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      Civil War In Kentucky and the Belchers Who Served

      by Ken Belcher

       

      Kentucky is one of those states that raised units for both sides in the war. There were Belchers who fought for both the Union and Confederacy. Kentucky's role in the war was very complex because of the great struggle to get the state to enter the Confederacy. As a border state, there were great struggles between families regarding their loyalty. I am sure Kentucky and West Virginia had close relatives fighting against each other. Virginia Belchers fought for Kentucky.

      Some of the battles that were fought within the state.

      Barbourville (ky001)

      Camp Wild Cat (ky002)

      Cynthiana (ky011)

      Ivy Mountain (ky003)

      Middle Creek (ky005)

      Mill Springs (ky006)

      Munfordville (ky008)

      Paducah (ky010)

      Perryville (ky009)

      Richmond (ky007)

      Rowlett's Station (ky004)

      TOTAL = 11

      About 16 Belchers fought for the Union and 10 Confederates. Only one died in the war and this as a prisoner of war. A couple were reported wounded. Three are reported to have deserted. Compared to some of the other states, Kentucky Belchers fared quite well and the casualties were quite low.

      The remainder of this paper will explore the different rosters and attempt to pin down which Belchers actually fought. To better understand their role in the war, a few of the regiments will have some history noted.

      The following is an index of the Belchers of KY found in the Consolidated Military Service Records (CMSR).

      Surname Given Name Middle Initial Company Unit Rank - Induction Rank - Discharge Notes Allegiance

      Belcher Bartley F 10 (Diamond's) Kentucky Cav. Private Private Confederate (1)

      Belcher Isaac C 5 Kentucky Mounted Infantry. Private Private Confederate

      Belcher Isaac N. I 17 Kentucky Infantry. Private Corporal Union

      Belcher James B. A 11 Kentucky Infantry. Private Private Union

      Belcher James C. K 8 Kentucky Cavalry. Sergeant Sergeant Union

      Belcher James W. G 5 Kentucky Mounted Infantry. Private Private Confederate

      Belcher John A 37 Kentucky Infantry. Private Private Union

      Belcher John F 10 (Diamond's) Kentucky Cav. Private Private John Belcher Jr. 21 Battn Va. Inf. Confederate (2)

      Belcher John B. K 8 Kentucky Cavalry. Private Private Union

      Belcher John M. F 10 (Diamond's) Kentucky Cav. Private Private John Belcher Jr. 21 Battn Va. Inf. Confederate (3)

      Belcher John W. A 12 Kentucky Cavalry. Private Private Union

      Belcher John W. C 5 Kentucky Mounted Infantry. Private Private Confederate

      Belcher Levi C 5 Kentucky Mounted Infantry. Private Private Confederate

      Belcher Lewis D 18 Kentucky Infantry. Private Private Union

      Belcher Lewis G 5 Kentucky Mounted Infantry. Private Private Confederate (4)

      Belcher Little B. I 17 Kentucky Infantry. Private Private Union

      Belcher Monroe M. K 8 Kentucky Cavalry. Private Private Union

      Belcher Moses F 10 (Diamond's) Kentucky Cav. Private Private 21 Battn Va. Inf. Confederate

      Belcher Richard H. I 17 Kentucky Infantry. Private Private Union

      Belcher Stokely K 13 Kentucky Cavalry. Private Private Confederate

      Belcher Sutten E. D 11 Kentucky Infantry. Private Private Union

      Belcher Thomas A 12 Kentucky Cavalry. Private Private Union

      Belcher Wiley J 26 Kentucky Infantry. Private Private Union

      Belcher William H. A 12 Kentucky Cavalry. Private Private Union

      Belcher William H. A 12 Kentucky Cavalry. Private Private Union

      (1) 10 (Diamond's Cav (Yankee Chasers) is the same unit as 14th Cav

      (2) This seems to be John Matthew. He also served in 21st VA Battn prior to serving in the 10th Cav.

      (3) May be dupe of (2)

      (4) Name may be Louis.

      NOTE: 10 men were in 3 confederate units

      10th Cav = 4

      5th Inf = 5

      13th Inf = 1

      15 men in 7 Union units

      8th Inf = 3

      11th Inf = 2

      12th Cav = 4

      17th Inf = 3

      18th Inf = 1

      26th Inf = 1

      37th Inf = 1

      The following list is taken from my database which includes 3 not on the CMR and also include the names as they show on the 14th Cav and the 10th Cav rosters.

      Last First Middle St Unit Type Co U/C Date inDate Out Rank Casualty Status Survive

      Belcher Bartley KY 10Diamonds Cav K C 7/10/62 7/10/63 P Also Co F2 14KYCA

      Bartley KY 14 Cav K C2/28/63 surv

      Belcher Bartley KY 14 Cav F C2/28/63 (1)

      Belcher George Washington KY 3Fork BTN INF E U11/1/64 7/1/65 P Surv

      Belcher Isaac KY 5 Mtd Inf C C 9/3/62 Deserted

      Belcher Isaac N. KY 17 Inf I U 11/1/61 1/23/65 P-Corp

      Belcher James W.. (M.) KY 5 Mtd Inf G C 10/21/6110/20/62 P Surv

      Belsher James R. (B.) KY 11 Inf A U 10/11/61 12/17/64 P Surv (2)

      Belcher James E. (C.) KY 8 Cav K U 8/13/62 9/23/63 Sgt Sirv

      Belcher John KY 37MTD Inf A U P

      Belcher John Matthew KY 10Diamonds Cav F2 C 2/28/63 7/10/63 P also Co. K

      Belcher John Wesley,JR. KY 5MTD Inf C C 9/1/62 6/18/63 P deserted 6/18/63

      Belcher John Sandford KY 10DiamondsCAV E C 1862

      Belcher John W. KY 12 Cav A U 8/12/62 8/23/65 P Surv

      Belcher John Bell KY 8 Cav K U 8/5/62 9/23/63 P Surv

      Belcher John Wesley,JR. KY 10 Diamond Cav F2 C 2/8/63

      Belcher John Wesley,SR KY 10 Diamond Cav F2 C 1/28/63

      Belcher John KY 14 Cav F C 2/28/63

      Belcher John M. KY 14 Cav K C 7/10/63

      Belcher John W. H. KY 1st Capitol Gds B U 5/20/64 Y

      Belcher Levi KY 5MTD Inf C C 1/9/62 W Chikmauga,Jonevill

      Belcher Lewis KY 5 Mtd Inf C C 10/2/61 9/1/62 P Tr 1VASL

      Belcher Lewis KY 18 Inf D U 10/19/61 7/18/65 P POW Exc Surv

      Belcher Little Berry KY 17 Inf I U P

      Belcher M. KY 14 Cav F C 2/28/63

      Belcher Monroe M. KY 8 Cav K U 8/5/62 9/23/63 P Y

      Belcher Moses KY 10Diamonds Cav F2 C 2/28/63 P

      Belcher Richard F. KY 1st Capitol Gds B U 5/20/64 P Y

      Belcher Richard Henry KY 17 Inf I U P

      Belcher Stokley KY 13 CAV K C P

      Belcher Sutton E. KY 11 INF D U 10/11/61 12/17/64 P surv

      Belcher Thomas KY 12 Cav A U P

      Belcher Wiley KY 26 Inf I U 9/64 6/65 P Surv

      Belcher William H. (1) KY 12 Cav A U 8/12/62 8/23/65 P Surv

      Belcher William H. (2) KY 12 Cav A U 8/12/62 3/12/64 P DPOW Richmond N

      (1) Two of the Bartleys are the same person, but this is a second Bartley that is not in the CMRs

      (2) James R. Belsher in HDS, but James B. Belcher in CMR. sure they are same person. Not sure of spelling or initial.

      (3) 3 men served in Union Reserve/Militia units that are not shown in the CMRs. They are:

      George Washington Belcher 3 Forks Battn

      John W. F. Belcher 1st Capitol Guards

      Richard F. 1st Capitol Guards

      Information about individual soldiers found in the Historical Data systems (HDS).

      CONFEDERATE

      Isaac Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 03 September 1862 in Pike County, KY

      Enlisted in Company C, 5th Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 03 September 1862

      Deserted on 18 June 1863 (Reported deserted)

      Sources: Confederate Kentucky Volunteers War 1861-65. (KYRosterC) Published in 1915.

      John W (Wesley) Belcher , JR.

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 01 September 1862 in Pike County, KY

      Enlisted in Company C, 5th Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 01 September 1862

      Deserted on 18 June 1863

      Sources: Confederate Kentucky Volunteers War 1861-65. (KYRosterC) Published in 1915

      Note: Deserted same days as Isaac.

      Levi Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 01 September 1862 in Salyersville, KY

      Enlisted in Company G, 5th Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 01 September 1862

      Transfered on 24 November 1862 from company G to company C .

      Wounded on 20 September 1863 at Chickamauga, GA

      Wounded on 31 August 1864 at Jonesboro, GA

      Date and method of discharge not given.

      Sources: Confederate Kentucky Volunteers War 1861-65. (KYRosterC) Published in 1915 .

      James Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 02 November 1861 in Pike County, KY

      Enlisted in Company G, 5th Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 02 November 1861

      Mustered out on 20 October 1862

      Sources: Confederate Kentucky Volunteers War 1861-65. (KYRosterC) Published in 1915 .

      Louis Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 02 November 1861 in Pike County, KY

      Enlisted in Company G, 5th Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 02 November 1861

      Mustered out on 20 October 1862

      Sources: Confederate Kentucky Volunteers War 1861-65. (KYRosterC) Published in 1915.

      John Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 28 February 1863 in Buchanan County, VA

      Enlisted in Company F, 14th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on 28 February 1863

      Sources: Confederate Kentucky Volunteers War 1861-65. (KYRosterC) Published in 1915.

      M (Moses) Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 28 February 1863 in Buchanan County, VA

      Enlisted in Company F, 14th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on 28 February 1863

      Sources: Confederate Kentucky Volunteers War 1861-65. (KYRosterC) Published in 1915.

      Bartley Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 28 February 1863 in Buchanan County, VA

      Enlisted in Company F, 14th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on 28 February 1863

      Sources: Confederate Kentucky Volunteers War 1861-65. (KYRosterC) Published in 1915 Bartley Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 10 July 1862 in Liberty Hill, VA

      Enlisted in Company K, 14th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on 10 July 1862

      Sources: Confederate Kentucky Volunteers War 1861-65. (KYRosterC) Published in 1915.

      John M Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 10 July 1863 in Liberty Hill, VA

      Enlisted in Company K, 14th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on 10 July 1863

      Sources: Confederate Kentucky Volunteers War 1861-65. (KYRosterC) Published in 1915 .

      UNION

      Lewis Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 19 October 1861 in Paris, KY

      Enlisted in Company D, 18th Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 08 February 1862

      was POW on 30 August 1862 at Richmond KY

      was Exchanged on 15 December 1862 (place not stated)

      was Apprehended on 11 July 1864 (place not stated

      Mustered out on 18 July 1865 in Louisville, KY (Awaiting trial at muster out)

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney

      NOTE: Several things about Lewis's record are puzzling. If he enlisted in Oct, why was he not assigned a regiment until the next Feb? Where was he held as a POW? Why was he apprehended some 18 months after his exchange? Did he not report back to the regiment after exchange and was arrested for desertion? It is hard to believe he would have been held for a year without trial. The awaiting trial upon his muster out after the war was over must have been for some other offense. Lewis is certainly one that I would like to know more about. Hope some one can help fill in the gaps.

      I have included a history of the battle of Richmond because it clearly tells the story of one of KY's notable, but mostly unknown battles. What I find fascinating from this history is that Lewis was the only POW from the 18th KY Inf., but for the entire battle the Union had 4,303 captured and missing. The statistics for the 18th are: 40 Killed, 79 Wounded, 1 POW, and 3 Missing.

      Richmond, Ky., Aug. 29 30, 1862. 1st and 2nd Brigades, Army of Kentucky. The battle of Richmond was one of the incidents of Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. When it was known that Bragg was moving northward a force of men had been hurriedly collected at Louisville and organized into the Army of Kentucky, under the command of Maj.-Gen. William Nelson. The Union forces at Richmond consisted of the 1st and 2nd brigades of this army, respectively commanded by Brig.-Gen. M. D. Manson and Brig.-Gen. Charles Cruft. Manson's brigade was composed of the 16th, 55th, 68th and 71st Ind. infantry, and Lanphere's battery. Cruft's was made up of the 12th and 66th Ind., 18th Ky. and 95th Ohio infantry and Andrews' battery. Many of the men were new recruits, unused to army discipline and unskilled in the arts of war. In the absence of Gen. Nelson the command of the two brigades devolved on Manson, who had established his headquarters about 2 miles from the town of Richmond. Here he received word at 11 a.m. on the 28th, that Munday's cavalry had encountered the enemy, some 5,000 strong in the vicinity of Kingston. Manson sent word to Munday to hold the Confederates in check as long as possible, and ordered his whole brigade under arms. Reinforcements were sent out to the pickets, but about 2 p.m. the entire picket line was compelled to fall back toward the main body. South of Manson's camp were some high hills that completely commanded his position and he determined to move out and occupy these, to prevent their falling into possession of the enemy. When he had advanced about three-fourths of a mile a heavy column of Confederate cavalry was discovered some distance east of the road. Lieut. Lanphere was directed to open fire with the artillery, and a few well directed shots scattered the enemy in all directions. The brigade then moved forward and took up a position where the artillery commanded the road as far south as Rogersville, and awaited the appearance of the enemy. Again the battery opened fire and after a skirmish of about an hour the Confederates were forced to retire from the field, with a loss of a number of captured, together with several horses and a piece of artillery. Manson then moved his command to Rogersville, where the men bivouacked for the night, with orders to sleep on their arms. Col. Metcalfe with his cavalry, was sent out to pursue the retreating enemy. After following them for some 6 miles he encountered a cavalry picket who after a slight skirmish retired. Metcalfe lost 2 men killed and wounded.

      That evening Gen. Kirby Smith, commanding the Confederates, was reinforced by the arrival of Churchill's division, and decided to move to Richmond the next day, "even at the cost of a battle with the whole force of the enemy." Manson had sent word to maintain a strong picket on the Lancaster road, and to hold his command in readiness to move at a moment's notice. At 6 o'clock a.m. on the 30th, he found that the Confederates were advancing. He at once sent an order to Cruft to bring up his command as soon as possible, and placing himself at the head of the 55th Ind., moved out with his brigade to meet the Confederate column. About half a mile beyond Rogersville, near Mt. Zion church the enemy's advance was encountered and after a sharp skirmish was driven back. Manson then took possession of some woods and high ground on the left of the road and formed a line of battle. Skirmishers were thrown to the front and the enemy was held in check over an hour when it was discovered that a movement was under way to turn the left of the skirmish line. This was McCray's brigade of Churchill's division, which had almost gained a position on the flank before its presence there was discovered. At this juncture Cruft's brigade came on the field and Manson ordered him to send the 95th Ohio to the support of the skirmishers, while the 69th Ohio was sent against a battery that the enemy was trying to plant on a hill a short distance to the front and right. In attempting to take the hill the regiment was subjected to an enfilading fire that threw it into some confusion, and the enemy, prompt to take advantage of this circumstance, pressed forward with a heavy force, driving the right of the line from the field. At the same time the left was turned and for a short time it looked as if the Union troops were hopelessly defeated. But Manson, who was a veteran of the Mexican war, inspired confidence in his men by his heroic example, and after falling back for about a mile a new line of battle was formed on: White's farm, with Cruft's brigade on a ridge to the right of the road, the 1st brigade being formed some distance to the rear on the left of the road, with its battery in front. The first attack on thus position was made against Cruft's left, but it was repulsed by the 95th Ohio and 66th Ind., which formed that part of the line. The enemy now moved up through the woods and attacked the right of the brigade. Here the 18th Ky. and 12th Ind., who had not been engaged in the first fight, stood their ground for some time, but finally yielded to overpowering numbers and fell back in disorder. The 1st brigade had already been driven from the field, and in a short time the whole army was flying toward Richmond. Manson and Cruft both rode to the front and tried to rally the men, but in vain. At Richmond Gen. Nelson was met and he assumed command. Most of the men had fled through the town, but about 2,500 were rallied and a third line formed, the left resting on the state road near the tollgate, occupying the cemetery and thence running back into the woods on the right. The line was scarcely formed when the Confederates, elated by their first victory, again advanced to the attack. For a time the enemy was held in check by the skirmishers, but in a little while the attack became general and the Union lines broke and fled in confusion. It was now a case of "every fellow for himself." Before the attack was made at the cemetery the Confederate cavalry had gained a position in the Federal rear and as the fugitives rushed back into this enemy they were either killed or captured in large numbers. Gen. Cruft in his report says: "The account of the whole battle may be summed up in a few words. It was an attack by at least 15,000 well disciplined troops, under experienced officers, upon 6,250 citizens, ignorant of war, without officers of experience. The wonder is that the latter fought so well for a whole day, could be twice rallied after being panic-stricken, and that any escaped slaughter or capture."

      The Union loss at Richmond was 206 killed, 844 wounded and 4,303 captured or missing. Gen. Manson himself was among the captured and all the artillery fell into the hands of the enemy. Kirby Smith reported his losses as being 98 killed, 492 wounded and 12 missing.

      Source: The Union Army, vol. 6

      James E Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Sergeant on 13 August 1862 in Russellville, KY

      Enlisted in Company K, 8th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on 06 September 1862

      Mustered out on 23 September 1863 in Ru

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney .

      John B Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 05 August 1862 in Russellville, KY

      Enlisted in Company K, 8th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on 06 September 1862

      Mustered out on 23 September 1863 in Russellville, KYs

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney.

      Monroe N Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 05 August 1862 in Russellville, KY

      Enlisted in Company K, 8th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on 06 September 1862

      Mustered out on 23 September 1863 in Russellville, KY

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney.

      John Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 01 June 1863 in Glasgow, KY

      Enlisted in Company A, 37th Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 17 September 1863

      Mustered out on 29 December 1864 in Louisville, KY

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney .

      William H Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 12 August 1862 in Owensboro, KY

      Enlisted in Company A, 12th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on 17 November 1862

      Died as a prisoner on 12 March 1864 in Richmond, VA

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney

      Note: William H.'s story is interesting and sad. The record does not show where he was captured or in which prison he died. The 12th KY has 127 POWs total for the war recorded and 31 of these the place captured is unknown. William is one of the unknowns. One wonders if he may have been captured at Philadelphia, TN. The following is taken from the HDS records.

      Philadelphia, Tenn., Oct. 20-22, 1863. Col. Frank Wolford's Unattached Cavalry Brigade. At 10 a.m. on the 20th Wolford learned that between 1,200 and 1,500 Confederates had attacked the wagon train of his brigade 6 miles from Philadelphia, and immediately sent the 1st and 11th Ky. cavalry to its assistance. These two regiments got in the enemy's rear and were cut off. Another body of the enemy approached from Sweet Water and with the rest of his men, about 700, Wolford attacked and drove them back several times.

      Owing to the enemy's superior numbers Wolford was finally obliged to fall back, abandoning his 6 pieces of artillery. During the following two days the Confederates were again driven out of and beyond Philadelphia. The Federal loss, all of which occurred on the 20th, was 7 killed, 25 wounded and 447 captured.

      Source: The Union Army, vol. 6

      The 12th had recorded 2 KIA, 7 Wounded 28 captured and 12 missing. William may have been another unreported missing. If the number of 447 captured for the two regiments can be believed, then it is easy to see why the 40 captured and missing identified in HDS is probably quite low.

      John W Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 12 August 1862 in Owensboro, KY

      Enlisted in Company A, 12th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on 17 November 1862

      Mustered out on 23 August 1865 in Louisville, KY

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney

      William H Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 12 August 1862 in Owensboro, KY

      Enlisted in Company A, 12th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky on 17 November 1862

      Mustered out on 23 August 1865 in Louisville, KY

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney .

      Wiley Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 19 September 1864 in London,KY

      Drafted in Company I, 26th Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 19 September 1864

      Mustered out on 30 June 1865 in Salisbury, NC

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney .

      Suton W Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 14 September 1861 in Calhoon, KY

      Enlisted in Company D, 11th Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 09 December 1861

      Mustered out on 16 December 1864 in Bowling Green, KY

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney.

      Isaac N Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 01 November 1861 in Calhoon, KY

      Enlisted in Company I, 17th Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 04 January 1862

      Promoted to Full Corporal on 24 August 1864

      Mustered out on 23 January 1865 in Louisville, KY

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney.

      Richard H Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 10 November 1861 in Calhoon, KY

      Enlisted in Company I, 17th Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 04 January 1862

      Mustered out on 23 January 1865 in Louisville, KY

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney.

      Littleberry Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 20 December 1861 in Calhoon, KY

      Enlisted in Company I, 17th Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 04 January 1862

      Mustered out on 23 January 1865 in Louisville, KY

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney .

      Richard F Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Sergeant on 20 May 1864 in Frankfort, KY

      Enlisted in Company B, 1st Capital Gds Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 27 June 1864

      Mustered out on 12 January 1865

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney .

      John W. H. Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 20 May 1864 in Frankfort, KY

      Enlisted in Company B, 1st Capital Gds Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 27 June 1864

      Mustered out on 12 January 1865

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney.

      George W Belcher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Corporal on 01 November 1864 in Crockettsville, KY

      Enlisted in Company E, Three Forks Battn Regiment Kentucky on 19 February 1865

      was Wounded on 24 April 1865

      Mustered out on 17 July 1865 in Irvine, KY

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney .

      James R Belsher

      Residence: Occupation:

      Service Record:

      Enlisted as a Private on 11 October 1861 in Calhoon, KY

      Enlisted in Company A, 11th Infantry Regiment Kentucky on 09 December 1861

      Mustered out on 17 December 1864 in Bowling Green, KY

      Sources: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky. (KYRoster) Published in 1866 by Harney .

      Regimental Histories

      Confederate

      5th Infantry Regiment Kentucky Infantry 22 October 1861 to 06 May 1865

      Regimental History: None listed here but see after battles for an explanation of the regiments place in the Orphan Brigade.

      Battles Fought

      Fought on 19 October 1861 at Princeton, VA.

      Fought on 01 January 1862.

      Fought on 04 January 1862 at Middle Creek, KY.

      Fought on 06 January 1862.

      Fought on 07 January 1862.

      Fought on 09 January 1862.

      Fought on 10 January 1862 at Middle Creek, KY.

      Fought on 11 January 1862 at Middle Creek, KY.

      Fought on 13 January 1862 at Middle Creek, KY.

      Fought on 14 January 1862.

      Fought on 14 January 1862 at Martin's.

      Fought on 15 January 1862.

      Fought on 16 January 1862.

      Fought on 16 January 1862 at Martin's.

      Fought on 26 January 1862.

      Fought on 03 February 1862 at Rock House, KY.

      Fought on 04 February 1862.

      Fought on 04 February 1862 at Rock House, KY.

      Fought on 05 February 1862 at Rock House, KY.

      Fought on 07 February 1862 at Whitesburg, KY.

      Fought on 08 February 1862 at Whitesburg, KY.

      Fought on 10 March 1862 at Moccasin, VA.

      Fought on 01 April 1862 at Moccasin, VA.

      Fought on 14 April 1862 at Moccasin, VA.

      Fought on 16 May 1862 at Princeton, VA.

      Fought on 10 June 1862 at Mill Creek.

      Fought on 15 September 1862 at Owsley County, KY.

      Fought on 08 October 1862 at Perryville, KY.

      Fought on 15 October 1862 at Kentucky.

      Fought on 07 December 1862 at Hartsville, TN.

      Fought on 08 December 1862 at Hartsville, TN.

      Fought on 30 December 1862 at Stones River, TN.

      Fought on 31 December 1862 at Murfreesboro, TN.

      Fought on 02 January 1863 at Murfreesboro, TN.

      Fought on 15 January 1863 at Stones River, TN.

      Fought on 18 January 1863 at Wolfe County, KY.

      Fought on 20 February 1863 at Chickamauga, GA.

      Fought on 13 April 1863 at Jackson, KY.

      Fought on 29 April 1863.

      Fought on 15 September 1863.

      Fought on 20 September 1863 at Chickamauga, GA.

      Fought on 10 October 1863 at Chattanooga, TN.

      Fought on 23 November 1863 at Missionary Ridge, TN.

      Fought on 24 November 1863 at Missionary Ridge, TN.

      Fought on 25 November 1863 at Missionary Ridge, TN.

      Fought on 26 November 1863 at Missionary Ridge, TN.

      Fought on 09 May 1864 at Rocky Face Ridge, GA.

      Fought on 10 May 1864 at Rocky Face Ridge, GA.

      Fought on 11 May 1864 at Dug Gap.

      Fought on 14 May 1864 at Resaca, GA.

      Fought on 20 May 1864.

      Fought on 25 May 1864 at Dallas, GA.

      Fought on 26 May 1864 at Dallas, GA.

      Fought on 28 May 1864 at Dallas, GA.

      Fought on 08 June 1864 at Mount Sterling, KY.

      Fought on 19 June 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.

      Fought on 20 June 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.

      Fought on 22 June 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.

      Fought on 23 June 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.

      Fought on 30 June 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.

      Fought on 20 July 1864 at Peach Tree Creek, GA.

      Fought on 22 July 1864 at Atlanta, GA.

      Fought on 22 July 1864 at Intrenchment Creek, GA.

      Fought on 06 August 1864 at Utoy Creek, GA.

      Fought on 09 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA.

      Fought on 31 August 1864 at Jonesboro, GA.

      Fought on 01 September 1864 at Jonesboro, GA.

      Fought on 15 November 1864 at Stockbridge, GA.

      What was the "Orphan Brigade?"

      The Orphan Brigade was formed in October 1861 from a group of Kentucky units that mustered into Confederate service in northern Tennessee and southern Kentucky in the summer and fall of 1861. Due to Kentucky's neutrality policy in the summer of 1861, men wishing to join the Confederacy traveled to Camps Boone and Burnett, near Clarksville, TN. Here, the nucleus of the Orphan Brigade was formed.

      The following units composed the Orphan Brigade at its formation:

      2nd Kentucky Infantry, organized at Camp Boone, 17 July 1861

      3rd Kentucky Infantry, organized at Camp Boone, 20 July 1861

      4th Kentucky Infantry, organized at Camp Burnett, 13 September 1861

      6th Kentucky Infantry, organized at Bowling Green, KY, 19 November 1861

      9th Kentucky Infantry, organized at Bowling Green, 3 October 1861, as the 5th Kentucky Infantry (preliminary organization; final organization not complete until 15 May 1862 (Thompson, p. 434)

      1st Kentucky Artillery (Cobb's Battery), organized at Bowling Green, 20 September1861

      Graves' Battery, organized at Bowling Green, 8 November 1861

      Byrne's Battery, organized in Washington County, MS, July 1861

      John Hunt Morgan's Cavalry Squadron, organized at Bowling Green, 5 November 1861

      Some of these units left the Brigade for other organizations, and other units joined later. Through most of its career, the Orphan Brigade was composed of the 2nd, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 9th Infantry regiments, and Cobb's Battery.

      We will use the designation "9th Kentucky Infantry" for Col. Thomas Hunt's regiment. When organized in 1861, this regiment was known as the 5th Kentucky, and it is so-called in many period records. However, another regiment in Eastern Kentucky had also formed as the 5th Kentucky; since this regiment had perfected its organization first, the Confederate War Department redesignated Hunt's regiment as the 9th Kentucky in October 1862. To confuse the issue even further, the Eastern Kentucky 5th Kentucky Infantry joined the Orphans in November 1863, and served with them through the remainder of the war.

      The Orphan Brigade served all across the South, from Bowling Green, KY, to Baton Rouge, LA, and from Vicksburg, MS, to Camden, SC. They participated in most of the major battles of the Confederate Army of Tennessee, earning a reputation for steadiness in battle and unequaled prowess in drill. Following the Atlanta Campaign, the Orphans were converted to mounted infantry. The end of the war found them in South Carolina, where the 4th Kentucky Infantry fought one of the last actions east of the Mississippi River on 29 April 1865. The survivors of the Orphan Brigade were paroled at Washington, GA, on 6-7 May 1865.

      Why the name "Orphan Brigade?"

      The name "Orphan Brigade" was apparently a post-war invention by the veterans. It may have been in limited use by the end of the war, but it was not a widespread name like "Stonewall Brigade." During the war, the Orphan Brigade was generally known as the Kentucky Brigade, or the First Kentucky Brigade. There have been two theories put forward as to the source of the name, both are probably partly correct.

      Following the Orphans' disastrous assault at Murfreesboro on 2 January 1863, in which they suffered devastating casualties from massed Federal artillery, Gen. Breckinridge rode along their lines. Distraught at the obvious high casualties, he cried out, "My poor Orphan Brigade! They have cut it to pieces!" ("E.P. Thompson," Confederate Veteran, Vol. 4, No. 11, November 1896, p. 368). In this battle, the Brigade commander, Gen. Roger Hanson, was mortally wounded. The Kentuckians again lost their commander, Gen. Ben Hardin Helm, at Chickamauga, further contributing to their feeling of being "orphaned."

      Another possible source for the name was the general situation faced by the Kentucky Confederates. When they left the state in February 1862, they were never able to return as a unit during the war. Cut off from supplies, recruits, and even mail from their homes behind enemy lines, the Kentuckians began to see themselves as "orphans" whose only home was the Confederate Army (Thompson (1898), p. 29).

      14th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky Cavalry CSA, 01 July 1863 12 April 1865

      Regimental History None available

      Battles Fought

      Fought on 20 December 1862.

      Fought on 06 February 1863.

      Fought on 14 February 1863 at Floyd County, KY.

      Fought on 09 March 1863.

      Fought on 10 March 1863.

      Fought on 15 March 1863.

      Fought on 19 March 1863.

      Fought on 14 April 1863.

      Fought on 30 April 1863.

      Fought on 01 May 1863 at Little Stone Gap, VA.

      Fought on 14 May 1863 at Floyd County, KY.

      Fought on 15 May 1863.

      Fought on 16 May 1863.

      Fought on 20 May 1863.

      Fought on 15 June 1863.

      Fought on 20 August 1863 at Blue Springs, TN.

      Fought on 20 August 1863 at Kentucky.

      Fought on 20 August 1863 at Piketon, KY.

      Fought on 01 September 1863.

      Fought on 20 September 1863 at Johnson City, TN.

      Fought on 01 October 1863.

      Fought on 10 October 1863.

      Fought on 11 October 1863 at Rheatown, TN.

      Fought on 15 October 1863.

      Fought on 15 October 1863 at Kentucky.

      Fought on 07 November 1863 at Rogersville, TN.

      Fought on 08 November 1863 at Rogersville, TN.

      Fought on 15 February 1864.

      Fought on 15 February 1864 at Kentucky.

      Fought on 01 March 1864.

      Fought on 12 March 1864 at Little Stone Gap, VA.

      Fought on 15 March 1864.

      Fought on 15 April 1864 at Puncheon Creek, KY.

      Fought on 07 May 1864.

      Fought on 01 June 1864.

      Fought on 08 June 1864 at Mount Sterling, KY.

      Fought on 09 June 1864 at Mount Sterling, KY.

      Fought on 10 June 1864 at Mount Sterling, KY.

      Fought on 11 June 1864.

      Fought on 12 June 1864 at Cynthiana, KY.

      Fought on 12 June 1864 at Little Stone Gap, VA.

      Fought on 13 June 1864 at Cynthiana, KY.

      Fought on 07 August 1864 at Blue Springs, TN.

      Fought on 07 August 1864 at Tennessee.

      Fought on 10 August 1864.

      Fought on 24 August 1864 at Blue Springs, TN.

      Fought on 28 August 1864 at Blue Springs, TN.

      Fought on 01 October 1864.

      Fought on 02 October 1864 at Saltville, VA.

      Fought on 04 November 1864.

      Fought on 06 November 1864.

      Fought on 15 December 1864 at Kentucky.

      Fought on 22 December 1864.

      UNION

      8th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky Cavalry , USA, 01 September 1862 23 September 1863

      Regimental History: Eighth Cavalry KENTUCKY (3-YEARS)

      Eighth Cavalry. -- Cols., James M. Shackelford, Benjamin H. Bristow; Lieut.- Col., James H. Holloway; Majs., Joseph M. Kennedy, Joe seph W. Weatherford, Samuel M. Starling.

      Recruiting for this regiment commenced in Aug., 1862, and the 1st battalion was raised in Henderson, Daviess and adjoining counties, under Maj. Holloway. The 2nd was raised in Logan

      and adjacent counties under Lieut.-Col. Bristow, and this battalion was under Maj. Kennedy. The 3d battalion was recruited by Mail Weatherford, at Lebanon.

      The 1st battalion was mustered in at Henderson Sept. 13, 1862, and the 2nd and 3rd at Russellville Sept. 8. The regiment was at that date full, numbering 1,248 men, and the whole number was raised in three weeks from the time recruiting began.

      Col. Shackelford, with Holloway's battalion. attacked Adam Johnson's command at Geiger's lake and dispersed it, but in the fight Shackelford was wounded by a shot through the foot.

      In Nov. 1862, Holloway's battalion moved from Henderson to Bowling Green. On the march a night attack was made upon the camp by Col. Fowler with his guerrilla band, but the 8th suffered no loss.

      From Bowling Green two companies went on a scout into Tennessee and captured 100 Confederates, who were foraging.

      The principal service of the regiment was its participation in the pursuit and capture of Morgan in July, 1863, under-the leadership of its original colonel, then Brig.-Gen., Shackelford.

      After the capture of Morgan the regiment returned to Russellville Ky., having spent a year in continued activity. On Sept. 23, 1863 the term of service having expired, it was mustered out at Russellville and a great many of the men at once joined other organizations.

      Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 351

      Battles Fought

      Fought at Geyger's Lake, KY.

      Fought at Madisonville, KY.

      Fought at Russellville, KY.

      Fought at Springfield, KY.

      Fought on 05 August 1863.

      Fought on 23 September 1863.

      12th Cavalry Regiment Kentucky Cavalry, USA 17 November 1862 23 August 1865

      Regimental History: Twelfth Cavalry KENTUCKY (3-YEARS)

      Twelfth Cavalry. -- Cols., Quintus C. Shanks, Eugene W. Crittenden Lieut.-Cols., Alexander W. Holeman, James T. Bramlette, Majs., Nathaniel L. Lightfoot, William R. Kinney, Ira H. Stout, Julius N. Delfosse, James B. Harrison, George F. Barnes.

      This regiment dated from Aug. 16, 1862, though it was not until Nov. 17 that eleven companies, with the field and staff, were mustered into the U. S. service at Owensboro. The twelfth company was on a scout, so it was mustered in later and joined the regiment at Munfordville. The roll then showed 1,250 men in all, but during the service from first to last it mustered over 2,000 men and quit the service with less than 900.

      During Morgan's first raid into Kentucky, the regiment with other troops under Col. John M. Harlan, acting under Gen. E. H. Hobson, was engaged in protecting the Louisville & Nashville railroad. While there was much sharp skirmishing no actual collision took place, but Col. Harlan in his report shows that his force saved several bridges from destruction, including the one at Rolling fork and the one at Shepherdsville, and by great activity prevented much injury to the road.

      On May 10, 1863, the regiment was engaged in a hard fight with Morgan at Horseshoe bottom. In June Morgan crossed the Cumberland at Burkesville and the regiment was again engaged with him at Marrowbone. It participated in the pursuit of Morgan through Indiana and Ohio, after which it reassembled at Glasgow and prepared for the expedition into East Tennessee under Gen. Burnside.

      Arriving at Knoxville Sept. 5, it moved up the valley as far as Jonesboro. After skirmishing there it was sent with Wolford's command south of Knoxville, to the neighborhood of Sweetwater and Philadelphia, where it encountered a large force of the enemy, was surrounded, lost heavily, but cut its way out and proceeded to Loudon. The next day it returned and for two days fought the enemy, after which it crossed to the north side of the Tennessee River.

      It then moved up to Knoxville, crossed the Holston and proceeded down the river about 16 miles, where it again encountered the enemy and fell back before him to Knoxville.

      Recrossing the river it went out on the Loudon road and contested the approach of Longstreet's forces. It bore its full share of the fighting during the three weeks' siege of Knoxville and after the siege joined in the pursuit up the valley.

      It participated in the severe battle at Bean's station. It remained in East Tennessee during the winter and had numerous fights with the enemy. In Jan. 1864, it was attacked at Dandridge, but defended the position. After that, by a circuitous march by way of Maryville, it reached Knoxville Feb. 3 and was ordered to return to Kentucky.

      Being mounted and equipped the regiment moved with Gen. Stoneman in May by way of Point Burnside into Tennessee and May 6 was at Kingston. It joined Sherman's army at Varnell's station, GA, and Dr. Littlepage says not a day passed in the Atlanta campaign that the regiment was not engaged with the enemy.

      After the capture of Atlanta it was ordered back to Kentucky and went to Camp Nelson where it prepared to accompany Gen. Stoneman on his raid to Saltville, Va. Before it could effect its return it had passed into the state of North Carolina. Returning, it fought at Glade spring and passed down by way of Bristol and Blountsville.

      After resting a few days in Tennessee the regiment was ordered to Kentucky and was employed in the winter of 1864, to protect the Louisville &: Nashville railroad. About March 20, 1865, it was ordered to Knoxville, Tenn., to participate in a raid under Gen. Stoneman, into Virginia and North Carolina.

      It moved into Virginia by way of Bristol, followed up near the railroad above Wytheville where it filed right and moved into North Carolina, meeting very little resistance until it arrived at Boone, when it met a small force of Confederates.

      After a hotly contested skirmish the enemy gave way with some loss on both sides, when it moved down the Yadkin River, crossed the Dee River and went to Salisbury, which it took by storm and recaptured about 1,000 of its own men.

      Then to Asheville and from there to Anderson, S. C. From Anderson it moved by a circuitous route to Athens, GA, and was finally ordered back to Louisville, where it was mustered out Aug. 23, 1865.

      Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 354

      Battles Fought

      Fought on 15 December 1862 at Abingdon, VA.

      Fought on 09 May 1863.

      Fought on 10 May 1863 at Horse-Shoe Bend, KY.

      Fought on 18 September 1863 at Jonesboro, TN.

      Fought on 20 September 1863 at Jonesboro, TN.

      Fought on 20 October 1863 at Philadelphia, TN.

      Fought on 30 October 1863.

      Fought on 13 November 1863 at Knoxville, TN.

      Fought on 16 November 1863 at Knoxville, TN.

      Fought on 17 November 1863 at Knoxville, TN.

      Fought on 18 November 1863 at Knoxville, TN.

      Fought on 20 November 1863 at Knoxville, TN.

      Fought on 27 November 1863.

      Fought on 10 December 1863 at Blain's Cross Roads, TN.

      Fought on 14 December 1863 at Bean's Station, TN.

      Fought on 18 December 1863 at Bean's Station, TN.

      Fought on 17 January 1864 at Dandridge, TN.

      Fought on 28 January 1864 at Fair Gardens, TN.

      Fought on 25 March 1864 at Paducah, KY.

      Fought on 12 May 1864.

      Fought on 22 May 1864 at Cassville, GA.

      Fought on 30 May 1864 at Altoona, GA.

      Fought on 12 June 1864 at Cynthiana, KY.

      Fought on 13 June 1864 at Cynthiana, KY.

      Fought on 20 June 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.

      Fought on 01 July 1864 at Lost Mountain, GA.

      Fought on 08 July 1864 at Nicholasville, KY.

      Fought on 12 July 1864 at Brandenburg, KY.

      Fought on 04 August 1864.

      Fought on 06 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA.

      Fought on 29 September 1864 at Duvall's Ford, TN.

      Fought on 30 September 1864 at Duvall's Ford, TN.

      Fought on 14 December 1864 at Glade Springs, VA.

      Fought on 15 December 1864 at Marion, VA.

      Fought on 16 December 1864 at Bristol, VA.

      Fought on 16 December 1864 at Marion, VA.

      Fought on 17 December 1864 at Marion, VA.

      Fought on 18 December 1864 at Marion, VA.

      Fought on 19 December 1864 at Marion, VA.

      Fought on 20 December 1864.

      Fought on 23 December 1864 at Saltville, VA.

      Fought on 27 December 1864 at Big Creek Gap, TN.

      Fought on 15 January 1865 at Camp Nelson, KY.

      Fought on 27 March 1865 at Boon, NC.

      Fought on 12 April 1865 at Salisbury, NC.

      Fought on 27 April 1865 at South Carolina Raid.

      Fought on 30 April 1865 at Punkintown, SC.

      INFANTRY

      11th Infantry Regiment Kentucky Infantry ,09 December 1861 16 December 1864

      Regimental History: Eleventh Infantry KENTUCKY (3-YEARS)

      Eleventh Infantry. -- Cols., Pierce B. Hawkins, S. P. Love, Lieut.Col., Erasmus L. Mottley; Majs., Woodford M. Houchin, Eugene F. Kinnaird.

      This regiment was recruited in the fall of 1861 by Col. Hawkins of Bowling Green. The companies were formed in the Green River counties, Muhlenberg, Butler, Warren and Edmonson, and went in camp at Calhoun, where were assembled at the same time several other Kentucky regiments.

      The Confederates were then in Kentucky, at Bowling Green, Russellville, Hopkinsville and other places, and the Union regiments encamped at Calhoun and Owensboro prevented their advance to the Ohio River. Skirmishing and picket fighting was carried on during December and January, but in Feb. 1862, upon the fall of Fort Donelson the Confederates retired and the Federals at once advanced into Tennessee.

      The regiment marched from its camp at Calhoun to Owensboro and thence went by boat to Nashville. Its casualties in the battle of Shiloh were 5 killed and 46 wounded. The regiment remained several days on the battle-field and then advanced to Corinth, Miss., reaching Farmington about 2 miles from that place and being daily on the skirmish line until the evacuation some days afterward.

      Under Gen. Buell it left its camp at Farmington and marched via Iuka, Miss., Tuscumbia and Florence, Ala. (crossing the Tennessee at the old Jackson crossing), to Athens, Huntsville, Stevenson and Battle Creek, where it remained until Bragg started on his march to Kentucky. The regiment followed him, crossed the mountains and moved by way of Murfreesboro, Nashville and Bowling Green to Louisville, thence on by Bardstown and Springfield to Perryville, in which battle it took part as skirmishers.

      It continued in pursuit of Bragg via Danville, Lancaster, Stanford, Crab Orchard and Mt. Vernon to Camp Wild Cat, when the pursuit was ended. It then moved by way of Somerset, Columbia and Glasgow, to Nashville, thence to Murfreesboro and was in the fight at Stone's River, where its casualties were 7 killed and 85 wounded, including 4 officers.

      The regiment then returned to Bowling Green, where it remained from February to July. From Bowling Green, with other troops under command of Gen. Manson it took up the line of march by way of Burkesville, Ky., for Knoxville where it became a part of Gen. Burnside's army. It made frequent scouts toward and beyond Loudon and Sevierville, fought a battle at Rockford, across the river, in which it was victorious, made several scouts up the railroad to Lenoir's station, Philadelphia and Sweetwater continually on the lookout until Longstreet approached Knoxville, fighting him at Lenoir's and Campbell's stations.

      The regiment endured the hardships of the siege of Knoxville; participated in numerous fights around the lines, in which loss was incurred, when the siege was raised the regiment with the other forces pursued Longstreet up the valley to Bean's station, was sent on several scouts and engaged in the battle at Bean's station when Longstreet turned upon his pursuers and gave them a hard fight. His attempt to capture them not only failed but he suffered more loss than he inflicted.

      Then (Col. Love being in command of his own regiment and the 27th Ky. infantry) the march was to Kentucky in the midst of the winter, meeting on the way trains of provisions going to east Tennessee, from which Col. Love supplied his command.

      Upon reaching Mt. Sterling, the regiment was dismounted and ordered back to East Tennessee, marching by way of Lexington Lancaster, Stanford Somerset, Point Burnside and Chitwood to Knoxville, where it remained until Gen. Sherman took position around Marietta.

      It then proceeded by rail via Cleveland and Dalton to join his army, which it did a short distance below Kingston; participated in the fighting around Kennesaw Mountain; thence through Marietta to the siege of Atlanta; took part in the battle in which Gen. McPherson was killed, moved with Sherman's army to the south side of the city; struck the railroad at Rough and Ready, fought at Jonesboro and Lovejoy's station; then proceeded with the 25th corps to Nashville and from that place to Pulaski, Tenn.

      It went thence by rail to Louisville and from Louisville returned to Bowling Green, where on Dec. 16, 1864, it was mustered out.

      Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 325

      Battles Fought

      Fought at Louden, TN.

      Fought on 07 April 1862 at Shiloh, TN.

      Fought on 31 December 1862 at Stones River, TN.

      Fought on 02 January 1863 at Stones River, TN.

      Fought on 07 April 1863.

      Fought on 14 November 1863.

      Fought on 15 November 1863 at Knoxville, TN.

      Fought on 16 November 1863.

      Fought on 18 December 1863.

      Fought on 06 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA.

      17th Infantry Regiment Kentucky Infantry 04 January 1862 23 January 1865

      Regimental History: Seventeenth Infantry KENTUCKY (3-YEARS)

      Seventeenth Infantry. -- Cols.,John H. McHenry, Jr., Alexander M. Stout, James M. Shackelford; Lieut.-Cols., Benjamin H. Bristow, Robert Vaughan, Ion Nall; Majs., William B. Wall, Isaac Calhoon, David M. Claggett.

      This regiment was organized in the fall of 1861, and before its muster-in was engaged with the enemy at Big Hill near Morgantown. After remaining at Camp Calhoon about two months, in Jan, 1862, it was sent to join the command of Gen. Grant and reached Fort Donelson in time to share in all the fighting that preceded the surrender. The casualties of the 17th Ky. in that battle were 4 killed and 34 wounded.

      The regiment was next in the battle of Shiloh, in the brigade under Brig.-Gen. J. G. Lauman. The casualties were 1 officer killed and 2 wounded, 17 men killed and 67 wounded. On April 13, 1862, the 25th Ky. was formally consolidated with the 17th and under the latter designation continued during the remainder of its service.

      The consolidated regiment moved with the army to Corinth and was engaged in severe skirmishing, lasting nearly all the night before the evacuation and it was with the first troops to enter the place. From Corinth it marched with Buell's army to Huntsville, Ala., in June it was at Athens, in July at Pulaski and Reynolds' station, Tenn.

      It was with Buell's army in the march to Louisville, being often near Bragg's columns, and at the battle of Perryville was in Starkweather's brigade, Rousseau's division McCook's corps. In December the regiment was ordered to Clarksville, Tenn., where it remained until March 1863, when it proceeded by steamboat to Nashville.

      In the organization of Rosecrans' army, July 31, 1863, the regiment was assigned to Beatty's brigade, Van Cleve's division, Crittenden's corps, where it remained until after the battle of Chickamauga, in which it was severely engaged both days. The casualties of the regiment in that battle were 1 officer killed, 2 wounded, 5 men killed, 103 wounded, and 15 missing.

      The regiment remained at Chattanooga until Nov. 25, when it participated in the battle of Missionary Ridge. After spending the winter in East Tennessee, it marched to Tunnel Hill, GA, advanced and suffered loss at Rocky Face Ridge also was engaged at Cassville, losing severely; fought at Pickett's mills where Capt. Thomas R. Brown was wounded, next was in action at Acworth; on June 17 Capt. R. C. Sturgis received a wound from which he died; was in the fighting throughout the campaign about Kennesaw Mountain, Dallas, Marietta, across the

      Chattahoochee, in the battles around Atlanta; and took part in the movement to Jonesboro and Lovejoy's Station south of Atlanta.

      The loss during the campaign was 1 officer killed, 4 wounded, 7 men killed and 83 wounded. The regiment went with the 4th corps and in November was at Pulaski, Tenn., the 4th and 23rd corps being under Gen. Schofield. The regiment participated in all the movements and engagements of that campaign, and after the battle of Franklin it was ordered to Louisville, where it was mustered out Jan. 23, 1865.

      The following statistics of the regiment are taken from the official records at Washington: Total enlistments, 1,473; killed in battle or died of wounds received, 135; wounded in action, 363; died in hospital, prison, by accidents, etc., 163; total fatalities, 661.

      Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 330

      Battles Fought

      Fought on 15 February 1862 at Fort Donelson, TN.

      Fought on 06 April 1862 at Shiloh, TN.

      Fought on 29 May 1862 at Corinth, MS.

      Fought on 19 September 1863 at Chickamauga, GA.

      Fought on 20 September 1863 at Chickamauga, GA.

      Fought on 12 March 1864 at New Market, KY.

      Fought on 16 May 1864 at Kingston, GA.

      Fought on 19 May 1864 at Cassville, GA.

      Fought on 27 May 1864 at Altoona, GA.

      Fought on 27 May 1864 at New Hope Church, GA.

      Fought on 31 May 1864 at Dallas, GA.

      Fought on 13 June 1864 at Kenesaw Mountain, GA.

      Fought on 21 June 1864 at Marietta, GA.

      Fought on 21 July 1864 at Atlanta, GA.

      Fought on 03 August 1864 at Atlanta, GA.

      Fought on 02 September 1864.

      Fought on 24 September 1864 at Atlanta, GA.

      Fought on 30 November 1864 at Franklin, TN.

      18th Infantry Regiment Kentucky Infantry 8 February 1862 18 July 1865

      Regimental History: Eighteenth Infantry KENTUCKY (3-YEARS)

      Eighteenth Infantry. -- Col., William A. Warner, Lieut.-Cols., John J. Landrum, Hubbard K. Milward; Majs., Frederick G. Bracht, Abram G. Wileman, John W. Robbins, John J. Hall.

      This regiment was mustered into the U. S. service Feb. 8, 1862. On June 16 a detachment under command of Lieut.-Col. Landrum participated in the defense of Cynthiana, Ky., against John H. Morgan, where it sustained a loss of 2 killed.

      In August the regiment participated in the battle of Richmond, losing 52 killed, 115 wounded and almost the entire remainder of the command captured and paroled. On Feb. 2, 1863, the remnant of the regiment left Louisville by boat for Nashville, Tenn., where, upon its arrival, it was assigned to the brigade of Brig.-Gen. Crook.

      On June 23 it moved with the Army of the Cumberland and took part in the engagement at Hoover's gap, losing 2 killed and 3 wounded. It participated in the battle of Chickamauga, where it lost 8 killed, 40 wounded and 38 prisoners. From Oct. 5 to Nov. 23 it was on special duty, holding the line of the river near Chattanooga at a point known as "The Narrows," and at Brown's ferry, on which duty it lost 1 killed and 5 captured.

      On Jan. 5, 1864, of 300 men present, 272 reenlisted as veterans and the command was ordered to Louisville, Ky., by rail to receive veteran furlough. On Feb. 1 it received a 30 days' furlough at Louisville, at the expiration of which it rendezvoused at Paris, Ky. and on March 12 started by rail for Nashville, Tenn. whence it marched on the 22nd for Ringgold, GA, a distance of 200 miles, to join the main army. There it had several skirmishes, in one of which Capt. J. B. Heltemus was captured.

      On Sept. 25 it left Ringgold, by rail, for Atlanta, and on Oct. 3 it marched from Atlanta northward in pursuit of Gen. Hood, to Gaylesville, Ala., a distance of 150 miles. On Oct. 29 it broke camp at Gaylesville, and after halting at Rome to be paid off marched to Atlanta, which place was reached on Nov. 15.

      It participated in the march to the sea, and on Feb. 5, 1865, it crossed the river into South Carolina. The march from that point to Goldsboro N. C., was terrible, through mud and mire, over wide swamps and deep rivers, and the comforts of life accessible only under difficulties. On April 12 the regiment was engaged, sustaining a loss of 2 killed and 2 wounded, and on the 13th entered Raleigh. On the 29th it started homeward and reached Washington, D. C. (a distance of 360 miles), on May 19.

      It remained at Washington nearly a month and was in the grand review. The regiment was mustered out at Louisville July 18, 1865.

      Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 330

      Battles Fought

      Fought on 30 August 1862 at Richmond, KY.

      Fought on 20 September 1863 at Chickamauga, GA.

      Fought on 05 October 1863 at Pendleton, KY.

      Fought on 09 October 1863.

      Fought on 20 March 1865.

      Fought on 23 March 1865.

      Fought on 02 April 1865 at Goldsboro, NC.

      Fought on 12 April 1865 at Raleigh, NC.

      26th Infantry Regiment Kentucky Infantry 01 March 1862 10 July 1865

      Regimental History

      Twenty-sixth Infantry KENTUCKY (3-YEARs)

      Twenty-sixth Infantry. -- Cols., Stephen G. Burbridge, Cicero Maxwell, Thomas B. Fairleigh; Lieut.-Cols., James F. Lauck, Rowland E. Hackett; Majs., John L. Davidson, Joseph L. Frost, Ignatius Mattingly, Cyrus J. Wilson, Francis M. Page, James H. Ashcraft.

      This regiment was recruited and organized by Col. Burbridge, but as he was made brigadier-general June 12, 1862, he was not long with the regiment. The companies came from the Green River counties, and there was no place or road in all the section of the state from Bowling Green to Henderson that was not known to some of the men.

      Arriving at the mouth of Green River after the fall of Fort Donelson, the regiment passed up the Cumberland by the fallen fortress and landed at Nashville just as Buell's army was crossing the river into the city. At Nashville on March 5, 1862, it was regularly mustered by Maj. Bankhead.

      Upon the second day at Shiloh it was engaged in heavy fighting, as the casualties show, there being 7 killed, including Maj. Davidson, and 60 wounded. After the battle of Shiloh the regiment moved with the army to Corinth; took part in the siege and skirmishing there; then moved to Tuscumbia, Florence and Athens, Ala., and camped at Battle Creek, Tenn.

      The regiment was but slightly engaged at Perryville. It continued in pursuit of Bragg until he was out of the state and then marched across the country to Nashville, where the army, then under Gen. Rosecrans, was concentrated, Buell having been relieved. Later the regiment was sent to Bowling Green.

      On Jan. 31, 1864, the members of the 26th reenlisted as veterans and rendezvoused at Bowling Green in the spring where on April 1 the 33d was consolidated with it, becoming Cos. F. H, I and K. The regiment was mounted and used through the entire spring and summer for the protection of Kentucky.

      It then joined the command of Gen. Burbridge for the raid to the salt works, in Virginia. From the day it left Pikeville until its return to that point it was in a continual fight.

      On Oct. 29 it was ordered to Paducah. On Dec. 7 it went to Nashville and was placed in the 1st brigade, 2nd division, 23d corps.

      It engaged in the battle of Nashville, moving with the 23d corps under Gen. Schofield, and joining in the general charge which broke up and destroyed Hood's army. Taking transports at Clifton, Tenn., it proceeded down the Tennessee and up the Ohio to Cincinnati, thence by rail to Washington, D. C., and Alexandria, Va, then taking ocean steamer the regiment went with the 23rd corps to Fort Fisher, N. C., arriving there in Jan., 1865.

      On the way to Wilmington the regiment fought at Fort Anderson and Town Creek, and led by Col. Fairleigh was the first regiment to enter Wilmington. It reached Raleigh and remained

      there until the surrender of Gen. Johnston, when it was sent to Salisbury, N. C., and encamped until it was ordered to Kentucky. It was mustered out July 10, 1865, at Louisville.

      Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 336

      Battles Fought

      Fought on 05 December 1861 at Whippoorwill Bridge, KY.

      Fought on 07 April 1862 at Shiloh, TN.

      Fought on 29 July 1862 at Russellville, KY.

      Fought on 02 October 1864 at Saltville, VA.

      Fought on 17 November 1864 at Hodgenville, KY.

      Fought on 15 December 1864 at Nashville, TN.

      Fought on 22 January 1865.

      Fought on 19 February 1865 at Fort Anderson, NC.

      37th Infantry Regiment Kentucky Infantry 17 September 1863 29 December 1864

      Regimental History: Thirty-seventh Infantry KENTUCKY(1-YEAR)

      Thirty-seventh Infantry. -- Col., Charles S. Hanson Lieut.-Col., Benjamin J. Spaulding; Maj., Samuel Martin.

      The necessity for troops in Kentucky led to the organization of this regiment in the summer of 1863. Cos. A, B and C were mustered into service Sept. 17, and D, E, F and G Oct. 24, all at Glasgow.

      Capt. Stroub's company, which was originally intended for the 51st Ky. infantry, was mustered into service at Covington Sept. 4, and afterward consolidated with the 37th as Co. H. Cos. I and K were mustered at Glasgow Dec. 21 and 22.

      On Oct. 6, at night, when but few of the regiment were in the camp at Glasgow, the place was attacked by Col. Hughes and 142 of Maj. Martin's men were captured. Col. Hanson's report

      shows that the regiment bore its full part in the exciting movements, hard marches and frequent encounters, incident to the campaign against Morgan in June 1864.

      Early in Sept. 1864, Gen. Burbridge organized his expedition to Saltville, Va., with which the regiment went in the brigade commanded by Col. Hanson. It participated in the fighting which occurred on this expedition, in which Col. Hanson was wounded and captured.

      Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 340

      Battles Fought

      Fought at Abingdon, VA.

      Fought on 06 October 1863 at Glasgow, KY.

      Fought on 01 March 1864 at Jackson, TN.

      Fought on 20 September 1864.

      Fought on 30 September 1864 at Richmond, VA.

      Fought on 02 October 1864 at Saltville, VA.

      Fought on 05 December 1864 at Abingdon, VA.

      Reserves/Militias

      1st Infantry Regiment Kentucky Infantry 27 June 1864 10 January 1865

      Regimental History: None

      Battles Fought

      Fought on 07 June 1864 at Owingsville, KY.

      Three Forks Infantry Battalion Kentucky Infantry 01 November 1864 17 July

      Regimental History: None

      Battles Fought

      Fought on 06 November 1864.

      Fought on 03 January 1865.

      Fought on 15 February 1865.

      Fought on 25 February 1865.

      Fought on 05 March 1865.

      Fought on 03 April 1865.

      Fought on 24 April 1865 at Breathitt County, KY.

      Fought on 25 April 1865.

      by: Kenneth Belcher

      kenbelc@attbi.com