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Notes for ANNE CONSTABLE


Paul C. Nagal, in The Lees of Virginia, states that Anne Constable, the wife of the immigrant Richard Lee I, had been a ward of Adam Thoroughgood's brother, Sir John Thoroughgood. Quoting Nagal - Of incalculable importance to his progress was Richard's fortunate marriage. When the young man accompanied Governor Wyatt to Jamestown, the official household also included a young woman, Anne Constable, whose identity later became lost to the family record. Even her name was unknown for two hundred years. Now, thanks particularly to the work of David Halle, genealogist for the Society of the Lees of Virginia, we know that Anne was baptized in London during 1622 and that she was one of the many daughters born to Francis Constable. 

Perhaps because of her father's connections, Anne became a ward of Sir John Thoroughgood, a personal attendant upon King Charles I. This affiliation would have made it easy for her to know the family of Sir Francis Wyatt and to accompany them to North America. She too sailed to America on the same ship as her husband to be. They were married in 1641 at Jamestown, Virginia. Anne's background and early associations meant that Richard Lee moved socially upward when she took him as husband. 

The family settled in the very northern part of the state, very close to Maryland. Here they raised ten children from 1643 through 1656. He becomes Colonel Richard Lee I after he names his second boy Richard, who in turn becomes Richard Lee II. In 1664, Richard I dies at the age of 46 at his last home in Dividing Creek, Northumberland County, Virginia. Anne lives on to 1706 and dies at home where they are both buried. In 1656, the last child of Richard I and Anne is born, a boy they name Charles Lee. Charles is only eight years old when his father dies, but he still has his mother, and older brothers Richard Lee II and Hancock Lee to help raise him.

Source: Nagel, Paul C., The Lees of Virginia: Seven Generations of an American Family, Oxford University Press, New York, 1990.