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Y-DNA Worksheet
Heinzerling/Hensarling & Bopp & Others!
Revised 3 March 2007 (links, etc. but results chart not updated, see below remarks)


The below DYS and ancestry charts were lasted updated 26 April 2006.  We stopped contacting new matches after it became clear that this is a common haplotype. The new matches between 28 November 2006 and April 2006 are designated with an asterisk (*) in this Summary of  T. Bopp’s Matches as of November 28, 2006 and are not included in the below DYS and ancestry charts.
GD = Genetic Distance, e.g., GD1 = Genetic Distance of 1.
Bopp has a Genetic Distance of 1 compared to the 37 marker modal.


12 markers
Exact matches with Faidley*, [Beno?]*, Rummler*, Unrine*, Schweizer*, Ventani, Lucas*, Hagen, Schaller*, Ventani,  Frimmer, Piper, Bopp, Riede, Bergman, Stabley, Bridenbecker, Schmidt, and four Hencerling/etc. [Dec 14 – now a Katzenberg]
25 markers
Exact matches with surnames Bopp and Heinzerling
GD1 with Dietl*, Schweizer*, Bergman, Stabley, and three Hencerling/etc.
GD2 with Hagen.
37markers
Exact match with Bopp
GD1 with Heinzerling
GD2 with Schweizer*, Hagen, and two Hencerling/etc.
GD3 with Hensarling and Stabley
GD4 with Raser*, Hensarling, and Schmidt.
67 markers
GD1 with Bopp
GD5 with Schweizer*
GD6 with Raser*
Note: None of the others have tested for 67 markers

This worksheet was prepared to assist in answering questions from others whose Y-DNA matches my Bopp (my husband). It is not the official web site of any surname project. More information about DNA surname projects is at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gkbopp/DNA/DNA and at Family Tree DNA (FTDNA).

The below charts/worksheet was first prepared in response to questions from the Hensarling/etc. family - the first to have a match with my Bopp. At the time we wondered about the possibility of a non-paternal event in one of the lines, but now we know it is a rather common haplotype. Most of the below matches at the end of April 2006 reported German ancestry and most of the names in the above summary update appear to be of German origin. It is possible those participants share a common "German" ancestor who lived before the existence of surnames. However, matches can also be the result of convergence or non-paternal events (see below article from FTDNA's Facts & Genes).

All entries on this page follow the nomenclature convention used by FTDNA.

In the below, the modal haplotype is used as a reference (the "white" markers are those that differ from the modal), but the modal is not necessarily the ancestral haplotype of the MCRA of the participants on this page.

26 April 2006

 

 

 

ysearch id, if known
¯

DYS# ®

SURNAME ¯
Hensarling variations listed first (they have the most tests); others listed alphabetically
If known, kit # is in ( )
~ = tested via Genographic Project

Hg

3
9
3

3
9
0

1
9

3
9
1

3
8
5
a

3
8
5
b

4
2
6

3
8
8

4
3
9

3
8
9
|
1

3
9
2

3
8
9
|
2

4
5
8

4
5
9
a

4
5
9
b

4
5
5

4
5
4

4
4
7

4
3
7

4
4
8

4
4
9

4
6
4
a

4
6
4
b

4
6
4
c

4
6
4
d

4
6
0

G
A
T
A

H
4

Y
C
A

I
I

a

Y
C
A

I
I

b

4
5
6

6
0
7

5
7
6

5
7
0

C
D
Y

a

C
D
Y

b

4
4
2

4
3
8

 

Locus ®

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37

 

Modal haplotype®

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

19

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

27

12

14

14

14

11

10

19

20

15

13

17

17

36

40

11

10

Heinzerling Hensarling Hencerling Group
W. Heinzerling matches the model haplotype.
Hensarlings with * share a paper trail. They are great great grandsons of Lewis, immigrant ancestor b. abt 1792, representing three different sons of Lewis: C is from oldest son, N. & M. from middle son, D. from youngest son.

Q5A8U

Heinzerling, W. (15258)

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

19

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

27

12

14

14

14

11

10

19

20

15

13

17

17

36

40

11

10

WB8RD

Hensarling, C.* (21002)

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

20

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

27

12

14

14

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YNY9E

Hensarling, N.* (13917)

G2

14

22

16

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

20

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

28

12

14

14

14

11

10

19

20

15

13

17

17

36

40

11

10

RGJ2H

Hensarling, M.* (23312)

 

14

22

16

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

20

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

28

12

14

14

14

11

10

19

20

15

13

17

17

37

40

11

10

Y8X6H

Hensarling, D.* (34776)

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

20

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

27

12

14

14

14

11

10

19

20

15

13

17

17

36

40

11

10

32S2E

Hencerling, N. D. (54477)

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

18

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

27

12

14

14

14

11

10

19

20

15

13

17

17

36

40

11

10

 

[ smgf ]

Bischoff

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

19

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

27

-

-

-

-

11

10

19

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

C6EX8

Bopp, T. (22032)

G2

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

19

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

27

12

14

14

14

11

10

19

20

15

13

17

17

37

40

11

10

 

Bopp R. (41284)

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

19

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

27

12

14

14

14

11

10

19

20

15

13

17

17

37

40

11

10

BNRRD

Bridenbecker ~

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B - man

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

18

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

27

12

14

14

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B - man

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

18

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

27

12

14

14

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frimmer ~

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A56QU

Hagen      

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

21

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

27

12

14

14

14

11

10

19

20

15

13

17

17

37

40

11

10

 

Piper [ancestry not known]~

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Riede

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schmidt, W.

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

21

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

27

12

12

14

14

11

10

19

20

15

13

17

17

36

40

11

10

[ smgf ]

 

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

19

9

9

11

11

22

16

20

27

-

-

-

-

11

10

19

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

 

Stabley, R ~

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

19

9

9

11

11

22

16

21

27

12

14

14

14

11

10

19

20

16

13

17

17

36

40

11

10

 

Ventani [ancestry not known; Italian email] ~

 

14

22

15

10

12

14

11

12

12

12

11

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ancestry Summary

Markers for Bischoff (ancestry Germany) and Schueler (ancestry Odessa, Russia) were obtained when Bopp entered his markers at http://smgf.org/ The - [dash] indicates markers not tested by SMGF.

Bopp. The two Bopps (3rd cousins) first tested under the Bobb project and are now at the Bopp project. Ancestors from Groszherzogtum Hesse-Darmstadt, Grebenhain and nearby Bermuthshain, Germany - east of Frankfurt. T. descends from Emil and R. from Henry - both sons of Johann Peter Bopp, Sr. (b. 1812); see Bopp ancestry summary. Our adopted Bopp son is also in the FTDNA database; his biological father (Cortner) is not a Bopp, hence his haplotype does not match the Bopp haplotype and is not included on this page (he is Ysearch ID 4MTXJ).

Bridenbecker reports: His ancestor emigrated to NY ca. 1875 from the Alsace region and was ethnically German, but a subject of the French Empire. Alsace-Lorraine was a disputed area between France and Germany. Apparently he was at risk of being drafted by France to fight Germans in the Franco-Prussian war, so as a teenager he was sent to live with relatives in the US. There are Bridenbeckers in upstate NY (Herkimer County) but no connection has been established with them, or any other Bridenbeckers. There are no Bridenbeckers in Germany, so we think his name was Anglicized when he came to the US. There is an old letter with the name "Breitenbucher" (with an umlaut over the u), and that name shows up in Alsace, so it's likely that is the real family name. (Genographic project transfer to FTDNA)

B-man (full name withheld) family researcher reports: Two B-mans who are distant cousins (common ancestor born about 1810) have tested but only one agreed to have results available in the FTDNA public database. The early family members spoke German and were from the village of Asch-Boehm, located six miles from the eastern edge of Germany, now in the Czech Republic. After World War II, the Russians/Communists ran out all the Germans. The villagers saved their records, and they are now housed across the border in Germany.

Frimmer reports his paternal grandfather was German and Hungarian. (Genographic project transfer to FTDNA)

Heinzerling Hensarling Hencerling Group

The Hensarling and variations surname study is at:
http://www.familytreedna.com/(myis1x553ohnz5ma5lqpxeiu)/public/hensarlingsurnameproject/index.aspx

W. Heinzerling reports a paper trail to Biedenkopf, Germany, in the 1600's.

The paper trail for all of the four below Hensarlings tracks to Lewis Hensarling, the immigrant, b ca 1792 in Germany (exactly where not known) who came to the U.S. about 1800. The four Hensarling participants are great great grandsons of the immigrant.
C. Hensarling < Bert < John T. < Jesse < Lewis.
N. Hensarling < Theron < Thomas A. < Abraham < Lewis.
M. Hensarling < George B., Jr. < George B. < Abraham < Lewis.
D. Hensarling < George A. < Thomas P. < Louis < Lewis

N.D. Hencerling descends from Daniel, b. abt. 1821 in Germany who went to England before 1856, married, went to Australia before 1861, back to England and then to New York state before 1870. The family next moved to south Texas before 1878.

 

Riede [German ancestry - participant migrated to Australia in 1951] states:
<The earliest known ancestor Georg Riede was a saw-miller in the "Hausen am Tann" region [Baden-Wuerttemberg] and he took out a "mortgage" on a saw-mill in Ratshausen [Baden- Wuetttemberg] on 28 July 1565. His birthplace and date of birth are unknown but it is assumed that he was born around 1525. One of his off-springs [Martinus Riede] went to Hessen and about 100 years later a descendant of his [Christian Riede] arrived in Holland, with the Prussian army, where he and his descendants stayed.
Note: The noble family Riede [the House of Riede] existed in 1064. We have a family tree from that time on till the year 1475 when a Wouther Riede was born. This is where the name Riede as such vanished. At least we can not connect any of the" Riede- van de Merwede" with this Wouther Riede. Interesting to know that a Daniel Riede [Daniel III] living in 1204 took part in one of the Crusades and was present at the capture of Constantinopel [Byzantium]. His "heroism" was rewarded by letting him add 15 "Byzants" [local gold coin in Constantinopel] to the family Crest. Our DNA markers indicate the presence of possible relatives [HaplogroupG2] in the Middle East. Could this Daniel be "responsible" for this?>

Schmidt report his great grandfather Schmidt was born in Plech [near Nürnberg], Germany, in 1816. His mother (Schmidt) was not married at his birth and hence her surname was passed on to her son. This "non-paternal" event was the beginning of a new Schmidt Y-DNA haplotype.

Stabley reports his surname is the English version of the German surname Staebler, Stebler or Stabler( with an umlauf over the a) and believes his immigrant ancestor was Christian Stabler who came from Musberg, Germany, to Pennsylvania in 1752 and settled in the York area, Cocalico and Shrewsbury. Musberg is near Stuttgart; the family is considered Swabian (Swabia is located in the south-west region of Germany). He also reports that his ancestor Adam, one of Christian Stabler's sons, "married a Hessian girl, Christina Klinefelter ( Kleinfeller). Her ancestor, Michael Kleinfeller married Elizabeth Freund in 1662. One of their sons, Johannes Michael married Anna Bopp daughter of Hans Bopp on 2 Feb. 1688 in Floersbach, Hesse. His brother Hans George is my direct ancestor. This is not much of a connection but it is the only time and place where I have found any connection with the Bopp family. (Genographic project transfer to FTDNA)

Hagen reports his line goes to John Hagen (ca. 1770-1825) of Martic Township, Lancaster Co., PA.

 

DYS# - DYS Numbers. DYS numbers as reported by FTDNA (note that these are not in numerical order).
DYS = DNA + Y chromosome + [unique DNA] Segment.
HUGO (Human Genome Organization) assigns DYS numbers.
DYS #19 is also known as #394
According to FTDNA, the red markers show a faster mutation rate than average. However, managers of large surname studies report variations that differ from those in a mixed random group.
(The allele values for DYS 464abcd reflect FTDNA's May 19, 2003 adjustment - all reduced by one.)

464abcd - These markers are unusual; see Genetic Distance calculations by FTDNA
464ef are rare and do no apply to these participants.

Interpreting Genetic Distance links at FTDNA
http://www.familytreedna.com/gdrules_37.html
http://www.familytreedna.com/gdrules_25.html
http://www.familytreedna.com/gdrules_12.html

=========================
Haplogroup G2 (Ancient ancestry - anthrogenealogy)

Everyone on this page who tested with FTDNA was "predicted" as Haplogroup G2 by FTDNA. N. Hensarling and T. Bopp SNP tested and confirmed their G2 haplogroup. It is presumed, therefore, that all in this worksheet are in G2.

G2 - This lineage may have originated in India or Pakistan, and has dispersed into central Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. The G2 branch of this lineage (containing the P15 mutation) is found most often in the Europe and the Middle East. [Source: FTDNA]

SNP Tests (FTDNA)

N. Hensarling G2
M285- M286- M287- M342- P16- P18- P20- M201+ P15+
T. Bopp G2
M201+ P15+
Because of upgrade, Hensarling knows he's G2, but not G2a and not G2b. Bopp knows only that he's G2 (Bopp has not upgraded to deep clade test).

Some G and G2 links:

Dennis Garvey
http://www.yhaplogroups.info/G_SNP_Project.html

Whit Athey

http://home.comcast.net/~whitathey/indexg.htm

Brian Hamman
http://www.brian-hamman.com/ModalsForG.htm

Y-DNA-HAPLOGROUP-G-L at RootsWeb
http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/index/Y-DNA-HAPLOGROUP-G

Carl-Johan Swaerdenheim, Project Manager of the Scandinavian Y-DNA Project, has a G2 Clan group
http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/GENEALOGY-DNA/2005-01/1105078922

Haplogroup G Project - Peter Christy
http://www.familytreedna.com/public/G-YDNA/index
If not working, use this:
http://www.familytreedna.com/(0hisgu45pebhfm454000pyvy)/public/G-YDNA/index.aspx?fixed_columns=on

=========================

Facts & Genes from Family Tree DNA
March 28, 2005 Volume 4, Issue 2
Understanding your Results: Y DNA and Surnames

For a long time, people were just known by their first name.

Surnames then began to be adopted in different countries at different times. As society became more complex, a system was needed to distinguish one person reliably and unambiguously from the next person.

A surname is defined as a hereditary name borne by members of a single family and handed down from father to son. Thus, surnames contrast with given names, which identify individuals within the same family. It is characteristic of surnames that all members of a particular family normally have the same surname.

In 1200 A.D., the world population is estimated to have been between 360 million and 450 million persons, depending on the estimate used.
[Source: http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/worldhis.html]

This estimate is close to the time frame when surnames began to be adopted.

On the whole, the richer and more powerful classes tended to acquire surnames earlier than the working classes and the poor, while surnames were quicker to catch on in urban areas than in more sparsely populated rural areas.

Occasionally, events impacted surnames. For example, in 1465 legislation was passed that impacted Gaelic surnames in several counties of Ireland, most notably Dublin. According to John D'Alton's "History of Co. Dublin", the following was enacted in 1465:

"That every Irishman, dwelling betwixt or amongst Englishmen, in this county, as well as those of Meath, Uriell (Louth) and Kildare, shall go like to one Englishman in apparel and in shaving of his beard above the mouth and shall within one year sworn the liege man of the King and shall take to him an English surname of one town, as Sutton, Chester, Trim, Scrine, Cork, Kinsale; or colour, as white, black, brown; or art or science, as smith or carpenter; or office, as cook, butler, etc. and that he and his issue shall use this name under pain of forfeiting his goods yearly."

Surnames were adopted in different areas at different times. In many parts of central and western Europe, hereditary surnames began to become fixed from the 12th century forward. The bulk of European surnames in countries such as England or France were formed in the 13th and 14th centuries. In some places, the process started earlier, and in some places the process continued into the 19th century. Overall, the norm is that in the 11th century people did not have surnames, and by the 15th century they did.

The process of adopting a surname was spread over time, and these surnames continued to evolve until the 1900's when spelling was standardized.

Surname variants occurred during the evolution of the surname. There was no guide to the spellings of names, and those who recorded events, such as the clergy and registrars, attempted to reproduce phonetically the sounds they heard. The great majority of the population were illiterate and had no notion that any one spelling of their name was more 'correct' than any other.

Prior to the time surnames were adopted, men with the same values for their Y DNA were spread out over a geographic area due to migrations. In addition, invasions and wars often significantly dispersed populations with the same Y DNA. Once people began to adopt surnames, these widely dispersed men with the same Y-DNA took different surnames.

As the database of Y DNA results at Family Tree DNA grows, everyone will eventually have Y DNA matches with other surnames. The primary reason for these matches is that multiple men with the same Y DNA result adopted different surnames during the time period when surnames were adopted. These men could have been in the same village, or in the same county, or perhaps migration had taken them to different countries.

In addition, two men with different surnames may have matching Y DNA due to convergence. Mutations are estimated to occur about once every N generations per Marker. There are mutations in the Y-DNA, and when after several mutations we see a match or a close match, it is called convergence. The larger the population with the same Y DNA, the more opportunity there is for convergence to occur. Since Haplogroup R1b is the largest population group in Europe, matches with other surnames are very common. These matches are due to the large population of this Haplogroup that existed when surnames were adopted. Many different surnames were adopted, and convergence has occurred over time.

If we go back far enough in time, we are all related. The surname is used to establish a boundary for determining whether two people are related. If you match some one with a different surname, you are most likely related prior to the adoption of surnames.

In some cases, you could be related after the adoption of surnames, due to one of the following events occurring:

1. informal adoption
2. extra marital event of either infidelity or illegitimacy
3. adoption of a new surname, such as by preference or for inheritance

Even though these events have occurred in the past, they were not the norm.

Pursuing a match with another surname should not be considered until both participants upgrade to 37 Markers to determine if the match still holds.

At this point, if the match still holds at 37 markers, a decision can be made as to whether to pursue the match with another surname. To avoid wasting time, there should be some evidence that one of the events above occurred. In making this decision, the place to start is to evaluate the evidence. Were the ancestors in the same location, at the same time? Was there a marriage by a widow who had children? Is there any evidence to support a match with another surname?

In most cases, there isn't any evidence to support pursuing the match.

A Surname Project is a very valuable tool for family history research. The surname establishes the time period for determining if two people are related. Surname Projects can provide tremendous benefit for those who are researching their family history. DNA testing has a wide range of applications, from additional information to use in conjunction with the paper records for interpretation, to clues to find the ancestral homeland.

In addition, as a long term goal, a Surname Project can determine the number of points of origin of the surname. The Surname Project could also combine DNA results with the techniques used to research surnames, and identify the ancestral location or area where the surname was adopted.

As you research your family tree, eventually you have to stop, because the written records end, or are sporadic. This could be the result of the destruction of records, such as due to a court house fire. Or, this could be the result of reaching the time period prior to a the majority of written records. For example, the time period before the adoption of Parish registers. Often your family tree will stop before the start of Parish registers, because there is insufficient documentation to make a connection.

When your family tree ends, there is still a long period of time between then and the adoption of surnames. For example, if your tree ends in the late 1700's due to insufficient documentation, there is still 400 to 500 years between then and the adoption of surnames, depending on your ancestral country.

DNA testing can fill this 500 year gap. Imagine a situation years from now, where every family tree with your surname has tested. The data would then be available to determine whether your surname had a single or multiple points of origin. Combining this information with surname mapping, frequency distribution studies, and research in Medieval records would most likely enable the Surname Project to identify a geographic area as the ancestral homeland.

Our surname is a very important part of us, and DNA testing tells us about this surname. For example, did one man take on the surname, and all the descendents today are related, except for descendents of an informal adoption, and descendents of an illegitimate birth?

With DNA testing, we might also discover previously unknown variants. This could be very helpful for research, especially when records can't be found, and later it is discovered that the records are actually there, but recorded with a previously unknown variant.

Surname dictionaries have been published and identify the origin for many surnames. The authors of these books used the tools available at the time. Never before have these experts or authors had the powerful tool of DNA testing available. There are many discoveries to be made with DNA testing. Most likely, DNA testing will prove that some long held beliefs about the origins of various surnames are incorrect.

By participating in a Y DNA Project, or sponsoring a participant if you are female, you are making a significant contribution to the knowledge about your surname. Even when your tree ends, you can still discover information about your origin.

For more information, see the following articles:

Interpreting Results: Why is the Surname relevant?
http://www.familytreeDNA.com/facts_genes.asp?act=show&nk=2.8

Understanding Your Results: Matching Other Surnames
http://www.familytreeDNA.com/facts_genes.asp?act=show&nk=2.11

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