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JOHN BEEN born 1735

Unverified notes on John Bean born 1735 Northumberland County, Virginia

His homestead was located at mouth of Boone's creek just across from his brother William Bean. Family history states he built a cabin on Boons Creek in 1761. His brother William moved into this cabin with his family in 1769. In 1772 John moved his family and built a cabin across the creek.

According to Sequatche by J. Leonard Raulston and JW Livingood, He and his brother Capt. William scattered a band of Tories and hung 9 of them at Kings Mountain. "Tories .. reinforced Indian attacks... Tories concealed themselves high in the mountains. Capt Bean and his wig comrades, including his son George, his brother John, and John's son, Edmund, ferreted them out, and fired upon and wounded their leader, Capt. Henry Grimes. ("In the sweet by and by" Mary Coghlan White.)
"Colonel Sever waited at the French Board .... "At daybreak John Bean was dispatched with 5 scouts to see it there was any trace of Indians. He killed one and brought his head to the camp (Brown, page 160).
From Moses Fisk 1816: "But part of the Cherokees notwithstanding Camerion's zeal, expressed a desire that the trespassers might be permitted to remain, provided they would make no further encrouchments. This favorable symptom was not long neglected. Robertson and John Bean were by these tenants at will in 1771 [1772] sent to treat with their landlords, and agree upon articles of accommodation and friendship. The attempt succeeded. Served in Capt. William Russell's unit during Dunmore's War (1774)
In 1784, Washington, Sullivan, and Gilbert counties formed the independent State of Franklin... John Bean was a delegate from Washington" ("In the sweet by and by" Mary Coghlan White.)
Note: Lots of confusion exists as to John Been, the name of his wife or wives and the names of his children, because there were other John Beans in the area who may or may not have been closely related to this John Been. There is probably a second wife to John Been who most probably is the mother of John Hogan Bean.

Many sources say John was killed by Indians about 1774. Others say John died in Ashville, North Carolina in 1810.

"John Beene (ca. 1728/40)" by Jim D. Beene, Norman, Oklahoma 1997.

This John Been was the brother of William Bean, born 1721 and Elizabeth Bean born 1723. These two brothers both had sons named Robert. They were both heads of well known pioneer families in the Tennessee/South Carolina area.

William, Elizabeth, and John were all born in Northumberland County, Virginia. Elizabeth married George Russell who later died in Grainger County, Tennessee and his will was probated there.

Grayson County: An illustrated history of Grayson County, Texas, by Graham Landrum; Historical Publishers; 2d ed edition (1967). 195 pages

William Bean of Inverness Scotland migrated to America on the Sarah and John. Arriving on 22nd February 1652 in Boston, Mass. On the same ship were two other members of the Bean family. John settled in Exeter, N.H. James in Mass. and William our progenitor (believed to be a brother of John) settled in Northumberland County, Va. His son William was a resident of Northumberland County Va. in 1721. Three of his children were born there between 1721-1725. His son Captain William Bean was born on 12-9-1721 in Northumberland County VA. Captain William Bean and his family moved to the territory of N.C. in 1769, becoming the first permanent white settlers in what is now the state of Tenn. Their ninth child, Russell Bean born May 1769 was the first white child born in Tenn. John, another son of Captain William Bean (born 1749) was the father of John Hogan Bean (about 1778)

Shirley has suggested that: "William Bean of Inverness Scotland migrated to America on the Sarah and John. Arriving on 22nd February 1652 in Boston, Mass. On the same ship were two other members of the Bean family. John settled in Exeter, N.H. James in Mass. and William our progenitor (believed to be a brother of John) settled in Northumberland County, Va. His son William was a resident of Northumberland County Va. in 1721. " The GRAYSON COUNTY TEXAS HISTORY BOOK. Although, I continue to be confused by the William" and "John" BEAN's, Shirley quotes:: "Three of [William of Inverness's son William's children] were born [in Northumberland County VA.] between 1721-1725. His son Captain William Bean was born on 12-9-1721 in Northumberland County VA. . . . John, another son of Captain William Bean (born 1749) was the father of John Hogan Bean.(about 1778)" Here, I have some further concerns. Although it has been documented that the father of John Hogan BEAN (b. 1778) was a John BEAN, exactly WHO this John BEAN was has perplexed researchers for many years. There appear to be two possibilities:
The first possibility is the John BEAN (b. 1728-1740) who was the brother of Captain William BEAN (b. 1721). The second possibility is the John BEAN (b. abt. 1760) who was the son of Captain William BEAN (b. 1721). Jamie Ault Grady in her book concludes, though tentatively, that John Hogan BEAN (b. abt. 1778) would have descended from Captain William BEAN's son John (b. abt. 1760) [p. 119]. However, Merton Eberlein, an extremely well-respected historian, has taken issue with Mrs. Grady. He has written a document, WHO WAS YOUR GREAT-GREAT-GREAT "GRANDPAPPY"? Was he William BEAN Sr [b. 1721] or his brother John BEAN Sr [b. 1728-1740]? Eberlein makes a clear argument that John Hogan BEAN (b. abt. 1778) descends from John BEAN (b. 1728-1740) who was the brother of Captain William BEAN, rather than from the John BEAN who was the son of Captain William BEAN.

The suggestion has been raised that the father of Wm. Bean (b. 1721) Pioneer of TN, was Wm Bean b. in Salem, MA in 1703, and in turn that his father Wm. Bean, who died in 1715/6, came over from the UK on the Sarah and John in 1652. We know that a Wm. Bean was born to Wm. Bean (mother is known too but I don't have it handy) in Salem in 1703. We know that a Wm Bean was in Salem at least as early as 1668, when he signed a petition. According to an article in V. 1 of the NE His & Gen Register, the Sarah & John (or John & Sarah as it seemed to be known at the time), carried a load of several hundred Scots prisoners who were taken captive at the battle of Dunbar by the victorious Cromwell..."4,000 slain and 10,000 made prisoner."

Those on the John & Sarah were brought to NE in 1851-2 (and possibly some on to Barbados) and sold into servitude for 6-8 years. The passenger list includes Wm. Banes, John Beme, Wm Beames, and James Benne. The authors of the large book on the descendants of John Bean of Exeter argue that he was on the John & Sarah...contrary to some earlier family legends about his wife dying on the trip over with him. Not possible here since it was all prisoners. As time allows I'll keep poking at the senior and junior Wm. Beans of Salem to see what I might find out. It would be nice if we could either prove or disprove the Salem Wm. Bean theory. John Cook

FIRST GENERATION

1. John BEENE(1) emigrated in 1660 from from England, probably Kent.
AUTHOR: Samuel C. Beene

The first one of the Beene family that we have any record of is the one Maur Bene. He lived in County Salpot during the reign of the Saxon King Edward the Confessor. Little is known of him.
The next mention of the name is in the Doomsday Book. This book is the record of the first great English census. We find the name Endive Bene who lived in Kent. He was a great land owner.
Other of the name through the years are Johnnes Beene 1379, Willemus Bene 1380, Thomas Bean 1380, Isaac Beanne, 1556.

The name is spelled several ways but always pronounced Bean. Here are some of the spellings: Bene, Benne, Behn, Bean, Beans, Beane, Beanne, Been and Beens.

According to the oral history of my family passed down from one generation to the next, the name Beene, with the different spelling of the name are the same family generally. They are of Saxon origin, coming from Saxony with the Saxon Prince that founded the Kingdom of Kent.

The family generally are tall, slender, fair completed, blue eyed, with sandy red hair. They are very decided and emphatic in their views and beliefs, whether in religion, politics, or law. When they make up their mind as to what they will do, they never change. You find them in the van of Civilization whether in England or America. In England, we find them with the Saxons in Kent.

In America, we first find them in Virginia. In William Beane, who at the age of twenty-five settled in Elizabeth City, Virginia in 1618. Then we find Christopher Beane at YaNeck of land Virginia. He was forty years of age in 1618, Steven Beane, Virginia 1635. John Bean in Exeter, New Hampshire or Massachusetts in 1660, and James Bean in Virginia 1700.

Our family seems to have descended from John Bean, who came to this country 1660 as above stated. While most of John Bean's descent seems to have stayed in New England, at least one son came South as far as Pennsylvania. In 1761 we find John Bean built a cabin, what is now
Tennessee. In 1769, we find William Bean moved with him, his family to Tennessee becoming the first white settler in the state, making his home in the cabin that his brother, John had built in 1761.

From these two families, John and William Bean, they seem to have spread over the South, West, and North West. Wherever you find one, you will find him on the side of law and order and for complete independence of though. They are among the schoolteachers, doctors, lawyers, preachers, and law enforcement agencies of the United States from 1660 down to the present day, and where there's a frontier, there you will find one of the Beene or Bean families doing his part in it's development.

In 1761, John Beene, a man of education and refinement, came to Tennessee from Pittsylvania Co., Virginia and built a cabin. In 1769 his brother, Capt., William Bean moved his family from Pittsylvania Co., Virginia into Tennessee, found this cabin and moved in it. When John Beene finally moved to Tennessee, about 1772, he found his cabin already occupied by his brother, Capt. William Bean so he just found another location and built.

John Beene was in the battle of Kings Mountain and was one of the delegates that from the State of Franklin. He was the father of William Beene who was born August 1771 in Pittsylvania Co., Virginia and married Martha Pack.