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MICHAEL RADER (READER)   1750-1839
of Shenandoah County, Virginia   &
Greenbrier, Mason, and Jackson, counties West Virginia
(15 September 2002)

Please read introductory remarks and related links at:
HOLEMAN-HOLMAN-HOLDMAN of Shenandoah County, Virginia &
MICHAEL RADER (READER) of Shenandoah County, Virginia and
Greenbrier, Mason, Jackson counties, West Virginia
Genealogy reports commissioned 1965 by an anonymous contributor
L I N K

The below cover letter and report state the parents of Michael Rader have not been determined; however, his parents are documented in Dr. William A. Rader's book (cited at the above L I N K).
See the Ancestry Chart of Michael Rader PDF file.

.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

[[Letterhead]]
JOHN FREDERICK DORMAN
Genealogical Research
2311 Connecticut Avenue, N. W.
Washington, D. C., 20008

 

5 June 1965

[[Name - Private]]
[[Address - Private]]
[[City - Private]]

Dear [[Private]]:

My report on Michael Rader (Reader) has been delayed longer than I had intended. When I realized several weeks ago that I was going to have to make a trip to West Virginia for another client, I thought there might be a chance of my stopping at the Mason, Jackson and Greenbrier County court houses to see what could be learned about Michael Rader. I had the good fortune of finishing the other work in time to do this and my findings are incorporated in the inclosed report.

The will and the deed of gift made by Michael Rader establish conclusively that he is your ancestor.

In my former report on the Holemans I did not mention that Jacob Holeman was a vestryman of Beckford Parish. On 6 March 1771 he "... took the usual oaths to his Majesty's Person and Government, took the Abjuration Oath and subscribed to be Conformable to the Doctrine and Discipline of the Church of England as Vestryman." (Frederick Co., Va., Order Book 15, p. 114). He was one of the vestrymen to whom a lot in Woodstock was deeded for the church of Beckford Parish on 20 April 1774 (Shenandoah Co., Va., Deed Book B, pp. 10-12). He was also named as one of the trustees of Woodstock in the Act of incorporation passed in May 1782 (W. W. Hening, Statutes at Large, v. 11, p. 57). [[See HOLEMAN-HOLMAN-HOLDMAN ]]

I failed to mention in the present report that there is a muster roll of Capt. Michael Rader's company published in Gaius M. Brumbaugh, Revolutionary War Records ... Virginia (Washington, 1936), pp. 602-03. I also see that while I mentioned the two children for whom Michael and Catharine Rader were sponsors, I did not mention the baptism of their daughter Maria (Polly of the family record) whose birth on 18 February [sic] 1786 and baptism on 17 April 1786, with Andrew Zerkel and Catherine his wife as sponsors, is recorded in the Rader's Church Record Book 1772-1884, translation by Leslie A. Miller (typewritten; Chyenne, [[sic]] Wyo., 1926), pp. 3-4.

Since Michael Rader was connected with Rader's Church and was sponsor for one of Adam Rader's children, it is evident that he belonged to family for whom that church was named. The published records of Augusta County are fairly complete and I have not found any clues in them to his parentage. An Adam Rader in his will of 1773 named sons Matthias, George, Anthony and Adam. Matthias was a witness as early as 1748 but could have been as young as fourteen then. If he was slightly older he might be Michael's father. I think the other sons were too young to have been married by 1750. Adam Jr. is apparently the man of that name whose inventory is of record in Shenandoah County in 1784 and I think George and Anthony are the men of that name who left wills in Greenbrier Co., W.Va., in 1815 and 1826 respectively. My search for Michael's parentage has been limited to printed sources and I am not certain what became of Matthias Rader. Perhaps if he were traced further some clues would appear. [[Adam, Jr., was Michael's father; see remarks at top of this web page.]]

If you wish any further exploration of the records of the Holeman and Rader families, or perhaps of the Long family, I shall be glad to hear from you.

Sincerely,

[[signed]] Fred

 

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MICHAEL RADER (READER)

Shenandoah County, Virginia
Greenbrier County, West Virginia
Mason County, West Virginia
Jackson County, West Virginia

Michael Rader or Reader was born 8 March 1751 in the lower part of what became Rockingham County, Virginia, but was then Augusta County.1 His parentage has not been determined. [[See remarks at top of this web page.]]

He married on 25 December 1769 Katherine Long who was born 16 February 1753.2

The records of Shenandoah County first mention him in 1772 when he purchased two tracts of land:

25-25 September 1772. John Sulcer of Dunmore County to Michael Rader of same. Lease and release; for 300 current money.
   Two tracts, one on the south river of Shanandoah joining to Mathias Sulver's land ... granted to Mathias Sulver ... 170 acres and 80 perches.
   The other being the upper lot of 15 acres of meadow set apart to John Sulcer, being part of the original tract...
                                               John Sulcer
   Witnesses: Burr Harrison, Rd. Branham, Abraham Brewbaker [signed in German], Wm. Slaughter.
   23 February 1773. Proved by Abraham Brewbaker and Richard Branham.
   21 April 1773. Proved by Burr Harrison, Gent.3

Shortly afterward he added an adjoining 155 acres to his holdings, although he did not receive the grant for this land until some years later:

23 July 1787. Grant to Michael Rader of 155 acres by survey 26 April 1774 on the north side of the South River of Shanandoah ... corner to Reder's former (surveyed) land ... high hill ... level ... Benjamin Strickler ...)4

The Court of Shenandoah County on 28 May 1776 included Michael Reader's name in a list of those recommended to the Governor as proper persons to be added to the commission of the peace.5 He was named in a commission which was issued two years later on 29 June 1778,6 but on 29 October 1778 the Court

Ordered that it be certified to the Governor ... Michael Rader ... Gent. who were appointed to serve as justices ... have been all summoned to swear to the Commission of the peace and have refused or neglected to attend for that purpose.7

On 27 November 1776 Michael Reader was appointed overseer of the road leading from the top of the mountain to the South River in the room of Benjamin Strickler.8

He was actively engaged in service during the American Revolution. On 27 August 1832 he made a declaration concerning his service:

Michael Rader of Mill Creek in Jackson County, aged 81 years 6 months and 19 days, declares he entered service in the latter part of 1777 by raising a volunteer company in Shenandoah County, Virginia, at Massanuten and took command of the company as captain.
They marched to Winchester and joined the troops commanded by Capt. Reddicken, Capt. Bauling, Capt. Nishswanger and Capt. Buck, each with his company. They marched together to Fort Pitt and when they arrived Gen. Hand took command and the troops went from Fort Pitt to Wheeling by water and then remained the balance of their tour of duty and were discharged there.
   They returned to Shenandoah County and he was appointed a major about 1 May 1778 and marched as major to Fort Pitt, having under his command two companies under Captains John Rouch and Abraham Byrd. After arriving at Fort Pitt they were ordered to proceed to Carnes Fort on Dickard's Creek about six miles from Morgantown and took the command of the fort.
   His documentary evidence was accidentally destroyed except one record he submitted.9

At the same time David Bumgarner declares that in 1777 he served as a private in Capt. Michael Rader's company and the facts in relation to that tour of duty were correctly stated in his declaration.10

The government investigators questioned that Michael Rader had served as an officer and requested further proof. On 22 September 1833 he submitted a further declaration:

Michael Rader of Mill Creek in Jackson County, aged 81, declares he in the latter part of 1777, it is believed on 1 or 2 September, raised a volunteer company in Shenandoah County at Masinutten. On that day he marched with the company as captain thereof to Winchester and joined the troops of Captains Reddicken, Pauling, Nighswanger, and Buck, each with a company of men. They marched to Fort Pitt at the head of the Ohio River. Gen. Hand at Fort Pitt took charge and after remaining at Fort Pitt about a month or six weeks they were ordered to Wheeling fort on the banks of Ohio River about one hundred miles below Fort Pitt. They went by water and there served the balance of their tour, which was for three months. Col. Zane was at Wheeling. There were regular soldiers at Fort Pitt and he saw Col. Steele and Col. Gibson. He drew two guns for his company from Steele. 
   Having completed this tour he returned to Shenandoah County and was appointed a major in the militia. About 1 May 1778 he marched to Fort Pitt a second time, having under his command two companies of Captains John Rouse and Abraham Byrd. After arriving at Fort Pitt he was ordered to Carnes Fort on Deckard's Creek about six miles from Morgantown and took command of the fort while he remained there. This tour was of three months. Col. Evans commanded at Carnes Fort. There were no other troops there but his, except what military duty was done by the inhabitants of the surrounding country congregated therein.
   He was born in the lower end of Rockingham County in 1750, it is believed in March. He has a record in his possession. He lived in Shenandoah County a short time after the Revolution, about ten years in Greenbrier County, and the past twenty-four years in Mason County (or Jackson County after it was created).
   He was a justice of Mason County until old age and infirmity rendered it proper for him to resign.11

At the same time James Rader, Michael Rader and Joseph Rader declared they had frequently seen the commissions of their father as captain and major.12

H. J. Fisher wrote from Point Pleasant concerning the claim, pointing out that if the Pension Office would not admit service as captain and major, they should at least grant Michael Rader as pension as a private for six months. He mentioned that a note given to Rader on 15 November 1777 styled him as captain and another paper of Archibald Steele, the deputy quartermaster general, styled him captain also.13

As a result, Michael Rader of Jackson County, Virginia, was placed on the Virginia pension roll at $70 per annum for service of six months in the company of Capt. Paulding in the Virginia Line under the Act of 1832 and certificate 23130 was issued 15 November 1833.14

Although Michael Rader was not aware of it, proof of his service as a major was contained in the records of Shenandoah County. The Court on 30 April 1778 administered the oath to him as major of militia.15

During the latter part of the Revolutionary War Michael Reader contributed supplies for the use of the American army. On 27 October 1781 the Court of Rockingham County certified that he had supplied 375 pounds of beef16 and in September 1783 the Court of Shenandoah County certified he had supplied a bay horse.17

His residence was probably close to the Rockingham County border. He was taxed for several yeas in that county, but whether by mistake or because he had moved his home is uncertain:

1782. Michael Reador
          1 white male tithe
          6 slaves
          8 horses; 20 head of cattle

1783. Michael Reader
          1 white male tithe
          2 slaves over 16; 5 under 16
          7 horses; 19 head of cattle

1784. Michael Reader
          3 white male tithes
          4 slaves
          7 horses; 13 head of cattle.   18

By 1785 he had returned to Shenandoah County if, in fact, he had left at all:

20-20 August 1785. Michael Reader of Shanandoah County to Philip Long of same. Lease and release; for 375 current money.
   Two tracts, one on the south river of Shanandoah [described as in deed of purchase] ... 170 acres and 80 perches ... the other 15 acres ...
                                                                Michael Rader
                                                                Catteran (X) Rader
   Witnesses: Rn. Moore, William McCay, Thomas Jones.
   23 August 1785. Acknowledged by Michael Reader and by Catteran.
   [He signed the lease alone, as Michael Reader]19

Michael Roeder and his wife Catherina were sponsors of John, son of Adam Rader, who was baptized 8 September 1787, and of Michael, son of George and Veronica Wolf, who was baptized 4 April 1790.20

He purchased two additional tracts in 1787:

2 June 1787. Alexander White and Sarah his wife of Frederick County to Michael Reder of Shenandoah County. For 350 current money.
   104 acres in the counties of Shenandoah and Rockingham ...
   253 acres on the northwesterly side of the North River ...
                                                                Alex. White
   Witnesses: Jacob Rinker, ABm. Bird, Saml. Clayton.
   27 September 1787. Proved by the witnesses.21

This land was sold in 1794:

24 March 1794. Michael Rader and Catharine his wife of Shanandoah County to Tunis Quick of same. For 720 current money.
   104 acres in the counties of Shenandoah and Rockingham on the north side of the North river of Shanandoah ... part of tract granted to James Wood for 400 acres 12 January 1746 at the Great Plains ... on the bank of said river in the dividing line the counties of Shanandoah and Rockingham ...
   Also 253 acres on the northwesterly side of the north river granted to Mrs. Mary Wood 10 February 1761 ... dividing line between counties of Shenandoah and Rockingham ... conveyed to Michael Rader by Alexander and Sarah White 2 June 1787.
                                                                Michael Reader
                                                                Catharine (X) Reader
   Witnesses: John Barnet, John Barr, Tunis Quick.
   9 April 1794. Proved by witnesses.22

Michael Rader's remaining land in Shenandoah County was disposed of a few days later:

8 April 1794. Michael Reader and Catharine his wife of Shenandoah County to Philip Long of same. For 5 shillings.
   155 acres by survey 26 April 1774 on the north side of the south river of Shanandoah ... corner to said Reader's former land ... on a high hill ... on a level ... granted to Michael Reader 4 May 1787.
                                                                Michael Rether
                                                                Catharine (X) Reader
   Witnesses: Jno. Barnet, John Bar, Tunis Quick.
   9 April 1794. Proved by witnesses.23

Later that year he moved to Greenbrier County where other members of the Rader family also settled. He was taxed there:

1794. Michael Reder
          1 white male tithe
          4 slaves over 16, one aged 12-16
          6 horses.24

He purchased land in Greenbrier County:

28 June 1796. Samuel Brown and his wife Elizabeth of Greenbrier County to Michael Rader. For 5 shillings.
   390 acres, part of a patent to said Brown 1 September 1795 on the north side of his improvement ... on the knobs ... by a road marked SB ...
                                                                Saml. Brown
                                                                Elizabeth Brown
   June 1796. Acknowledged and dower relinquished by Elizabeth Brown.25

He continued to reside there for about ten years, being taxed for the last time in 1803:

1803. Michael Reader.         
          3 white male tithes
          7 slaves aged over 16
          9 horses.26

The next year when Mason County was organized, Michael Rader was one of the gentlemen who met at Point Pleasant and on 3 July 1804 qualified as justices of the county.27 He sat as a member of the Court which on 22 August 1805 met to determine whether Jacob Rambo was guilty of felony28 and from time to time thereafter, although since his residence was some distance from Point Pleasant he was not frequently in attendance at the monthly meetings of the Court.

His Greenbrier County land was not disposed of until 1814:

1 October 1814. Michael Reader and Catharine his wife of Mason County to Abraham Reader of Greenbrier County. For $5.
   390 acres conveyed to Michael Reader by Samuel Brown 28 June 1796 ...
                                                                Michael Reader
                                                                Catharine (X) Reader
   17 October 1814. Catharine relinquished her right of dower.
   November 1814. Recorded.29

On his arrival in Mason County Michael Rader began to take out grants of land. At various dates he patented:

423 acres         Big Mill Creek
100 acres         Big Mill Creek   Trace Fork
68 acres           Big Mill Creek   Left hand fork
159 acres         Big Mill Creek   Trace Fork
84 acres           Big Mill Creek   opposite Elk fork
140 acres         Big Mill Creek   below Elk fork
140 acres         Big Mill Creek   left hand fork
84 acres           Big Mill Creek   Left hand fork
159 acres         Big Mill Creek   Trace fork
163 acres         Big Mill Creek   Parchment fork
181 acres         Big Mill Creek   Elk fork
105 acres         Big Mill Creek   Left hand fork 30

He disposed of two tracts of land in 1822 and 1824:

25 May 1822. Michael Reader and Katharine his wife of Mason County to James Woolf of same. For $1.
   140 acres which Michael holds by patent 1 October 1821, on the waters of Big Mill Creek a branch of the Ohio ...
                                                                Michal Rader
                                                                Katherine (X) Reader
   27 May 1822. Acknowledged by Michael and dower relinquished by Katharine.
   28 May 1822. Recorded.31

15 April 1824. Michael Reader of Mill Creek in Mason County and Catharine his wife to John Kounts, late of Point Pleasant, now of Mill Creek. For $1.
   144 acres on Mill Creek being the whole of a tract of 423 acres granted to Michael Reader, being at the forks of the main left hand fork of Big Mill Creek ... south bank of the creek just below said Reader's mill ...
                                                                Michael Rader
                                                                Catharine Rader
   15 April 1824. Acknowledged by Michael and dower relinquished by Katharine before James Rader and Enos Thomas, justices.
   17 April 1824. Recorded.32

The remainder of his deeds of record in Mason and Jackson counties were to member of his family:

22 July 1815. Michael Reader of Mason County to Jacob H. Holeman and William B. Holeman (my grandsons) jointly after the arrival of William to the age of twenty one years.
   Negro woman Jinney and her children John, Rachael, Lewis, Winston, Alfred and Summer.
   I gave the use and service of Jinney to my daughter Betsy, since Betsy Holeman, during my pleasure but intended Jinney with her increase for the children of of Betsey, and Betsey having two sons Jacob H. Holeman and William B. Holeman ...
                                                                Michael Rader
   Witnesses: James Rader, Joseph Rader.
   24 October 1817. Acknowledged by Michael Rader.33

31 December 1821. Michael Rader Senr. of Mason County to James Rader of same. For natural love and affection.
   Negro boy Ellick.
                                                                Michael Rader
   Witnesses: Wm. Parsons, George (X) Parsons [?], George Cleek.
   15 April 1822. Acknowledged by Michael Rader.34

31 December 1821. Michal Rader Senr. of Mason County to Michael Rader Junr. of same. For natural love and affection.
   Negro boy Peter.
                                                                Michal Rader
   Witnesses: Wm. Parsons, George Cleek, George (X) Parsons.
   15 April 1822. Acknowledged by Michael Rader.35

31 December 1821. Michael Rader Senr. of Mason County to Joseph Rader of same. For natural love and affection.
   Negro boy Robin.
                                                                Michal Rader
   Witnesses: Wm. Parsons, George Cleek, George (X) Parsons.
   15 April 1822. Acknowledged by Michael Rader.36

4 November 1823. Michael Rader Senr. and Catharine his wife of Mason County to James Rader of same. For $1.00.
   179 acres on the elm fork of Big Mill Creek whereon Michael Rader now lives and the upper end of the same.
                                                                Michael Rader
                                                                Catharine (C) Rader
   4 November 1823. Acknowledged by Michael and dower relinquished by Catharine before Michael Kouns and James Rader.
   17 November 1823. Recorded.37

2 April 1828. Michael Rader of Mason County to Joseph Rader of same. For $1.00.
   181 acres on the Elk fork of Big Mill Creek ... [adjoining] survey made for Abraham Rader ...
                                                                Michael Rader
   Witnesses: John Kouns, James R. Wolf, Michael Rader, Jr.
   7 April 1828. Proved by the witnesses.38

18 December 1828. Michael Rader Snr. of Mason County to Michael Rader Jnr. of same. For $300.
   150 acres on the trace fork of Big Mill Creek ... at the upper end of the bottom above Joseph Parsons' old cabbin in the said fork near the second ford ...
                                                                Michael Rader
                                                                Catharine (X) Rader
   Witnesses: John Rader, Michael Rader.
   1 October 1831. Acknowledged by Michael and dower relinquished by Katharine.
   24 October 1831. Recorded.39

29 May 1834. Michael Rader Sen. of Jackson County to Michael Rader Jun. of same. For $10.
   205 acres on the main left hand fork of Big Mill Creek under two patents, one 18 July 1815 for 100 acres ... at the first fording place on the trace fork of Big Mill Creek about the mouth of Station Camp Run ... the other 24 June 1826 for 105 acres ... [adjoining above]
                                                                 Michael (X) Rader Sen.
   20 April 1839. Acknowledged by Michael Rader.
   29 April 1840. Recorded.40

Some of the land which Michael Rader took up in the area of Big Mill Creek had already been patented under prior grants Michael Rader, Jr., had to purchase again from a previous grantee in order to secure good title to two tracts which he had purchased from his father, comprising 97 acres and 19 acres on the left hand fork of Big Mill Creek.41

Michael Rader made his will on 17 March 1829, describing himself as a resident of Mason County:

Unto my beloved wife Katharine Rader (during her life) the use of Negroes Lewis, Winny and Rachel and at her decease Lewis and Winny to whichever of my children they may choose for their master or mistress upon his or her paying to each of my other children their proportion of the valuation of said Negroes, the price I now set on them, to wit Lewis $100 and Winny $50.
   Unto my beloved wife the use of my clock during her life. At her death to my son Abraham Rader.
   Unto my wife Katharine Rader all my other personal property (exclusive of the Negroes) one moiety to use during her life and the other moiety freely and entirely to dispose of at her decease.
   Unto my son Abraham Rader two Negros Reuben and Rebecca.
   Unto my son James Rader three Negroes Adam, Alexander and Dorcas.
   Unto my son Philip Rader two Negroes Andrew and Hannah.
   Unto my son Michael Rader two Negroes John and Peter. Also at the death of his mother Negro woman Rachel.
   Unto my son Joseph Rader the tract of land on which I live and mill and three Negroes Reuben, Robin and Ruth.
   Unto my two grandchildren Jacob Harrod Holeman and William Holeman children of my daughter Elizabeth Holeman alias Rader the Negro slave Jane I formerly conveyed to them with her increase.
   Unto my daughter Katharine Rader two Negroes Matilda and Jane.
   Unto the children of my daughter Polly Rayburn alias Rader two Negroes the use of whom I had formerly given their mother, Alice and Rachel.
   Unto my daughter Susannah Kounts two Negroes Jacob and Rebecca.
   My executors sell all my lands not herein devised and money with that part of my personal estate at death of my wife bequeathed to her during life be kept together until the title of the lands I have given or sold to my sons James, Michael and Joseph Rader be settled, and if my sons should lose their land, in that case my executors shall indemnify them for such loss and the balance if any divide equally amongst all my children except the heirs of my daughter Holeman.
   My son in law Michael Kounts and my sons Abraham and James Rader executors.
                                                                Michael Rader
   Witnesses: Wm. H. Rogers, James R. Wolf, John Kounts.
   27 April 1840. Proved by James R. Wolf and John Kounts. Michael Rader with John Kounts and Nehemiah Smith his securities entered into bond $1000.00 for obtaining letters of administration with the will annexed.42

Michael Rader died on 18 June 1839.43 He was survived by his widow but she lived only a short time after this. Michael Rader, Jr., as administrator of both Katharine Rader and Michael Rader, Sr., sold the personal property belonging to their estates on 16 May 1840. Among the purchasers were Abe Rader, Michael Rader Jr., Michael C. Rader, Hannah Rader, Elvira Rader, Robert Rader, G. W. Rader and Polly Rader.44 He returned an accounting of their estates on 22 June 1846.45

The nine children of Michael and Katharine (Long) Rader were:46

1  Elizabeth, born 28 December 1771. She married Andrew Holeman.

2  Katherine, born 29 December 1773.

3  Susannah, born 29 December 1776. She married Michael Kounts.

4  Abraham, born 20 January 1779.

5  James, born 28 January 1782. He married Hannah (Cannady) Allen on 6 June 1805.47
                He qualified as lieutenant of the 106th regiment of militia in April 1805.48

6  Philip, born 16 March 1784.

7  Polly, born 18 February 1786. She married ---- Rayburn.

8  Michael, born 12 February 1788.

9  Joseph, born 21 October 1790.

 

[[signature]] John Frederick Dorman
John Frederick Dorman
Fellow, American Society of Genealogists

 

2311 Connecticut Avenue, n.w.
Washington, D. C. 20008
5 June 1965

_______________________________________________

 

 

[[In the original these endnotes were presented as footnotes (single-spaced and indented)]]  

1 Family record, supplied by Mrs. Jason Board, Buffalo, W. Va., West Virginia DAR Genealogical Records Committee, "Report" 1940 (typewritten; n.p., 1940), p. 36; Revolutionary War pension application, Michael Rader, S.7349.

2 Family records, loc. cit.

3 Shenandoah Co., Va., Deed Book A, pp. 252-55.

4 Northern Neck Land Grants, v. S, pp. 251-52.

5 Shenandoah Co., Va., Order Book 1774-80, p. 19.

6 Ibid., p. 65.

7 Ibid., pp. 81-82.

8 Ibid., p. 26.

9 Revolutionary War pension application, loc. cit.

10 Ibid.

11 Ibid.

12 Ibid.

13 Ibid. [["as pension as a private" is in Dorman original]]

14 Ibid.

15 Shenandoah Co., Va., Order Book 1774-80, p. 44.

16 Public Service Claims, Rockingham Co., Va., Court Booklet, v. 1, p. 8.

17 Ibid., Shenandoah Co., Va., Court Booklet, p. 20.

18 Rockingham Co., Va., personal property tax books.

19 Shenandoah Co., Va., Deed Book E, pp. 329-34.

20 Rader's Church, Rockingham Co., Va., Record Book 1772-1884 [Translation by Leslie A. Miller; typewritten; Chyenne[[sic]], Wyo., 1926], pp. 5-6, 42.

21 Shenandoah Co., Va., Deed Book F, pp. 484-86.

22 Ibid., Deed Book I, pp. 321-24.

23 Ibid., pp. 320-21.

24 Greenbrier Co., W.Va., personal property tax book.

25 Greenbrier Co., W.Va., Deed Book 1, pp. 548-49.

26 Greenbrier Co., W.Va., personal property tax book.

27 Mason Co., W.Va., Order Book 1, p. 1.

28 Ibid., pp. 59-60.

29 Greenbrier Co., W.Va., Deed Book 6, pp. 85-87.

30 Mason Co., W.Va., Index to Land Grants and Patents.  The book covered by this index cannot now be located.

31 Mason Co., W.Va., Deed Book E, pp. 395-96.

32 Ibid., Deed Book F, pp. 57-59.

33 Ibid., Deed Book D, p. 326. [[ "of of Betsey" in Dorman original]]

34 Ibid., Deed Book E, pp. 381-82.

35 Ibid., p. 382.

36 Ibid., p. 383.

37 Ibid., Deed Book F, pp. 7-8.

38 Ibid., Deed Book G, pp. 116-17.

39 Jackson Co., W.Va., Deed Book 1, pp. 11-12.

40 Ibid., Deed Book 2, pp. 479-80.

41 Ibid., p. 333.

42 Ibid., Will Book 1, pp. 165-67.

43 Revolutionary War pension application, loc. cit.

44 Jackson Co., W.Va., Will Book 1, pp. 163-64.

45 Ibid., pp. 344-45.

46 Family record, loc. cit.

47 Ibid.

48 Mason Co., W.Va., Order Book 1, pp. 59-60.

________________________________________________________________

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