CALIFORNIA

 

Alton B. Gowen was born September 15, 1904 in Massachusetts according to California Death index.  He died August 2, 1988 in California.

==O==

Brian Daniel Gowen was born March 7, 1985 in California according to California Death index.  He died May 14, 1986 in California.

==O==

Christopher Gowen was born March 31, 1987 in Alaska according to California Death index.  He died October 6, 1987 in California.

==O==

Sgt. David Gowen, California Seventh Regiment, Volunteer Militia, Union soldier, had his picture taken during the Civil War in a seated, waist-up pose.  He was wearing a distinctive uniform with exaggerated wavy chevrons.

 

His photograph survives today, 133 years after the end of the war, maintained by U.S. Army preservation specialists in a temperature and humidity controlled, acid-free environment.  It is part of a collection of 27,000 photographs of Union Civil War soldiers that have been catalogued and placed online by U.S. Army Military History Institute.  The portraits, some full length and some head-and-shoulders view, generally were taken by professional photographers and show the soldiers in their uniforms with military insignia and accoutrement.

==O==

Dora Mae Gowen was born August 10, 1894 in Illinois according to California Death index.  She died December 12, 1989 in California.

==O==

John Joseph Gowen was born May 30, 1903 in New Jersey according to the California death index.  He died July 6, 1987 in California.

==O==

Keith Armando Gowen was born June 10, 1989 in California according to California Death index.  He died June 22, 1989 in California.

==O==

Mitchell Robert Gowen was born December 1, 1988 in California according to California Death index.  He died December 1, 1988 in California.

==O==

Ronnie Davis Gowen was born March 31, 1952 in Arkansas according to California Death index.  He died August 4, 1990 in California.

==O==

Viva M. Gowen was born March 29, 1885 in Iowa according to California Death index.  She died February 2, 1986 in California.

 

ALAMEDA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

George Goins of Oakland, California has visited the Highland Hospital's emergency room more than 1,200 times since 1996, and more recently, once or twice a day, each time calling 911 to get an ambulance.  The total cost to taxpayers has been roughly $900,000 in the past five years, according to an Oak-land newspaper article.

                                             ==O==

Albert Edward Gowen was born August 14, 1926 in Indiana, according to California Death index.  He died February 19, 1986 in Alameda County.

==O==

Frances E. Gowen was born August 29, 1869 in California according to California Death index.  She died December 10, 1956 in Alameda County.

==O==

Laura Gowen was born July 4, 1865 in California according to California Death index.  She died May 7, 1957 in Alameda County.

==O==

Roberta M. Gowen was born July 27, 1928 in California according to California Death index.  She died March 29, 1993 in Alameda County.

==O==

Vesta T. Gowen was born September 12, 1878 in Tennessee according to California Death index.  She died February 20, 1959 in Alameda County.

==O==

Noble B. Gowing was born September 22, 1905 in Alameda County, according to California County birth records.  His mother’s maiden name was Cooley.  Dean V. Gowing, brother to Noble B. Gowing, was born in Alameda County May 5, 1908.

 

AMADOR COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Daniel Gowen was named as the godfather of Mary Ann Gubbins September 11, 1865 at her baptism at Immaculate Conception Church in Sutter Creek, California.  Mary Ann Gubbins.  Mary Ann Gubbins died about 18 months later.  Another child was born to John Gubbins, and she, like her sister, was also named Mary Ann Gubbins.  At her baptism at the same church on August 15, 1869 Edward Gowen was named as her godfather.

 

BUTTE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Robert B. Gowen was born October 9, 1908 in Texas according to California Death index.  He died November 6, 1972 in Butte County.

 

CALAVERAS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

G. W. Gowen, a Tennesseean who was born in 1824 appeared in the 1850 census of Calaveras County, page 179.

                                             ==O==

Henry Gowen, born in Great Britian in 1811, was enumerated in the 1850 census of Calaveras County, page 217.

 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Edward Gowen was born May 20, 1891 in Missouri according to California Death index.  He died April 10, 1975 in Contra Costa County.

==O==

Lloyd Elmer Gowen was born November 9, 1908 in Oregon according to California Death index.  He died October 16, 1992 in California.

==O==

Ruth E. Gowen was born May 30, 1901 in Missouri according to California Death index.  She died December 8, 1972 in Contra Costa County.

==O==

Jere Edwin Goyan, son of Gerald H. Goyan and Lucille Johnson Goyan, was born at Oakland, California August 3, 1930.  He received a B.S. degree from the University of California School of Pharmacy in 1952 and a Ph.D. in 1957.  He was married to Patricia B. Mesirow August 24, 1952.

 

He was assistant professor of pharmacy at the University of Michigan from 1956 to 1961.  He was associate professor of pharmacy at the University of California at San Francisco from 1963 to 1965.  He was assistant dean of the School of Pharmacy in 1966 and 1967.  He became the dean of the school in 1967.  In 1972 he made his home in Mill Valley, California, according to "Who's Who in America, 1972-1973".

 

Children born to Jere Edwin Goyan and Patricia B. Mesirow Goyan include:

 

          Pamela Goyan                        born about 1954

          Terrence H. Goyan                 born about 1957

          Andrew Goyan                        born about 1960

 

FRESNO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

David A. Gowen was born November 4, 1902 in Arkansas according to California Death index.  He died January 25, 1971 in Fresno County.

                                             ==O==

John Gowen was born August 10, 1896 in California according to California Death index.  He died July 15, 1964 in Fresno County.

                                             ==O==

John M. Gowen was born July 11, 1866 in Arkansas according to California Death index.  He died May 17, 1946 in Fresno County.

==O==

Mary E. Gowen was born December 4, 1898 in California according to California Death index.  She died May 16, 1963 in Fresno County.

==O==

Pearl Dora Gowen was born December 6, 1895 in Arkansas according to California Death index.  She died October 16, 1980 in Fresno County.

==O==

Ward Earl Gowen was born March 2, 1893 in Nebraska according to California Death index.  He died July 29, 1957 in Fresno County.

 

IMPERIAL COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

John S. Gowan purchased land in a Cash Sale October 8, 1912 in Imperial County according to “California Land Records,” document number 295349, serial number CALA 0000711, Meridian or Watershed: SB, parcel: township 015S, range 013E, section 31.

==O==

George Gowing purchased land in a Cash Sale June 2, 1891 in Mendocino County according to “California Land Records,” document number 15366, serial number CACAAA 027920, Meridian or Watershed: MD, parcel: township 024N, range 018W, section 33.

 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Mrs. Dee Hutchinson Goen was born January 30, 1932.  Her Social Security number was 560-38-1050.  She died October 31, 1995 at the age of 63 in Los Angeles County, California.

==O==

Jean Donelda Goen was born January 30, 1932 in Pasadena.  She died October 31, 1995 according to the California Death Index.

==O==

Mrs. Margaret M. Goin lived at 2492 Ganesha Avenue, Altadena, California, according to the 1954 city directory of Pasadena.

                                             ==O==

William W. Goin, an elevator mechanic, and his wife, Hope W. Goin lived at 3830 Arboleda, according to the 1954 city directory of Pasadena.

                                             ==O==

Ester G. Going, "widow of John S. Going" lived at 185 East Foothill Boulevard, according to the 1954 city directory of Pasadena.

                                             ==O==

Edwin G. Goins, lived at 112 North Craig Avenue, according to the 1954 city directory of Pasadena.

                                             ==O==

George Goins, mulatto, age 22, born in Virginia and Jane Smi-ley, mulatto, age 16, born in Illinois, were married March 23, 1862, according to Los Angeles County Marriage Book 1 August 1851-March 1870, page 64.  Both were residents of Los Angeles.  Children born to George Goins and Jane Smiley Goins are unknown.

==O==

Jess L. Goins, owner of Goins Chevron Service, 194 West Del Mar, lived at 150 West Bellvue Drive, according to the 1954 city directory of Pasadena.

                                             ==O==

 

Simeon H. Goins was listed as a plasterer residing at 19 How-ard in the 1888 Los Angeles city directory, and as residing at 23 Howard in the 1890 directory.

==O==

William Goins was listed as a barber employed by Alexander Barr and residing at 509 New North Main in the 1888 Los Angeles city directory.  He was listed as a barber employed by E. T. Gordon residing at 13 Metcalf in the 1890 Los Angeles city directory.

==O==

Charles Gowan was listed as a ship carpenter employed by B, and B. Dept. S. P. Co. in the 1890 Los Angeles city directory.

==O==

Gibson Gowan and Jean Hersholt were leading characters in the movie “Greed” which was produced in 1924, according to the Jacksonville “Florida Times-Union” edition of December 3, 1999:

 

“One of the most ambitious restoration projects in film gets its world television premiere Sunday, as TCM pre-sents a four-hour, 40-minute version of Eric Von Stro-heim's ‘Greed.’

 

The 1924 film by the legendarily stubborn Von Stroheim, whose career was marked by a chronic inability to work within the confines of Hollywood's studio system, has long been regarded as one of the classics of world cinema--even though the 9 1/2-hour version Stroheim first envisioned [as well as the 4 1/2-hour version he eventually submitted to MGM executives] was never released.

 

The studio eventually released a two-hour version.  The story of a dentist and his wife who escape poverty when she wins the lottery, only to find their riches a decidedly mixed blessing, ‘Greed’ shot to pieces all sorts of film conventions.

 

It also features one of the all-time classic endings, as the dentist, McTeague [Gibson Gowan] and his erstwhile-friend-turned-sworn-enemy Marcus Shoulder [Jean Her-sholt] face down each other in Death Valley.”

                                             ==O==

Samuel H. Gowan was listed as an extraman employed by Hook and Ladder No. 1 in the 1890 Los Angeles city directory.

==O==

Uriel H. Gowan was listed as a real estate dealer residing at 34 North Spring and later at 315 Ocean Avenue in the 1890 Los Angeles city directory.

==O==

Agnes Bucknell Gowen was born November 25, 1890 in Minnesota according to California Death index.  She died December 29, 1980 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Agnes L. Gowen was born March 22, 1889 in Arkansas according to California Death index.

==O==

Alice F. Gowen was born November 22, 1884 in Connecticut according to California Death index.  She died December 29, 1964 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Anita G. Gowen was born December 13, 1876 in California according to California Death index.  She died December 2, 1958 in Los Angeles.

                                             ==O==

Arthur W. Gowen of Los Angeles received a warranty deed from Bertha E. Phillips, feme sole of Los Angeles, July 27, 1916 to 160 acres in Upton County, Texas for $800, according to Upton County Deed Book 13, page 347.  He received a warranty deed January 22, 1925 to property in Wood County, Texas from Charles Boock, according to Wood County, Texas Deed Book 81, page 610.

 

On September 12, 1932 he received a warranty deed from John E. Berges and Dorothy Berges to the same property, as his sep-arate property, for $800, according to Upton County Deed Book 46, page 5.  On the same date Arthur W. Gowen and his wife, Anita G. Gowen, gave a warranty deed to Dorothy Ber-ges, "a married woman" to the same property for $800, accord--ing to Upton County Deed Book 42, page 395.

 

Later Arthur W. Gowen and Anita G. Gowen were divorced.  Arthur W. Gowen and his wife, Alicia Gowen, gave a warranty deed to Alicia Gowen, "as her separate property" March 4, 1935, according to Upton County Deed Book 46, page 4.  They continued to reside in Los Angeles at that time.

 

Anita G. Gowen "a single woman, formerly the wife of Arthur W. Gowen of Los Angeles" gave a quit claim deed to Alicia Gowen June 12, 1935 to the Upton County property, according to Upton County deed Book 46, page 146.  Shortly afterwards Arthur W. Gowen and Alicia Gowen "of Los Angeles" gave an oil and gas lease to W. M. Hollan to the property, according to Upton County Deed Book 47, page 210.

 

On February 18, 1942 Arthur W. Gowen and Alicia Gowen of Los Angeles gave a warranty deed to the property to Herbert W. Stanton for $1,600, according to Upton County Deed Book 62, page 270.  Apparently they retained a mineral interest.

 

Arthur W. Gowen and Alicia Gowen of Los Angeles gave a quit claim deed to the minerals on the property to Herbert W. Stanton of Los Angeles June 25, 1961, according to Upton County Deed Book 299, page 357.

==O==

Aubrey William Gowen was born June 12, 1897 in Minnesota according to California Death index.  He died February 3, 1954 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Cora M. Gowen was born September 7, 1878 in Indiana according to California Death index.  He died June 21, 1960 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Dorothy A. Gowen was born November 27, 1909 in Los Angeles County, according to California State birth records.  Her mother’s maiden name was Storm.

==O==

Edgar J. Gowen was born September 25, 1893 in Maine according to California Death index.  He died April 9, 1969 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Edna Gowen was born August 11, 1893 in Colorado according to California Death index.  She died August 16, 1979 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Eric Loufton Gowen was bron January 12, 1978 in California according to California Death index.  He died January 12, 1978 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Francis D. Gowen was born April 19, 1861 in Maine, accord-ing to California Death index.  He died August 25, 1941 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Helen Christine Gowen was born April 4, 1916 in Georgia ac-cording to California Death index.  She died July 5, 1984 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Horace Charles Gowen was born January 12, 1873 in another country (unknown), according to the California Death index.  He died January 20, 1952 in Los Angeles.

==O==

James Arvel Gowen was born May 9, 1921 in Arkansas according to California Death Index.  He died April 24, 1945 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Jessie L. Gowen was born December 22, 1881 in Washington according to California Death index.  She died November 2, 1966 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Joseph L. Gowen was born August 30, 1902 in Tennessee according to California Death index.  He died November 19, 1968 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Josephin D. Gowen was born February 21, 1901 in Indiana according to California Death index.  She died August 6, 1966 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Lillis B. Gowen was born March 6, 1865 in Alabama, according to California Death Index.  She died January 18, 1940 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Mary Adella Gowen was born February 19, 1858 in Illinois according to California Death index.  She died January 8, 1946 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Mary F. Gowen was born August 28, 1904 in New Mexico according to California Death index.  She died September 5, 1964 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Mary J. Gowen was born April 30, 1892 in Ireland according to California Death index.  She died January 13, 1960 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Mary Ward Gowen was born March 6, 1888 in Massachusetts according to California Death index.  She died March 19, 1979 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Mayford L. Gowen was born February 24, 1896 in Mississippi according to California Death index.  She died July 29, 1970 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Myra Henrietta Gowen was born August 8, 1869 in Wisconsin according to California Death index.  She died September 22, 1947 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Nancy Mary Gowen was born December 17, 1874 in Indiana according to California Death index.  She died September 1, 1954 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Percy D. Gowen was born June 23, 1881 in Canada according to California Death index.  She died July 15, 1960 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Rose A. Gowen was born August 12, 1896 in Connecticut according to California Death index.  She died September 7, 1971 in Los Angeles.

                                             ==O==

Samuel H. Gowen was listed as a foreman pipemaker em-ployed by J. D. Hooker residing in Los Angeles in the 1888 Los Angeles city directory.

==O==

Sylvester A. Gowen was born August 18, 1897 in New York according to California Death index.  He died September 11, 1961 in Los Angeles.

==O==

Uriel H. Gowen was listed as a real estate dealer employed by Gowen U. H. & Co. residing at 9 North Main and later at 597 Orange in the 1888 Los Angeles city directory.

==O==

Thomas C. Gowen was listed as a teacher residing at 60 Edge-ware road in the 1890 Los Angeles city directory.

==O==

William C. Gowen was born November 24, 1876 in Illinois according to California Death index.  He died March 19, 1960 in Los Angeles.

                                             ==O==

Mary B. Gowan, a clerk at Nash's of Pasadena, lived at 87 East Green, according to the 1954 city directory of Pasadena.

                                             ==O==

William Gowins was listed as a barber residing at 509 New North Main in the 1888 Los Angeles city directory.  He was later listed as residing at 531 Beaudry Avenue in the 1890 Los angeles city directory.

 

MADERA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

George Morton Gowen was born July 14, 1895 in Tennessee according to California Death index.  He died February 15, 1958 in Madera County.

 

MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Bessie Mildred Gowen was born August 30, 1881 in Oregon according to California Death index.  She died December 28, 1958 in Marin County.

 

MARIPOSA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

O. J. Gowin who was born in Norway in 1815 was enumerated in the 1850 census of Mariposa County, page 57.

 

MENDOCINO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Alice Studebaker Gowan, pages 180, 182, Aunt Stella Brown Gowan, page 88 and Cecil Gowan, pages 67, 80, 181, 182, 192and 230 were mentioned in “Mendocino County, Cali-fornia Remembered,” according to Phil Carnahan of Ukiah, California.

==O==

Samuel Gowen purchased land in a Cash Sale September 30, 1891 in Mendocino County according to “California Land Records,” document number 12367, serial number CACAAA 029746, Meridian or Watershed,: MD, parcel: township 012N, range 015W, Section 26.

 

MODOC COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

W. A. Gowan was mentioned in the April 7, 1909 edition of the “Modoc New Era” as making a trip to Burns, Oregon in a neighboring county:

 

“W. A. Gowan and family left for Burns last Friday af-ternoon, where Mrs. Gowan will attend the bedside of her sister who is dangerously ill.  Mr. Gowan will return in a few days.”

 

NAPA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Lt./Capt. James Gowan who served in Capt. Adams Company, Virginia Militia in the War of 1812 received a bounty land grant in Napa County, according to "Northern California Bounty Land Grantees Under Acts of 1847-1855."  The article was published in the "National Genealogical Society Quarterly," Volume 67, December 1979.

 

NEVADA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Richard Ralph Goyne, white, who was born June 10, 1897, registered for the World War I draft in Nevada County.

 

ORANGE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

A. Marie Goin, 89, a retired music teacher of Huntington Beach, “died Thursday,” according to her obituary in the Aug-ust 16, 1998 edition of the “Orange County Register.”  She was buried in Fairhaven Memorial Park Mortuary in Santa Ana.  She was survived by daughter, Bonnie Goin Flint of Huntington Beach.

                                             ==O==

Fred Goins, a worker of the California Department of Trans-portation, received a head injury in an accident caused by a drunken driver, according to the June 13, 1992 edition of the “Orange County Register.”  He had worked for the Depart-ment 20 years.

                                             ==O==

Leslie Raymond Goins, 80, a retired Sears employee of Buena Park, California died July 31, 1994.  He was buried in River-side National Cemetery, according to his obituary in the Aug-ust 11, 1994 edition of the “Orange County Register.”

                                             ==O==

 

Lee Remick Gowans, 55 died of cancer July 2, 1991 in her Brentwood home, according to her obituary published on the same day in the “Orange County Register.”  She was sur-vived by her husband of 21 years, Kip Gowans, daughter Kate Colleran Sullivan, son Matthew Remick Col-leran and step-daughters, Justine Gowans Solly and Nicola Gowans.

 

“Her stage name was Lee Remick, and she was nominated for an Academy Award for her work in “Days of Wine and Ro-ses.”  Miss Remick was diagnosed with cancer in the spring of 1989.  She appeared in frail health when she received a star in the Hollywood Walk of Fame in April.

 

Miss Remick died at 5:15 a.m. today, said her publicist, Dick Winters.  Family members were at her bedside when she died, he said.  This has been a slow slide, and it finally came about, Winters said.  He said Miss Remick had undergone only phy-sical therapy to copy with the cancer in recent months.  The actress appeared in more than 20 motion pictures.

                                             ==O==

Agnes M. Gowen, 71, died January 12, 2001 at Roseville, California, according to Orange County death records.

==O==

Arthur W. Gowen was born September 27, 1879 in California according to California Death index.  He died January 21, 1975 in Orange County.

                                             ==O==

Ella G. Gowen was born February 22, 1867 in Illinois according to California Death index.  She died February 19, 1947 in Orange County.

==O==

Florence B. Gowen, was born August 18, 1898 in California according to California Death Index.  She died March 2, 1940 in Orange County.

==O==

Frank Goodie Gowen was born September 15, 1890 in Cali-fornia according to California Death index.  He died Decem-ber 5, 1952 in Orange County.

==O==

Harlan F. Gowen was born December 11, 1915 in Tennessee according to California Death index.  He died March 20, 1948 in Orange County.

==O==

Lucinda May Gowen Martindill, 93 of Yorba Linda, Cali-fornia “died Monday,” according to her obituary in the June 12, 1996 edition of the “Orange County Register.”  She was buried in Park Lawn Cemetery in Commerce.  She was sur-vived by three brothers, Clell Gowen, Morris Gowen and Robert Gowen.

                                             ==O==

Thomas Francis Gowen was born July 25, 1905 in Pennsyl-vania according to California Death index.  He died October 19, 1957 in Orange County.

==O==

Thomas Kenneth Gowen was born February 21, 1893 in Ten-nessee according to California Death index.  He died July 10, 1981 in Orange County.

                                             ==O==

Earl Astor DeGowin, 79 of Anaheim, California, a medical technologist, “died Sunday,” according to the April 13, 1993 edition of the “Orange County Register.”  He was buried in Holy Sepulcher Cemetery in Orange.  He was survived by his wife, Julia DeGowin, a son Thomas De Gowin of Vallejo, California and a daughter Debra DeGowin Wright of Ana-heim.

                                             ==O==

Mrs. Frances Wiekhorst Gowin, 97 of Orange, a secretary and widow of George Gowin, died November 9, 1993, according to her obituary in the December 1, 1993 edition of “Orange County Register.”  She was survived by her son, George Gowin, Jr.

 

PLACER COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

James E. Gowen was born April 1, 1925 in California accord-ing to California Death index.  He died June 30, 1962 in Pla-cer County.

 

PLUMAS COUNTY, CALIFONRIA

 

RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Doris L. Goins was born January 25, 1908 in Riverside County, according to California State birth records.  Her mother’s maiden name was Smith.

==O==

Lois Marie Gowen was born March 24, 1912 in Idaho accord-ing to California Death index.  She died November 22, 1991 in California.

==O==

Mittie Lane Gowen was born April 3, 1868 in Maine according to California Death index.  She died November 25, 1959 in Riverside County.

 

SACRAMENTO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

“W. A. Gowan and family from Sacramento are visitors in Modoc, California and are staying at the Royal Hotel,” according to the “Modoc New Era” of June 9, 1909.

                                             ==O==

Helen L. Gowen was born September 6, 1897 in Missouri, according to California Death index.  She died July 31, 1979 in Sacramento.

                                             ==O==

Lillian A. Gowen was born March 1, 1901 in Maryland according to California Death index.  She died January 24, 1978 in Sacramento.

==O==

Mary Elizabeth Gowen was born July 31, 1888 in Ohio according to California Death index.  She died December 27, 1957 in Sacramento.

==O==

Philip L. Gowen was born January 2, 1891 in New Hampshire according to California Death index.  He died December 6, 1965 in Sacramento.

==O==

Roy W. Gowen was born December 23, 1883 in Missouri according to California Death index.  He died March 8, 1949 in Sacramento.

==O==

Virginia Kent Gowen was born December 23, 1930 in Penn-sylvania according to California Death index.  She died No-vember 29, 1994 in Sacramento County.

==O==

Mrs. Caroline M. Gowin Ellis, a retired elementary school teacher, age 88, died May 6, 1994 of cancer, according to her obituary in "The Sacramento Bee."  She was born in 1905 in North Dakota in a sod house to a pioneer family.  She began a teaching career and moved to California in 1934.  After living in Temple City, California and Walnut, California, she removed to Sacramento where she began working as a civilian aircraft mechanic during World War II.

 

She returned to teaching in the 1960s at Roseville, California and retired in 1971.  After retirement, she served in VISTA, Volunteers in Service to America, serving in Honolulu and Tucson, Arizona.  She died at her home in Carmichael, California, and at her request, no funeral service was held.

 

Her survivors include two daughters, Jeanne Thompson of Carmichael and Colleen Johnson and Kathleen Green of Sacramento. 

 

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Ermaline Dixie Gowen purchased a Small Tract Sale December 2, 1964 in San Bernardino County according to “Californa Land Records,” document number 1237455, serial number CARI 0005910, Meridian or Watershed: SB, parcel: township 004N, range 003W, section 32.

==O==

Frank E. Gowen purchased land in a Cash Sale December 7, 1953 in San Bernardino County according to “Californa Land Records,” document number 1141783, serial number CALA 0097487, Meridian or Watershed: SB, parcel: township 005N, range 001E, section 19.

==O==

Olga Gowen purchased land in a cash sale December 7, 1953 in San Bernardino County according to “California Land Records,” document number 1141783, serial number CALA 0097487, Meridian or Watershed: SB, parcel: township 005N, range 001E, section 19.

==O==

Robert D. Gowen purchased land in a Small Tract Sale February 18, 1964 in San Bernardino County according to “California Land Records,” document number 1235159, serial number CARI 0004707, Meridian or Watershed: SB, parcel: township 004N, range 003W, section 32.

==O==

William J. Gowen lived at 14122 Valley Boulevard, Fontana, California, according to the 1960 telephone directory.  He was born August 3, 1909 in Missouri according to California death records.  He died April 15, 1977 in San Bernardino County.

==O==

Greta A. Gowins purchased land in a Small Tract Sale September 21, 1953 in San Bernardino County according to “California Land Records,” document number 1140856, serial number CALA 0066401, Meridian or Watershed: SB, parcel: township 001N, range 011E, section 31.

 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Luther C. Goins was born in North Carolina November 4, 1877, according to his tombstone.  He was married about 1906 to Naoma Analda Blair.  She was born April 19, 1875 in Waco, Texas.

 

Luther C. Goins and his wife, “Neoma Alwilda Blair Goins,” were property owners in Scurry County prior to 1907.  Neoma Alwilda Blair Goins and husband, of San Diego, California gave a warranty deed to Luella A. Blair of Scurry County for 80 acres of land in the county on September 24, 1907, according to Scurry County Deed Book 21, page 639.

 

While living in Imperial, Imperial County, California on April 7, 1910 Luther C. Goins and Alwilda Goins sold 54/100 acre to Scurry County for $33.  This transaction, recorded in Deed Book 28, page 39, apparently was to assist in a right-of-way easement for Pecos & North Texas Railroad.

 

Neome Alwilda Blair Goins, "of Imperial County, California and formerly of San Diego County, California," gave a release of a vendor's lein note to Mrs. Lucy A. Curnette of Snyder, Texas on January 8, 1914, for 78 49/100 acres in Scurry County.  Consideration in the transaction for $1982 according to Scurry County Deed Book 65, page 612.

 

On October 27, 1919 Luther C. Goins and Neoma Alwilda Blair Goins, of Rodeo, New Mexico in Grant County, joined other heirs of James A. Blair in selling 1½ acres of land located near the city limits of Snyder, Texas to Riley B. Price for $350, according to Scurry County Deed Book 44, page 251.

 

Luther C. Goins died on his 79th birthday, November 4, 1956 and was buried in Cottonwood Cemetery, Cottonwood, California in Shasta County.  “Neoma Analda Blair Goins died February 10, 1971 and was buried beside her husband.

 

Children born to Luther C. Goins and Naoma Analda Blair Goins are believed to include:

 

          Wayne A. Goins                                        born December 31, 1907

          William Ira Goins                                     born July 22, 1909

 

Wayne A. Goins, son of Luther C. Goins and Naoma Analda Blair Goins, was born December 31, 1907 in San Diego County, according to California state birth records.

 

William Ira Goins, son of Luther C. Goins and Naoma Analda Blair Goins, was born July 22, 1909 in California.  He died March 28, 1979 in Red Bluff, California and was buried with his parents in Cottonwood Cemetery.

==O==

Gary Randall Gowen was born December 30, 1952 in Hawaii according to California Death index.  He died in San Diego County.

                                             ==O==

Joyce R. Gowen was born April 25, 1927 in California accord-ing to California Death index.  She died January 10, 1993 in San Diego County.

                                             ==O==

Olga Gowen was born March 1, 1904 in China according to California Death index.  She died July 13, 1982 in San Diego.

 

SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

B. B. McGowen of Harlem, New York, age 29 died aboard ship in San Francisco Harbor between July 1 to October 13, 1850, according to the October 9, 1850 edition of the  “Sac-ramento Courier.”

 

The month of October 1850 was an eventful and tragic one for San Francisco. On the morning of October 7th, the Steamship  Carolina  arrived from Panama, via Acapulco and San Diego, with 210 passengers and anchored off Rincon Point. When she arrived, fourteen of the passengers had died due to Asiatic cholera. Panama had just recently been infected with the dis-ease  and it was subsiding by September 16th, but the Carolina had left on September 10th.  There was also news of cholera “at Carson Valley, hundreds of miles in the interior, where it was said to have broken out among the overland immigrants."

 

Three days later [Oct 10], a newspaper reported "we have heard that there have been one or two cases very closely re-sembling  cholera in the city, but the symptoms were similar to those exhibited in other diseases", and on Oct 13, "the [Medical] Society cannot ascertain that there has been more than a single case of Asiatic cholera originating in the city." There didn't appear to be any cause for alarm, yet.

 

On October 18th, San Francisco received the exciting news that California had been admitted to the United States. This had caused great joy in the city and parties and celebrations spread quickly.  The jubilation lasted throughout the rest of the month.  The formal celebration was scheduled for October 29th.

 

A reporter, along with the police, visited a "settlement con-sisting of fifty tents, all huddled together, on the square bounded by Dupont, Kearney, California and Bush streets" [Oct 20].  The occupants were primarily Hawaiians, or Kan-akas, and some from Sydney.  The reporter noticed many were sick of a strange disease which caused death within twenty-four hours. It was later determined that the "strange disease" was cholera.  The next day, in Sacramento, the news reported that "Two or three cases of cholera have appeared in town during the past two or three days."

 

On October 23rd, local news reported "Our citizens were startled yesterday morning by the report that a vessel had ar-rived in the harbor, having on board a large number of cases of cholera.  Two men [Brooks and Buell] who came ashore from the vessel [schooner G H Montague] yesterday morning, and put up at the Sacramento Hotel, are now sick with cholera. That although cases of cholera have occurred in San Francisco it does not exist yet in epidemic form."  In fact, according to the newspaper on October 28th, "In most instances the disease can be traced to Sacramento City—except in the case of the Hawaiians, near Bush street, among whom sickness had pre-vailed for several weeks."

 

The month ended on a sour note. On the afternoon of October 29th, after casting off from Central wharf, the Steamer Saga-more's boiler exploded.  Between seventy-five to hundred people were on-board at the time, and at least thirty died in-stantly, many more wounded.  A local newspaper declared it was "the most destructive to life which has ever befallen our city."

 

Throughout the next couple of months, the epidemic flowered and between 250 and 300 individuals perished in San Francis-co, and over 1,000 in Sacramento.

                                             ==O==

 

Pauline Goen was listed as a widow residing at 726 California in San Francisco, according to the San Francisco city directory 1889-1890.

                                             ==O==

Charles Goin was employed as a waiter for the Palace Hotel in San Francisco, according to the San Francisco city directory of 1889.

                                             ==O==

William Going was occupied as a laborer at 19 Rausch in San Francisco, according to the San Francisco city directory of 1889.

                                             ==O==

Karma C. Goins was born December 5, 1908 in San Francisco County, according to California State birth records.  Her moth-er’s maiden name was Schultz.

                                             ==O==

Mrs. Alice Gowan sued Benson Gowan for divorce in 1884, according to the “San Fancisco Examiner” in its edition of January 1, 1885, page 8.

                                             ==O==

B. Gowan, white male, arrived June 1, 1851 in San Francisco from Panama aboard the steamer Panama.

                                             ==O==

Edward Gowan and Kate Gowan had their photograph made in San Francisco October 13, 1867, according to Bonnie Elston in an E-mail message dated April 20, 2000.

 

Edward Gowan was employed as a carriage painter at 1016 Geary in San Francisco, according to the San Francisco city directory of 1890.

                                             ==O==

Frederick Gowan was listed as an upholsterer employed by S. M. Gruman residing at 458 Clementina according to the 1889-90 San Francisco city directory.

==O==

George J. Gowen was born May 31, 1892 in Pennsylvania according to California Death index.  He died July 7, 1965 in San Francisco.

                                             ==O==

Henry Gowan was born in San Francisco County December 14, 1906, according to California State birth records.  His mother’s maiden name was Conlin.

                                             ==O==

Hugh Gowan was listed as an oiler residing at 37 South Park according to the 1889-90 San Francisco city directory.

                                             ==O==

J. T. Gowan resided at 309 Third St. in San Francisco, according to the San Francisco city directory of 1890.

                                             ==O==

P. Gowan, white male, arrived in San Francisco from Panama January 2, 1851 "after 28 days at sea" aboard the steamer "Panama."

==O==

William Gowan was listed as a salesman employed by O’Connor, Moffatt, & Co. residing at 1603 Golden Gate Ave. according to the 1889-90 San Francisco city directory.

                                             ==O==

E. Gowen, white male, arrived in San Francisco August 31, 1851 from San Diego, California aboard the steamer "Goliath."

                                             ==O==

Eleanor Gowen lived at 2650 Franklin Street, according to the 1969 city directory of San Francisco.

==O==

Frank Freeman Gowen was born December 29, 1927 in Illi-nois according to California Death index.  He died June 3, 1943 in San Francisco.

                                             ==O==

J. Gowen, white male, arrived in San Francisco aboard the steamer "Golden Gate" from Panama December 17, 1852.

                                             ==O==

J. A. Gowen arrived in San Francisco November 22, 1852 aboard the brig "Baltitmore" from Honolulu, Hawaii.

                                             ==O==

James Gowen arrived in San Francisco from San Diego February 27, 1852 aboard the steamer "Sea Bird".

                                             ==O==

Lloyd Gowen, a musician with the San Francisco Symphony Association, lived in Daly City, California, according to the 1969 city directory of San Francisco.

                                             ==O==

Paul Gowens, a plasterer, lived at 227 Foerster Street, accord-ing to the 1969 city directory of San Francisco.  Robert Gow-ens, also a plasterer, lived at the same address.

                                             ==O==

L. Gowin, white male, arrived in San Francisco aboard the steamer "California" from Panama June 23, 1850.  The steam-er, 22 days en route from Panama, reported "heavy weather."

                                             ==O==

Mrs. Gerrie K. Gowing, a clerk, lived at 1425 Taylor Street, according to the 1969 city directory of San Francisco.

                                             ==O==

George Gowing was listed as a salesman for the Singer Manu-facturing Company residing in Oakland according to the 1889-90 San Francisco city directory.

                                             ==O==

Jim G. Gowing, owner of a parking lot, lived at Daly City, California, according to the 1969 city directory of San Fran-cisco.

                                             ==O==

Capt. M’Gowan was listed as the master of the steamer, “Co-lumbus” which arrived in San Francisco May 23, 1851, ac-cording to “San Francisco Ship Passenger List, 1850-1864,” Volume I, page 38, by Louis J. Rasmussen,

 

The ship arrived after a voyage of “24 1/2 days from Panama via Acapulco, Mexico.”  It “experienced a succession of head winds which accounted for the unusual length of passage.  In coming up the San Francisco Harbor, it ran aground on Ton-quin Shoal, but was off again with the flood tide, without sus-taining any damage.  It left Panama on May 1, 1851.  Cargo was 90 packages of assorted merchandise.”

                                             ==O==

Ruth McGowan was a member of the graduating class of Mis-sion High School, 18th and Mission Streets, San Francisco De-cember 15, 1921, according to Ruth Grady Skewis.

 

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Alma E. Goins was graduated from Stockton High School in 1928, according to the class roster.

==O==

Dorothy G. Gowen was born October 11, 1922 in Oklahoma according to California Death index.  She died June 22, 1993 in San Joaquin County.

                                             ==O==

No Gowens or spelling variations were listed in "Index to Probate Records, San Joaquin County, California, 1850-1900," nor in "Marriage Records of San Joaquin County, California, 1884-1899," Volume III published by San Joaqiun Genealogical Society.

                                             ==O==

John Gawne was married to Marie Farrington November 16, 1878, according to San Joaquin County Marriage Book 4, page 19.  Of John Gawne and Marie Farrington Gawne nothing more is known.

                                             ==O==

Martha Gowen, born 1851, died 1920, was buried in Glenview Cemetery, Clements, California, according to "Old Cemeter-ies of San Joaquin County, California, Volume III" publish-ed by San Joaquin Genealogical Society.

 

SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Irene Madeline Gowen was born December 1, 1917 in California according to California Death index.  She died February 25, 1985 in San Luis Obispo County.

==O==

Lillie E. Gowen was born June 7, 1934 in Georgia according to California Death index.  She died April 1, 1977 in San Luis Obispo County.

==O==

Orvill M. Gowen was born January 16, 1913 in Missouri according to California Death records.  He died February 25, 1977 in San Luis Obispo County.

 

SAN MATEO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Cecil H. Gowen was born April 27, 1890 in Maine according to California Death index.  He died October 15, 1970 in San Mateo County.

==O==

Faye Martha Gowen was born February 12, 1893 in Illinois, according to California Death index.  She died December 19, 1985 in San Mateo County.

==O==

Lucille Margaret Gowen was born January 4, 1911 in Nebraska according to California Death index.  She died August 23, 1981 in San Mateo County.

==O==

Mrs. Marianne Porter Gowen, Stanford University, was the recipient of the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Foundation Award in 1959-1960.  She was an employee of Psychology Research Center and lived at 207 Stanford Village, California.

 

SANTA BARABRA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Thomas Brian Gowen was born August 29, 1959 in California according to California Death index.  He died July 27, 1984 in Santa Barbara County.

 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

                                             ==O==

Abbie Susan Gowen was born August 21, 1858 in Missouri according to California Death index.  She died August 22, 1952 in Santa Clara County.

==O==

Bela E. Gowen was born March 19, 1884 in Canada according to California Death index.  He died April 17, 1958 in Santa Clara County.

==O==

Dorothy Teresa Gowen was born May 2, 1901 in New York according to California Death index.  She died February 15, 1992 in Santa Clara County.

==O==

Lillie Gowen was born December 11, 1875 in South Carolina according to California Death index.  She died November 23, 1964 in Santa Clara County.

 

SHASTA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

 

SISKIYOU COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Edmund W. Gowen purchased homestead land in Siskiyou County March 30, 1900 according to “California Land Records,” document 6, serial number CACAAA 038894, Meridian of Watershed: MD, parcel: township048N, range 003E, section 14.

 

SONOMA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Clarence Gowen was born March 27, 1884 in Kentucky according to California Death index.  He died November 21, 1962 in Sonoma County.

==O==

George Edward Gowen was born August 23, 1893 in New York according to California Death index.  He died May 22, 1982 in Sonoma County.

 

STANISLAUS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Gene Cameron Gowan was born August 8, 1976 and died De-cember 16, 1976 in Oakdale, California.

 

SUTTER COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

B. Gowan who was born in 1826 in Massachusetts was enumerated in the 1850 census of Sutter County, page 23.

                                             ==O==

Hiram Gowen who was born in 1825 in Missouri was recorded in the 1850 census of Sutter County, page 56.

                                             ==O==

John Gowen who was born in Maine in 1810 was enumerated in the 1850 census of Sutter County, page 46.

                                             ==O==

M. Gowen who was born in 1823 in New Hampshire appeared in the 1850 census of Sutter County, page 23.

                                             ==O==

B. Gowin who was born in Maine in 1825 was recorded in the 1850 Census of Sutter County, page 22.

 

TEHANA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

David Gowen was listed as a lumberman in the 1885 county directory of Tehana County, living at Butte Meadows, Califor-nia.  William Gowen, lumberman, was also listed in the direct-ory living at Butte Meadows.

 

TULARE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

William Goin was married July 12, 1906 to Mary Jane Wil-liamson, according to Tulare County Marriage Book K, page 28.  Children born to William Goin and Mary Jane Williamson Goin are unknown.

 

VENTURA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Virgil Goines, Jr. who was born in 1949 was married July 1, 1968 to Evelyn Ann Leverett who was born in 1947, according to Beckham County, Oklahoma Marriage Book 32, page 475.  Virgil Goines, Jr. was a resident of Fillmore, California, and Evelyn Ann Leverett Goines was a resident of Elk City, Oklahoma.

==O==

Pauline Inez Gowen was born February 11, 1919 in Missouri according to California Death index.  She died November 6, 1943 in Ventura County.

 

YUBA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

 

Andrew Goins, 22, born in New York, page 216; Hugh Goins, 29, born in New York, page 16; Jacob Goins, 30, born in Texas, page 234 and R. D. Goins, 27, born in Illinois, page 233 were enumerated in the 1850 census of Yuba County.

                                             ==O==

David Gowin, who was born in 1819 in Ireland, appeared in the 1850 Census of Yuba County.

 

COLORADO

 

ARAPAHO COUNTY, COLORADO

                                             ==O==

George E. Gowan was married December 2, 1890 to Julia Johnson, according to Arapaho County marriage records.  Children born to George E. Gowan and Julia Johnson Gowan are unknown.

                                             ==O==

Mary M. Gowan was married October 27, 1893 to Roland Chism, according to Arapaho County marriage records.

                                             ==O==

David M. Gowins was married December 24, 1894 to Beatrice Clayburn, according to Arapaho County marriage records.  Of David M. Gowins and Beatrice Clayburn Gowins nothing more is known.

 

BENT COUNTY, COLORADO

 

 

 

BOULDER COUNTY, COLORADO

 

Mary Gowan was married April 24, 1872 in Boulder County to Oscar Savory, according to Boulder County marriage records.

 

CHAFFEE COUNTY, COLORADO

 

J. E. Gowan was a resident of Poncha Springs, Colorado, ac-cording to the 1962 telephone directory of Salida, Colorado.

                                             ==O==

W. H. Gowan lived at 748 Avenue G, Salida according to the 1962 telephone directory.

                                             ==O==

Brenda Gowen was born April 4, 1957 in Lyons, New York.  She wrote May 30, 2003 that she was living in Salida, Color-ado.

 

DENVER COUNTY, COLORADO

 

Ruben H. Going was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Denver, living at 323 Blake Street, enumeration District 1, page 42.

 

The household consisted of:

 

          "Going,      Ruben H.             31, born in Canada

                                      Anna A.                         29, born in Ohio

                                      Ethel M.                6/12, born in Colorado"

                                             ==O==

Grace Going of Denver served in the U. S. Navy during World War I as a nurse, according to “Colorado Soldiers in World War I.”

                                             ==O==

Archie R. Gowan was a clerk for R. G. Dun & Company residing in Denver, Colorado in 1890 according to the city directory.

                                             ==O==

George Gowan was a hostler for City railway residing at 1748 Wynkoop in Denver, Colorado in 1890 according to the city directory.

                                             ==O==

Gowan resided at 1008 Larimer in Denver, Colorado in 1890 according to the city directory.

==O==

Edward H. Gowen, retired, and his wife May Gowen, lived at 1411 Lafayette, according to the 1965 city directory of Denver.

                                             ==O==

Florence M. Gowen, the widow of Ben A. Gowen, lived at 2870 South Grant, according to the 1965 city directory of Denver.

                                             ==O==

Mrs. Helen Gowen, retired, lived at 200 East Ellsworth Avenue, according to the 1965 city directory of Denver.

                                             ==O==

John B. Gowen, retired, lived at 500 Lowell Boulevard, according to the 1965 city directory of Denver.

                                             ==O==

John W. Gowen, a contractor, and his wife, Elsie A. Gowen, lived at 1595 South Bellaire, according to the 1965 city directory of Denver.

                                             ==O==

Keith Gowen lived at 932 Corona, according to the 1965 city directory of Denver.

                                             ==O==

Louis Gowen, a public service employee and his wife, Irene E. Roedel Gowen, lived at 2575 South Clayton, according to the 1965 city directory of Denver.

                                             ==O==

Mitch Gowen was born and raised in Denver about 1958, ac-cording to his website created April 17, 1996.  He was gradu-ated from Denver Lutheran High School in 1978 and enrolled in Corcordia Teachers College in Seward, Nebraska in the pre-seminary program. 

 

In 1983 he was married to Nancy Sonheim, his childhood sweetheart.  In 1986 he was graduated with a BA degree and was enrolled in the Concordia Theological Seminary in Ft. Wayne, Indiana.  He served his vicarage at Holy Cross Lu-theran Church in Los Gatos, California and later became as-sistant pastor of Lutheran Church of our Savior at Cupertino, California.  In 1996, he was pastor of Lutheran Church of our Savior at Aiea, Oahu, Hawaii. 

 

Children born to Mitch Gowen and Nancy Sonheim Gowen include:

 

          Molly Elizabeth Gowen                                     born in 1991

          Micah Sterling Gowen                                       born in 1992

          Katie Ann Gowen                                               born in 1995

 

EL PASO, COUNTY, COLORADO

 

Gerald R. Goings lived at 1730 Luna Drive, Fountain, according to the 1971 city directory.

                                             ==O==

David D. Goins lived south of Colorado Springs, according to the 1971 city directory of Fountain.

                                             ==O==

Larry Gowan and Chong Suk Gowan lived at 4001 Old Pueblo Road, Fountain, Colorado, according to the 1971 city directory.

                                             ==O==

Charles Gowen, an aircraft mechanic, and his wife, Linda Gowen lived at 133 Williams Street, according to the 1966-1967 city directory of Colorado Springs, Colorado.

                                             ==O==

Gary L. Gowen, an aircraft mechanic, and his wife, Janis Gowen, a data processor, lived at 330 Pilot Knob Avenue, Manitou Springs, Colorado, according to the 1966-1967 city directory of Colorado Springs.

                                             ==O==

Otto S. Gowen, an aircraft mechanic, and his wife, Audrey Gowen, an assembler, lived at 3357 West Kiowa Street, according to the 1966-1967 city directory of Colorado Springs.  Michael Gowen, U. S. Army, also lived at 3357 West Kiowa Street, according to the directory.

                                             ==O==

Patrick R. Gowen and his wife, Kath M. Gowen, lived at 16 Minnehaha Street, Manitou Springs, according to the 1966-1967 Colorado Springs, city directory.

                                             ==O==

Victor S. Gowen, a laborer for Cold Concrete, and his wife Oleta Gowen, lived at 925 North Spruce Street, Colorado Springs, according to the 1971 city directory.

 

FOWLER COUNTY, COLORADO

 

Pvt. Samuel George Goins of Fowler County serve in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War I, according to “Colorado Soldiers in World War I.”

 

 

LAKE COUNTY, COLORADO

 

George Goens was listed as a machinist residing at 502 North Alder in the 1886 Leadville city directory.  He was listed as an engineer residing at 211 East 8th in the 1889 Leadville city directory.

==O==

Charles F. Gowen was listed as a laborer employed by A. H. Meyers residing at 319 East 6th in the 1885 Leadville city directory.  He was listed as a teamster for the Morning Star Mine in the 1886 Leadville city directory.

==O==

Frank E. Gowen was listed as a wagon maker residing at 516 Harrison Avenue in the 1882 Leadville city directory.  He was listed as an engineer residing at 319 East 6th in the 1885 direct-ory.  He was later listed as a carpenter employed by the Morn-ing Star Mine in the 1886 Leadville city directory.  In the 1888-89 directories he was listed as residing at 420 East 7th.

==O==

James Gowen was listed as a miner residing at 310 East 5th in the 1883 Leadville city diretory.

==O==

James H. Gowen was listed as a mine superintendent residing at 506 East 8th in the 1883-84 Leadville city directories.  He was later listed as residing at Spruce on the southwest corner of Elm in the 1886-87 leadville city directories.  In 1887, he was listed as a grocer.

==O==

John J. Gowen was listed as a miner residing at 610 Harrison Avenue in the 1890 Leadville city directory.

==O==

James Goyne was listed as a miner residing at the Grand Pacific Hotel in the 1886 Leadville city directory.

 

LARIMER COUNTY, COLORADO

 

Aubrey W. Gowen of Loveland served as a infantry private during World War I, according to “Colorado Soldiers in World War I.”

                                             ==O==

Kathie Gowen was married December 7, 1977 in Mesa, Ari-zona to Harold Porter “Bud” Myers, according to his obituary in the “Loveland Reporter-Herald” in its edition of May 2, 2001.

 

“Harold "Bud" Porter Myers, 56, formerly of Loveland, died April 22, 2001, at Scottsdale Healthcare in Arizona of complications of a rare lung disease.  He was born June 30, 1944, in Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania to Char-les Richard Myers and Lenora May Porter Myers.  He worked as a mechanic and carpenter.

 

He is survived by his wife, Kathie Gowen Myers of Loveland; sons Harold W. "Bud" Myers of Peoria, Arizona, Tad L. Hendrickson of Killeen, Texas, and Ralph Louis Taylor of Omaha, Nebraska; daughters Tamara Bellinger of Phoenix, Arizona, Sherry Stitt of Newcastle, Pennsylvania, and Tess L. Swenson and Jewell Myers of Loveland.

 

Condolences may be sent to the wife at 1439 Sylmar Place, Loveland, 80537, or to his son, Bud Myers, at 8713 W. Ironwood Drive, Peoria, Arizona, 85345.”

 

MESA COUNTY, COLORADO

 

Edgar A. Gowen of Grand Junction, Colorado served as a private in the Engineers during World War I, according to “Colorado Soldiers in World War I.”

 

ROCKY FORD COUNTY, COLORADO

 

Corp. Louis Goins of Rocky Ford County served in the American Transportation Branch of the U.S. Army during World War I, according to “Colorado Soldiers in World War I.”

 

SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO

 

John Gawon was the head of a household enumerated in the 1880 census of Summit County, Enumeration District 108, Page 4, Precinct 6, listed as:

 

          "Gawon,              John                     41, born in Canada

                                      Virginia                41, born in Canada

                                      Eugene                 11, born in Illinois

                                      Eugenia                  9, born in Illinois

                                      Lizzie M.                8, born in Illinois"

                                               ==O==

Clay W. Vaden, a writer for the Works Progress Administration Life Histories Collection wrote a series of articles entitled "Old Days in Kingston Mine Area" during the 1930s.  One article featured Cobe Goins, a 90-year-old freighter who was interview by Vaden. 

 

"Ox teams were not so fast as the trucks used now to haul ore from the mines," observed Cobe Goins, "but they got the ore out."

 

Goins drove ten yokes of oxen to freight wagons of seven tons capacity and with tires four inches wide.  He later replaced the oxen with 12 teams of mules to each wagon.  Goins hauled ore from the paying mines in Kingston district, among them the Brush Heap, Gypsy, Blackie, Lady Franklin, Bulloin, U.S, Cumberland, Calamity Jane, Keystone, and numbers of others.

 

When a $1,500 nugget was picked up at Blackie mine, seven miles north of Kingston, a rush to that district followed.  The Bridal Chamber mine at Lake Valley was one of the best paying in this section of the State.  Blocks one yard square of almost pure native silver were often taken from this mine, and it has been roughly estimated that it produced ore worth between five and seven millions of dollars.

 

"There was danger in freighting such rich shipments," said Goins, "and I always had a guard armed with a double barreled shotgun and two six shooters on my wagons, until the ore was placed on the cars in Lake Valley."

 

Goins recalls how the knowledge of ores was responsible for the amassing of a small fortune by Dennis Finley, now a resident of Denver.  According to Goin's story, a Judge Holt had a lease on and was foreman of the Virginia mine, while Finley was one of the 30 workmen, although he had been foreman of another mine and was a practical mining man.  One day Finley picked up a rich piece of ore and said to Judge Holt, "This is worth saving."

 

Judge Holt, replied, in effect, that if he wanted any advice, he would ask for it, and continued to throw [$300-a-ton] rock over the dump.  Finley was given his 'time' in a few days.  He obtained a lease from the Virginia Mine Company and hauled 13 carloads of high grade ore from the dump.  He now owns a chain of stores in Denver.  Before he made his stake at Kingston, he had not seen his family in five years.

 

Goins came to Sierra county about 1885, living first at Percha, north of Kingston.  While several fortunes were taken out of the Kingston mines, he says that the big companies never found official veins, only ores in pockets and chimneys.  The Virginia mine is still being worked."

 

CONNECTICUT

 

No individuals of interest to Gowen chroniclers appeared in the 1830 census of Connecticut.

                                             ==O==

Samuel Goen, a 24 year old farmer, emigrated to the United States from Ireland in the fourth quarter of 1823.  He was aboard a ship that docked at Passamaquoddy, Connecticut.

 

FAIRFIELD COUNTY, CONNECTICUT

 

Russell L. Goings, Jr, negro son of Russell L. Goings and Rose Pegues Goings, was born at Stamford Connecticut July 5, 1932.

 

He was a student at Xavier University from 1955 to 1959.  He was married to Mattie M. Howell June 21, 1955.  He was an investment executive with Jay W. Kaufman Company, New York City from 1959 to 1961.  He was with Van Alstyne Noel Company, New York City in 1961 and 1962.  He was with Burns, Nordeman & Company from 1962 to 1968.  He was Harlem branch manager of Sherson, Hammil & Company, Harlem, New York from 1968 to 1972, according to "Who's Who in America in 1972-1973."  He was president of First Harlem Securities Corporation in 1972.  He was a director of "Essence" magazine in New York City.  He was chairman of Better Business Bureau, Harlem in 1972.  He was trustee of Rider College, Trenton, New Jersey in 1972.  He was manager of the first black brokerage firm on the New York Stock Exchange.  In 1972 he lived in Albany, New York.

 

Children born to Russell L. Goings, Jr. and Mattie M. Howell Goings include:

 

          Russell L. Goings III                       born about 1957

          Rhodessa B. Goings                        born about 1960

 

HARTFORD COUNTY, CONNECTICUT

 

Victor Gowan was listed as a laborer residing at 52 Sanford according to the 1889-92 Hartford city directories.

                                             ==O==

Mrs. Catharine Gowen, 96, of Bloomfield, Connecticut died Monday, June 10, 2002 at Bloomfield Healthcare in Bloomfield, according to her obituary:

 

“She was born March 18, 1906 in Bloomfield.  She was a member of First Congregational Church, Bloomfield at 10 Wintonbury Avenue.  Services will be held Sat-urday, June 15, 2002, at 2:00 PM at First Congregation-al Church, Bloomfield.  Rev. Dr. James Christopher will be officiating.  Burial will be at Mountain View Ceme-tery on Saturday, June 15, at 3:30 PM.

 

Survivors include her son, Burton Gowen of Brattle-boro, Vermont; daughter Louise Gowen Rose of Aqua Dulce, California, daughter Mabel Gowen Chenette of Bloomfield.”

 

NEW HAVEN COUNTY, CONNECTICUT

 

Edward Harold Goin of New Haven, Connecticut, received an A.M. degree from Columbia University in 1930, according to an alumni bulletin.

                                             ==O==

William Gowan, who lived in New Haven at the time of the 1790 census was the only person living in his household and the only member of the Gowen family living in the state at that time.  He was shown as a "male, over 16."  His residence was in the city of New Haven.

                                             ==O==

Lee Francis Gowen was born in Waterbury, Connecticut in 1944 of parents unknown.  He died June 26, 2000 in Lebanon, Tennessee at age 56, according to his obituary in the “Nash-ville Tennessean:”

 

Mr. Gowan was born and raised in Waterbury, CT. He moved to Lebanon, TN in 1962, where he went to work for TRW Inc. on September 5, 1962.  He retired October 1, 1999. He is survived by his daughter and son-in-law, Jackie Gowen Red-mond and David Redmond and grandchildren, Alexis and Richard Redmond.  He was buried in Hermitage Memorial Gardens.

 

DELAWARE

 

No individuals by the name of Gowen or spelling variations appeared in the 1790, 1800 or 1820 census of Delaware.

 

NEW CASTLE COUNTY, DELAWARE

 

Christopher Gowing was married September 28, 1771 to Ann Murhpy in Wilmington, Delaware, according to "Irish Set-tlers in America" by Michael J. O'Brien.  Children born to Chris-topher Gowing and Ann Murphy Gowing are unknown.

                                             ==O==

John M’Gowan was mentioned as being a passenger on the brig “Brothers” in a newspaper account dated July 4, 1789.  The item was reproduced in “Delaware Newspapers Abstracts, 1786-1795” at the Seaford, Delaware Library.

 

“DGW Jul 4, 1789/The following Passengers of the brig Brothers, give thanks to James Jefferis, master, for his care and humanity.  The trip took 45 days from Belfast.

 

Capt. Henry Hughes, William M'Cluney, Sampson Togh, John Densmew, Samuel Scott, Andrew Davidson, William Crabb, Francis Hamilton, William Huston, John Walter, Jeremiah Waters, Thomas Hughes, John Hughes, Thomas Huston, John M'Fadden, William Wier, Joseph Dearmon, Henry Dearmon, Archibald Conner, Samuel Thompson, Robert Ross, William Ross, Nathan Gregg Bryson, Samuel Patton, Alexander Pat-on, Alexander M'Kimson, John Tamison, Adam Boal, Leonard Padey, Daniel Carr, William M'Cune, Robert Wallace, Henry O'Hasron, John Livingston, Henry Mor-gan, James M'Culloch, Thomas Latherdale, James Gaughroggs, David Crookshanks, William O'Connel, Adam Murdoch, Hugh Girvin, John M'Gowan, John Gordon, Alexander Clark, William Adams, David M'Gerrald, William Blair, Robert Caorlon, John Car-olon, James Armstrong, Joseph Tosh, George Kennedy, James Rodgers, James Malhollan, John Brannan, Jacob Corsby, William Corsby, Henry Montgomery, William Gastlin, John Huston, William Bell, Robert Smith, Thomas Watson, Samuel Linton, William Moony, John Bell, Matthew Brown, William Martin, and Hugh Strickland. 

 

Just imported in the brig Brothers from Belfast - Window glass – James Jefferis or Edward Gilpin, Wilmington.”

 

KENT COUNTY, DELAWARE

 

Edward Gowen Budd was born in Smyrna, Delaware in 1870 and died in 1946.  He was the subject of a booklet written in 1990 for the Budd Family Association by Francenia Budd Towle, a daughter of Edward Gowen Budd.  She wrote:

 

“Edward Gowen Budd was a descendant of Thomas Budd of England and of his son William Budd, who settled in Burling-ton County, New Jersey about 1678.

 

Edward Gowen Budd was born in Smyrna, Delaware in 1870 and came to Philadelphia at age 17 to seek work.  After going to night school at the Franklin Institute and working for several manufacturing companies, he had saved enough money by 1912 to start his own business, the Edward G. Budd Manufacturing Company, now called the Budd Company.

 

Mr. Budd, was a gentle and attentive husband and father of five children, an extensive reader of biography and history, and a devout Methodist. He considered work the greatest privilege in life; any account of his life must center on his achievements in creating and building with steel.

 

Many people know that the Budd Company pioneered in the manufacture of stainless steel railroad cars, but few remember the historical revolution Budd created in building all-steel automobile bodies.”

 

 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

 

No members of the Gowen family [or spelling variations] lived in the District of Columbia, according to the 1800 cen-sus.  In 1890 Washington showed a population of 232,000, and several individuals of interest to Foundation chroniclers appeared in the city directory.

                                             ==O==

Willie R. Gawen, an officer of the Washington Metropolitan Police was killed “in the line of duty May 2, 1915, according to Frank Dunnigan.  His memorial is recorded on Panel 34-E-9 of the Police Monument.  His personnel file is maintained in the National Archives.

                                             ==O==

Isaac S. Goin, a student was living at 1616 4th NW in Wash-ington, D.C. in 1890, according to the city directory.

                                             ==O==

Arthur B. Going, a blacksmith who lived at 3135 K NW, ac-cording to the 1890 city directory of Washington, D.C.  His shop was located at 1303 27th NW.  He continued at the same locations in 1891.

                                             ==O==

Joanna Going was born in Washington, D.C. about 1964.  Later her family removed to Newport, Rhode Island.  She attended Emerson College in Boston and then enrolled in American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York. 

 

She starred in the 1998 movie comedy "Still Breathing."  In 1997 she appeared in Roundabout theatre's production of George Bernard Shaw's "Misalliance" and in the off-Broadway production of "The Maiden's Prayer."

                                             ==O==

Kate Goings was recorded in the 1890 city directory of Washington living at 1512 14th NW.

                                             ==O==

Lavinia Goings, a cook was living at 911 Desmond Alley SW, according to the 1890 city directory of Washington.

                                             ==O==

Lewis Goings, a laborer was listed in the 1890 city directory of Washington, living at 2622 P NW.

                                             ==O==

Missouri Goings, a bookbinder, was recorded at 1224 Wylie NE in the 1890 city directory of Washington.  In 1891 Missouri Goings, a clerk lived at 617 Q NW.

                                             ==O==

Rosa Goings, lived at 2425 F NW in 1890, according to the Washington city directory.  “Rosa Goins, washing” continued at the same address in 1891.

                                             ==O==

Mrs. Flossie Johnson Goins was a resident of Washington about 1928, according to the research of Sandy Johnson.

                                             ==O==

George W. Goins, an upholsterer lived at 428 Washington NW, according to the 1891 city directory.

                                             ==O==

Hannibal Goins, a coachman lived at 1526 Madison Avenue NW, according to the Washington city directory of 1890.  Living at the same address was Prince A. Goins, “slater.”

                                             ==O==

John Goins and Lorene I. Goins were parents of a daughter born in the District of Columbia December 10, 1929, according to the “Washington Post” in its edition of December 11, 1929.

                                             ==O==

Thomas M. Gowan, a printer, lived at 1219 6th NW, according to the 1891 city directory of Washington.

                                             ==O==

William E. Gowan, “milk,” showed two locations in the 1890 city directory of Washington.  One was at 1423 L NW, and the other was at 70 Defrees NW.  In 1891, William E. Gowan, “collector” showed only the 70 Defrees NW address.

                                             ==O==

James Gowans, “plate printer” was shown in residence at 951 25th NW in the 1890 city directory of Washington.  Living at the same address was Margaret Gowans, a clerk.  In the 1891 edition, James Gowans continued at the same address with no listing for Margaret Gowans.

                                             ==O==

Lewis Gowans, a laborer appeared in the 1890 city directory at 2622 P NW in Washington.

                                             ==O==

Mary A. Gowans, “widow of Peter F. Gowans,” appeared as the head of a household at 2630 K NW in the 1890 city direc-tory of Washington.  Living at the same address was Lucy Go-wans, “Bureau of Engraving and Printing.”  Mary A. Gowans and Lucy Gowans appeared in the 1891 city directory at the same address.  Alice Gowans, a clerk, also appeared in this household in the 1891 city directory.

                                             ==O==

Anna May Gowen died January 11, 1944, according to her obituary in the “Washington Evening Star” in its edition of January 12, 1944.

                                             ==O==

Annie Gowen was a staff writer for the “Washington Post” in August 2001.

                                             ==O==

Gowen W. Brooks, draftsman appeared at 115 B NE in the 1891 city directory of Washington.

                                             ==O==

Several individuals of interest to Gowen chroniclers appeared in the District of Columbia area in 1960 according to the telephone directory.

 

Included were:

 

          Ann and Diana Gowen, 4707 Connecticut Ave, Washington, D.C.

          G. Howard Gowen,5531 Devon Road, Bethesda, MD

          Hylda H. Gowen, 4335 Harrison Road NW, Washington, D. C.

          I. J. Gowen, 8202 Adelph Road, Hyattsville, Maryland

          J. P. Gowen, Jr, 6311 Patterson Eastons, Washington, D C.

          Miss Mary A. Gowen, 2721 Ordway, NW, Washington, D. C.

          M. J. Edward Gowen, 162 E Colony Road, Silver Spring, MD

          Morris E. Gowen, 3326 Loring Drive, Washington, D. C.

                                             ==O==

Doris L. Gowen was an employee of the U. S. House of Representatives, Publications Distribution Service in January 1966, according to the "Congressional Register."

                                             ==O==

George W. McGoines was born in August 1854, according to his enumeration on April 20, 1910 in the District of Columbia, Enumeration District 193.  He resided on Sheriff Road, N.E. in Washington, D.C.

 

His brother, Thomas McGoines, was born November 6, 1869,  according to the U.S. Coast & Geodetic Survey Bulletin of October 1919, according to Bruce Sellers.

                                             ==O==

 

Follows is the certain geneology of my known ancestors. I will also send a

more conjectural geneology.

 

Patrick Goins, supposed to be of Ireland, on May 6, 1830, married a

(mulatto?) woman Ann Hurst in Washington DC. These may be the parents of

John Gabriel Goins, though it is not certain.

    John Gabriel Goins (born January 1836 in Washington DC) on October

6, 1859, in Washington DC, married Augustine Upshur (born March 1839 in

Washington DC).1(2)  According to the 1900 census, Augustine gave birth to

12 children, of whom 9 were alive at the time.

    The children of John Gabriel Goins and Augustine Upshur were:

 

(1) William Henry Goines (born December 6, 1859 in Washington DC - died

August 2, 1912 in Arundel MD). He married Emma Morgan King (born December

9, 1864 in Virginia - died March 10, 1907 in Washington DC) on June 29,

1887.

(2) Harriet A. Goines (born November 1861 in Washington DC)

(3) Sarah A. Goines (born March 1864 in Washington DC)

(4) John Gabriel Goines II (born July 1866 in Washington DC)

(5) Mary A. Goines (born 1869 in Washington DC)

(6) Charles Patrick Goines (born 1871 in Washington DC). He married

    Lottie Adelaide Chisolm on June 29, 1899.

 

    William Henry Goines, MD and Emma Morgan King had four children:

 

(1) Laurence Archibald Goines (born in Washington DC on July 23, 1888 -

died in Alliance, Nebraska, Box Butte County, December 18, 1932), a civil

engineer, married on July 29, 1910 to Lulu Mae Mead (born in Dry Creek,

Carbon County Wyoming on October 6, 1888 and died in Austin TX on February

26, 1978).

 

    Lulu Mae Mead was the niece of Daniel Mead, the first director of

the Bureau of Reclamation, after whom Lake Mead is named. Lulu Mae Mead's

father was George Shakespere Mead (born on October 9, 1861 in

Thompsonville, Racine County Wyoming - died on December 26, 1940 in

Cheyenne Wyoming) who lived in Wyoming, and her mother was Carrie Mae Hill

(born August 14, 1862 in Johnstown, Rock County WI - died Austin TX January

19, 1953). They were married on June 27, 1887 in on the C.M. Morrison

Ranch, Ferris Tract, Carbon County Wyoming. Their other children were:

 

    Minnie Ann Mead (July 27, 1890 in Ferris, WY - died February 12,

1908 in Bozeman MT). She married George Trone.

 

    George Henry Mead (born August 18, 1892 in Ferris WY - died January

30, 1949 in Cheyenne WY)

 

    Nellie Mead (born September 2, 1895 in Thermopolis WY - died

January 11, 1967 in Santa Cruz CA) married Earnest Joseph Pickens.

 

(2)  "A pension claim filed by a Mississippi black soldier's widow made the

same point [about black surnames being hidden from whites].  'My maiden

name was Rebecca Upshur but I went by the name of my owner [Nathaniel B.

Lanier] and was called Rebecca Lanier.'"  The Black Family in Slavery and

Freedom, 1750 - 1925, Herbert G. Gutman, Random House, 1976, page 238

 

    Ethel Easter Mead (born April 10, 1898 in basin WY - died in

Cheyenne WY). Married Otis James Kitchen.

 

    The birth certificate of Laurence Archibald Goines indicates that

his father's occupation is Clerk Reusim (sic) (3) Office. He was born at

2040 17th St NW, Washington DC. He is registered as colored. Laurence

Archibald Goines claimed in adulthood to have been born and educated in New

York City.

 

(3)  I don't know what this means.

 

(2) Emily (called Meg) Augustine Goines (born in Washington DC on January

25, 1891 - died May 19, 1892 in Washington DC). She is buried in Harmony

cemetery, Landover MD

    In the Washington DC Evening Star the following notice appears:

    On Thursday May 19, 1892 at 7 o'clock am Emily Augustine, infant

daughter of William H. and Emma M. Goines.

    And thou art dead, as young and fair

    As a flight of mortal birth

    And form so soft and charms so rare

    To soon return to earth.

Funeral from parent's residence 506 P Street NW, Sat. 21st, 2 o'clock pm

 

(3) Emerson Charles Goines (born June 17, 1893 in Washington DC - died

September 12, 1983 in Muscatine, Iowa). He, too, claimed to have been born

in New York City, and like his brother became a civil engineer. He married

Ruth Ripley Clore (1892 - died May 1960 in Los Angeles CA) in 1916 in

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. They had one son, Warren Charles Goines, (Born in

Milwaukee, Wisconsin February 6, 1921) and were divorced in 1927. Emerson

Charles became alienated from the family before Warren Charles was born,

and was considered the black sheep. He later changed his name to Charles

Emerson Goines. Charles Emerson Goines went to Janesville, Wisconsin in

about 1927 and met with Laurence and Lulu and all the children, perhaps to

effect a reconciliation. They met in a restaurant. His second wife was

Frieda S. Stamm, whom he married on January 27, 1937 in Rock Island

Illinois. There were no children by that marriage. They lived in Muscatine,

Iowa, where he was a church janitor.

 

(4) William Cecil Goines, MD a urologist of Washington, DC born on November

19, 1895 and died April 12, 1958 in Washington DC, and is buried in

Arlington National Cemetery. His education was interrupted by the draft and

he went into the Army in WWI.

    He was a 2nd Lt. in the 70th Co., 6th M.G. Training Center, main

Training Depot, Camp Hancock, Georgia. Dates of commission October 26, 1918

through January 9, 1919.

    After the war he returned to Howard University Medical College in

Washington DC and in 1918 got his degree as a physician and pharmacist. He

was twice married, the second marriage to Mildred W. (born September 24,

1897 - died December 2, 1976 in Washington DC, buried in Arlington National

Cemetery). Her address at the time of his death is given as 1010 S Street,

N.W., Washington D.C.

 

    His first wife died, and there is no record of any children of that

union.

 

    William Cecil Goines' birth certificate dated November 19, 1895 in

Washington DC states:

    Date of Birth: November 19, 1895

    Place of Birth (Street and Number): 506 P St - NW

    Was it a Male or a Female? male

    Was it White or Colored? Colored

    Full Name of Mother: Emma M. Morgan

    Mother's Maiden Name: " " King

    Mother's Birthplace (State or Country) Va

    Full Name of Father: William H. Goines

    Father's Occupation: Clerk

    Father's Birthplace: DC

    Number of Children Mother has give birth to, including present

birth: four

 

    The five children of Laurence Archibald Goines and Lulu Mae Mead are:

 

(1) William Henry Goines II, (born February 17, 1912 in Denver CO - died

June 6, 1970 in Austin TX) a civil engineer with the federal government. A

graduate of the University of Texas, he was the director of the Texas

United States Geographical Survey (USGS). Married Ruth Lentsch (October 30,

1921 - ) on February 5, 1944 in Austin TX.

 

    They had three sons:

 

    William Henry Goines III (July 20, 1953 in Jackson MS - ), who

married Suzanne Saunders on October 8, 1983 in Kailua Kona, HI. They were

divorced in 1989 and had no children. He is a commercial airline pilot in

Hawai'i. He remarried an Australian,  Ingrid, with whom he has a son,

Emmett (born about 1994).

 

    Laurence Patrick Goines, born August 17, 1955 in Austin TX, married

JoAnna Theresa Benko (born April 25, 1957 in Misawa Japan) on May 19, 1985.

 

    John Timothy Goines, born November 6, 1961 in Austin TX. (2523 Ohio

Drive #1903, Plano TX 75093)

 

    Ruth Lentsch Goines, (2913 Stoneway Drive, Austin TX 78731)

 

(2) Marguerite Kathryn Goines (born July 7, 1913 in San Accacio CO - died

November 2, 1984 in Everett MA) married Ralph Eugene Hughes of Everett MA

on January 14, 1936 in Columbia, Missouri. Marguerite Kathryn Goines was a

graduate of Stevens College, Missouri. They had two sons and one daughter.

 

Howard Chandler Hughes (born May 14, 1938 in Everett Mass) married Jennifer Rainwater on June 9, 1956 in New Orleans LA. Their children are Sean, Megan, Carmen and Adam.

 

    Rosalind Elaine Hughes (born January 11, 1941) married James Terrel

Heath on June 29 19?? in New Orleans LA. She lives in Bellevue Washington.

They had a son named Dayn. She divorced and married a man named Cusak.

 

    Steven Austin Hughes, was born on September 12, 1949 in Everett

Massachusetts and is married to a woman named Mary. They have a son named

Colin.

 

(3) Laurence Archibald Goines II (born October 4, 1915 in San Accacio CO)

lives in Carmel, California. He married Edna Kaye Kamm (born April 12,

1922) called "Kay," on February 17, 1945 in Chicago IL. They have no

children.

 

(4) Patricia Eileen Goines (born April 26, 1918 in San Accacio CO - died

February 12, 1973 in Austin TX) married James Madison Warner on October 1,

1943 in Austin TX. They had one son, James Madison Warner, Jr "Jimmy,"

(July 19, 1948 in San Bernadino CA - ) and twins who died at one day.

Patricia Eileen Goines divorced James Warner in 1962 or '63 and married

James Yent, from whom she was divorced after about 2 years.

 

(5) Dorothy Jeanne Goines a political and legal secretary (born June 30,

1922 in Yemmassee SC -  ). Married Ralph Juneau Claypool (born November 30,

1919 in Wichita Falls, TX, a civil engineer), on October 7, 1942 in Austin

TX.

 

    They had two children:

 

Robert Kent Claypool (born April 11, 1945 in Austin TX - ). He married

Leslie Clark on December 29, 1974. The marriage was annulled because she

wanted to return to the Catholic church. He then married Deborah McGinnis

(born February 17, 1960 in New York - ) on October 7, 1983 in Austin TX.

They have two children: Joseph Juneau Claypool (born January 17, 1983 in El

Paso TX - ) and Travis Lee Claypool (born January 23, 1984 in El Paso TX -

). Debbie McGinnis and Robert Kent Claypool were divorced in January of

1986 in Lubbock TX.

 

Carol Jeanne Claypool (born December 25, 1946 in Austin TX - ) married John

Warren Webb (born April 4, 1945 in Austin TX - ), a biologist. They lived

in Africa for five years and now live in Tennessee. They have three

children:

 

    Jason Wilfred Webb (born July 6, 1970 in Columbus, MS - )

 

    Kerrigan Jeanne Webb (born September 1, 1972 in Grahamstown, South

Africa - )

 

Laura Ann Webb (born February 24, 1975 in Austin TX - )

    Dorothy Jeanne Goines Claypool, 3625 Kentfield Road, Austin TX

78759 Telephone: 1-512-345-4064

 

    * * *

 

Joseph Martin Clore married Carrie Gordon Beale. Joseph Martin Clore showed

his grandson, Warren Charles Goines a photograph of himself in

dress-uniform, with a high bear-skin head dress, telling him that he was a

member of the Capitol Guards. Carrie Gordon Beale was born in Round Hill,

Virginia. Her cousin, Allison Davis, became a renowned anthropologist and

chairman of the department of anthropology at the University of Chicago.

His son, John Davis, also was an anthropologist.

 

    Joseph Martin Clore and Carrie Gordon Beale had six children:

    Ruth Riply Clore (1892 - 1960)

    Louis Leonard (d. 1969) two children, Gordon and June (both born c.

1912)

    Malcolm (died c. 1953), daughter

    Joseph Martin (d. in the 1970s), three children, Donald (born

1920), Audry (born February 29, 1924); Bonnie (1941 - 1955)

    Wilton (d. 1972)

    Raymond & Ralph twins, Raymond died in infancy, Ralph in 1956

 

Warren Charles Goines' grandmother's (Carrie Gordon Beale, Scottish)

grandfather was Jewish.

 

On September 3, 1944 Wanda Burch married Warren Charles Goines in Klamath

Falls, Oregon.

 

Warren Charles Goines and Wanda Burch had 8 children:

 

David Lance Goines                              born May 29, 1945

 

(Born in Grants Pass, Oregon, May 29, 1945 -  ) a

graphic designer and writer on  August 29, 1976, married Sarah Hodges

Leverett (September 30, 1942) an attorney in Berkeley California. They were

divorced on December 22, 1980. There were no children by that marriage.

    He married  a motion picture editor (Born in Fresno

California, June 13, 1962) on July 14, 1985 in Saint Helena, California.

They were divorced on September 22, 1994. There were no children by that

marriage.

    On May 12, 1996 in Santa Cruz, California, David married Sophie

Maureen Aissen (born in Berkeley, California, September 23, 1973). They

were divorced on Decembr XX, 2000. There were no children by that marriage.

 

Lisa Goines (Born in Medford, Oregon on January 2, 1947 -  ) a nurse at

Alta Bates hospital, Berkeley, was married in Berkeley, California (April

10, 1971 and divorced December 13, 1983) H. Tim Hoffman (November 7, 1940 -

) an attorney in Oakland California, by whom she had two daughters, Hannah

Tema (Born in Berkeley, CA April 18, 1975 -  ) and Lydia Gabrielle (Born in

Berkeley CA March 16, 1978 -  ).

    On December 1, 1996, Lisa married Norman Shea. They were divorced

in February 2000. There were no children by that marriage.

 

Lawrence Burch Goines(Born in Salt Lake City, Utah on August 20, 1949 -  )

a housepainter, on November 27, 1977 married Carol Marrone (Born in Los

Angeles, CA on October 27, 1947 -  ). They have two children, Marika

Marrone (Born in Berkeley CA on May 31, 1977 -  ) and Alexander Burch (Born

in Berkeley CA on February 10, 1984 -  ). They separated in 1989, and were

divoced in 1995.

    On July 18, 1996, Lawrence married Linda Page Ballard.

 

Deborah Goines (Born in Fresno, California on May 5, 1951 - died September

17, 1997 in Vancouver, British Columbia) on January 12, 1970 married

Terrance Peter Cloughly (Born in Ireland on December 17, 1947) in North

Vancouver, BC, Canada. Both he and she were hairdressers and beauticians.

They had two children, Nicole Michelle (Born in North Vancouver, BC on

March 26, 1970 - ) and Elliott Terrence (Born in North Vancouver, BC,

Canada on August 8, 1976 - ). They were divorced on February 6, 1992.

    On August 15, 1993 Deborah remarried to Adolf "Dolf" Hengelmolon,

born in Holland. They separated in 1996. There were no children by that

marriage.

 

Lincoln Charles Goines (Born in Fresno, California on October 2, 1953 -  )

a jazz musician playing the upright and electric bass, on November 24, 1982

married Merle Lynette Dumas (born August 3, 1953 in Port of Spain,

Trinidad) in New York City. They had no children, and were divorced in

1996.

        Lincoln Charles Goines and Juliana Kohl have a daughter Lia

Kohl (Goines) born March 6,1989 in Los Angeles, California.

    In October of 1996, Lincoln married Mikako Horiike, a Japanese

national. They have a son, Theo Lincoln Charles Goines, born  October 27,

1999 in New York City.

 

Elisabeth "Libby" Goines (Born in Sacramento, California on February 7,

1956 -  ) weaver, singer and musician, had a daughter by an unidentified

father, Seandra (March 12, 1977 - November 27, 1977).

    She also had two sons by Patrick Farley (September 27, 1943 -  ):

Allin (Born in Takilma OR on February 23, 1981 -  ) and Eusheen (Oisean)

(Born in Takilma, OR on January 3, 1979)

 

Daniel William Goines (Born in Sacramento, California on January 29, 1958 -

) a roofer on May 22, 1988 married Linda Belle Richardson (November 13,

1947 - December 18, 1997). There were no children by that union, and they

were divorced in 1996.

    In 1999 he married Susan Alderson by whom he had a son Thaddeus

Victor Alderson-Goines (March 2000 - ).

 

Sarah Goines (Born in Oakland, California on August 18, 1960 -  ) an

elementary schoolteacher, on March 21, 1993 married James Arvid Armstrong

in Ashland, Oregon.

    A son, Emmett James Armstrong was born to them on June 16, 1995 in

Medford, Oregon.

    Justus Lee Armstrong was born to them on October 29, 1997 in

Ashland, Oregon.

    Terrel Benjamin Armstrong., born 12:37pm June15, 2000, Ashland, Oregon.

 

On February 6, 1988 Nicole Michelle Cloughly married Shane Lowrey (b. March

22, 1970 -  ) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. They had a son, Joshua T (the middle initial does not stand for a name) Lowrey (Born in Vancouver, BC on February 7, 1988 - ). They were divorced in 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

David Lance Goines wrote:

 

“My father, Warren Charles Goines, was born February 6th, 1921 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. His father, Charles Emerson Goines, a civil engineer, turned in his retirement church jani-tor, died in 1984 at the age of ninety-one in Muscatine, Iowa. My paternal grandmother, Ruth Ripley Clore Goines, died of cancer in Los Angeles in 1960. 

 

My father's parents separated when he was young, leaving his upbringing in the hands of his vain, stupid, silly, alcoholic mother. My father seems to have only the bitterest memories of his childhood. He had no siblings.

 

From this side of the family, I claim the credit of even more ethnic variety than from my mother's.  If Mom provided English, Scotch,

Irish, Welsh, French and American Indian, Pop tossed in Spaniards, Basques,

Jews, Cajuns, maybe even a Chinaman, yet another few assorted brands of Red Indians, and assorted Negroes. This last was kept quiet until only

recently. Not so long ago, in parts of this nation, one-sixty-fourth part

Negro blood was sufficient to allow a man or woman to be bought and sold as

personal property. Colored blood was not something to boast about, but more

prudently, to hide away. It is still not all that popular.

 

The reason why tri-racial ancestry was played down is clear. Throughout

most of American history, the legal, social, educational, and economic

disadvantages of being African-American were so great that it was

preferable for a person to be considered almost anything else.

    During the height of segregation, apprehensions were justified. In

1811, for example, the Gingaskin tribe of Virginia's Eastern Shore had its

existence legally terminated by the state, largely because its white

neighbors claimed that the tribe had 'at least half' African-American

blood. In 1824, the Nottoway of Southampton County, Virginia, were

similarly terminated. An attempt was made in 1843 to deprive Virginia's

Pamunkey of their reservation on the grounds that the population had a

Negro admixture. On a personal level, discrimination also occurred. An

attempt was made to subject South Carolina's Elijah Bass and his daughter, Mrs. Thomas White, to the capitation tax imposed upon free persons of color. 

 

Witnesses testified that the family was believed to have mulatto ancestry but had intermarried with white families, had never been compelled to have white guardians as required for free persons of color, and was received in the homes and at the tables of white neighbors. 

 

A suit was pressed in Claiborne County, Tennessee, 1853-58, by the schoolteacher Elijah Goins, who alleged that the brother of his daughter's husband 'spoke . . . false, malicious, scandalous and defamatory words . . [alleging] the plaintiff [to be] a mulatto, meaning a person of mixed blood one degree removed from a full-blooded negro . . . as reason of which said several grievances the plaintiff hath been greatly damaged and subjected to the suspecion [sic] disgrace and infamy of a per-son of mixed blood.

 

    The name Goines (also spelled Goins, Goin, Going, Goings, Goen,

Goin, Gowen, &c.) probably owes something to the Scottish name Gowen (See

Hunter Black Friday, &c. below). The Goin(e)(g)(s) family was represented

in 1980 by some two thousand souls, about equally divided in skin color

between black and white. Except for the outer integument, we look a whole

lot alike.

 

    Since the eighteenth century, communities with a mixed ancestry and

an uncertain ethnic identity have been scattered across the Upper South.

Originating in Virginia1 and North Carolina, they spread significantly into

South Carolina,1 Kentucky and Tennessee, then developed offshoots into the

Deep South1 and states north of the Ohio River.1 Journalists in the

nineteenth and twentieth centuries have called them 'mystery people,' and

advanced incredible legendary stories to account for their origins.

Anthropologists usually refer to them as tri-racial isolates.

 

    The group names Guinea, Lumbee, Smiling, Redbone, Croatan,

Melungeon and Brassankle refer to larger, sub-racial groups of such people,

though they are sometimes also patronymics.

    The Guinea appellation refers to a group of people of mixed white,

Indian and Negro ancestry who originate chiefly in West Virginia, Ohio and

Maryland. The primary attribution of the name is to the West Coast of

Africa, hence a slave recently imported from the West Coast of Africa. The

Spanish Guinao refers to peoples of AmerInd origin, specifically an extinct

Arawakan people of Venezuela. There may be no connection. West Virginia and

Maryland is the locus of the Goines family before the Civil War. It is

likely that the Goines' are of the Guinea people. The name Goines may have

evolved from Guinea, though again there may be no connection.

    The Brassankles are one of a group of mixed white, Indian and Negro

ancestry in South Carolina. The name is also used disparagingly of a person

passing as white who is partially Negro. It is possible that it refers to

the brass shackle used to secure a slave in a coffle

    The Redbones are of mixed white, Indian and Negro blood originating

in Louisiana.

    Croatans are named after an island off the coast of North Carolina,

or the island is named after them. They are people of mixed white, Indian

and Negro blood in southern North Carolina and adjoining sections of South

Carolina.

    Lawrence Archibald Goines, Jr., sent me this information on March 23, 1992, quoting from Black Friday Coming Down: Real Cops. True Stories,

by David Hunter (Berkley Books, New York, 1990, page 87)

 

    The French passed through, but few stayed. It was the Scots, for

the most part, who took up residence. I have never been to Scotland, but I

have talked to those who have. They tell me that East Tennessee is enough

like the Highlands of Scotland to bring tears to Scottish eyes. There are

still annual Highlander festivals held each year in the region.

    East Tennessee, of course, was already inhabited, not by one, but

by two ethnic groups: the Cherokee Indians and a little known people who

had been contemptuously called Melungeons by the French, who first

encountered them. The word meant "mongrel" because the French mistakenly

thought them to be a mixture of white and Indian races. 1

    The Melungeons, the other ethnic group already here [East

Tennessee] when the French first arrived was so intent upon privacy that

they made everyone else seem outgoing. A dark people, with raven hair and

eyes that ran the gamut from black to pale gray to blue, they had such

names as Goin, Collins, and Mullins. Except in Claiborne County, where they

became politically powerful, they kept to themselves, even refusing to take

part in the political process.

    This suited the canny European people. In 1834, the Tennessee state

legislature declared that the Melungeons were a "colored race" and as such

could not vote, own property, sue in a court of law, or marry a white

person. Their neighbors simply moved in and took their land by force, the

law reinforcing their actions.

    Most of the Melungeons retreated to a place called Newman's Ridge

in Hancock County. During the Civil war, they carried out raids against

both the Union and Confederate forces. Today you will find many of their

descendants still there, a shy retiring people.

 

My mother was a Goin, descended from the Melungeons of Clairborne

County. There they were the political power. Fearing their neighbors, they

called themselves "Black Dutch," denying their heritage. It was successful.

It was only after I stumbled across the literature during a research

project that I discovered my mother was a Melungeon.

 

    To this possible etymology for Melungeon, I will add another.

Interestingly enough, Bruce Rodgers in his lexicon of gay slang (The

Queen's Vernacular, Straight Arrow Press, 1972) under the entry "dinge

queen" (black homosexual man) gives a number of general slang words and

phrases for Negroes, one of which is mulengian. His entry reads, "known in

the Midwest, late '60s-71, from Sicilian from a previous derivation of

Italian melanzana = eggplant." Of course, an eggplant is an intense, shiny

purple-black, and is easily compared to the black skin of a Negro.

    It is interesting that the date of birth of John Gabriel Goins

roughly coincides with this disenfranchisement, and that the history of

this branch of the family begins, ex nihilo, in Washington, D. C. at just

about this time.

    A reliable source for this family's heritage is to be found in the

large body of anthropological literature on "mixed racial isolates," of

which the

 

". . . surname Goins (with its many variations in spelling) is the most

widespread and one of the oldest and most reliably indicative surnames of

tri-racial origin in the United States. I have documented its existence

among mixed bloods in more than thirty-five counties and seven states. The

Goinses were mixed in Colonial days in Virginia, and both of the Carolinas.

The name is found today among the Lumbee, the Melungeons, the Smilings, the

Red Bones, the Ohio Guineas, and in various other parts of Ohio, Tennessee

and North Carolina where none of these terms are used. Some are white, some

Indian, and some Negro, in current status.1 An investigation of the

Goinses, their origins and traditions, their dispersal through the South

and the old Northwest Territory and their status today would touch almost

the whole fabric of the tri-racial phenomenon." Calvin L. Beale, Economic

Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. American Anthropologist,

Volume 74 Number 3, June 1972, page 708

 

    The ultimate American originator of our patronymic was probably one

Mihill Goen (Michael Gowen), Negro, who completed his indenture in Virginia

several years before the colony established slavery by law.1  That he was

an indentured servant provides a tantalizing glimpse into his status and

origins, but nothing is certain. The biggest reason that people indentured

themselves was to get to America from someplace else. Sometimes they were

on the run, but generally they were just poor and wanted a chance at a

better life. The fact that Michael Gowen came here of his own free will, as

an indentured servant, shows that he was not brought to America as a slave.

This and other evidence provides good reason to believe that our Goines

ancestors never at any time were slaves, but were always "free persons of

color." Where did he come from? Why did he have a (probably) Scottish

surname?

 

25 October, 1657

Mihill Gowen, negro, of late serving my Brother Xopher [Christopher]

Stafford, dec'd., by his Last Will & Testament, 18 Jan. 1654, had his

freedom given him after the expiration of 4 years service to my Uncle

Robert Stafford. I Anne Barnhouse do absolve quit and discharge the sd.

Mihill Gowen from my service.

 

    The earliest records surviving show one son, William (b. 1655) and

that child's mother, Prossa, (Rosa) the Negro servant of Mrs. Anne

Barnhouse.

 

16 September 1657

I, Anne Barnhouse of Martin's Hundred, Widow, have given Mihill Gowen,

negro, at this time servant to Robert Stafford, a male child born 25 August

1655 of the body of my negro Prossa being baptized by Mr. Edward Johnson 25

Sept. 1655 and named William & I bind myself never to trouble Mihill Gowen

or his son William or demand any service of them.

 

Contemporaneously with Gowen on the Eastern Shore was a man of similar name and circumstances, who may or may not prove to bear a connection to Mihil.   Russell's Free Negro in Virginia mentions one "JohnGeaween being a negro servant unto William Evans" in 1640-41 and reports,

"Geaween, like Dregis, accumulated property, and purchased from Lieutenant

Robert Sheppard his child's freedom; by order of the court the child was

declared to 'be free from the said Evans' its father's master, and 'to be

and remain at the disposing and education of the said Geaween and the

child's god-father, Robert Sheppard."

    The fate of John Geaween and his unidentified son appears to be

unknown. However, scattered land records created over the next sixty years

provide further information on Mihill Gowen.

 

8 Feb. 1668

[Land grant to] Mihill Gowree, 30 or 40 acres, scituate in Mchants hundred

parrish in James Citty Co., formerly belonging to John Turner Dec'd. and by

him purchased of Capt. Rich. Barnehouse and lately found to escheat, . . .

20 Dec. 1666 & now granted to said Gowree.

 

11 Sept. 1717

Inquisition, Jas. City, 11 Sept. 1717 . . . Mihil Goen late of the said

County of Jas. City dyed seised of 30 or 40 acres . . . Escheat . . .

Survey, 24 Nov. 1708, by Christopher Jackson Surveyor of Jas. City Co. is

found to condtain 37 acres . . . in Yorkham parish, Jas. City Co.

 

11 Sept. 1717-22 Jan. 1718

[Grant to] Robert Hubbard, 37 acs. James City Co. in Yorkhampton Parish,

beg[in] at corner of [land of] Mihil Goen (Michael Gowen), Hubbard &

Francis Moreland. . . . Escheated from Mihil Goen, dec'd, by inquisition under Edmund Jennings, Esqr., 11 Sept. 1717.

 

Escheats [that is, the reversals of land titles to the colony] typically occurred when landholders died without legal heirs. Given the fact that Mihill Gowen left descendants, the escheat of his land may indicate a public view that he was not legally married--either to Prossa or a subsequent wife-and that his children were not considered legitimate under the law of the colony.

 

On the other hand, Anthony Johnson, a free black of Acco-mack County, was married to a free wife, Mary. They are believed to have been legally married, and he and Mary did have offspring.

 

However, when Johnson died, a jury of white men in Acco-mack County, assembled in August 1670 by the escheator for the Eastern Shore, John Stringer, decided that because "he was a Negroe and by consequence an alien,"  the land originally held by Anthony Johnson in Virginia should escheat to the Crown' rather than descending to his heirs.  [Deal, "Race and Class," 270]

 

Almost nothing is known about the wives of the early-generation Goins.  William, born 1655, may have married a white woman [a legal and social possibility in Virginia of the 1670s], as all males of the next generation are described as mulattoes. The logical conclusion is that to get from a man born in 1655 as the child of two Africans to men born in the 1740s described as 'about an eight[h],' most wives must have been white, Indian or mixed. Unfortunately, record loss creates some uncertainty whether the Goins of the next generation were William's sons.  If Mihill and Prossa had daughters, these men, or some of them, could have been illegitimate offspring of the women of the family.  Such an assumption is reasonable since that pattern prevailed among other free black families of the Eastern Shore and can be later documented in the Goins family itself. 

 

A record created in adjacent New Kent County, two years after the land of Mihill (or Michael) was regranted to another Virginian, reflects more of the economic discrimination that was faced by such families.  However, it does not speak directly to the ethnic issue-other than its indication that the family of this younger Michael was not considered white.

 

“14 July 1720  Ordered . . . that Peter Harrilson be Surveyor of the Lower prect [precinct] . . . and that he have Michl Gow-ing's Male Tithables, Mrs. Mary Anderson's Tithables at the Quarter adjoining to that, Geo: Butlers,

 

Henry Tylers, and his own Tithables to Assist him.”

 

New Kent County was formed in 1654 of land from York County and James City County.  Hanover County was formed in 1720 from New Kent County.  In that year "Michael Gow-ing" appeared as a resident of the new county in St. Paul's Par-ish, according to "The Vestry Book of St. Paul's Parish, Hanover County, Virginia, 1706-1786" by C. G. Chamber-lane.  A reference to him appeared on page 93:

 

"In Obedience to an order of New Kent Court, dated ye 14th day of July 1720, it's Ordered that the precinct, whereof Jere: Parker is Surveyor, be divided into two precincts & that Peter Harrilson be Surveyor of the Lower Prec't, beginning at Ash Cake Road, thence up the road to Magirt's path, and that he have Mich'l Gow-ing's Male Tithables, Mrs. Butlers, Henry Tylers and his own Tithables to Assist him in the Clearing.”

 

Under Virginia's laws regarding the payment of tithes, white females were not liable far a head tax, although white females who were heads of households might be assessed for male family members or slaves.  By contrast, non-white heads of households were charged with polls for the females in their family.  Thus, the reference to Gowing's male tithables [in contrast to other families in which gender was not specified] clearly implies that he had female tithables also, and, thus, that his family bore discernible or community-recognized color. 

 

Other eighteenth-century sources treating the Goins of Virgin-ia's Northern Neck are more explicit in their ethnic reference. For example, in Fairfax county in 1767, the seventy-year-old Charles Griffith testified that some forty-three years earlier (ca. 1724) he had been the overseer of one Phillip Noland in Stafford County, where one branch of the Goings then lived.

 

According to Griffith, 'when Noland told Majr. Robert Alex-ander that the Goings [who were then Alexander's tenants] were taking and surveying .. . Alexander's land . . . Alexander replied to the said Noland that he had a great mind to turn the Molatto rascals of[f] his land.'

 

    Descendants of the Eastern Neck Goins family served in the colonial

militia, along with other free men of color.1 They fought as soldiers in

the French and Indian War and in the American Revolution in Virginia and

the Carolinas. They bought property, paid taxes, left estates, suffered

wartime losses, and were still free (if sometimes unwelcome) citizens at

the time of the Civil War. Whenever one of the Goins appeared in a

previously Indian-white settlement and was accepted by intermarriage, a

certain proportion of African-American heritage was introduced into the

group, even though it may have been very slight if the migrant Goin was an

octoroon (or even less). Some branches became light enough to be counted as

white by neighbors. Even in a single county, one branch might be labeled

white, another mulatto, and yet another black. . . .

    Another Granville document, filed during the War of 1812, reflects

the extent to which marital alliances linked the Goings with other families

of mixed ancestry. Heirs to the will of Lewis Anderson were named as Jacob

Anderson, Darling Bass and his wife Rhody, Isaac Anderson, Peter Anderson,

Edward Going and his wife Josie, and Benjamin Mitchell and his wide

Winnefred (together with minor grandchildren).1 This pattern of repeated

intermarriages between families of both African and Indian ancestry would

occur time and again as these families dispersed to other frontiers. From

southwestern Virginia and North Carolina, the Goins/Gowen family can be

(and has been) documentarily traced in its migrations-to the northwest via

Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana; and to the southwest via South Carolina,

Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas. (Volume 80,

Number 1, March 1992 of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly,

article by Virginia Easley DeMarce, " 'Verry Slitly Mixt': Tri-Racial

Isolate Families of the Upper South-A Genealogical Study," pages 18-22).

 

Patrick Goins, supposed to be of Ireland, on May 6, 1830, married Ann Hurst in Washington, D. C.  These may be the parents of John Gabriel Goines, though it is not certain.  There have been repeated references in the family tradition to a Patrick Goins of Ireland.

 

Among the family photographs is one of a Patrick Goins who is in appearance as Irish as Paddy's pig.  He looks to be about fifty years old, is wearing an apron over his clothes and is holding an unidentifiable object [perhaps a shaving brush] in his left hand. The name "Patrick" is something of a family name, as well.

 

John Gabriel Goins changed his name to "Goines," adding an "e" sometime between 1860 and 1870. This change may have been done more to associate John Gabriel Goins and his wife with Washington, D.C.'s free colored society and less to reflect actual patrimony.  That the original of the name "Goines" is "Goins" is not open to much dispute.  I don't doubt that Patrick Goins married Ann Hurst in Washington, D. C. on May 6 of 1830.

 

If, however, he was originally Irish, he bore a name that had been common among mixed-blood peoples in the United States for almost two hundred years.

    Though the Irish at that time in the United States and England were

deeply despised, they were still considered white, and it's not likely that

a pure-blood white man would have-or could have-publicly married a mulatto

woman in 1830.

    The "Goines International Registry" published by Halbert's Family

Heritage in 1991 as part of its computer-generated World Book of Goines

provides statistical information about the family name, and claims (and we

here allow for some hyperbole):

 

    Using a highly sophisticated network of computer sources in Europe,

North America, and Australasia, over 220 million name and address records

have been searched to locate Goines family members. The sources of these

records include electoral rolls, telephone books, city directories, and

miscellaneous public surname lists. The result of this research as related

to Goines single and family households is summarized in the following chart.

    "Total Estimated Households are 840; Total Households in Registry:

737; Total Estimated Population: 2,436; Number of Counties, States,

Territories or Provinces where Households reside: 39; Most Populous County,

State, Territory or Province: Texas.

 

    All are located in the United States. No Goines names are found in

Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Ireland,

Germany or Austria.

    Of course, any coat of arms or noble Old World lineage is

transparent nonsense; it is based on the conjecture that the name "Goines"

derives from the French "Godine" (Friend of God). There is nothing to

support this derivation.

    There is, however, plenty of evidence in the family history of

deliberate obfuscation of antecedents. There was something-Negro blood-that

my ancestors wanted to cover up, and for good reason. I don't blame them

for a minute; in 1860 the soupçon of 1/64 Negro blood was enough to allow a

resident of slave states to be bought and sold as chattel, and if you could

hide it, you by God did.

    However, in July of 1993, I met a young woman at a barbecue whose

name was Dale Going, of Irish ancestry, whose brother Robert N. Going of

Amsterdam, New York, is interested in the genealogy of his own family.

Furthermore, looking through the Dublin telephone directory in 1993, I

discovered a "Going." Only one, but there you have it. This does not

precisely throw our genealogy into a cocked hat, but it seriously messes up

the connection between what I know, what I believe to be true and what I

don't know. Patrick may be a red herring, and he may not. The Burch history

is Byzantine enough, what with cousins marrying after the 1690 massacre and

people changing their names and so on and so forth, so I don't rule out the

possibility that we have a Gowen ancestor as well as a Going ancestor, one

a son of Ham and one with the map of Ireland upon his face.

    Looking through the 1993 Dublin, Ireland telephone directory, I

discovered a Rober Going, and wrote him asking if he knew of any Patrick

Going who had emigrated to the United States in or about 1830. On September

14, 1993 he courteously responded:

 

14. Sept. 93

 

Old Kaspar

Kinlen Road

Greystones

County Wiklow

Ireland

 

Dear David Goines,

    Thank you for your letter. I have started to examine my copies of

the Going family trees but up to now have not found a Patrick Going who

would have emigrated in the 1830s. A number of Going, Goin, Gowen (and

other variations on the name) did emigrate to the USA in the 18 hundreds

particularly in the 1840s. Most of our family lived in Counties Tipperary

and Limerick-they were Protestant and we think of Huguenot extraction-there

were few if any Patricks-but a number of Johns, Roberts, Thomases etc.

    I will continue to search and root out any thing that I find to

keep you but alas don't hold out much hope as the records are hard to

verify.

    The name Going is almost certainly of French origin-Goin, and Coing

and Burgeoin. The Crest with palm tree and hand grasping palm branch is

said to be Goin since the Crusades when the Goin ancestors accompanied

Richard Cour de Lion on his Crusades. Motto Dum Sprio Spero (While I

breathe I live) or Serusus [?] Dumino [?] (Always Faithful). That is a

splendid picture of Patrick. What is he holding.

    All the best

    Robert Going

 

    The certificate of marriage (#29087) of Charles P(atrick). Goines

and Lottie Adelaide Chisolm states:

 

    To the Health Officer, District of Columbia

    Date of Marriage: June 29th, 1899

    Full Name of Husband: Charles P. Goines

    Age: Twenty Eight years

    Color: Colored

    Place of Residence: 1932 - 11th St N.W.

    Occupation: Feed business

    Husband's Birthplace: Washington D.C.

    Number of Husband's Marriage: First

    Maiden Name of Wife: Lottie Adelaide Chisolm

    Age: Twenty-five years

    Color: Colored

    Place of Residence: 1915 - 11th St. N.W.

    Wife's Birthplace: Charleston, S. C.

    Number of Wife's Marriage: First

    (In the application for a marriage license, the color of both

Charles Patrick Goines and Lottie Adelaide Chisolm is given as " white,"

which is struck out and "colored" written in beside it.)

 

(7) Margaret A. Goines (born July, 1873 in Washington DC)

(8) Alice E. Goines (born July 1875 in Washington DC)

(9) George W. Goines (born November 1880 in Washington DC)

 

    Boyd's Washington, D.C. Directory of 1860 lists:

        Goins Augustine, dressmaker, h 394 8th west1

        Goins John G. (col'd), painter, bds1 324 8th west

 

    Boyd's Washington, D.C. Directory of 1870 lists:

        Goines Augustine [c] dressmaker, bds 1539 M nw

        Goines John G. [c] lab, 1539 M nw1

 

    Boyd's Washington, D.C. Directory of 1907 lists:

        Goines John G, painter, 2302 6th nw

        Goines Wm H, clk int, 506 P nw

 

    Boyd's Washington, D.C. Directory of 1909 lists:

        Goines, Wm H, physician, 506 P nw

 

    Boyd's Washington, D.C. Directory of 1910 lists:

        Goines Anna, dom, 1434 Corcoran nw

        Goines Wm H, chf div ind o, 506 P nw

 

    Boyd's Washington, D.C. Directory of 1911 lists:

        Goines John G, 506 P nw

        Goines Wm H, physician, 596 P nw, h do1

 

    Boyd's Washington, D.C. Directory of 1912 lists:

        Goines Wm H, physician, 506 P nw

 

    Boyd's Washington, D.C. Directory of 1917 lists:

        Goines Lottie E (wid Chas P) r1218 U nw

         " Wm C clk r506 P nw

 

    Boyd's Washington, D.C. Directory of 1923 lists:

        Goines Henry C chauf r1336 W nw

         " Lotte A (wid Chas) sk lab g p o r1313 T nw

         "   Mary r2706 Olive av nw

      " Phyllis T clk p o d r1615 S nw

         " Wm C mgr Seventh Street Pharmacy r1615 S nw

 

In passing, it might be noted that this small representative sampling of

the Directory is riddled with typographic errors, and requires careful

interpretation. This sloppiness is hard for me to understand, because from

what I know of such directories, the names are entered by subscription and

one would think that they were proofread by the subscriber, thus preventing

errors. But, this was evidently not the case here.

 

In 1850, Senator Henry Clay obtained a compromise, which provided that California would be admitted as a free state, that the slave trade be abolished in the District of Columbia; that New Mexico and Utah be organized without any prohibition of slavery, and a rigid fugitive slave law be enacted.  Slavery, however, remained legal in Washington, D. C. until the end of the War Between the States. Any distinction, therefore, that a free colored person could draw between himself and the slaves whose condition could not but be an uncomfortable reflection on him, was no doubt made.  This subscription by John Ga-briel Goins and his wife Augustine Upshur Goins to have their names included in the D.C. directory says, therefore, two things: first, that they were free, because it goes without say-ing that no slave would be entered in such a directory and, sec-ond that they had a surname and used it publicly.  Slaves were discouraged from using or having a surname, and to have one further emphasized one's free status. The general degree of literacy among the Washington, D. C. Goines' also attests to free status, as many slave states had Draconic laws prohibiting teaching slaves to read and write.

 

    John Gabriel Goines (born January 1836 in the District of Columbia)

and Augustine Upshur (born March 1839 in D. C.) had seven children living

at their home at 745 S Street, Washington D. C., at the time of the census

of 1880. His trade is given as housepainter, hers as keeping house.

 

    William H. twenty years old, messenger Int Dept

    Harriet A. nineteen, hairdresser

    Sarah sixteen, at school

    John G. fourteen, at school

    Mary A. twelve

    Charles P. nine

 

    Also living in the household was Shermond Cupill, nephew, a hotel

worker; birthplace, RI, place of mother's birth, VA.

 

    The 1900 census records John Gabriel Goines, age 64, as living at

1932 Eleventh Street, Washington DC. His wife Augustine is 61. Children are

listed as:

 

    Harriet A. (born November 1861 in Washington DC) 38 years old

    Sarah A. (born March 1864 in DC) 36 years old

    John G. (born July 1866 in DC) 33 years old

    Margaret A. (born July 1873 in DC) 26 years old

    Alice E. (born July 1875 in DC) 24 years old

    George A. (born November 1880 in DC) 19 years old

 

    The 1910 census records William H. Goines (widowed) (physician,

general practice) as living at 506 P Street NW, Washington DC. He owned his

own house, free and clear. The people recorded as also living at this

address were:

 

    John G. (father), age 74, number years present marriage 51

    Augustine (mother) age 71, number years present marriage 51,

        number of children born this mother, 12

        number of these children living, 7

    Emerson (son), age 16, born in DC (occupation student)

    William C. (son) age 14, born in DC (occupation student)

    All members of this household could read and write.

 

    William Henry Goines, MD (born in Washington, DC, December 6, 1859,

died in Arundel, Arundel County, Maryland on August 2, 1912 and is buried

in Woodlawn Cemetery, Washington DC) married Emma Morgan King (born

December 9, 1864 in Paris, Loudon county VA and died March 10, 1907 in

Washington DC; also buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Washington DC). They were

married on June 29, 1887 at the Berean Baptist Church in Washington, DC.

The marriage certificate lists him as 27 years, seven months old.

 

    Color: Mulatto

    Place of residence: 2040 - 17th Street N.W.

    Occupation: Clerk, Department of the Interior

    Maiden name of wife: Emma M. King

    Age: 22 years, ten months

    Color: Mulatto

    Place of residence: #426 M Street, N.W.

    Wife's birthplace: Paris, Virginia

 

    William Henry Goines, MD graduated from Howard University Medical

College.

    The death certificate of William Henry Goines, who died in

Arundel-on-the-Bay, Arundel County, Maryland states:

 

    Sex: male

    Color or race: colored

    Widowed

    Age: 52

    Occupation: physician

    Birthplace: Washington DC

    Name of father: John Gabriel Goines

    Birthplace of father: Washington DC

    Mother: Augustin Upshur

    Birthplace of mother: Washington DC

    Cause of death: Metastatic cancer of liver; from information

supplied by Dr. John R. Francis, Washington DC

    The certificate is attested by Chas. Emerson Goines, 506 P St,

N.W., Washington D. C.

 

    Emma Morgan was at least partly of Welsh ancestry. Though her

patronymic was Morgan, she called herself Emma Morgan King. Morgan was her

father's name, and King was her step-father's name. She was raised by the

Lewis family. This home is where W. H. Goines used to visit Emma (426 M

Street, NW). The Lewis family also lived at 321 - 11th St NE.

    The pleasant tale that Emma Morgan King is blood relative to the

pirate Henry Morgan is contested by the fact that Henry Morgan had no

legitimate children, although he adopted two sons.

    The certificate of death of Emma Morgan King Goines dated March

10/07 in the District of Columbia states:

 

    Sex: Female

    Age: 42

    Color: colored (Beneath this the certificate states "under color,

the term 'colored' includes all of African descent, whether of pure or

mixed blood)

    Conjugal condition: married

    Occupation: housekeeper

    Birthplace of deceased: Virginia

    Birthplace of Father: Virginia

    Birthplace of Mother: Virginia

    Duration of residence in this district: 29 years

    Place of Death: 506 P St N.W.

    Cause of Death: Phitisis pulmonalis & Intestelis (?)

    Duration: 1 year

    Immediate: Exhaustion

    Place of burial: Harmony

    Date of Burial: March 13, 1907

 

FOOTNOTES (Somewhat dissociated, sorry)

 

 Volume 80, Number 1, March 1992 of the National Genealogical Society

Quarterly, article by Virginia Easley DeMarce, " 'Verry Slitly Mixt':

Tri-Racial Isolate Families of the Upper South-A Genealogical Study," pages

6-7 In her footnote number 14, she cites the source for the lawsuit:

    Carol Anne Williams Ledford, "Elijah Goin Sues Slanderer in

Clairborne County," Gowen Newsletter 2 (June 1991): 1,4. Ledford has

supplied the present author with copies of the original documentation.

Witnesses testified that "they are all acquainted with old Tommy Goins the

grandfather of plff [plaintiff] and knew him in 1800, [that] he [was]

reputed to be distantly mixed blooded and that he voted, served on jury

[juries?], and was examined as a witness between white men, [during which

they] never heard him questioned or denied." The comments in court got

rather lively (e. g., did the plaintiff refer to his own cousin as "a

damned negro hog thief"?); but it was proved that the plaintiff, his

father, and his grandfather had voted, performed jury duty, and held such

county offices as constable. The defendant countered that he "did not

intend to charge and impute the legal disabilities of a mulatto but only

the reputation of the county." The local jury found for the plaintiff, but

the case was reversed by the Superior Court in Knoxville on the grounds

that the rumor had been common knowledge and thus the plaintiff sustained

no damages from its repetition.

 

 

 Further sources on genetic isolates in the United States:

    Berry, B. Almost White

    Dromgole, W. A. "The Melungeon Family Tree and its Branches," The

Arena 3:745-751 (1891)

    Harte, T. "Trends in Mate Selection in a Tri-racial Isolate,"

Social Forces 37: 215-221 (1959)

    Hill, Carol W. "Triracial Isolates/Native American Groups in the

Eastern United States . . . in Archaeological "Objectivity" in

Interpretation, One World Archaeology, vol. 1, 1986

    "Who is What? A Preliminary Inquiry into Cultural Physical

Identiy," ed. by S. J. Shennan, pp. 233-241, 1986 One World Archaeology,

vol. 10

    Pollitzer, J. G. "The Physical Anthropology and Genetics of

Marginal People of the Southeastern United States," American

Anthropologist, 74: 719-734 (1972)

    Speck, F. G. The Nanticoke Community of Delaware. Museum of the

American Indian Contributions Vol. 2, No. 4, New York, 1915

    Stopp, G. H. "Mixed Racial Isolates," American Anthropologist 76:

343-345. 1976

 

 

 For an introduction to the seventeenth-century social context that

permitted these groups to originate, see Edmund S. Morgan's American

Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia (New York: W. W.

Norton, 1975)

 

 

 For the South Carolina groups generally, see Brewton Berry, "The Mestizos

of South Carolina," American Journal of Sociology 51 (July 1945): 34-41.

The complicated, overlapping terminology of South Carolina is most clearly

explained in William Harlen Gilbert, Jr., "Memorandum Concerning the

Characteristics of the Larger Mixed-Blood Racial Islands of the Eastern

United States," Social Forces 24 (May 1946): 438-47. Gilbert provides, as

of 1946, names of the groups, population, characteristics, environment,

occupations, economy, nicknames, and bibliography.

 

 

 See Gary B. Mills, "Tracing the Free People of Color in the Antebellum

South: Methods, Sources, and Perspectives," National Genealogical Society

Quarterly 78 (December 1990): 264, regarding families of Nash, Going,

Perkins, and Sweat in northwestern Louisiana; See also Mills, nn. 6 and 7.

Edward T. Price, "The Melungeons: A Mixed-Blood Strain of the Southern

Appalachians," Geographical Review 41 (1951): 271, notes that the Red Bones

of southwestern Louisiana apparently spring from the basic Upper South

group. See also May Wilson McBee, The Natches court Records, 1767-1805:

Abstracts of Early Records (1953; reprinted, Baltimore Md.: Genealogical

Publishing Co., 1979), 595 regarding Gideon Gibson; and E. Russ Williams,

Jr., The Trader-Merchants: The Black People, Free & Slave; Chapters in the

Colonial Ouachita Valley Experience, 1783-1804 (Monroe, La.:

Monroe-Ouachita Valley Bicentennial Commission, 1982), 16 and 34-54,

regarding Zadoc Harman.

 

According to Professor Mills, several names from the present study, particularly Goins, Chavis, Locklear, Hunt, Ivey, Ken-nedy, Sampson, and Scott, are noteworthy names of free non-whites in early Alabama.  Letter of Mills to DeMarce, May 1991.  Several of these appear in Mills, "Miscegenation and the Free Negro in Antebellum 'Anglo' Alabama: A Reex-amination of Southern Race Relations," Journal of American History 68 [June 1981]: 16-34.

 

 Edward T. Price, "The Mixed-Blood Racial Strains of Carmel, Ohio, and Magoffin County, Kentucky," Ohio Journal of Science 50 (1950): 281-90.

 

 

 Volume 80, Number 1, March 1992 of the National Genealogical Society

Quarterly, article by Virginia Easley DeMarce, " 'Verry Slitly Mixt':

Tri-Racial Isolate Families of the Upper South-A Genealogical Study," page

5.

 

 

 "Mongrel" in French is bastard, melange, hybrid. That "melungeon" is

derived from "melange" seems quite possible. The Greek "melan" for dark

colored (as "melanin") probably enters into this etymology somewhere, as

well. Perhaps the "eggplant" argument is really a "melan" argument.

 

 

 "Frank Grouard, the Grabber. Garnet, whose sister married Grouard, heard

Gallino, a Missouri River breed, called him Prazost (Ricker's spelling) at

Red Cloud Agency, saying that was Grouard's name when he lived up on the

Missouri. Nick Janis told Garnett that he knew a former steamboat cook

called Brazo (Ricker's later spelling), a colored man with several Indian

wives, working for the Missouri traders. Mrs. Nettie Goings says she and

Grouard were children of the same father, John Brazeau, a French Creole

employed by the American Fur Company at Fort Pierre and related to the

Chouteaus and Picottes. Stover says Grouard told him he was a cousin of the

mother of Frank Goings, a colored woman, and came from up near Apple river.

(Indian relationship terms are flexible and translations vary.  Author)

Crazy Horse, The Strange Man of the Oglalas, Mari Sandoz, University of

Nebraska Press, 1942, page 426

 

 

 This information about Mihill Goen is from Volume 80, Number 1, March 1992

of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, article by Virginia Easley

DeMarce, " 'Verry Slitly Mixt': Tri-Racial Isolate Families of the Upper

South-A Genealogical Study," pages 5-35.

 

 

 Linsay O. Duvall, Virginia Colonial Abstacts [sic], ser. 2, vol. 5, Wills,

Deeds, Orders of York County, Virginia, 1657-1659 (Easley, S. C.: Southern

Historical Press, 1978), 16, 18.

 

 

 Beale, "Overview of the Phenomenon of Mixed Racial Isolates," 708.

Prossa's name is rendered as Rosa in Philip Alexander Bruce, Economic

History of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century, 2 vols. (1895-1907;

reprinted, N. Y.: Peter Smith, 1935) 2: 96 n. l.

 

 

 Lindsay O. Duvall, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, ser. 2, vol. 4, James City

County, Virginia, 1634-1904 (Easley, S. C.: Southern Historical Press,

1979), 42

 

 

 Lindsay O. Duvall, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, ser. 2, vol. 4, James City

County, Virginia, 1634-1904 (Easley, S. C.: Southern Historical Press,

1979), 78

 

 

 Nell Marion Nugent, Cavaliers and Poineers, Abstracts of Virginia Land

Patents and Grants, 1623-1800, 3 vols. (Richmond: Press of Dietz Printing,

1934; and Va. State Library, 1977, 1979) 3: 210.

 

 

 Dred Scott, a Missouri slave, sued for his freedom after his owner took

him into free territory. The 1857 Supreme Court case of Dred Scott v

Sanford held that Congress could not bar slavery in the territories. Scott

remained a slave because the Missouri Compromise of 1820, prohibiting

slavery from part of the Louisiana Purchase, violated the Fifth Amendment

by depriving slave owners of their property without due process of law.

Scott himself was held unable to sue on his own behalf, because he was held

to be property and not a citizen.

    I'm not sure of the legal logic that denied citizenship to free

Black Africans, especially property owners, unless it was generally agreed

that Negros were ipso facto not fully citizens. I also do not know what the

legal logic was when free persons of color were stripped of their rights in

the 1840s.

    It seems plain to me that the Dred Scott decision has more to it

than is often supposed. The extraordinary speculation in slave prices has

at least one foundation, that being the "greater fool theory," in which the

buyer believes that he is in an eternally rising market. "I may be a fool

to pay this much, but without too much trouble I can find a fool even

greater than myself who will pay even more." Slaves did have real value,

and when it is considered that a healthy breeding female could be expected

to produce four or five slaves for either the market or domestic labor, a

thousand dollars does not seem too high. "Fancy girls for fancy gentlemen,"

brought truly astronomical prices. Three to five thousand for a high yellow

beauty was not uncommon. Underlying the later prices of slaves is an oddly

serene confidence that, come what may, the buyer will not be left holding

the bag. The year 1857 is extraordinarily close to the beginning of the

Civil War, and it may be the case that slave owners may have thought that

the Dred Scott case was an invitation to the Congress to advance a general

slave buy-out. Since the center of the decision was that Dred Scott was valuable property, of which his owner could not be deprived except with

just compensation, it seems that the case was a heavy-handed hint to theNorth that if they wanted slavery abolished, and wanted to avoid war, they

could just buy all the slaves, free them and be done with it. I imaginethat the expense required would have been many millions, but as it turned out the war cost a lot more than that. In any event, the overture failed.

 

"In the matter of continued intermarriages with whites, see for example Eli Wadsworth's affidavit, 'Daniel Go-ins' Genealogy,' 21, stating that 'his grandfather, Wil-liam Goins was mixt , his grand mother Patsey Petty was white . . . her great grand father Edward Goins ‘was slitly mixt about an eight[h] her grand mother Celia Co-fer white, her father William Goins verry slitly mixt,  her mother Kisiah Sinclare white,'" according to the “National Genealogical Society Quarterly,” Volume 80, Number 1, March 1992.  It contained an article by Dr. Virginia Easley DeMarce entitled, "Verry Slitly Mixt': Tri-Racial Isolate Families of the Upper South--A Genealogical Study," page 27.”

 

 See Weisiger, Charles City County, Virginia, Records: 1737-1774, 81;

Rosalie Edith Davis, Louisa County, Virginia, 1743-1814: Where Have All the

Children Gone? (Manchester, Mo.: Heritage Trails, 1980), 61, 66, 70-71; and

Davis, Fredericksville Parish Vestry Book: Indentures and Processioning

Returns, 1742-1787 (Manchester, Mo.: Heritage Trails, 1981), 29

 

 

 Ruth and Sam Sparacio, transcr., Land Records of Long Standing, Fairfax

County, Virginia, (1742-1770) (McLean, Va.: The Antient Press, 1988),89.

 

 

 "In early Virginia, free nonwhite males were expected to do militia duty.

For example, in Accomack County in 1685, James Longo was fined for not

appearing for militia muster-according to Deal. 'Race and Class,' 425.

According to Breen and Innes, Myne Owne Ground, 26, it was 'not until 1738'

that Virginia statutes limited their participation by requiring free

mulattoes, Negroes, and Indian militiamen to appear without arms. The

statute, which is actually dated 1723, limited their militia service to the

position of drummer or trumpeter except in case of 'Invasion, Insurrection,

or Rebellion,' when they would be 'obliged to attend and march with the

Militia, and do the Duty of Pioneers, or such other servile Labor as they

shall be directed to perform.' See A Collection of All the Acts of

Assembly, Now in Force in the Colony of Virginia . . . (1733; reprinted,

Baltimore: Gateway Press, 1976), 334.

    Whatever the law may have prescribed, these families apparently

continued to appear armed. See the general reference works on colonial

soldiers, such as those by Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck, Virginia's Colonial

Soldiers (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1983).

    In North Carolina, the same ambiguities existed. 'In the colonial

period, free Negroes served in the militia . . . with no apparent

discrimination against them,' according to Franklin, who presumably

included mulattoes and tri-racial individuals in this catchall phrase free

Negroes. By 1815, the sons and grandsons of men who had served as soldiers

in the Revolution were legally relegated to musician status in the North

Carolina militia. See Franklin, Free Negro in North Carolina, 102-3."

(Volume 80, Number 1, March 1992 of the National Genealogical Society

Quarterly, article by Virginia Easley DeMarce, " 'Verry Slitly Mixt':

Tri-Racial Isolate Families of the Upper South-A Genealogical Study," page

32).

 

 

 Zac Hargett Gwynn, Abstracts of the Wills and Estate Records of Granville

County, North Carolina, 1808-1833, 2 vols. (Rocky Mount, N. C.: Joseph W.

Watson, 1976), 2: 67.

 

 

 For a White man to publicly marry a colored woman at any time after about

the middle of the seventieth century was extremely rare, and also illegal

in many slave states. If the woman was a slave, the children,

too-regardless of the status of the father-were born slaves, as the slave

or free status followed the mother, not the father. See Warren M. Billings,

"The Cases of Fernando and Elizabeth Key: A Note on the Status of Blacks in

Seventeenth-Century Virginia," William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 30

(July 1973): 467-74. Billings speculates that this case, in which Elizabeth

contended that under common law a child followed the status of the father,

may have contributed to the passage of the Virginia legislation which

determined that in relation to slavery, the child was to follow the status

of the mother. (DeMarce, 27).

 

 

 The street number is probably a typographical error.

 

 

 I believe that "bds" means "boards," i.e. that he is a boarder at this

address.

 

 

 Notice that at this point the name is changed from "Goins" to "Goines."

The Washington directory has a number of "Goins" and "Goings" who, we may

safely suppose, are related in some way to "Goines."

 

 

 The "596" address given here may be a typographic error.

 

Patrick Goins, supposed to be of Ireland, on May 6, 1830, married a

(mulatto?) woman Ann Hurst in Washington DC. These may be the parents of

John Gabriel Goins, though it is not certain.

    John Gabriel Goins (born January 1836 in Washington DC) on October

6, 1859, in Washington DC, married Augustine Upshur (born March 1839 in

Washington DC).1(2)  According to the 1900 census, Augustine gave birth to

12 children, of whom 9 were alive at the time.

    The children of John Gabriel Goins and Augustine Upshur were:

 

(1) William Henry Goines (born December 6, 1859 in Washington DC - died

August 2, 1912 in Arundel MD). He married Emma Morgan King (born December

9, 1864 in Virginia - died March 10, 1907 in Washington DC) on June 29,

1887.

(2) Harriet A. Goines (born November 1861 in Washington DC)

(3) Sarah A. Goines (born March 1864 in Washington DC)

(4) John Gabriel Goines II (born July 1866 in Washington DC)

(5) Mary A. Goines (born 1869 in Washington DC)

(6) Charles Patrick Goines (born 1871 in Washington DC). He married

    Lottie Adelaide Chisolm on June 29, 1899.

 

    William Henry Goines, MD and Emma Morgan King had four children:

 

(1) Laurence Archibald Goines (born in Washington DC on July 23, 1888 -

died in Alliance, Nebraska, Box Butte County, December 18, 1932), a civil

engineer, married on July 29, 1910 to Lulu Mae Mead (born in Dry Creek,

Carbon County Wyoming on October 6, 1888 and died in Austin TX on February

26, 1978).

 

    Lulu Mae Mead was the niece of Daniel Mead, the first director of

the Bureau of Reclamation, after whom Lake Mead is named. Lulu Mae Mead's

father was George Shakespere Mead (born on October 9, 1861 in

Thompsonville, Racine County Wyoming - died on December 26, 1940 in

Cheyenne Wyoming) who lived in Wyoming, and her mother was Carrie Mae Hill

(born August 14, 1862 in Johnstown, Rock County WI - died Austin TX January

19, 1953). They were married on June 27, 1887 in on the C.M. Morrison

Ranch, Ferris Tract, Carbon County Wyoming. Their other children were:

 

    Minnie Ann Mead (July 27, 1890 in Ferris, WY - died February 12,

1908 in Bozeman MT). She married George Trone.

 

    George Henry Mead (born August 18, 1892 in Ferris WY - died January

30, 1949 in Cheyenne WY)

 

    Nellie Mead (born September 2, 1895 in Thermopolis WY - died

January 11, 1967 in Santa Cruz CA) married Earnest Joseph Pickens.

 

(2)  "A pension claim filed by a Mississippi black soldier's widow made the

same point [about black surnames being hidden from whites].  'My maiden

name was Rebecca Upshur but I went by the name of my owner [Nathaniel B.

Lanier] and was called Rebecca Lanier.'"  The Black Family in Slavery and

Freedom, 1750 - 1925, Herbert G. Gutman, Random House, 1976, page 238

 

    Ethel Easter Mead (born April 10, 1898 in basin WY - died in

Cheyenne WY). Married Otis James Kitchen.

 

    The birth certificate of Laurence Archibald Goines indicates that

his father's occupation is Clerk Reusim (sic) (3) Office. He was born at

2040 17th St NW, Washington DC. He is registered as colored. Laurence

Archibald Goines claimed in adulthood to have been born and educated in New

York City.

 

(3)  I don't know what this means.

 

(2) Emily (called Meg) Augustine Goines (born in Washington DC on January

25, 1891 - died May 19, 1892 in Washington DC). She is buried in Harmony

cemetery, Landover MD

    In the Washington DC Evening Star the following notice appears:

    On Thursday May 19, 1892 at 7 o'clock am Emily Augustine, infant

daughter of William H. and Emma M. Goines.

    And thou art dead, as young and fair

    As a flight of mortal birth

    And form so soft and charms so rare

    To soon return to earth.

Funeral from parent's residence 506 P Street NW, Sat. 21st, 2 o'clock pm

 

(3) Emerson Charles Goines (born June 17, 1893 in Washington DC - died

September 12, 1983 in Muscatine, Iowa). He, too, claimed to have been born

in New York City, and like his brother became a civil engineer. He married

Ruth Ripley Clore (1892 - died May 1960 in Los Angeles CA) in 1916 in

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. They had one son, Warren Charles Goines, (Born in

Milwaukee, Wisconsin February 6, 1921) and were divorced in 1927. Emerson

Charles became alienated from the family before Warren Charles was born,

and was considered the black sheep. He later changed his name to Charles

Emerson Goines. Charles Emerson Goines went to Janesville, Wisconsin in

about 1927 and met with Laurence and Lulu and all the children, perhaps to

effect a reconciliation. They met in a restaurant. His second wife was

Frieda S. Stamm, whom he married on January 27, 1937 in Rock Island

Illinois. There were no children by that marriage. They lived in Muscatine,

Iowa, where he was a church janitor.

 

(4) William Cecil Goines, MD a urologist of Washington, DC born on November

19, 1895 and died April 12, 1958 in Washington DC, and is buried in

Arlington National Cemetery. His education was interrupted by the draft and

he went into the Army in WWI.

    He was a 2nd Lt. in the 70th Co., 6th M.G. Training Center, main

Training Depot, Camp Hancock, Georgia. Dates of commission October 26, 1918

through January 9, 1919.

    After the war he returned to Howard University Medical College in

Washington DC and in 1918 got his degree as a physician and pharmacist. He

was twice married, the second marriage to Mildred W. (born September 24,

1897 - died December 2, 1976 in Washington DC, buried in Arlington National

Cemetery). Her address at the time of his death is given as 1010 S Street,

N.W., Washington D.C.

 

    His first wife died, and there is no record of any children of that

union.

 

    William Cecil Goines' birth certificate dated November 19, 1895 in

Washington DC states:

    Date of Birth: November 19, 1895

    Place of Birth (Street and Number): 506 P St - NW

    Was it a Male or a Female? male

    Was it White or Colored? Colored

    Full Name of Mother: Emma M. Morgan

    Mother's Maiden Name: " " King

    Mother's Birthplace (State or Country) Va

    Full Name of Father: William H. Goines

    Father's Occupation: Clerk

    Father's Birthplace: DC

    Number of Children Mother has give birth to, including present

birth: four

 

    The five children of Laurence Archibald Goines and Lulu Mae Mead are:

 

(1) William Henry Goines II, (born February 17, 1912 in Denver CO - died

June 6, 1970 in Austin TX) a civil engineer with the federal government. A

graduate of the University of Texas, he was the director of the Texas

United States Geographical Survey (USGS). Married Ruth Lentsch (October 30,

1921 - ) on February 5, 1944 in Austin TX.

 

    They had three sons:

 

    William Henry Goines III (July 20, 1953 in Jackson MS - ), who

married Suzanne Saunders on October 8, 1983 in Kailua Kona, HI. They were

divorced in 1989 and had no children. He is a commercial airline pilot in

Hawai'i. He remarried an Australian,  Ingrid, with whom he has a son,

Emmett (born about 1994).

 

    Laurence Patrick Goines, born August 17, 1955 in Austin TX, married

JoAnna Theresa Benko (born April 25, 1957 in Misawa Japan) on May 19, 1985.

 

John Timothy Goines, born November 6, 1961 in Austin TX. (2523 Ohio

Drive #1903, Plano TX 75093)

 

Ruth Lentsch Goines, (2913 Stoneway Drive, Austin TX 78731)

 

(2) Marguerite Kathryn Goines (born July 7, 1913 in San Accacio CO - died

November 2, 1984 in Everett MA) married Ralph Eugene Hughes of Everett MA

on January 14, 1936 in Columbia, Missouri. Marguerite Kathryn Goines was a

graduate of Stevens College, Missouri. They had two sons and one daughter.

    Howard Chandler Hughes (born May 14, 1938 in Everett Mass) married

Jennifer Rainwater on June 9, 1956 in New Orleans LA. Their children are

Sean, Megan, Carmen and Adam.

 

    Rosalind Elaine Hughes (born January 11, 1941) married James Terrel

Heath on June 29 19?? in New Orleans LA. She lives in Bellevue Washington.

They had a son named Dayn. She divorced and married a man named Cusak.

 

    Steven Austin Hughes, was born on September 12, 1949 in Everett

Massachusetts and is married to a woman named Mary. They have a son named

Colin.

 

(3) Laurence Archibald Goines II (born October 4, 1915 in San Accacio CO)

lives in Carmel, California. He married Edna Kaye Kamm (born April 12,

1922) called "Kay," on February 17, 1945 in Chicago IL. They have no

children.

 

(4) Patricia Eileen Goines (born April 26, 1918 in San Accacio CO - died

February 12, 1973 in Austin TX) married James Madison Warner on October 1,

1943 in Austin TX. They had one son, James Madison Warner, Jr "Jimmy,"

(July 19, 1948 in San Bernadino CA - ) and twins who died at one day.

Patricia Eileen Goines divorced James Warner in 1962 or '63 and married

James Yent, from whom she was divorced after about 2 years.

 

(5) Dorothy Jeanne Goines a political and legal secretary (born June 30,

1922 in Yemmassee SC -  ). Married Ralph Juneau Claypool (born November 30,

1919 in Wichita Falls, TX, a civil engineer), on October 7, 1942 in Austin

TX.

 

    They had two children:

 

Robert Kent Claypool (born April 11, 1945 in Austin TX - ). He married

Leslie Clark on December 29, 1974. The marriage was annulled because she

wanted to return to the Catholic church. He then married Deborah McGinnis

(born February 17, 1960 in New York - ) on October 7, 1983 in Austin TX.

They have two children: Joseph Juneau Claypool (born January 17, 1983 in El

Paso TX - ) and Travis Lee Claypool (born January 23, 1984 in El Paso TX -

). Debbie McGinnis and Robert Kent Claypool were divorced in January of

1986 in Lubbock TX.

 

Carol Jeanne Claypool (born December 25, 1946 in Austin TX - ) married John

Warren Webb (born April 4, 1945 in Austin TX - ), a biologist. They lived

in Africa for five years and now live in Tennessee. They have three

children:

 

    Jason Wilfred Webb (born July 6, 1970 in Columbus, MS - )

 

    Kerrigan Jeanne Webb (born September 1, 1972 in Grahamstown, South

Africa - )

 

Laura Ann Webb (born February 24, 1975 in Austin TX - )

    Dorothy Jeanne Goines Claypool, 3625 Kentfield Road, Austin TX

78759 Telephone: 1-512-345-4064

 

    * * *

 

Joseph Martin Clore married Carrie Gordon Beale. Joseph Martin Clore showed

his grandson, Warren Charles Goines a photograph of himself in

dress-uniform, with a high bear-skin head dress, telling him that he was a

member of the Capitol Guards. Carrie Gordon Beale was born in Round Hill,

Virginia. Her cousin, Allison Davis, became a renowned anthropologist and

chairman of the department of anthropology at the University of Chicago.

His son, John Davis, also was an anthropologist.

 

    Joseph Martin Clore and Carrie Gordon Beale had six children:

    Ruth Riply Clore (1892 - 1960)

    Louis Leonard (d. 1969) two children, Gordon and June (both born c.

1912)

    Malcolm (died c. 1953), daughter

    Joseph Martin (d. in the 1970s), three children, Donald (born

1920), Audry (born February 29, 1924); Bonnie (1941 - 1955)

    Wilton (d. 1972)

    Raymond & Ralph twins, Raymond died in infancy, Ralph in 1956

 

Warren Charles Goines' grandmother's (Carrie Gordon Beale, Scottish)

grandfather was Jewish.

 

On September 3, 1944 Wanda Burch married Warren Charles Goines in Klamath

Falls, Oregon.

 

Warren Charles Goines and Wanda Burch had 8 children:

 

David Lance Goines (Born in Grants Pass, Oregon, May 29, 1945 -  ) a

graphic designer and writer on  August 29, 1976, married Sarah Hodges

Leverett (September 30, 1942) an attorney in Berkeley California. They were

divorced on December 22, 1980. There were no children by that marriage.

    He married a motion picture editor (Born in Fresno

California, June 13, 1962) on July 14, 1985 in Saint Helena, California.

They were divorced on September 22, 1994. There were no children by that

marriage.

    On May 12, 1996 in Santa Cruz, California, David married Sophie

Maureen Aissen (born in Berkeley, California, September 23, 1973). They

were divorced on Decembr XX, 2000. There were no children by that marriage.

 

The following article concerning the work of David Lance Go­ines was published in "Art Business News" in its December 1995 edition.

 

By Tony Fusco

 

"With the publication of his most recent poster ‑ his 162nd since 1968‑ the career of Berkeley, California graphic designer and journeyman printer David Lance Goines [b. 1945] has in many ways come full circle.

 

The poster celebrated the 25th anniversary of the University Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive in Berkeley, a client for whom Goines has designed and printed some 30 posters in his 30‑year career.

 

Today, his series of posters for this client are among his best known, and were featured in the University Art Museum anniversary exhibition, which closed toward the end of August.

 

While still best known in the San Francisco Bay area, Goines has gained a national reputation among graphic design profes­sionals and poster aficionados and collectors. This most recent exhibition can only serve to enhance his profile, as the Univer­sity Art Museum has kept the entire exhibition online.

 

 Not only can you take a Virtual tour" of the exhibit via Internet (http://www.uampfa.berkeley.edu),l they've made it possible to download the Goines designs without charge as a screen saver. The museum is reporting over 7,000 "hits" a week to their web site.

 

Another full circle in Goines' story: in 1966 the old University Art Museum, now a fire station, was the site of one of the most important graphic events of the 1960s: a show of Jugendstil [German and Austrian Art Nouveau] posters.

 

"This exhibition was seen by all of the people in San Francisco and Berkeley who were doing posters for rock 'n' roll events of the time," Goines writes in his notes on the poster. "As a press­man, I printed some of their psychedelic posters and later be­came a poster designer myself. "

 

Should the combination of graphic designer/journeyman printer fail to awe you, add writer, teacher, calligrapher, typographer, and eight‑gallon blood donor to Goines' credits.

 

 Then consider that his book, "A Constructed Roman Alphabet" [Godine, 1982], received the 1983 American Book Award for design and that his work is in the permanent collections of the Cooper­Hewitt/National Design Museum, the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art, and many others. He has over 60 oneman and group shows nationally and internationally on his vita.

 

Today his works are beginning to surface as collectibles in New York City poster auctions such as Swann Galleries and Poster Auctions International, side by side with other post World War II noted American graphic designers such as Milton Glaser, Seymour Chwast and psychedelic‑era artists like Wes Wilson.

 

Goines is a poster maker in the traditional sense. He has been called the Toulouse Lautrec of the 1990s. His ability to com-bine the commercial concerns of the client with his own uncompromised aesthetic integrity has created a true modern revival of the medium of fine poster art.

 

Like poster artists at the last turn‑of‑the‑century, his clients come to him with commissions for posters ‑ to announce events, publicize a business or sell products.

 

The only exceptions are a few posters he has published pro bono publico to express his own political or social views, such as his dramatic 1991 poster "No War," created in response to the Gulf War, but really a statement against all war.  It received wide recognition, was published in several graphic design and printing magazines, and was included in the book "Angry Posters, Protest Posters of the Regan/Bush Era" [Perrigrine Smith, 1992].

 

Occasionally, one of his posters will become "cannon fodder for bored reporters," to quote Goines, such as his 1985 AIDS Prevention poster for the Student Health Service at Berkeley.

 

However, for the most part, his clients wouldn't be considered controversial, and most are local. Recent clients include the Berkeley Horticultural Society, the San Francisco Early Music Society, the Los Angeles Central Library, Bananas Child Care Information and Referral, and Mount Vedeer Winery.

 

Add to that list, of course, the Berkeley restaurant Chez Panisse, another of Goines' well‑known poster series for a long‑standing client located just two blocks away from Goines' operations.

 

Yet, in spite of all the publications, accolades and awards, Goines still prefers to work alone, as designer, printer and pub­lisher at his business, the Saint Heironymous Press.

 

In a recent telephone interview with “Art Business News,” Goines commented with a laugh, "I guess one of the reasons why I haven't done more corporate work is that the corporate types say 'Have your girl call my girl to arrange an appoint-ment,' but I haven't got a girl!  I also don't want to be told 'blue‑greens sell better than yellow‑greens'.  They want to dictate my artistic choices."

 

His current poster project? A 24th‑anniversary poster for client and friend Alice Waters at Chez Panisse, to be published in an edition of 962 copies.  Like all of his posters since 1992, only 100 will be signed and numbered by him, with another 26 signed and lettered A‑Z for his own use.

 

Editions that small mitigate against a broad national distribu­tion, but Goines has held his ground.  "For one thing, large edi­tions are beyond my printing abilities," he noted. "I would love to have wider representation, but I'm just not willing to sacrifice the quality of my work to get the money."

 

The now discontinued "Aura Design" line from Graphique de France, Woburn, Mass., once carried five different Goines from his original unsigned editions, such as his 1978 poster "Dance: The Cinc Arts Ball," but they had to advertise them as available in very limited quantities.

 

The technical excellence with which Goines executes his posters is an inherent part of their appeal. His offset press is an ATF Solna Chief 24, manufactured in 1954. He does the entire print run single­handedly. The only exception he makes is for some posters that include foil stamping, which is done by a col­league at another firm.

 

His use of photo‑offset lithography is also unique. Instead of using the usual four‑color separation process, which results in an overall dot screen, Goines makes separate solid tone plates for each color he uses, ranging in number from as few as three to as many as 20.

 

The colors and juxtaposition of colors created in this often painstaking manner are extraordinarily subtle and complex. Goines' use of this solid‑color offset lithography process is en­tirely personal, and involves as high a degree of craftsmanship as any of the more traditional methods of fine print­making. such as stone lithography or silk screening.

 

"The colors are built up using the printing press as the tool," Goines explains. "Similar methods were used through the 1920s, so that my design process mirrors that used by such poster artists as Ludwig Hohlwein."

 

Indeed, in the interview preface to the book Goines Posters (Alphabet Press, 1985), he stated that he "consciously emulated the work of those artists whom I admire, most notably Ludwig Hohlwein, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Hans Rudi Erdt, Al­brecht Durer, Hokusai and Hisoshige."

 

Perhaps he was referring to the German artists Hohlwein's and Erdt's flat color fields and simplified design; the refined ornamentation of Mackintosh's Glasgow School; Durer's atten­tion to detail; and the delicate openness of Japanese prints. Whatever the influences may have been, Goines has developed his own unique and recognizable style.

 

"I'm not aware of any other artist who also prints their work us­ing an offset press. It isn't something they teach at art schools," he notes. "But I am aware that printing is undergoing a dramatic change in technology.  Even Kodak sees the length of time limited for the use of photographic film in printing.  Just look at how quickly current offset methods replaced the letterpress.  In five years I may not be able to get the supplies I need."

 

Both Goines' signed and unsigned posters, especially those pro­duced before 1975, have become highly valued in the poster collecting market. Early, rare signed posters now retail from about $500 to a high of $3,000 for the 1973 poster for his own first retrospective exhibition.

 

Several signed prints, and a few of his unsigned editions, are no longer available at retail at all.  Even early unsigned posters can retail as high as $2,000.

 

For posters produced since 1975, almost all signed examples retail from about $500 down to $150 for the most recent, and unsigned ones from about $300 down to $35.  His editions rarely exceed 3,000 total impressions, with 1,500 to 2,000 being the most common print run and with most of the print run becoming the property of the client to do with as they see fit. Some of his posters are so popular they have had more than one edition.

 

However, with very few exceptions, no editions other than the first are hand‑signed.

 

Some time ago, in response to evidence of pirating, he licensed Portal Productions to reproduce a certain number of his posters. Discontinued in 1987, these editions were printed four‑color process photo‑offset, and therefore have the dot screen on close inspection, allowing a collector to easily distinguish them from the originals. They were also produced five percent larger than the originals and on thin glossy paper stock as opposed to the Mohawk No. 80 Superfine Cover that Goines prefers.

 

Long‑time, loyal Goines collectors who want to be ensured of receiving a hand‑signed copy of each poster he produces at a special price of only $100, actually have a standing subscription with his exclusive gallery/distributor Dow & Frosini in Berkeley.

 

For over 20 years, from 1972 until its closing in 1994, Goines' exclusive gallery was Thackery & Robertson, formerly called The Poster, in San Francisco.

 

"I like having an exclusive gallery," comments Goines.  "I like the fact that they are local, and they do a good job."

 

Dow & Frosini owner Todd Padgett notes, "We've had a rela­tionship with David for over 20 years, selling his unsigned posters.  When Thackery & Robertson closed their doors, we were pleased to be asked to take their place."

 

Dow & Frosini specializes in promoting Bay area artists, and Goines has become one of its main artists.  Padgett is in the pro­cess of compiling a new book on Goines' posters, this time with commentary on each one written by the artist.

 

"It is fascinating to see a second generation of enthusiasts buy­ing David's work. The students here in Berkeley buying his posters today are the sons and daughters of those buying them 20 years ago. They grew up with them in their parents' home and are now discovering them for themselves," Padgett says.

 

Goines had another observation about the same phenomenon. "Artists, writers and others in the arts never seem to have very long careers," he states. "I feel lucky to see my work moving beyond a full human generation."

 

It's another way in which Goines' career has come full circle, even as his reputation continues to spiral outward from the Bay area.

 

Additional information on the posters of David Lance Goines is available from Todd Padgett at Dow & Frosini, 2284 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94704. Phone: (510) 841‑4402; fax: (510) 841‑5057, E mail: dowfro @ ix.netcom.com.

 

Tony Fusco, specialist in posters and Art Deco, is director of Fusco & Four Associates, One Murdock Terrace, Brighton, Mass."

 

 

 

 

Lisa Goines (Born in Medford, Oregon on January 2, 1947 -  ) a nurse at

Alta Bates hospital, Berkeley, was married in Berkeley, California (April

10, 1971 and divorced December 13, 1983) H. Tim Hoffman (November 7, 1940 -

) an attorney in Oakland California, by whom she had two daughters, Hannah

Tema (Born in Berkeley, CA April 18, 1975 -  ) and Lydia Gabrielle (Born in

Berkeley CA March 16, 1978 -  ).

    On December 1, 1996, Lisa married Norman Shea. They were divorced

in February 2000. There were no children by that marriage.

 

Lawrence Burch Goines(Born in Salt Lake City, Utah on August 20, 1949 -  )

a housepainter, on November 27, 1977 married Carol Marrone (Born in Los

Angeles, CA on October 27, 1947 -  ). They have two children, Marika

Marrone (Born in Berkeley CA on May 31, 1977 -  ) and Alexander Burch (Born

in Berkeley CA on February 10, 1984 -  ). They separated in 1989, and were

divoced in 1995.

    On July 18, 1996, Lawrence married Linda Page Ballard.

 

Deborah Goines (Born in Fresno, California on May 5, 1951 - died September

17, 1997 in Vancouver, British Columbia) on January 12, 1970 married

Terrance Peter Cloughly (Born in Ireland on December 17, 1947) in North

Vancouver, BC, Canada. Both he and she were hairdressers and beauticians.

They had two children, Nicole Michelle (Born in North Vancouver, BC on

March 26, 1970 - ) and Elliott Terrence (Born in North Vancouver, BC,

Canada on August 8, 1976 - ). They were divorced on February 6, 1992.

    On August 15, 1993 Deborah remarried to Adolf "Dolf" Hengelmolon,

born in Holland. They separated in 1996. There were no children by that

marriage.

 

Lincoln Charles Goines (Born in Fresno, California on October 2, 1953 -  )

a jazz musician playing the upright and electric bass, on November 24, 1982

married Merle Lynette Dumas (born August 3, 1953 in Port of Spain,

Trinidad) in New York City. They had no children, and were divorced in

1996.

        Lincoln Charles Goines and Juliana Kohl have a daughter Lia

Kohl (Goines) born March 6,1989 in Los Angeles, California.

    In October of 1996, Lincoln married Mikako Horiike, a Japanese

national. They have a son, Theo Lincoln Charles Goines, born  October 27,

1999 in New York City.

 

Elisabeth "Libby" Goines (Born in Sacramento, California on February 7,

1956 -  ) weaver, singer and musician, had a daughter by an unidentified

father, Seandra (March 12, 1977 - November 27, 1977).

    She also had two sons by Patrick Farley (September 27, 1943 -  ):

Allin (Born in Takilma OR on February 23, 1981 -  ) and Eusheen (Oisean)

(Born in Takilma, OR on January 3, 1979)

 

Daniel William Goines (Born in Sacramento, California on January 29, 1958 -

) a roofer on May 22, 1988 married Linda Belle Richardson (November 13,

1947 - December 18, 1997). There were no children by that union, and they

were divorced in 1996.

    In 1999 he married Susan Alderson by whom he had a son Thaddeus

Victor Alderson-Goines (March 2000 - ).

 

Sarah Goines (Born in Oakland, California on August 18, 1960 -  ) an

elementary schoolteacher, on March 21, 1993 married James Arvid Armstrong

in Ashland, Oregon.

    A son, Emmett James Armstrong was born to them on June 16, 1995 in

Medford, Oregon.

    Justus Lee Armstrong was born to them on October 29, 1997 in

Ashland, Oregon.

    Terrel Benjamin Armstrong., born 12:37pm June15, 2000, Ashland, Oregon.

 

On February 6, 1988 Nicole Michelle Cloughly married Shane Lowrey (b. March 22, 1970 -  ) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. They had a son, Joshua T (the middle initial does not stand for a name) Lowrey (Born in Vancouver, BC on February 7, 1988. They were divorced in 1996.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FLORIDA

 

April 6, 2002

 

OBITUARIES

 

A.T. Goins, 87; One of Few to Survive White Mob's 1923 Rosewood Massacre

 

By JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER

 

A.T. Goins, one of the few survivors of the 1923 massacre by a white mob in the small Florida town of Rosewood that left the predominantly black community in ruins, has died. He was 87.

 

Goins, who was awarded $150,000 in compensation by the Florida Legislature in a highly publicized fight in 1994, died March 24 in St. Petersburg.  The cause of death was not announced.

 

The massacre, documented in the 1997 movie "Rosewood" from director John Singleton, began on Jan. 1, 1923, when a white mill worker's wife in the nearby town of Sumner, Florida claimed that she had been attacked by a black man. A

posse was formed to search for the assailant and went straight to Rosewood, a

community of perhaps 200 residents.

 

When no suspect was found, the posse turned into a vigilante mob, pulling

blacks from their homes and burning structures. The siege went on for six

days and the mob grew in size, eventually numbering as many as 300 people.

 

While the official death toll was six blacks and two whites, black

descendants of Rosewood have alleged that many more were killed and their

bodies hidden in mass graves.

 

Three days into the siege, the mob came to the home of Sarah Carrier, one of

Rosewood's leading residents. The mob had called for Carrier to come out of

her house and she refused. Goins, Carrier's grandson, was 8. He was hiding

upstairs with several other children.

 

In testimony to the Legislature, Goins recalled the assault on the house.

 

"Grandma didn't want to go out, so the mob just started shooting in the

house," Goins said. "Grandma got hit in the head with a bullet."

 

Goins' grandmother was killed. So were two members of the mob, who were shot

by Sylvester Carrier, Sarah Carrier's son, as they tried to enter the house.

 

"They bust right in that front room and came right into the hallway," Goins

said.

 

Goins and several other children escaped from the house and were led by an adult to safety in the nearby woods.

 

A train eventually came and took the survivors of the attack--mostly women

and children--to Gainesville. Goins said that he believed the train was sent

by a white businessman who had dealings with the people of Rosewood.

 

Black descendants of Rosewood maintained that the attack on the mill worker's

wife was carried out by the woman's white lover, a railroad worker, and that

she made up the story of the racial attack in an attempt to save her

marriage.

 

Goins said that his sister told him she had seen the woman's attacker. "My

sister said she seen this man go out and step across the fence," Goins said.

"She said it was a white man."

 

The survivors of the Rosewood massacre fled to various parts of the state.

Goins returned briefly to the area as a teenager when he was playing for a

baseball team.

 

"That was the last time I've been to Rosewood," he told the St. Petersburg

Times some years ago. "I don't want no part of Rosewood."

 

All the survivors kept quiet about the events, fearing repercussions.

 

That silence lasted until the early 1980s when a reporter for the St. Petersburg Times happened upon the area near Rosewood and asked residents why the area was all white. Shocked and intrigued by the answer, reporter Gary

Moore spent the next two years searching for survivors and piecing together

the Rosewood story. A segment of CBS' "60 Minutes" later explored the

massacre and the long-buried secret.

 

By the early 1990s, there were calls to provide survivors of the massacre and

their descendants with restitution for their suffering.

 

The state Legislature appointed a team of scholars from several Florida

universities to investigate the claims. The scholars determined that police

in Rosewood "failed to control local events" and failed to contact the state

government for help. Despite some legislators' reservations, administrative

analysts recommended that damages be paid.

 

Each of the eight known survivors was awarded $150,000. Another $500,000 was

designated for families that lost property in the massacre and a $100,000 fund was established for minority scholarships.

 

Goins is survived by his wife, Anna Maude, a sister and nine grandchildren.

 

ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

Mary Elizabeth Goin, daughter of Sanford W. Going and Elizabeth Henderson Goin, was born at Gainesville, Florida March 31, 1939.  She received a A.B. degree from Wilson College in 1961.  In 1970 she was an educator living at Keuka Park, New York.

 

CLAY COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

The 1860 census of Clay County recorded no members of the Gowen family or spelling variations.

 

COLUMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

Coleman J. Goin was born in 1911, according to the research of Warren Tyndale Faulkner.  He was married about 1934, wife's name Olive.  He became a professor at the University of Flori-da.  He was the co-author of "Reptiles and Amphibians."  Children born to Coleman J. Goin and Olive Goin are un-known.

 

DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

Dr. Thomas S. Gowin, Coral Gables, Florida, was listed in the 1969 "American Medical Directory."

 

Ruth McGowan was married about 1920 to Eugene Sheridan, son of Martin J. Sheridan and Elma Knowles Sheridan who were married in the Bahamas.  Martin J. Sheridan was born in November 1867, probably in County Cork.  Elma Knowles was born in 1876 in the Bahamas.  Eugene Sheridan was one of their five children.

 

Eugene Sheridan was elected sheriff of Dade County.  Two children were born to Eugene Sheridan and Ruth McGowen Sheridan:

 

          Everett Sheridan                                        born in 1924

                                                                                 died in 1981

          Ardith Sheridan                                         born in 1925

                                                                                 died in 2003

 

ESCAMBIA COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

Arthur Goyne, age 81, a Navy veteran of World War II, was interviewed for his recollection of the surrender of Germany in the waning days of the war.  "People were hilariously overjoy-ed--they were happy as hell," he recalled to a reporter for the "Pensacola Journal."  The article published May 8, 1995 men-tioned that Goyne, a Pensacola resident had spent much of the war on an amphibious ship in the Mediterranean Sea. 

 

BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

The obituary of Mrs. Elizabeth Gowen Richardson appeared in the August 17, 1994 edition of the “Ft. Lauderdale Sun-Sen-tinel:”

 

“Elizabeth Gowen Richardson, 84, died Sunday.  She had resided in Ft. Lauderdale since 1957. A member of First United Methodist Church of Ft. Lauderdale, Mrs. Richardson was graduated from the University of New Hampshire and received her master's degree from Cornell University.  Mrs. Richardson was a past president and member of the Ft. Lauderdale branch of the American Association of University Women, Alpha Xi Delta Sorotity and The Delta Kappa Gamma Fraternity.  She previously taught locally at Fern Hall, a private school and the Ft. Lauderdale Winter School.  She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. George [Priscilla Gowen] Irby, Lauderdale Lakes, Nancy Gowen Rolf, San Franciso and Mrs. Daniel [Carol Gow-en] Hovanesian, Somerville, Massachusetts, brother, George Gowen, Sarasota, Florida and four grandchildren.  Funeral service will be Thursday, August 18, 1994 at Fairchild Oakland Park Funeral Home.”

 

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

Walter Gowen Elliott, white male, was born May 29, 1893 in Cynthiana, Kentucky according to WWI Civilian Draft Regis-tration records.  He was living in Hillsborough County at the time of service.

==O==

Colleen Sullivan Gowan was born April 23, 1940 in Tampa Florida.  She was married September 15, 1964 to John M. O'Meara in Albuquerque, New Mexico, according to Bernalillo County, New Mexico Marriage Book 103, page 62965.  He was born in New York City May 19, 1934.  They lived at 160 Perimeter Street in Albuquerque.

==O==

Nathan Gowen, black male, was born October 23, 1882 in Hillsborough County according to WWI Civilian Registration records.

 

JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

Sam Goins, a negro who was born in South Carolina in 1826, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Jackson County, Enumeration District 70, page 45, 11th precinct as:

 

          "Goins,               Sam                      54, born in SC

                                      Francis                 37, born in AL

                                      Adaline                17, born in AL

                                      Minerva               12, born in AL

                                      Henry                   11, born in AL

                                      Willie                     8, born in AL

                                      Eddy                      6, born in AL

                                      Lilley                     5, born in AL

                                      Alice                      2, born in AL"

==O==

Clarence Jules Gowen, black male, was born March 3, 1873 in Jackson County, according to WWI Civilian Registration records.

==O==

William Gowen Mizell, white male, was born September 22, 1889 in Folkston, Georgia according to WWI Civilian Draft Registration records.  He was living in Jackson County at the time of service.

 

LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

Lovely Goings, a negro who was born in North Carolina in 1825, was enumerated in the 1880 census of Leon County, as the head of a household in Enumeration District 8, page 13:

 

          "Goings,             Lovely                           55, born in North Carolina

                                      Betsy                             50, born in North Carolina

                                      Charlton                        12, born in Florida, son

                                      David                               9, born in Florida, son"

 

LEVY COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

MANATEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

Stephen C. Goings who was born in Georgia in 1830 was enumerated as the head of a household in Manatee County, Enumeration District 104, page 32, Precinct 3, in the 1880 census:

 

          "Goings,             Stephen                50, born in Georgia

                                      Alpine                  18, born in Florida, wife

                                      John                       9, son"

 

Stephen C. Goins had married Mary Alpine Surgnier June 25, 1880 as his second wife shortly before the enumeration.  She was born about 1861 in Florida to Benjamin Surginer.  Stephen C. Goins died before 1899, according to Wanda Rodriquez.

 

Mary Alpine Surgnier Goins was remarried to Harley Anderson Rimes about 1900.  He was born November 4, 1883 in Desoto County, Florida.  She died before 1913 in Florida.  He died August 9, 1948 in Tampa, Florida.

 

Children born to Stephen C. Goins and his first wife include

 

          John Goins                                                born about 1871

 

Children born to Stephen C. Goins and Mary Alpine Surgnier Goins include:

 

          Charles A. Goins                                       born about 1893

 

MARION COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

Martha Goin who was born in South Carolina in 1840, was enumerated in the 1880 census of Marion County, as the head of a household in Enumeration District 16, page 16, Township 16:

 

          "Goin,                  Martha                 40, born in South Carolina

                                      Clara                    18, born in Florida

                                      John                     12, born in Florida

                                      Henry                   10, born in Florida

                                      James                     4, born in Florida

                                      Alice                      1, born in Florida"

                                             ==O==

Noah Goin, a mulatto who was born in Georgia in 1830, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Marion County, Enumeration District 165, page 7, Township 17:

 

          "Goin,                  Noah                    50, born in Georgia

                                      Sara                      35, born in South Carolina

                                      Louisa                  14, born in Florida

                                      Francis                  12, born in Florida, daughter

                                      George                    9, born in Florida

          Hardie,       Alfred                             10, born in Georgia, stepson"

==O==

 

NASSAU COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

Glenn Washington Gowen, white male, was born September 4, 1874 in Nassau County according to WWI Civilian Draft Registration records.

 

PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA

 

Ike Gowen Atwell, white male, was born June 16 1883 in Palm Beach County, Florida according to WWI Civilian Draft Registrations.

 

 

  Gowen Research Foundation                        Phone:806/795-8758, 795-9694

  5708 Gary Avenue                                     E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net

  Lubbock, Texas, 79413-4822              GOWENMS.064, 10/30/02

Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

 

 

 

 

 

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