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William Talbot and Mary Bailey Talbot
1761 -1831                   1764 - 1825
By
Ann Talbot Brandon Womack
and
Farris W. Womack

May 2000
Revised July 2006

William Talbot was born about 1760-61 in Bedford County,  Virginia.  He was the fifth child and fourth son of Matthew (II) and Mary Hale Talbot.   Although little is known about his early years, it is quite clear that his family was among the leadership in the Virginia Wilderness.  His grandfather, Matthew (I),  had been an organizing founder of Bedford County and his uncle, John, was a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses from 1760 to 1776 and a member of the Virginia Assembly from 1776 to 1783.  The family was devoutly Anglican and Matthew (I) served the parish in a wide variety of offices.  His uncles, Charles and James, were community leaders and often were elected or appointed to important positions in the County.   His father, Matthew (II) was a militia captain and an acknowledged leader of the pioneers who struggled to create a civilized community in the outback.  William's father was engaged in the stock raising business and while his grand father had died a few years before William's birth, the legacy left to his father was substantial by the standards of 1760.  His early years were quite likely much the same as other children on the frontier.  Schooling was limited and life was often difficult as well as dangerous.  Skirmishes with the Indians were frequent and often lethal.

He was a teenager when the family moved from Virginia to the Watauga area of what is now eastern Tennessee. Undoubtedly, he was engaged in the work of his father and must have kept busy with duties at the gristmill and stock tending. He served in the American Revolution as did his older brothers and, although the limited data available to describe his or their service makes research sometimes frustrating, enough is extant to prove their service.  The National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution has published works in which William's descendants have made reference to his Revolutionary War service.  He was in the Battle of Kings Mountain and his father had helped to supply provisions to Sevier's men before they set out to overtake Ferguson and the Tories.  The years in Watauga must have been interesting as well as difficult.  The speculative questions about his life in Watauga are endless: what did he actually do to make a living, why was he not married, was he a convert to the new faith when his father and mother were, and the list goes on.

Although no written record has been found to determine why the family moved to Wilkes County, Georgia, it appears certain that William accompanied his father in the relocation, soon after 1785 but before 1788.  Current research shows rather clearly that the traveling party consisted of William, his father, Matthew (II), and William's two younger brothers, Edmund and Clayton, and perhaps his older brother, Matthew (III).  William's uncle, John Williston Talbot, had moved to Wilkes County in 1783 and by the time William and his father arrived, John had established himself as a successful Georgia planter and a member of the Georgia political establishment.   William's father had not only converted to the Baptist faith but had also become a minister.  Indeed, he was a founder of the Sinking Creek Baptist Church in Tennessee and served as its first pastor.   While that fact alone sheds little or no light on the reasons for moving to Georgia, it does emphasize further the question of why they moved.  William did not follow in the ministry as his father but the Baptist roots would bear fruit because many of his descendants take up the call of the Baptist ministry.

He was 28 years of age when he married Mary Bailey probably in Wilkes County, Georgia in 1789.  She was 25.   No record has been found to document the marriage but their first child was born in 1791 in Wilkes County and the conclusion of an approximate date for their marriage seems reasonable.  Georgia did not require the recording of marriages until 1806 and, even after the law was enacted, there were many couples who never made it to the County Court House to  record their marriage.

From the available land records, it is clear that William was a buyer and seller of land in Wilkes County as early as 1791.  Moreover, the pattern of buying and selling continued at least through 1801.  Unfortunately, the identity of the Matthew Talbot, who was on the other side of many of these land transactions, cannot be determined with certainty.  The identity can be narrowed to the three known Matthews who were probably living in Wilkes County at the time.  The first possible Matthew was William's father, Matthew (II) Talbot, the second, Matthew (III), William's older brother, and the third, Matthew, William's cousin,  the son of John Williston Talbot.  That Matthew would later become Governor of Georgia for a brief period.  Some evidence suggests that Matthew (III) might not have been living in Georgia after 1792.  Current research shows that he married Jane Quarles in Campbell County, Virginia in 1792 and that their six children were born in Davidson County, Tennessee.  The Matthew who was a seller in 1801 would have been either William's father or his cousin.
 
 
Land Transactions in Wilkes County, Georgia involving William Talbot
Grantee
Last Name
Grantee
First Name
Grantor
Last Name
Grantor
First Name
Acreage
Type of
Instrument
Location
Month
Day
Year
Book
Page
Talbot
William
Bankston
Dave
278.5
POA
 
1
10
1791
MM
248
Talbot
William
Talbot
Matthew
228
POA
Chicksaw
11
3
1791
MM
250
Talbot
Matthew
Talbot
William
228
POA
 
11
13
1791
MM
250
Talbot
William
Gaddy
James
570
Deed
Fishing Creek
5
1
1798
RR
210
Talbot
William
Talbot
Matthew
250
Deed
Soap Creek
7
27
1801
SS
145
POA= Power of Attorney
Sales are bold and italicized.

When William and Mary actually moved from Wilkes County to Morgan County must have been in late 1806 or early 1807.  Here the record grows but leaves some questions unanswered.  William's son, Hale, reported that he was born in Clarke County in 1807 and Harriett's descendants assert that she was born in Walton.  Both counties adjoin Morgan and William's land was very near the lines for both counties.  Because the county boundaries were often not well known or accepted, the actual location of a birth could be difficult to fix.  Unfortunately, the 1790, 1800, and 1810 Census records for Georgia have been lost.  As a result, actual migrations of families are difficult to trace except through land records and even those are not without error.  Moreover, merely owning land in a county did not necessarily mean that the individual lived there.  Nevertheless, William was on the Tax Lists for Morgan County each year beginning in 1808.  William's and Mary's  family had grown to perhaps nine children before they arrived in Morgan in 1807.  Green Berry Talbot, the first born, reported in a letter to his daughter in 1872 that he had been born in Wilkes but the record other than that cited above, is silent concerning the birth place of the other children.  If the move to Morgan came in 1807, then it is likely that the first nine were born in Wilkes.  If it came earlier, the number of children born in Wilkes would be fewer and births would have taken place in other counties.  Three daughters would be born to them after their arrival in Morgan and by 1813 the family was complete at twelve, six sons and six daughters.  Eleven of their twelve children survived to adulthood, Bailey being the only child to die either as an infant or youth.

Morgan County was formed from Baldwin County by Act of the Georgia Legislature December 10, 1807 but settlement was occurring before the county was formed..  The table below discloses the Morgan County land transactions of William and some of his sons.  Although William's father, Matthew (II), was living in Morgan County when he died in 1812, all of the land transaction involving a "Matthew" occurred after his death.  Accordingly, it appears that the "Matthew" in these transactions would be William's son, Matthew, although the possibility exits that it could be the "Matthew" from Wilkes County.  If the Matthew in question was his son, he would have hardly reached legal age.  It is noteworthy that the first transaction occurred before the County was actually created and the second only a few months later.

In 1807, William built the house shown below.  It most surely did not look then as it does now but the central structure remains quite similar to the original.  Every one of William's children lived in this house and three, perhaps four, were born here.  The architectural style is similar to the antebellum plantation house throughout the South.  After Mary Bailey's death, William gave the house to his oldest daughter, Lucy, who had married Thomas Swift.  All the Swift children lived in this house and Amanda was probably born here.  The Swift's lived here for almost 30 years.  A succession of owners followed until 1969 when Joan and Larry Taylor bought the house and lands.  Significant restoration has followed and now it stands once again as a silent testimonial to the merits of hard work and attention to preservation of things important.
 

Talbot - Swift - Taylor House
1090 Hardeman Mil Road
Madison, Georgia
Current owners:  Joan and Larry Taylor

 

By 1810, William had acquired more than 800 acres in Morgan County, all  in the 20th District with the parcels adjoining.  The first of his children to leave the nest to begin a family of her own was Lucy, the oldest daughter,  who married Thomas Swift in 1810. One year later, Lucy presented William and Mary with their first grandchild, a grandson, William, and two years later Lucy gave birth to Eleanor.   Green and Matthew, aged 24 and 20, respectively,   began to buy and sell land by 1815.  Green had married Mary Grant Hughes in 1812 but she died less than a year later.  Green had remarried and Matthew had married by 1815 and Green's first child, James Anthony, had been born.  They were undoubtedly engaged in the same farming interests as their father.   And so for a period of almost  20 years, William and his sons pursued their farming and other business interests in the area of Sandy Creek in Morgan County.  Green was elected Captain of the Militia for the 400th District in 1817 and held the rank and office until 1822.  The 1820 Census listed 89 Heads of Household in Capt. Tolbert's District.

The 1820 Census listed William and Mary in Morgan County with seven of their eleven living children still at home.  Green, Lucy, Matthew, and Mary Hale had married and the three older ones had families of their own.  Green's and Lucy's Census records show their households but the writer has been unable to locate the records for Matthew and Mary Hale in 1820.  William, James, and Hale, ages 16, 15, and 13, respectively, were shown on the Census under the category,  Free White Males 10-16.  The Census groupings for the Free White Females showed 2 under the age of ten, probably Martha and Emily.   One between the ages of 10 and 16, probably Elizabeth and one between the ages of 16 and 26, probably Harriett.  Harriett would soon leave the household to marry William Hinton Crawford.   William Talbot was 59 and Mary Bailey Talbot was 56.  Living next door to William and Mary was John Malcom, a neighbor with whom they had traded land in prior years and John Malcom bought the house and lands from the Swift heirs in 1860.  These must have been happy years, their children were establishing families of their own and they could enjoy the grandchildren and their own prosperity.  Rebecca Felton wrote later that her grandfather, Thomas Swift, was a Deacon at the Sandy Creek Baptist Church.  It is quite likely that all of the Talbot clan attended that Church and it could have been the site where Green was made a Deacon for we shall see in his story that he served as the Deacon when the County Line Baptist Church was formed in Chambers County, Alabama in 1835.

With Mary's death in 1825, the land and slave transactions reveal an interesting pattern.  It appears that William began to dispose of his estate by transfers to his sons and to Thomas Swift who was his son-in-law, the husband of his oldest daughter, Lucy.  Rebecca Latimer Felton, the granddaughter of Lucy Talbot and Thomas Swift, wrote in 1919 that the house where her grandmother lived had been given to Lucy by William Talbot.  Click here to read the Felton account of her youth in Georgia and her description of visits to her grandmother Lucy's home.  Thomas Swift was a substantial land owner himself and the Morgan County records show numerous entries for him either as buyer or seller of land.  Felton reported that he had a plantation, a grain mill,  and a sawmill.  Thomas and Lucy were substantial members of the Morgan County community and probably remained in the same place until their deaths.  The 1820, 1830, 1840, and 1850 Census list them as residents of the County.

Before 1830 and probably between 1826 and 1828, Green Talbot relocated his family to Meriwhether County, Georgia.  The Green Talbot story is an epoch itself and the reader is encouraged to Click here to read the story of  Green Talbot's life.   About the same time, Matthew, William, Jr., Hale, and James Talbot all moved to Pike County, Alabama.  Camille Head Corte, a descendant of Hale Talbot, has written extensively about the Talbot brothers in Pike County.  The reader may click here to see her account of the four Talbot brothers who moved to Alabama.  Questions abound regarding the reasons why the Talbot male children might have left the Morgan County area so soon after their mother's death, leaving as they did, their father alone at age 66-67.  While the answers  surely lie in the prospects for better land with greater opportunity, the decision to go must have been wrenching.   Green made at least two trips to settle his father's estate in 1831 but whether he, or any of his brothers then in Alabama,  had returned for  visits before his father's death is unknown.  The presence of the Talbot women, all of whom were then married, living nearby with grandchildren for William to enjoy, surely eased the pain of the separations.
 
 
Morgan County Land Records Involving William Talbot and his sons
Instrument
Grantee
Last Name
Grantee
FirstName
Grantor
Last Name
Grantor
FirstName
Book
Page
Inst
Type
Month
Day
Year
Property
Description
9-00014
Tolbert
William
Taylor
Richard
B
21
Deed
3
6
1807
202.5 Acres, 20th Dist. 
Land Lot 260
8-00087
Talbot
William
Denmark
Denmark
Stephen
Elizabeth
A
114
Deed
6
10
1808
202.5 Acres, 20th Dist. 
Land Lot 261
8-00086
Talbot
William
Benton
Benton
Benton
Wain
Mary
Abel
A
112
Deed
9
17
1808
133.5 Acres, 20th Dist
Land Lot 256
9-00011
Tolbert
William
Bailon
Matthew
B
17
Deed
9
10
1809
67.5 Acres, 20th Dist
Land Lot 256
9-00194
Tabot
William
Oliver
William
D
341
Deed
5
2
1810
202.5 Acres, 20th Dist.
Land Lot 287
9-00190
Waddle
John
Tolbert
William
B
335
Deed
11
13
1810
202.5 Acres, 
Land Lot 387 By Sugar Creek
11-00274
Malcom,Sr.
James
Talbot
William
D
15
Deed
1
11
1813
89 Acres, Dist. UNK
Land Lot 261
By Sandy Creek
8-00066
Malcom
John
Talbot
William
F
312
Deed
8
8
1815
133.5 Acres, 20th Dist.
Land Lot 256
15-00100
Talbot
Matthew
Evans
Josiah
F
129
Deed
12
1
1815
67.5 Acres, 20th Dist
Land Lot 144
North Side of Lot
15-00325
Talbot
Green B.
Talbot
Matthew
E
390
Deed
10
23
1816
67.5 Acres, 20th Dist.
Land Lot 144
North Side of Lot
16-00190
Talbat
Greene
Stringer
Daniel
F
191
Deed
11
7
1817
202.5 Acres, 20th Dist.
Land Lot 159
16-00244
Talbot
Matthew
Atkins
Willis
F
240
Deed
12
1
1817
150 Acres, Dist and Land Lot Unknown, By lots 197 234 235
24-00019
Allison
John
Talbot
Matthew
H
77
Deed
12
28
1819
150 Acres, 5th Dist.
Land Lot 234
By Jack's Creek
18-00304
Talbot
William
Malcom
David
G
299
Deed
5
29
1820
200 Acres, 20th Dist.
LL UNk By L 283 n. Side
Little Sandy Creek
24-00401
Talbot
Greene
Talbot
William
H
247
Deed
10
9
1826
665.5 Acres, 20th Dist.
Land Lots 261 256 260 283 259 By  Sandy Creek
24-00401
Swift
Talbot
Thomas
Greene
Talbot
William
H
247
Deed
10
9
1826
665.5 Acres, 20th Dist.
Land Lot 261 256 283 259
By Sandy Creek
24-00283
Bohannon
Buddy
Talbot
Greene
H
181
Deed
11
6
1826
65 Acres, 20th Dist,
Land Lot 143
24-00479
Betts
Elisha
Talbots
William
H
291
Deed
10
9
1827
Sold 12 Slaves
2,259.00
22-00176
Swift
Thomas
Talbot
William
I
62
Deed
4
7
1829
666.5 Acres, Dist and LL UNK
By lots 261 255 256 283 282 281
 Sales are bold and italicized.
(The Talbot name has been spelled exactly as it appeared in the record books.)

One of the ironies of the William Talbot story lies in the Talbot legacy or,  more accurately,  the lack of it in Morgan County.  William and his family were among the early settlers in the County and he and his sons established strong ties to the area and made significant contributions to the social, political and religious life of the western part of the Morgan County.   That strong Talbot presence lasted for almost a quarter of a century.  But, astonishingly, by the time of the 1830 Federal Census, there was not a single Talbot listed in the entire County.  Green had moved to Meriwether County, Georgia, Matthew, William, Jr., James, and Hale had moved to Pike County, Alabama, and William had remarried and moved to Walton County, Georgia.  And so, by 1830, the William Talbot lineage in Georgia was represented entirely by the daughters of William and their children.

William Talbot sold or transferred land to William Nunnally in Walton County as early as 1824,  four years after the marriage of William Nunnally and Mary Hale Talbot.  Of even greater interest is the land sale from William to his son in 1828.  If William, Jr. actually moved from the Morgan/Walton area in 1828 to Pike County, AL,  why would William be selling land to him in 1828.  Perhaps he was still transferring his assets to his children after the death of Mary Bailey in 1825.

It appears certain that William was generous with his children.  The Census records for Pike County, Alabama reveal that the four Talbot brothers who moved there in 1828 did not come to the County penniless.  Indeed, the records show a level of economic success for men so young that could hardly have been achieved without some assistance.  Other records show that they were prominent landowners with numerous slaves soon after their arrival.  While no record has been found to show that William actually made property transfers to them , a reasonable assumption would be that he was the donor.
 
Walton County, Georgia involving William Talbot
Grantee
Last Name
Grantee
FirstName
Grantor
Last Name
Grantor
FirstName
Acreage
Type
Location
MO
DY
YR
Book
Page
Talbot
William
Claborn
M. Jackson
     
11
16
1821
C-D
59
Nunnaly
William
Talbot
William
     
4
7
1824
E
304
Talbot
William
Meton
Sheriff
     
5
3
1825
F
141
Talbot, Jr
William
Talbot
William
     
2
18
1828
F
299
Sales are bold and italicized.

William lived in Morgan County for a few years after Mary's death but he moved to Walton County, probably before 1830.  Why he decided to relocate remains uncertain.  His estate was probated in Walton County in 1831 and he may have lived in Walton County for a longer period.  In his will, he mentions his wife, Elizabeth, and it appears that she was the  Elizabeth Fullalove whom he had married in Clarke County June 12, 1830.  He signed his will on October 6, 1830, just four months after the marriage.   A copy of his will can be seen by clicking here.  He named Green Talbot and William B. Nunnally, Executors. William B. Nunnally was his son-in-law, the husband of William's daughter, Mary Hale Talbot.  The  Nunnally's lived in Walton County and the account of their family is a distinguished one.

The 1830 Census for Walton County listed a William Tolbert, no doubt the William Talbot who is the subject of this piece.  But the composition of the household is noteworthy.  Under the category of Free White Males, there was one whose age was 5 to 10, two whose ages were 10 to 15, one whose age was 15 to 20,  one whose age was 20 to 30, and one whose age was between 60 and 70, presumably William, himself.  .  Under the category of Free White Females, there was one whose age was between 10 and 15, one whose age was between 15 and 20, and one whose age was between 40 and 50, presumably William's wife, Elizabeth.  It is, of course,  possible that the female, age 15-20,  was William's daughter, Emily,  but an equally plausible and more likely explanation is that all the children were Elizabeth's children from her first marriage.  Irrespective of that, at age 69 or 70, William was again faced with the rearing of young children.  The Census also revealed that there were 12 slaves in the household and that the total household contained  21 people.  Since William had sold 12 slaves earlier as described in the table above, it may be that these slaves  were the property of his new wife.  But  they could very well have been his property not yet devised to his children.  Whatever the ownership, a household consisting of 21 persons could not be considered trivial.

William died in Walton County, Georgia before April 1831.  He was 70. His burial site is unknown.  Burial practices were different then and most burials occurred on the property of the deceased.  In Green's accounting of the estate, he notes a charge for a casket and winding sheet but no indication of the place of interment.   In William's lifetime, he had witnessed and participated in some of the most important decisions affecting  the young republic.  He had accompanied his parents from the Talbot ancestral home in Virginia to the new lands in Tennessee, he had been a soldier in the American Revolution, he had moved with his father to Georgia when he was an adult and soon after his arrival he had married Mary Bailey.  William Talbot and Mary Bailey, so much a part of the land and culture, would produce twelve children, eleven surviving to adulthood,  whose frontier spirit would make a profound difference in shaping the future of the country.  Although this page is dedicated to William and Mary, it is, in a small way, a recognition of that countless army of 19th century Americans whose stories have never been written and whose descendants still struggle to find them.
 

Descendants of William Talbot

1 [4] William Talbot b: 1761 in Bedford Co., VA d: Bef. 05 Aug 1831 in Walton Co.,GA
.. +Mary Bailey b: 1764 m: 1789 in Morgan/Clarke Co., GA d: 1825 in Morgan Co., GA

. 2 [1] Green Berry Talbot b: 25 Nov 1791 in Wilkes Co., GA d: 27 Dec 1875 in Calhoun Co., AR
..... +Mary "Polly" Grant Hughes b: 06 Feb 1795 in Georgia m: 15 Dec 1812 in Morgan Co., GA d: 13 Aug 1813 in Morgan Co., GA
. *2nd Wife of [1] Green Berry Talbot:
..... +Mary Tate Anthony b: 06 Feb 1795 in Jasper Co., GA m: 12 Jan 1815 in Morgan Co., GA d: 08 Nov 1885 in Calhoun Co., AR

. 2 Bailey Talbot b: Abt. 1792 in Prob Wilkes Co.,GA d: Bef. 1820 in Prob. Wilkes Co.,GA

. 2 Lucy Talbot b: 26 Sep 1793 in Prob Wilkes Co., GA d: 05 May 1862 in Morgan Co.,GA
..... +Thomas Swift b: 1787 in Prob North Carolina m: 19 Dec 1810 in Morgan Co.,GA d: 1857 in Probably Morgan Co.,GA

. 2 Matthew Talbot b: Abt. 1795 in Morgan Co., GA
..... +Elizabeth "Betsy" Hughes b: Abt. 1795 m: 04 Oct 1815 in Morgan Co.,GA

. 2 Harriett Talbot b: 11 Sep 1799 in Walton Co.,Ga d: 12 May 1872 in Greene Co.,GA-Crawford Cem 8 miles west of Greensboro
..... +William Hinton Crawford b: 24 Sep 1798 in Greene Co.,GA m: 12 Dec 1822 in Monroe Co,Ga d: 22 Feb 1868 in Greene Co.,GA-Crawford Cem 8 miles west of Greensboro

. 2 Mary Hale Talbot b: 26 Jul 1802 in Morgan Co., GA d: 28 Dec 1878 in Prob. Walton Co.,GA-Family plot off Nunnally-Shoals Road
..... +William Branch Nunnally b: 06 Dec 1791 in Powhattan, VA m: 10 Oct 1820 in Probably Walton/Morgan Co.,GA d: 08 Jan 1858 in Prob. Walton Co.,GA-Family plot off Nunnally-Shoals Road

. 2 William Talbot b: Abt. 1804 in Morgan Co., GA
..... +Catherine Whatley b: Abt. 1807 in GA m: 21 Dec 1825 in Morgan Co.,GA

. 2 [2] James Talbot, Sr. b: 10 Dec 1805 in Morgan Co., GA d: 18 Sep 1882 in Robertson Co.,TX
..... +Eliza Moore m: 27 Feb 1828 in Montgomery Co.,AL d: Bef. 1832 in Pike Co.,AL, Orion
. *2nd Wife of [2] James Talbot, Sr.:

..... +Hannah Herring b: 14 Feb 1804 in SC m: 17 Apr 1832 in Pike Co.,AL d: 01 Jan 1855 in Robertson Co.,TX
. *3rd Wife of [2] James Talbot, Sr.:
..... +Mary Jane Rucker b: 18 Apr 1822 in Virginia m: Aft. 1855 in Robertson Co.,TX d: 28 Feb 1889 in Prob Robertson Co.,TX

. 2 Hale Talbot b: 16 Nov 1807 in Clark/Morgan Co.,GA d: 13 Oct 1890 in Pike Co.,AL-Oakwood Cem #78
..... +Mary Ann "Polly" Townsend b: 23 Dec 1813 in Morgan Co.,GA m: 31 Dec 1829 in Montgomery Co.,AL d: 22 Jun 1893 in Pike Co.,AL

. 2 Elizabeth Talbot b: Abt. 1809 in Morgan Co., GA d: Nov 1836 in Robertson Co.,TX-Calvert-Massacred by Indians
..... +John Harvey b: 1805 in Alabama m: 19 Sep 1826 in Morgan Co.,GA d: Nov 1836 in Robertson Co.,TX-Calvert-Massacred by Indians

. 2 [3] Martha Talbot b: 04 Jul 1812 in Morgan Co., GA d: 16 Apr 1882 in Chambers Co.,AL
..... +Jesse B. Phillips b: 1798 in Georgia m: Abt. 1829 in Prob Morgan/Greene Co.,GA d: 14 Oct 1842 in Chambers Co.,AL
. *2nd Husband of [3] Martha Talbot:
..... +Jesse Fitzpatrick b: 27 Mar 1796 in Oglethorpe Co.,GA-Farm Hill m: 14 Nov 1844 in Chambers Co.,AL d: 14 Feb 1865 in Chambers Co.,AL

. 2 Emily Talbot b: Abt. 1813 in Morgan Co., GA
..... +John Greer b: Abt. 1810 m: 23 Jun 1830 in Greene Co.,AL

*2nd Wife of [4] William Talbot:
.. +Elizabeth Fullalove b: 1782 in North Carolina m: 12 Jun 1830 in Clarke County, GA d: 1859 in Georgia

____________________________________________

William Talbot and Mary Bailey were born before the American Revolution and they participated in the struggle for independence.  The children of William and Mary Bailey Talbot lived through some of the most interesting times in the history of the United States.  While life was no doubt difficult and demanding, during the first half of their lives, they certainly enjoyed a measure of economic success that was above average.  Although planters and slave owners, these families were not the "Gone With the Wind" genre or the romanticized Hollywood portrayal of the ante bellum South.  Rather they were hard working, deeply religious people with a pretty clear notion about who they were, what they wanted, and what they hoped and believed.   Although the great Civil War in 1861-1865 exacted a personal and financial toll from which many of these families would not recover, their spirit and determination remain alive today in their descendants..

One of the many interesting facts about this family is the different pattern of migration.  All of the males, with the exception of Bailey who had presumably died as an infant or youth,  left Georgia and headed west to Alabama and then further west to Arkansas and Texas.   Albeit,  Green's first stop was in Meriwether County,  Georgia, he eventually moved to Alabama and in his 80th year moved further west to Arkansas.   Lucy, Harriett, and Mary Hale all married in Georgia, reared their families there,  and died within a few miles of their birth place.  Elizabeth moved to Texas and died there in 1836.  Martha moved to Alabama and was buried there.    Emily's history is yet to be written.  

The following links contain much more information about the children of William Talbot and Mary Bailey.  In many instances, comprehensive biographical essays are linked to describe the life and times of these fabulous people.  In a few, the data available to this point are insufficient to permit a compete story.

 

1

Green Berry Talbot
1791 - 1875
Ann Talbot Brandon Womack and Milton W. Talbot, Jr. have written about Green Berry Talbot with a special feeling that comes only from descendants with deep appreciation for ancestors.


2

Bailey Talbot

It appears that Bailey died while quite young.  He was certainly dead before William's will was written in 1831 and more than likely died as an infant or very young child.  Because there are no  land records in Wilkes or Morgan that make reference to him, we have assumed that he did not live to reach adulthood.


3

Lucy Talbot 

Lucy married Thomas Swift in Morgan County and they were successful planters and business people.  Thomas Swift was one of the largest landowners in Morgan County.  Rebecca Felton wrote at length about her memories of Lucy and Thomas Swift and the reader may see Felton's recollections on the Talbot web site.


4

 Matthew Talbot

Probably born in Wilkes County, moved to Morgan and accompanied his brothers, William, James, and Hale to Pike County, Alabama about 1928.  Camille Head Corte has authored an interesting story about these four brothers, a link to which can be found on the Talbot web site.


5

Harriett Talbot

Harriett married William Hinton Crawford, a minister.  They lived in Greene County quite likely their entire lives and they were buried in the Crawford Cemetery in Greene County.  The 1850 Census records show them with five children at home and with real estate valued at $15,000.00.  That value suggests a sizable acreage with a significant number of persons required to tend it.


6

Mary Hale Talbot 

Mary Hale married William Branch Nunnally.  The Nunnally's were successful planters and their children distinguished themselves in a variety of professions.  Five of their sons served in the Civil War and Captain Matthew Talbot Nunnally was killed at Gettysburg.  Gustavus Alonzo Nunnally was President of Mercer University and graduated second in his class at the University of Georgia, missing first honors only because of a two month illness.  Many of their descendants lived and died in Walton County and a number are buried in the Cemetery at Monroe.


7

 William Talbot 

Married Catherine Whatley in Morgan County, farmed there for a few  years and moved with his brothers, Matthew, James, and Hale to Pike County, Alabama about 1828.  See #4 above.


8

 James Talbot 

Moved with his brothers, Matthew, William, and Hale to Pike County, Alabama about 1828 and then to Robertson County, TX in 1853.  It appears that James was the Talbot brother who played such an important role in the recovery of his niece from the Mexican/ Indians who massacred her family in 1836.  See #10 below.    After her recovery and marriage, the two families returned to the scene of the massacre and built their homes and futures in the Robertson County area.  James was a prominent Texas Citizen and a leader in the Calvert, Texas community.  He was buried in Robertson County, TX in 1862. See #4 above


9

Hale Talbot 

Moved with his brothers, Matthew, William, and James to Pike County, Alabama about 1828.  Married Mary Ann Townsend in Montgomery County, Alabama in 1829. Two of his sons were killed in the Civil War.   One of the most poignant and heart wrenching stories of the Civil War is the letter written by Bailey Montgomery Talbot to his two year old son just days before his death in 1864.  A copy of the letter is on the Talbot Web site.  Hale died in Pike County, AL in 1890.  See #4 above


10

Elizabeth Talbot

Married John Harvey, a minister.  She and John moved to Texas in 1836 just after Texas gained its independence from Mexico.  Soon after they arrived, they were massacred by Indians along with their small son.  Their daughter, Ann, was carried away by the Indians and sold as a slave in Mexico.  After a diligent search, she was found and returned to her Talbot relatives in Alabama.  Milton W. Talbot, Jr. has written a magnificent history of the Harvey Massacre and that story may be seen on the Talbot web site under the title of "The Searchers"..


11

Martha Talbot
1812 - 1882

Martha Talbot lived a fascinating life.  She was twice married, the first to Jesse B. Phillips with whom she produced six children and the second to Jesse Fitzpatrick with whom she had three additional ones.  When Martha married Fitzpatrick, he brought to the marriage seven or more children from a previous marriage to Nancy Melinda McCowen.  All in all, Martha was engaged in the rearing of 15 or more children.  The tale that is told here will keep the attention of every Talbot fan and a few who might not be!


12

Emily Talbot 

Emily, the last child of Mary Bailey and William Talbot was born in 1813 in Morgan County, Georgia.  She was only 12 when her mother died and she married John Greer, June 23, 1830 in Greene Co., Alabama when she was 17.  Shortly after her marriage, she moved with her family to Meriwether County, Georgia and still later, about 1846, she moved to Claiborne Parish in north Louisiana.  She died there sometime after 1854 but before 1860.

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