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Bundrant Civil War Letters

Thank you David Hancock for sending me these! 

"During their service in the Civil War, Harden Alexander Bundrant and his brother, my ancestor, Daniel Gillie Bundrant authored the following letters.
[Prepared July 7, 2002 from an undated transcript of the original letters that belonged to Saletha Rebecca Simpson Caulfield, descendant of Hardin Alexander Bundrant - Whereabouts of the original letters unknown.]"

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Letter written by Hardin Alexander Bundrant (brother of Daniel) addressed to his wife Nancy.

[transcriber's note: much of page gone]

October 28, 1862

I must take my pen in hand to let you know how I am getting along in this sinful world, hoping that when these few lines come to you, they may find you all well. I am well with the exception of diarrheic. I have had it every since I been here.

There has been one death in the Company since I been……

name was Pace.

We expect to remain at this camp about a mo…..

are three miles from Brenham. We have a very pretty…

had good springs to get water, but there is nothing….

and the horses always keeps it muddy. When we leave he….

calculation is to go to Hempstead.

Tell Peter if he has traded for the mule to b……

on and I will take him, if he has not traded for him no….

trade for him unless he is in tolerable good plight.

You must write as soon as you get this letter…….

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Letter written by Hardin Alexander Bundrant (brother of Daniel) addressed to his wife Nancy.

January 25, 1863

State of Texas, Austin County

I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines to let you know how I am at this time. I am about like I was when I left home. Daniels health is right smart better than it was when he left home. Bradley is not very well, he has had the diarrhoeia for three or four days now.

Nancy, I rite to you about your folks. Your Pa and Loyd----is here at Hempstead and are all well except the old man, he is right poorly. Your Pa talks like coming up to see you before long. He says he has not heard from home since he left there. If you want to write to them direct you letter to Hempstead, Moody's Co. 7th, Regiment.

The regiment was all back here at Hempstead when I got home. I don't know how long they will stay. I have nothing more to write. You must write to me as soon as you get this letter.

Hardin A. Bundrant,

To Nancy P. Bundrant. Addressed, Mrs. Nancy Bundrant, Serbin P.O. Bastrop Co., Texas

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Letter written by Daniel Gillie Bundrant addressed to his mother Lucy Gilley Bundrant and sister Elizabeth "Bettie" Bundrant.

First Side of Sheet.

-----there aint more than 100 men in the regiment now. We are on our way to Louisiana again. I don't like to go there much, tho I cant help myself unless I desert with the rest of them, and that I don't like to do for I don't think the war will last much longer and for that reason I will try to tough it out. I received two from you. I received the 11th day of March which gave me great satisfaction to hear from you and that you was all well. I was sorry to hear of Mary's colt being dead. Tell her I will buy her a pony when I come home. So nothing more at present, only I remain--------------------

(On reverse side of sheet in different writing)

------------I met a dispatch ordering First Regiment to Hempstead: he said our Regiment would be at Hempstead the next Friday, and I turned my wagon around and went to Hempstead, when I got there the Regiment was there. We are camped at Montgomery. You must write to me as soon as you get this letter. Direct your letter to Hempstead Texas.

D.G. Bundrant

To Lucy Bundrant and Family.

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Letter written by Hardin Alexander Bundrant (brother of Daniel) addressed to his wife Nancy.

March 15, 1863

State of Louisiana,

Natchitoches Parish.

Dear Wife and Children: -I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines and let you know that I am well at this time, hoping that these few lines will find you all well. We are now on Red River. We will go on from here to Alexandria. We are on a forced march. We expect to meet the enemy some where down on Red River. Me and Daniel is both driving wagons yet and we expect to drive on. Me and Daniel is in better health now than we have been since we joined the service. I would like to hear from home now might well. Write every chance you get. So nothing more at present. I remain your husband till death.

Hardin A. Bundrant

To N.P. Bundrant Addressed - Postmarked Mrs. N.P. Bundrant Natchitoches LA Serbin P.O. Bastrop Co. Mar 21, 1863 Texas

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Letter written by Hardin Alexander Bundrant (brother of Daniel) addressed to his wife Nancy.

Dear Wife and Children:-It is with pleasure that I write to you and the little ones for you are in my mind all the time. I hope you are getting along as well as I am for I enjoy good health at this time.

Daniel is with me at this time and he is well. I have not heard from you since the 17th of March and think it a long time not to hear from you for it is a great pleasure to me to hear from you at any time. You must write to me as often as you can for I have not got the chance to write to you.

We can hold our position in this country, the Gunboats cannot get here and we do not fear the land forces, if they will come to us. You must not be uneasy about me if you do not hear from me often, for I will write to you every chance that I get, but that must not stop you from writing to me. I will send one hundred dollars with Mr. Tooling (editor's note: could also be Mr. Tooting, cannot read manuscript) which he will hand to you. Daniel sends fifty dollars to his mother. We have not received our pay for six months. If they would pay off up to this time we would send you more.

Nothing more at present but I remain,

Your affectionate Husband,

H.A. Bundrant,

To His Wife.

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Letter written by Hardin Alexander Bundrant (brother of Daniel) addressed to his wife Nancy.

La. Camp Bestand,

June 13th, 1863

I this evening have the pleasure of dropping you a few lines to let you know that myself and Daniel is well at this time and I am in hopes that when these few lines rench you they may find you enjoying the same blessing.

We are in camp at the present and I don't know how long we will remain here. We have been fighting a big battle with sixteen thousand men and they have retreated to the other side of Boswick Bay. They have got to try to take ----- and if they succeed in taking it I think they will come back and try it again. I don't think they can take it if we repair it in time I heard they had a big fight at Vicksburg and that we gained a big victory.-----------

I want you to write me all about how you are getting along, and whether the rent of the place will make corn enough to do you or not, if not you had better buy enough as soon as corn is gathered.

If you want any money I will send you some the first opportunity. Write me whether you are out of money or not. I have not seen Bradley in two or three weeks, but I heard from him yesterday and he was well. He will be in camp tomorrow. We are all three still driving a team.

Nancy, you will find enclosed my daguerrotype and ring, I send you that so you may remember me, for many miles afar it be. I don't want you to be uneasy about me for it is very seldom I can get to send a letter, as we have no mail line open to us at this time, but I think it will be open in a few weeks.

I want you to write to me as soon as you get this letter and tell me how you are all getting along. I have nothing more at present to write, only that I remain your ever true husband, give my love to all the children and reserve a portion for your self.

Harden A. Bundrant

To Nancy J. Bundrant Direct your letters to H.A. Bundrant Louisiana, Col. Green's Regiment, Company I. 2d Regiment Sibleys Brigade.

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Letter written by Hardin Alexander Bundrant (brother of Daniel) addressed to his wife Nancy.

August 17, 1863

State of Louisiana.

We are camped at Washington

80 miles above Nero Bay.

Dear Wife and Children: --I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines and inform you that we are all well at this time, hoping these few lines may find you all well.

I received a letter from you July 2d, another July 8th, another July 21st, They all give me a right smart of satisfaction. ------------

You wrote to me to let you know when Lloyd was killed. He was killed April 13th, 1863 on Monday Morning. He was shot with a Minnie ball in the breast and died immediately. He was killed about 15 miles from Berwicks Bay at the breast works on Bayou Tash. We have had right smart of trouble here with bushwhackers. That is men that (torn off)

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Letter written by Hardin Alexander Bundrant (brother of Daniel) addressed to his wife Nancy.

Evergreen, October 29, 1863

State of Louisiana.

Dear wife and Children: I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines to inform you that I am well at this time, hoping these few lines may find you all well.

There has been a right smart of sickness in our company. The captain and three of his men start home today on furlough. I would have been glad to have been one of them, tho I don't want to be sick to get a furlough. My health has been better this summer than it has been for several years. I don't know when I will get a furlough to come home.

I want you to do just as you think best. If you need any money, sell anything you can spare the best. I would send some money now but I have only 275 dollars and I think I had better keep it for fear I might get sick this winter.

I will send you my gold watch by John Shattle. I was affered three hundred dollars for it. It is worth more money than that the way money rates now. It needs cleaning out. If you want to use it you had better get Frbin to clean it out. It keeps first rate time and I think it is a good watch tho I have no use for it here.

I am acting as wagon master now. It is some easier on me, but I had as soon drive a team. For I have so many men to contend with.

I have nothing more to write only you must kiss the children for me and tell them I will come home as soon as I can. You must write soon. So nothing more at present only I remain your affectionate husband until death.

H.A. Bundrant.

To N.P. Bundrant

I made a little bobble in spelling your names, tho I was sober. I will try it again. H.A. Bundrant To N.P. Bundrant

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Letter written by Daniel Gillie Bundrant addressed to his mother Lucy Gilley Bundrant and sister Elizabeth "Bettie" Bundrant.

Oct. 29th, 1863

Dear Mother and Sister:-I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines to inform you that I am well at this time, hoping that these few lines may find you all well. I have nothing much to write. I would like mighty well to come home, but I don't see any chance to get a furlough only to get sick, and I don't want to get sick if I can help it. I would send you some money if I had it to send, but as bad luck would have it, somebody stole every cent of money I had, tho I have got about 50 dollars now. If you need any money you can sell some of the hogs if they aint all gone wild or been stoled. You must do the best you can. I am going to come home as soon as I get a chance. Write soon, Nothing more at present.

D.G. Bundrant

To Lucy Bundrant and Elizabeth Bundrant.

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Letter written by Hardin Alexander Bundrant (brother of Daniel) addressed to his wife Nancy.

(top torn off)

But I don't know how it will be. I want you to write whether the rent of that field will make enough corn to do you or not. And how the stock is doing. If I don't get to come home I want you to sell some pork if you can sell it for gold or silver. I saw William Hancock the other day. He is well and he is a Lieutenant of his Company. I am to send this letter by Captain Raleigh. He is going home. Our brigade is over on the Arkansas River, but they are camped now round about Louisville.

You must write as soon as you get this letter. Direct your letter to Shreveport so nothing more at present, only I remain your affectionate husband until death.

Hardin A. Bundrant

To Nancy J. Bundrant.

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Letter written by Hardin Alexander Bundrant (brother of Daniel) addressed to his wife Nancy.

November the 18, 1863

Dear Wife and Children: I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines to inform you that I am well at this time, hoping these few lines may find you all well I received your letters, bearing date September the 10, and 26th. I received them day before yesterday which gave me great satisfaction to hear that you was all well but was sorry to hear of the water getting so scarce and stock a going to nothing so fast but it is no use for a body to grieve for such things cant be helped. You must try and take care of yourself and the children, just let the stock go if you need any money, if the hogs get fat you can trade them for money or corn, I would sent you some money when Bradley came home but I was in hopes I would get a furlough shortly and if I do I will need it myself. I sent you a gold watch and a letter by John Shuttle if you don't need it you can trade it for corn or anything you need I was affered three hundred dollars for it in Confederate money. If you can get as much as a hundred bushels of corn for it you had better trade it. The baggage wagons are at Big Cane about 75 miles above here. I am with the command in charge of 8 wagons. Daniel is with me a hauling forage. We had a fight about 10 days ago on Caren Crow Bayou and we taken 800 prisoners and killed about 200 of them if I could see you I could tell you a right smart but I have not got time to write any more now. Tell the children to be good children and I will bring them something when I come home. Write soon

H.A. Bundrant to N.P. Bundrant

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Letter written by Hardin Alexander Bundrant (brother of Daniel) addressed to his wife Nancy.

April the 26th, 1864

In camp 20 miles below the Natitoches.

Dear Wife and Children:-I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines to inform you that we are all well at this time. Hoping these few lines may find you all well. I have a right smart to write if I knew the terms of it, there has been a right smart of fighting since we have been in Louisiana. There has been a right smart loss on both sides. I would suppose that we gained the best victory, our men took something about four thousand prisoners and about 130 wagons. They say our loss was about 2500 men killed and wounded, we took a good many pieces of artillery. I will write to you again in a few days then I will tell you something more about how things is arranged.

The command is down below here they have some fighting to do nearly every day if I know the statements but I don't know only what I hear and I hear a heap of ways. I reckon you know nearly as much about the fight as I do. I expect you have heard a right smart about it.

You must write to me as soon as you get this letter. Direct your letter to Shreveport so I must bring my letter to a close, nothing more at present only remain your husband until death.

H.A. Bundrant to

Nancy P. Bundrant

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Letter written by Hardin Alexander Bundrant (brother of Daniel) addressed to his wife Nancy.

Black River, Louisiana.

July the 10, 1864

Dear Wife and Children:--I seat myself to answer your kind and welcome letters. I received a letter from you bearing date Ar April 21, 1864 and another May 4 and one May 16, another May 18, and another bearing date June 19, 1864. I have received all of them since I wrote to you, but I am writing now with the first opportunity that I have had of sending a letter, and it is too much work for me to write unless I could send it off. Your letters found me well and I was glad to hear from you and the children, and was very glad to hear that you was well I am in hopes these few lines will find you all enjoying the best of health. Nancy, you said you wanted me to write you about your Brothers, Joel Hancock is at home. He started home about the first of March. William was well about a month ago. I didn't see him but I saw Bud Kennedy and he told me that he was well. We are camped about 28 miles above Neches on Black River and about one mile from the Tensaw. ---------------- D.G. Bundrant is well. Tobacco is worth 40 dollars a plug and it is very hard to find at that. I paid one hundred dollars for 25 pounds of flour a few days ago. I think that it is better than boarding. I got some peaches the other day and I had the biggest peach cobbler you ever saw; it was worth more than a hundred dollar bills: it was the first one I ever tried to cook, but I done the best I could, and it was splendid. Me and Daniel is driving now with the Brigade Commissary train. We have plenty of Molasses, sugar, bacon and a roast goose with the gravy running down both sides of our mouth. We eat of anything that is got for the brigade officers. Any way I like it better driving here than I did driving for the Regiment. Tom Willard bought me 2 pair of socks. You wanted to know how I was off for clothing. I have plenty to do me this ----though if I get to come home ---------(torn off)

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Letter written by Hardin Alexander Bundrant (brother of Daniel) addressed to his wife Nancy.

September the 9, 1864

Arkansas, Ashley County.

We are camped about 30 miles south of Monticello.

Dear Wife: -I now take my pen in hand to answer your kind and welcome letter which came to hand a few days ago. It was bearing date August the 9th, which gave me great satisfaction to hear from you one time more and to hear that you and the children was well and was very sorry to hear mother and Betty had the chills. I have but a little to write. I haven't got time to write much.

John Ward is gone home, you can send a letter by him. He lives about two miles from Peter on Boone's Creek. Tell Buddy that I am glad that He can say his A.B.C's. Tell him that I sent him a knife by John Ward.

We are on our way from Louisiana up in Arkansas. We are to go to Little Rock if we can drive Yankees back. So nothing more at present only you must write soon. No more at present only remain your affectionate husband until death.

H.A. Bundrant

To Nancy P. Bundrant.

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Letter written by Daniel Gillie Bundrant addressed to his mother Lucy Gilley Bundrant and sister Elizabeth "Bettie" Bundrant.

November the 18, 1863

State of Louisiana.

Dear Mother and Sister: -I now take my pen in hand to write you a few lines to let you know that we are all well at this time. Hoping these few lines may find you all enjoying the best of health. I received a letter from you day before yesterday which was dated September the 27, which give me great satisfaction to hear from you and that you was as well as for common; but I was sorry to hear of the contention that you was ----to pack water so far. I am in hopes that it has rained there before now so you can get some water nearer home if I could come home I would move you somewhere that you could be handier to water but I don't see any chance to come yet. The Yankees is a falling back towards the Bay. If they leave this country maybe they will be some chance to get a furlough but as long as we stay as close to the Yankees as we are now I don't expect there will be much chance to get to come home. We are camped today where the Yankees was yesterday. We are camped on Vermilion Bayou about 20 miles above Neursberg. Our men took 25 Yankees on 2 wagons yesterday. Bradley started home about 20 days ago. If he has had good luck he is at home now. Nancy, wrote to him if he would come home she would save him some butter and eggs. I reckon he will get the butter and eggs so I come to a close. You must write soon.

D.G. Bundrant

To Lucy Bundrant and Betty Bundrant.

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Letter written by Daniel Gillie Bundrant addressed to his mother Lucy Gilley Bundrant and sister Elizabeth "Bettie" Bundrant.

September 9th, 1864

Arkansas, Ashley County.

Dear Mother and Sister:-I now take my pen in hand to answer your kind and welcome letter which came to hand a few days ago, it dated August the 9th,. It found me and Cardin well. I was glad to hear from home but was very sorry to hear of you both being sick.

We have left Louisiana. We are on our way to Little Rock if we can drive the Yankees from there. You can send a letter back to me by John Ward. He lives at the old man Rose's about two miles below Peter. I will write again in a few days no more.

D.G. Bundrant

To Betty Bundrant.