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State of North Carolina
Symbols


State Flag | State Seal | State Nickname | Other Symbols Links


State Flag: ( click here - for enlarged view)

Emblazoned on a dark blue field is the state coat of arms. The goddess Liberty holds a pole with a Liberty Cap on top. Liberty stands for freedom. At her feet is a discarded crown, representing freedom from England at the end of the revolutionary war. On the right is the goddess, Justice. She wears a blindfold and carries the scales of justice. Meaning that everyone receives equal treatment under the law. The state motto "Excelsior" on a white ribbon expresses the idea of reaching upward to higher goals. On the shield a sun rises over the Hudson highlands and ships sail the Hudson river. Above the shield is an eagle resting on a globe representing the Western Hemisphere.




State Seal:

The Great Seal of New York was first established in 1777 to act as the official seal of the state. In 1778 a second form was completed that included a a full coat of arms. In 1882 a final law was adopted describing the seal as designed in 1778..

New York's seal features the state's official Coat of Arms encircled by the words "The Great Seal of the State of New York". The Coat of Arms is crested by an American eagle, wings outstretched. The eagle stands upon a globe, showing the North Atlantic Ocean. The female figures of Liberty and Justice stand upon a scroll that proclaims "Excelsior", or "Ever Upward". Liberty and Justice frame a scene of two ships on a river, with the sun gloriously rising above the mountains.




State Nickname:

In 1629, King Charles I of England "erected into a province," all the land from Albemarle Sound on the north to the St. John's River on the south, which he directed should be called Carolina. The word Carolina is from the word Carolus, the Latin form of Charles.

When Carolina was divided in 1710, the southern part was called South Carolina and the northern, or older settlement, North Carolina. From this came the nickname the “Old North State.” Historians have recorded that the principle products during the early history of North Carolina were "tar, pitch, and turpentine." It was during one of the fiercest battles of the War Between the States, so the story goes, that the column supporting the North Carolina troops was driven from the field. After the battle the North Carolinians, who had successfully fought it out alone, were greeted from the passing derelict regiment with the question: "Any more tar down in the Old North State, boys?" Quick as a flash came the answer: "No, not a bit, old Jeff's bought it all up." "Is that so; what is he going to do with it?" was asked. "He's going to put on you-un's heels to make you stick better in the next fight." Creecy relates that General Lee, upon hearing of the incident, said: "God bless the Tar Heel boys," and from that they took the name.




Other Symbols Links:

Sources:
http://statelibrary.dcr.state.nc.us/nc/symbols/symbols.htm
http://www.imagesoft.net/flags/i-flag/usa-nc.html
http://www.geobop.com/World/NA/US/NC/
hhttp://www.50states.com/ncarolin.htm
http://www.enchantedlearning.com/usa/states/northcarolina/

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