1884, according to Bexar County Mar­riage Book H, page 285.

==O==

Carl Eugene Goins who was born in 1931, was married De­cember 18, 1954 to Doreen Mona Vradenburg who was born in 1934, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 120, page 41.  Carl Eugene Goins and Doreen Mona Vradenburg Goins lived at 545 Lovette Avenue, San Antonio.

==O==

Carol Ann Goins was born in Bexar County January 14, 1936, according to BVS File 396.

==O==

Clara Goins, negro, was married to Charlie Walton July 27, 1921, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 24, page 602.

                                              ==O==

Clara Goins died January 31, 1930 in Bexar County, accord­ing to BVS File 267.

==O==

Clara Gayle Goins was born in Bexar County August 9, 1961, according to BVS File 131838.

                                              ==O==

Clarence Goins died May 27, 1921 in Bexar County, accord­ing to BVS File 12752.

==O==

Charles Goins was married to Dorothy Ann Jackson March 29, 1974, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 228, page 83.  Of Charles Goins and Dorothy Ann Jackson Goins nothing more is known.

==O==

Cynthia Diane Goins was married to Jose Mario Hernandez III February 12, 1972, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 200, page 219.

==O==

Doncella Joan Goins was born in Bexar County June 7, 1955, according to BVS File 89045.

==O==

Dorothy Goins was married to Thomas M. Murphy Decem­ber 9, 1914, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 7, page 212.

==O==

Emma Goins was married to Victor L. Orr November 6, 1918, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 14, page 503.

                                              ==O==

Mrs. Emma Goins was married to Frank Kindla October 10, 1923, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 31, page 59.

==O==

Mrs. Emma Goins was married to Ira Paddy May 22, 1924, ac­cording to Bexar County Marriage Book 32, page 490.

==O==

Emma Goins was married to Willie Dorn September 8, 1925, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 36, page 241.

                                              ==O==

Fannie Goins died in Bexar County July 3, 1931, according to BVS File 31954.

==O==

Fay Goins was married to Simon Lampkins January 3, 1905, according to Bexar County Marriage Book T, page 3.

==O==

Fay Goins was the parent of an infant born in Bexar County March 15, 1919 [18?], according to BVS File 11452.

==O==

Frances Ola Goins was born in Bexar County November 19, 1917 according to BVS File 49913.

==O==

Frank Goins was born in San Antonio December 19, 1881, ac­cording to Otero County, New Mexico Marriage Book 3, page 773. He was married September 10, 1914 to Izetta L. Cham­bers, who was born in Texas November 24, 1895.  He was a resident of Hillsboro, New Mexico and she was a resi­dent of La Luz, New Mexico.  Children born to Frank Goins and Izetta L. Chambers Goins are unknown.

                                              ==O==

Gary Douglas Goins was born in Bexar County October 24, 1963, according to BVS File 172467.

==O==

Guy Michael Goins was born in Bexar County June 14, 1963, according to the BVS File 107766.

==O==

Harold C. Goins and Helen W. Goins received a warranty deed February 14, 1955, according to Bexar County Deed Book 3631, page 119.

==O==

Howard Thomas Goins was born in Bexar County June 2, 1943, according to the BVS File 61561.

==O==

J. E. Goins, plaintiff sued R. H. Goins, defendant, according to Bexar County Judgement Book G, page 358.

                                              ==O==

James Goins was the father of an infant son born in Bexar County March 21, 1915, according to BVS File 9091.

==O==

James Douglas Goins, age 25, and Esther Gertrude Stauffer, age 18, were married July 8, 1957, according to Bexar County Mar­riage Book 125, page 605.  James Douglas Goins and Esther Gertrude Stauffer Goins lived at La Siesta Apart­ments, 3632 Southwest Military Drive, San Antonio.

                                              ==O==

James E. Goins was married to Annie Ruth McGee July 30, 1931, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 51, page 430. James E. Goins and Annie Ruth McGee Goins received a warranty deed from Proctor L. Hook July 26, 1946, according to Bexar County Deed Book 2277, page 230.

==O==

Jane Elizabeth Goins was born in Bexar County January 26, 1964, according to BVS File 798.

==O==

Jessie Lee Goins was born in Bexar County August 15, 1948, according to BVS File 89485.

==O==

Jewel E. Goins was married to Rufus J. Powe February 1, 1915, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 7, page 370.

                                              ==O==

Jewel Goins was married to Ernest Tarin October 16, 1932, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 53, page 612.

==O==

Jim Goins was married to Frances Black September 14, 1894, according to Bexar County Marriage Book M, page 148.  Ran­dolf Goins and Elizabeth Goins were witnesses to the wedding.  Of Jim Goins and Frances Black Goins nothing more is known.

==O==

John H. Goins died in Bexar County January 24, 1931, ac­cording to BVS File 293.

==O==

John H. Goins received a contract from General Investment Corporation December 4, 1941, according to Bexar County Deed Book 1869, page 296.

                                              ==O==

John Henry Goins was born in Bexar County February 24, 1920, according to BVS File 6640.  He was the father of an in­fant born in Bexar County July 8, 1940, according to BVS File 52064.

                                              ==O==

John Paul Goins, age 22, and Helen Marie Stanton, age 18, were married September 22, 1962, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 138, page 673.  They lived at 338 Schley, San Antonio.  Helen Marie Stanton Goins was remar­ried to Howard Eugene Fowler October 18, 1966, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 151, page 222.

==O==

Julia Dianne Goins was born in Bexar County June 10, 1961, according to BVS File 93897.

                                              ==O==

Karen Elizabeth Goins was married to Douglas Courtney Eggleston March 5, 1973, according to Bexar County Mar­riage Book 22, page 454.

==O==

Kenneth Ray Goins was born in Bexar County December 19, 1958, according to BVS File 221684.

==O==

Kermet Goins was born in Bexar County September 29, 1949, according to BVS File 122977.

==O==

Landa Jean Goins was born in Bexar County January 14, 1935, according to BVS File 581.  She was married to Weldon Wayne Gromatsky June 8, 1965, according to Tarrant County, Texas Marriage Book 137, page 17.

==O==

Leroy Goins died April 8, 1946 in Bexar County, according BVS File 16155.

==O==

Lillie Goins, born in 1928 and Burnice Lewis, born in 1927, were married July 12, 1950, according to Bexar County Mar­riage Book 128, page 93.  They lived at 235 Hollenbeck, San Antonio.

==O==

Linda Jean Goins, age 18, was married to Roland Gomez Zap­ata, age 23, 608 North Hamilton, San Antonio, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 115, page 239.

                                              ==O==

Linda Sue Goins was born in Bexar County March 9, 1948, according to BVS File 17763.  She died there October 31, 1959, according to BVS File 53884.

==O==

Lisa Gail Goins was born in Bexar County August 7, 1965, ac­cording to BVS File 116403.

==O==

M. F. [or P.] Goins was married to Louisa Moore in 1915.  They received a deed from Harvard Place May 12, 1926, ac­cording to Bexar County Deed Book 891, page 225. M. F. Goins died in 1924.  Louisa Moore Goins was remarried to Ed Roberts in 1927.  No children were born to M. F. Goins and Louisa Moore Goins.  Louisa Moore Goins Roberts re­ceived proof of heirship from the estate of M. F. Goins Oc­tober 16, 1930, according to Bexar County Deed Book 1209, page 296.

==O==

Madden Goins died in Bexar County January 11, 1926, ac­cording to BVS File 198.

                                              ==O==

Maribell Goins was born in Bexar County August 13, 1948, according to BVS File 88560.

==O==

Martha Goins was married April 11, 1862 to Clemento Elinda, according to Atascosa County marriage records.

==O==

Mary Jane Goins was married to Presciliano Gonzales September 13, 1876, according to Bexar County Marriage Book E, page 317.

==O==

Mary Jane Goins was born in Bexar County May 12, 1938, ac­cording to BVS File 37583.  She was married to John Jacob Stauffer, Jr. who was born in 1934, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 121, page 251.  They lived at 265 Crook, San Antonio, Texas

                                              ==O==

Melda June Goins was born in Bexar County June 25, 1942, according to BVS File 50979.

==O==

Minnie Goins was married to Louis B. Albrecht December 3, 1914, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 7, page 196.

==O==

Minnie Goins was married to James E. Cude June 21, 1926, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 38, page 165.

==O==

Minnie Louise Goins was born in Bexar County March 2, 1936, according to BVS File 18335.

==O==

Paul Goins was married to Clara Arnold August 20, 1917, ac­cording to Bexar County Marriage Book 11, page 617.  Of Clara Arnold Goins nothing more is known. Paul Goins was the father of an infant that died in Bexar County, September 16, 1925, according to BVS File 31546.  Paul Goins, age 44, was married to Frances Orens, age 42, August 7, 1937, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 66, page 300.  Children born to Paul Goins and Frances Orens Goins are unknown.

==O==

Patricia Ann Goins who was born in 1939 was married to Clarence Edward Acord, who was born in 1934, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 122, page 273.  B. R. Goins wit­nessed the ceremony.  The couple lived at 1555 Somerset Road, San Antonio.

==O==

Patricia Eileen Goins was married to James Madison Warner October 1, 1943, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 85, page 522. The bride was 25 and the groom 24.

==O==

Patricia Myce Goins was born in Bexar County January 9, 1933, according to BVS File 534.

                                              ==O==

Patricia Myrle Goins was married to Garland Chester Tennell January 7, 1972, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 198, page 368.

==O==

Ralph Todd Goins was born in Bexar County February 23, 1962, according to BVS File 17942.

==O==

Vernon Denford Goins, believed to be a son of Reuben A. Goins and Caroline Goins, was born about 1881, probably in Atascosa County. "V. D. Goins" of Glendale, Arizona and McCamey, Texas corresponded with the Oklahoma Confeder­ate Pension Board about his father's pension application.  Ver­non Denford Goins died in Harris County, Texas October 4, 1963, according to BVS File 63742.

                                             ==O==

James Goen and James Gipson had a joint Choctaw claim in connection with the tribe being moved from Choctaw Nation in Mississippi to Oklahoma, according to "A Complete Roll of all Choctaw Claimants and their Heirs," pages 27, 451 and 980, edited by Joe R. Goss.  The roll was originally printed in 1889 by Robert D. Patterson Stationery Co, St. Louis.  Betsey Gowin was also a Choctaw claimant, according to the volume, page 392.

==O==

Robert Henry Goins was born in Bexar County, Texas September 6, 1956, according to BVS File 155195.

==O==

Robert Franklin Goins, age 27, San Antonio was married to Barbara Ann Corey, age 24, May 6, 1961, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 135, page 92.  Of Robert Franklin Goins and Barbara Ann Corey Goins nothing more is known.

==O==

Rosa Goins was married to Eugene Mills July 5, 1919, accord­ing to Bexar County Marriage Book 18, page 493.

==O==

Rose Gale Goins was born in Bexar County May 23, 1952, ac­cording to BVS File 64650.  She was married November 18, 1968 to Bernard Frank Schwegmann, III, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 163, page 635.

==O==

Rosie Elizabeth Goins was born in Bexar County September 10, 1877, according to BVS File 648309.

==O==

Rosie May Goins was married to John Love November 1, 1933, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 55, page 592.  The license was mailed to Box 53, Newell, North Car­olina September 9, 1948.

==O==

Rosy Goins was born in Bexar County November 6, 1917, ac­cording to BVS File 49926.

==O==

Ruth Jane Goins was examined for lunacy by the Bexar County Probate Court, according to Bexar County Probate File 71334.

==O==

Sarah Goins was married January 10, 1872 to William Carr, according to Atascosa County marriage records.

==O==

Starley M. Goins was married to William T. Gravel Septem­ber 4, 1920, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 22, page 291. 

==O==

Stephen Wayne Goins was born in Bexar County December 21, 1962, according to BVS File 242096.

==O==

Toi Lynette Goins was born in Bexar County October 17, 1956, according to BVS File 178304.  She was married to Rodney Eugene Lewis October 17, 1974 according to Bexar County Marriage Book 259, page 159.

==O==

Vera Goins, was married to Jessie H. Bryan, age 23, May 20, 1945, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 91, page 102.

==O==

Vinnita Sue Goins was born in Bexar County September 12, 1952, according to BVS File 139295.

                                              ==O==

William Eugene Goins was married to Janet Gail Grunewald July 28, 1967, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 154, page 66. Of William Eugene Goins and Janet Gail Grunewald Goins nothing more is known.

                                              ==O==

William L. Goins, 29 was married to Alma Goins, 27, March 27, 1941, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 75, page 270. William L. Goins and Alma Goins Goins lived at 3108 Broadway, San Antonio.  William L. Goins was remarried to Alma Goins Goins April 16, 1944, according to Bexar County Marriage Book 87, page 422.  At that time they lived at 203 Elmhurst Street in San Antonio. William L. Goins was born in 1912 and Alma Goins Goins was born in 1914.  Apparently the second marriage did not last because Alma Goins received a deed from William L. Goins October 23, 1945, according to Bexar County Deed Book 2163, page 525.

==O==

Willie Goins, Jr. was born in Bexar County May 25, 1921, according to BVS File 27046.

 

 

 

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