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State of   TENNESSEE -   (The Volunteer State)
      The 16th U.S. State to join the Union:   01-June-1796
Genealogy & History Resources


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State Files of Interest - -      
Genealogical & Historical Societies
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Vital Records
Tennessee Gateway Resource Links -
Cemeteries   Flag, Seal & Symbols  Map   Native Americans   Ports   Railroads

A - Z Menu, Tennessee Gateway page
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Page 1 of 5:  (General Statewide Information)
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Page updated:  Nov 17, 2014
Casual Contributor Indicator
Tennessee State Pages Steward:  P. Franklin

A
Assorted Groups  (Anthology, Cultural, Ethnic, & Religious):
    African American Griots Project - The Griots, storytellers of their tribes, pass on the
         history of their people orally. It is said that when a Griot dies, a library has burned
         to the ground.
    The Forgotten Confederates - "When you eliminate the black Confederate soldier,
         you've eliminated the history of the South." quoted from General Robert E. Lee,
         in 1864.

Note:  These items are presented as part of the historical record and should not be interpreted to mean that the WebMaster, in any way, endorses any stereotypes which may be implied by the linked web sites.

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C
Census & related Lists of various kinds:
    1831-1850 Census Index - Inmates of the Tennessee State Penitentiary
         (Tennessee State Archives)
    Civil War Rosters - A directory of Civil War Rosters/Muster Rolls that have been found
         on the internet.
    Tennesseeans in the Revolutionary War - Records and Histories of Soldiers who Lived
         or Fought in Tennessee:  search by Co., by Surname and for Tennessee Soldiers
         with Rejected or Suspended Pensions.
    Tennessee Pension Applications - Names of African-Americans, mostly former slaves,
         who applied for pensions in Tennessee claiming to have served with the
         Confederate States of America during the American Civil War.

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E
Extinct Tennessee Counties:: (not linked unless noted, ):
    (If you know of more to be added, please contact us.)
Co. Name
James -



Lewis -



Tennessee -


Wayne -

Factual information
In 1919, went bankrupt and became a part of Hamilton Co. on April 1919. A
         small portion was given to Bradley Co., Tennessee The Co. was
         made by the Tennessee General Assembly and named after
         Rev. Jesse J. James.
Created in 1843, then completely abolished for a year following the Civil War. It
         became a part of Maury, Lawrence, Hickman and Wayne Counties for that
         year. The following year it was reorganized, and is still in existance today.
         (not truly extinct).
This County was created in 1788 as part of the State of Franklin. When
         Tennessee was created in 1796, the County surrendered its name. It was
         divided among Stewart, Houston and other counties.
Created in 1785 as part of the State of Franklin. Abolished in 1788.
More information here soon

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G

Genealogical/Historical Commissions, Societies and Museums:
  Please click here - (Counties we have listed),   (To list a local society, please contact us.)
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L
Libraries & Newspapers:
    Tennessee State Library and Archives - Digital Collections.
    Abstracts from Tennessee Newspapers - Consists of articles abstracted from
         newspapers printed throughout Tennessee.

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N
National Parks:
    Chickamauga & Chattanoga National Military Park - In 1863, Union and
         Confederate forces fought for control of Chattanooga, known as the "Gateway to the
         Deep South." The Confederates were victorious at nearby Chickamauga in
         September. However, renewed fighting in Chattanooga that November provided
         Union troops victory and control of the city. Also, see Hamilton County.
    Fort Donelson National Battlefield - Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant was becoming
         quite famous as he wrote these words following the surrender of Confederate Fort
         Donelson on Sunday, February 16, 1862. The Union victory at Fort Donelson elated
         the North, and stunned the South. Within days of the surrender, Clarksville and
         Nashville would fall into Union hands. Grant and his troops had created a pathway
         to victory for the Union. (quoted from the web site)

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R
Rootwalker - Genealogy Pages for Northern Middle Tennessee
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S
  • State of Tennessee
  •   State Capital CityNashville (Capital since 1826 - located in Davidson County)

    The State name:  The state of Tennessee was named after the Little Tennessee River. Originally "Tanasi", the river took its name from two Cherokee villages on its banks.
    American History and Genealogy Proj.
    American Local History Network
    Colonial Currency
    Cemetery Listings
    Co. maps of Tennessee
    Daughters of the American Revolution
    General History
    Migration Patterns
    State Archives (Govt.)
    State Archives (USGenWeb.)
    State Genealogy Forum
    State Genealogical Society
    State Historical Society
    State USGenWeb Site
    Symbols (Flag, Seal, etc.)
    Timeline (Historic)
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    T
    Tennessee Historical Commission
    Tennessee Pension Applications - (CSA Service)
    Tennessee Place Names and Post Offices - Introduction & Index
    Tennesseans in the Revolutionary War - Records and Histories of Soldiers who lived
             or fought in Tennessee.
    ^

    U
    U.S.A. - General Information links page
    U.S.A. - Possessions & Territories
    ^

    V
    Vital Records:
        Birth Records - Search the Tennessee Birth Records Database and find other Birth
             Records Websites.
        Death Indexes - Includes Obituaries, Cemeteries & the Social Security Death Index.
        Marriage Records - Search Tennessee Marriage Records (Anderson to Wilson Counies).

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    * When you tell us about your Surname(s) quest, by posting your Surnames on our Message Board, we will gladly set out to find as many listings, within time, for your particular SURNAME(S). If you wish, we will also be happy to provide you with your own Ancestors listing.
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