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MacLeod/McLeod
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Secondary Research
When not researching my McLeods and working on the FTDNA projects, these lines are researched.


Wilke of Germany/N.Y.
Jessup of England
Checker/Tskeris of Greece/N.Y.
Abnett of England
Hudson of South Carolina
Ives of South Carolina

Sideline Research
These lines have married into my family (primary and secondary lines of research seen above) and are included here to aid other researchers. I am not currently researching these names; however, the pages are updated as information becomes available.


Arrants of South Carolina
Barnes of South Carolina
Blyther of South Caroliina
Boykin of South Carolina
Cook Family of South Carolina
Coombs of Maine
Checker/Tskeris Greece
Davis of South Carolina
Dennis of South Carolina
Freeman of South Carolina
Holland of South Carolina
Huggins of South Carolina
Hurst of South Carolina
Jones of South Carolina
Josey/Jossey of South Carolina
Keretas of Greece
Medhurst of England
Meyers of South Carolina
Moseley of South Carolina
Rodgers of South Carolina
Ross of South Carolina
Yates/Yeates of South Carolina

 

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Sumter South Carolina Genealogy
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Walking with Ghosts..........

a website for the descendants of Angus and Nancy McCutchen MacLeod~~

~~~~~~



The Ives Family of Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina

Research for our Ives family is ongoing, as a result this is a work in progress. Mary Rosa Ives McLeod was my great grandmother, a strong woman who helped raised eleven stepchildren, run Whites Mill in Sumter, South Carolina and Ives Dairy in the Miami Dade area of Florida.

Born just after the Civil War, she grew up in a South ravaged by the aftermath of that war. Her father, Joseph Freeman Ives, was a Confederate Soldier who lost two of his four brothers, and several of his cousins in the war. He was in the Battle of Gettysburg and at Appomatox.

Much of the research shown on this page and the others in our Ives portion of the site, was done by my father, Donald Ross McLeod, Jr., Mary Rosa's grandson. I am continuing the research in North Carolina with Josiah and Penelope Ives. If you have any information, please contact me at the above email address.

This web page has been updated in May/June of 2011. The original intent of this site is the same as it has always been; to provide a FREE tool for researchers to help each other by the sharing of information - please support this intent by helping to keep it as accurate as possible. The information on this page represents the combined efforts of several researchers. I have verified the information by Wills, Equity, Deeds, Census and Cemetery Records where possible. Where no source is given, the information is unproven/unverified. Additions and corrections are welcome (rude emails are not). When writing, please include the Page Title and Web Address. Proper credit is always awarded to the provider of information. Happy Researching! Keep the circle of sharing intact, include the following if you take information for your own records: !Source: Lori McLeod Wilke; "Walking with ghosts", Research 2000 - 2011


Generation One Josiah Ives

b. unknown Edgecomb, (nr Rocky Mountains) NORTH Carolina d. unknown Sumter District, presently Lee County, South Carolina married to Penelope (--?--) b. unknown but probably NORTH Carolina d. unknown Sumter District, presently Lee County, South Carolina

From the Research of Donald Ross McLeod Jr.

Josiah and Penelope Ives are the earliest of our ancestors we have been able to trace through recorded data. It is not known for certain when they came to the United States, but they were in the Edgecombe District of North Carolina (near Rocky Mountain) in the 1700's. Wills and deeds from North Carolina were researched from 1732 to 1758 and although one Ives and several Ross' were found, there was no reference to Josiah and Penelope. They were possibly the next generation. Records for this area from the years 1759 -1810 will need to researched to determine more of the Ives origins.

A document on file in the Sumter County Court House, South Carolina, shows that they deeded a slave, named Nancy, to their son Matthew William Ives and his wife Julia Ann Freeman on 1 Oct 1799. This document indicates that Josiah and Penelope resided in Edgecombe North Carolina.

Court House, Jane Revill Files, Sumter Deed M58/9 S4635; Ives, Josiah of the County of Edgecombe, N.C. , wife Penelope Ives ilegible; to son Matthew William Ives, illegible (may be proved in Edgecombe Co. Fed Court 1800")

Census Records for 1810 indicate that Josiah had moved to the Claremont, Sumter District area of South Carolina. The 1860 Census of that same area recorded that Matthew William Ives was born in North Carolina around the year 1798. This would then indicate that the move from North Carolina to South Carolina took place between 1798 and 1810.

" Feb 25 1994

Researched wills and deeds from Edgecomb District, NC from 1732-1758, Found one Ives and several Ross's. No reference to Josiah and Penelope Ives who would probably have been the next generation. Need to check wills and deeds from 1758 to 1810 to find out more".

Land Grants - 1767 Joab Ives 6335 (same area)
1767 John Ives 5979 (Craven Cty, NC, Ives Branch, S. Side of Nuce River, and
Brices)

Marriages - Bertie County, NC Henry and Mary Ives married 1793


Generation Two - Child of Josiah and Penelope

Matthew William Ives b. 1798 in North Carolina d. Bef. 1870 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District South Carolina buried Ives Family Graveyard, located on Harvest Road, near Ives creek (now Bracey's Mill Creek) married Abt. 1830 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina Julia Ann Freeman b. abt 1806 in Sumter District South Carolina d. Aft. 1870 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District South Carolina buried Ives Family Graveyard, located on Harvest Road, near Ives creek (now Bracey's Mill Creek) Sumter County, now Lee County, South Carolina Court House, Jane Revill Files, Sumter Deed M58/9 S4635; Ives, Josiah of the County of Edgecombe, N.C. , wife Penelope Ives ilegible; to son Matthew William Ives, illegible (may be proved in Edgecombe Co. Fed Court 1800")

Records

Sumter District Census 0f 1810 - Claremont, Sumter District, SC. Mathew William Ives shown as living with Josiah and Penelope Ives

Sumter Deed M-58/9 S-4635 Court House, Jane Revill Files, Sumter Ives, Josiah of the County of Edgecombe, N.C. , wife Penelope Ives ilegible; to son Matthew William Ives, illegible (may be proved in Edgecombe Co. Fed Court 1800")

Will of Jose Freeman - names daughter Julia Ives (note: a transcriber in the 1920's mispelled the name Ives as Joes)

Sumter District Census 0f 1850 -

  • Matthew - age 52 occupation - Planter
  • Sarah Ann age 20
  • Charles age 18 occupation Laborer
  • Joseph F age 16
  • William age 16
  • Margaret age 16
  • Eugenia age 11
  • Henry age 10
  • James age 8
  • Mary age 4.

Joseph and William were said to be twins, but the ages of Margaret, James, and Henry were apparently written incorrectly as will be seen in the 1860 Census

Sumter District Census 0f 1860

  • William Matthew aged 61 Occupation - Farmer, born North Carolina Dwelling NO. 544
  • Julia Ann aged 54
  • Joseph F aged 26
  • Margaret aged 22
  • Eugenia aged 20
  • Henry aged 18
  • James aged 16
  • Mary aged 14

The 1860 Census shows that dwelling numbers 541 - 545 were the homes of the Ross and Ives families. William and Sarah Ross, their son James and daughter Mariah Richburg (w/o William H.A. Richburg) and her family occupied dwellings 541 - 543 with William and Julia Ives, their sons William and Charles at dwellings 544 and 545 and 566.

Charles J Ives was now married and 29 years old working as an overseer, with a wife, Elizabeth aged 24 and two children, Robert aged 3 and William M. aged 2. Their dwelling no. was 545, next door to his parents.

William Thomas Ives, the twin of Joseph, was also married by 1860, living at dwelling no. 566, aged 26 and married to Amanda, aged 16. The census shows that Amanda was born in Alabama.

Between 1860 and 1870, along with the death of Matthew Ives, Sr., the War between the States occured bringing major changes to the Ives family. On April 8 1861, Charles, Joseph, James and William enlisted in the Confederate Army. Henry was old enough to enlist, however, we have found no record that he did so.

By the 1870 Census, William was dead, killed at Adams Run Fort Wagner on March 14, 1864. His widow, Amanda, applied for a Widow Pension on June 3, 1920 at the age of 79. James was also dead having been killed July 10, 1863 at Morris Island . Both William and James are listed on the Sumter Monument to the Confederate Dead.

Charles, although he enlisted, did not report for duty and records show that he was listed a deserter on at least one roster. It can be assumed from the date of his third child's birth that Elizabeth was pregnant at the beginning of the war and that could have been a factor in his not reporting. Also, Matthew had died leaving Julia Ann a widow, and although we have not found any record to date of Henry enlisting, it is possible that Julia and Elizabeth convinced Charles that he could not fight along with all his brothers.

Joseph survived the war and returned to Sumter to marry his cousin, Sarah Ross. He helped his mother, Julia Freeman Ives, farm the property. Although Joe moved to Ojus, Florida in 1903 after Sarah's death in 1902, he returned to Sumter and was buried at Tirzah Baptist Church next to Sarah in 1909.)

The 1870 Census shows

  • Charles 35, Farmer, Prop value $300, Real Est. $100 Dw No. 288
  • Elizabeth aged 34,
  • Robert M, age 12,
  • William N. aged 8,
  • Martha A. aged 6,
  • Sarah P. aged 4,
  • Charles H, aged 1

    The Census also shows a Eugenia aged 21 but as the writing is unclear, it could read aged 2 or age 31 and be Charles' sister Eugenia. A black boy named Wesley is listed in the dwelling as well, no. 288. (Wesley was the grandson of Uncle Mingo, a slave until the war).

In that same census (1870)

  • Julia Ann Ives is listed as head of household at dwelling no. 270.
  • The real estate is valued at $500.00 and personal posessions at $100.
  • Her birthplace is shown as South Carolina.
  • Mary is still living with her at the age of 21.

    Using the census of 1850 and 60, Mary was actually 24. A Eugenia is also shown as living there with an age listed as 24. Using the census of 1850 and 60, she would have been 30. This could have been family help and not the daughter Eugenia shown in the earlier census.

    NOTE: The 1870 Census shows a Eugenia living in both the home of Charles and Elizabeth and the home of Julia Ann. Eugenia Ives would have been 31 and as the writing is illegible near the entry for Eugenia living with Charles, but appears to be 21 it is quite possible that Julia Ann's daughter was living with her brother and that the Eugenia, at 24, living with Julia Ann could have been family help. Interviews with family and family records have given no indication as to which is correct.

In that same census (1870)

  • Joseph, aged 35, is shown living in dwelling no. 271.
  • His personal property value was $165.00 with no amount given in the Real Estate column, this probably means that dwelling 271 was on the property owned by Julia Ann. Joseph was now married to
  • Sarah Ann Ross, aged 32 in this census, with three children;
  • James W., aged 2,
  • Mary aged 1/2
  • Catherine age 1/2.
  • The census shows that Joseph could read and write


Children of Matthew William and Julia Ann Freeman Ives

1. Sarah Ann Ives b. Abt. 1830 Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina d. unknown Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina (source 1850 Sumter Census)

2. Charles J Ives b. Abt. 1832 Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina d. unknown Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina

1860 Sumter South Carolina Census

  • Charles J Ives married 29 years old overseer dwelling no. 545
  • wife, Elizabeth aged 24
  • Robert aged 3 and William N. aged 2.

The 1860 Census shows that dwelling numbers 541 - 545 were the homes of the Ross and Ives families. William and Sarah Ross, their son James and daughter Mariah Richburg (w/o William H.A. Richburg) and her family occupied dwellings 541 - 543 with William and Julia Ives, their sons William and Charles at dwellings 544 and 545 and 566.

William T. - married living at dwelling no. 566, aged 26 Amanda, Wife aged 16 born in Alabama

Military

Enlisted January 14, 1862 at Columbia SC in Co. E, 7th SC Nelsons Battalion, never served- refused to report

Although he enlisted in Co. E, 7th SC Nelsons Battalion, Charles did not report for duty and records show that he was listed a deserter on at least one roster. It can be assumed from the date of his third child's birth that Elizabeth was pregnant at the beginning of the war and that could have been a factor in his not reporting. Also, Matthew had died leaving Julia Ann a widow, and although we have not found any record to date of Henry enlisting, it is possible that Julia and Elizabeth convinced Charles, as the eldest son, that he could not fight along with all his brothers.

From the book "Ives in the Civil War" by Ken Ives

(CSR, RH) Charles J. Ives.

The oldest son of William Matthew Ives and Julia Freeman, Charles was born abt 1832 in Sumter County, SC. Although he was nearly 30, married, and had two young children, he enlisted 1/14/1862 at Columbia, SC, as a Private in Co E, 7th Battalion of South Carolina Infantry. (aka the Enfield Rifles, or Nelson's Battalion).

Although he clearly enlisted, it is unclear if he ever actually served with the battalion. A unit return for February 1862, indicates he "refused to report at camp," and surviving company muster lists for July/August 1862 list him as a deserter. He may have had a premonition. He was the only one of three brothers named Ives on this company's muster rolls to survive the war. (note: this is incorrect, although James and William both died, Joseph survived)

7th SC Nelsons Battalion Company E
(Enfield Rifles, or Nelson's Battalion)
Source: James A Gabel http://www.researchonline.net/sccw/history/7thbatt.htm

Had men from Kershaw, Sumter, Richland, Clarendon, Barnwell, Edgefield, Fairfield, Colleton, Lexington, Chesterfield and Orangeburg Districts. Its commander was Captain B. E. Boykin. Because all the companies of the battalion had been raised directly for Confederate service "for the war," they were designated to be equipped with Enfield Rifles, which were in short supply at the time. Thus, the battalion is often referred to as the 7th SC Battalion (Enfield Rifles). The battalion itself is also frequently referred to as Nelson's Battalion or Rion's Battalion as those men were its only commanders.

1870 Sumter South Carolina Census

  • Charles 35, Farmer, Prop value $300, Real Est. $100 Dw No. 288,
  • Elizabeth aged 34
  • Robert M, age 12
  • William N. aged 8
  • Martha A. aged 6
  • Charles H. aged 1
  • Sarah P. aged 4,

    NOTE: The 1870 Census also shows a Eugenia aged 21 but as the writing is unclear, it could read aged 2 or age 31 and be Charles' sister Eugenia. A black boy named Wesley is listed in the dwelling as well, no. 288. (Wesley was the grandson of Uncle Mingo, a slave until the war).

1880 Sumter South Carolina Census
Source Information:Census Place Spring Hill, Sumter, South Carolina Family History Library Film 1255241 NA FilmNumber T9-1241 Page Number 261B

  • Charles J. IVES Self M Male W 48 SC Occupation Farmer Father's Birthplace SC Mother's Birthplace SC
  • Elizabeth A. IVES Wife M Female W 45 SC Occupation Kpg. House Father's Birthplace SC Mother's Birthplace SC
  • Robert M. IVES Son S Male W 22 SC Occupation Farmwork Father's Birthplace SC Mother's Birthplace SC
  • Wm. N. IVES Son S Male W 18 SC Occupation Farmwork Father's Birthplace SC Mother's Birthplace SC
  • Martha A. IVES Dau Female W 16 SC Occupation At Home Father's Birthplace SC Mother's Birthplace SC
  • Sarah P. IVES Dau Female W 14 SC Occupation At Home Father's Birthplace SC Mother's Birthplace SC
  • Eugene J. IVES Dau S Female W 12 SC Occupation At Home Father's Birthplace SC Mother's Birthplace SC
  • Charles H. IVES Son S Male W 10 SC Father's Birthplace SC Mother's Birthplace SC
  • Margaret J. IVES Dau S Female W 8 SC Father's Birthplace SC Mother's Birthplace SC
  • Elizabeth E. IVES Dau S Female W 6 Father's Birthplace SC SC Mother's Birthplace SC
  • Maria G. IVES Dau S Female W 4 POB SC Father's Birthplace SC Mother's Birthplace SC
  • Idella B. IVES Dau S Female W 2 POB SC Father's Birthplace SC Mother's Birthplace SC

    neighbors:
    Henry J. and Martha A. Dunlap
    William E. and Sarah A. Moore
    James and Mary Ross - cousins of Charles J. Ives
    John W. and Mary S. Hawkins

Children of Charles and Sally

i) Robert M. Ives b. Abt. 1857 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina source: 1860 Census age 3 d. unknown

ii) William Nelson Ives b. December 13, 1860 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina source: 1860 Census d. February 10, 1939 buried Pisgah Baptist Church source: Kornegar Funeral Home Record married to Rosa Lee Hurst (granddaughter of Alexander and Harriet Yates McLeod) b. 1877 Sumter County, South Carolina source: Kornegar Funeral Home Record d. December 24, 1936 Sumter County, South Carolina buried Pisgah Baptist Church source: Kornegar Funeral Home Record

1930 Lee County South Carolina Census Township: Spring Hill Roll: T626_2203 Page: 8B Image: 1102 Ed 20

Ives, Nelson W Age: 68 Birthplace: South Carolina Race: White Relationship: Head ; age at first marriage 30; occupation Farmer; Farm Schedule 88
Ives, Rosa L Age: 52 Birthplace: South Carolina Race: White Relationship: Wife age at first marriage 16
Ives, James M Age: 15 Birthplace: South Carolina Race: White Relationship: Son occupation Farm Laboror
Ives, Horace Age: 12 Birthplace: South Carolina Race: White Relationship: Son
Ives, Sidney D Age: 10 Birthplace: South Carolina Race: White Relationship: Son
Ives, Ida P Age: 8 Birthplace: South Carolina Race: White Relationship: Daughter
Granddaughter Marie Ives age 4 years 8 months old
no information s of 1/25/2003 regarding the exact identity of Marie

Children of Rosa Lee Hurst and William Nelson Ives

Note: The 1930 Census shows that 52 year old Rosa had married at age 16 cr. 1893- it also shows 4 children born between 1915 and 1922. Rosa's age in 1930 and the fact that Bertie Ives is not shown in that census in their home indicates that she was born bef. 1915. The year gap between the marriage (1893/4 and 1915) when the first child shown on the 1930 census was born also indicates that there may be more children than shown on this page. An initial search of the 1920 census has not revealed William and Rosa. Further research into that census may reveal the existence of more children. Using two years between each birth, beginning in 1895, as many as 11 other children may have been born.

i. Unknown Male Ives b. bef 1915 in Rafting Creek, Lee or Sumter County, South Carolina (source: 1930 Spring Hill, Lee County, South Carolina Census in which a grandchild, Marie Ives, aged 4 lived with William and Rosa Ives) d. unknown

Child of Unknown Ives

Marie Ives b. abt 1826 (source: 1930 Spring Hill, Lee County, South Carolina Census in which a grandchild, Marie Ives, aged 4 lived with William and Rosa Ives)

ii. James M. Ives b. abt 1915 (source 1930 Lee County South Carolina Census age 15 - found on Ancestry.com 1/25/2003) d. unknown
iii. Horace Ives b. abt 1918 (source 1930 Lee County South Carolina Census age 12 - found on Ancestry.com 1/25/2003) d. unknown
iv. Sidney D. Ives b. abt 1920 (source 1930 Lee County South Carolina Census age 10 - found on Ancestry.com 1/25/2003) d. unknown
v. Ida Pauline Ives b. abt 1922 (source 1930 Lee County South Carolina Census age 8 - found on Ancestry.com 1/25/2003) d. unknown
vi. Bertie Ives b. bef 1915 in Rafting Creek, Lee or Sumter County, South Carolina d. bef April 13 2000 (Source: Obituary of son Charles Britton Yates Jr., dtd April 15 2000 - provided by Mike Gillis) married aft. January 1920 but bef. September 1928 (based on 1920 Providence Sumter County Census in home of father Robert Jarret Yates and the known birth date of son Charles Britton Yates Jr. ) to Charles Britton Sr Yates b. abt 1895 in Sumter County, South Carolina d. bef April 13 2000 (1930 Sumter Census - not found on Ancestry.com 1/25/2003/Obituary of son Charles Britton Yates Jr., dtd April 15 2000 - provided by Mike Gillis) Bertie Also married Unknown Toczko (Source: Obituary of son Charles Britton Yates Jr., dtd April 15 2000 - provided by Mike Gillis)

Children of Bertie Ives and Charles Britton Yates Sr.

1) Living Yates
2) Charles Britton Jr. Yates b. September 9, 1928 in Sumter County, South Carolina d. April 13, 2000 in Self Memorial Hospital in Greenwood, South Carolina married Nora Talbert b. unknown d. Bef. July 13, 2000 (source of all: Obituary of Charles Britton Yates Jr., dtd April 15 2000 - provided by Mike Gillis)
Charles B. Yates Jr.

McCORMICK — Charles Britton Yates Jr., 71, of West Subdivision, Lot 245, widower of Nora Talbert Yates, died April 13, 2000, at Self Memorial Hospital in Greenwood. Born in Sumter, he was a son of the late Charles Yates and Bertie Ives Yates Toczko. He retired from the Army, a veteran of the Korean War, and was a member of Rehoboth Baptist Church. Survivors include a son, Staff Sgt. Barry Lee Yates of Fort Benning, Ga.; a daughter, Charlene Elizabeth Yates of McCormick; a brother, Madison Lamar Yates of Sumter; a sister, Carol Y. Morris of Sumter; and three grandchildren. Services will be at 3 Sunday at Rehoboth Baptist Church, Plum Branch, conducted by the Rev. Tim Conort. Burial will be in the church cemetery. The body will be placed in the church at 2. Pallbearers are the men of the church. Visitation is from 7-9 tonight at Strom Funeral Home. Strom Funeral Home is in charge.

Charles YATES
Birth Date: 9 Sep 1928
Death Date: 13 Apr 2000
Social Security Number: ***-**-****
State or Territory Where Number Was Issued: South Carolina
Death Residence Localities
ZIP Code: 29835
Localities: Bordeaux, Mc Cormick, South Carolina
Britts, Mc Cormick, South Carolina
Mc Cormick, Mc Cormick, South Carolina
Willington, Mc Cormick, South Carolina
FamilySearch™ U.S. Social Security Death Index
30 September 2000 - found November 2002

iii) Martha A. Ives b. Abt. 1864 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina source: 1870 Sumter Co. Census age 6 d. unknown

iv) Sarah P. Ives b. abt 1866 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina source: 1870 Census age 4 d. unknown

v) Eugenia J. Ives b. abt 1868 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina source: 1880 Sumter Census d. unknown

vi) Charles H."Durham" Ives b. Abt. 1870 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina source: 1870 Census age 1 d. unknown but possibly Ojus, Florida married in Sumter County, Sumter, South Carolina to Scotta Bell Baker b. 31 July 1885 died Nov 1945 in Ojus, Florida

Parents of Scotta Bell Baker - Annie Margaret Yates b 13 July 1857 Kershaw SC d.26 Aug.1931 Sumter & Charles Samuel Baker b 18 April 1853 Kershaw d. 22 Jan 1904 Sumter-Charles S. Baker's Father was Daniel Baker b.1824 Kershaw d.15 April 1889 Sumter--Mother, Eliza Yates b. 1830 Kershaw d.12 May 1899 Sumter. source: Maria Green Sumter SC November 23 2009

Moved to Ojus Florida and apparently helped at some point to run the Ives Dairy owned by his first cousin James William and Madie Cason Ives. According to Sally Brown Partin (daughter of James' sister Catherine Ives Brown), Durham and Bell eventually opened a competing Dairy.

Child of Durham and Bell

1) Charles Dupree Ives b. 1916 in Ojus Florida d. unknown

1920 United States Census, Florida, Dade County, Ojus Township Roll: T625_215, page 2A, ED: 18; Image: 800 Charles H. Ives Owns property, Married, male, white, age 50, POB South Carolina; Mom South Carolina, Father South Carolina Occupation Farm Operator; Truck; Farm Sch. 4 / Bella Ives wife age 35 POB South Carolina Mom South Carolina, Father South Carolina / Chalres D. Ives son age 3 1/2 POB Florida; Mom South Carolina, Father South Carolina

Emails recieved January 2008 - Greetings~! I grew up in north Miami with baseball hall of famer "Steve Carlton" my neighbor, 1950-69. Steve's grandmother had a farm at the NE intersection of SR9 and 183 street across from "velda dairy". we used to hunt just north of maule lake (just north of the carleton farm). one day we kept thinking there were more doves and quail on the ives dairy property. so we climbed the fence and hunted for a while. this year would have to have been 1956 or 57, we were about 11-12 at that time. mr ives manager picked us up in his pickup truck with shotguns laid in the bed and drove us to mr. ives who was sitting on a chair on a lake or water pond. mr. ives lectured us on "trespassing, honesty and integrity" and vowed to through our shotguns in that lake. we profusely apologized for trespassing, it was such a large farm that we thought nobody would care, then after the lecture, he had his manager drive us back to our bikes. i have later been to the ives home, near the school. but my question is, which mr. ives would have been the lecturer in those years? which mr. ives? and was mattie alive then too? i am working on a family biography and tidbits keep popping up. thanking you in advance, richard, north miami, fl

...as i recall as a kid, the ives dairy property went from a canal on the south to SR-9 on the east, to the county line road (199th st) on the north and SR-7 on the west. you could not see in, it was fenced off with an entry around where ives dairy road and interchange now sits. possibly, the first dairy was subdivided into two dairies at one time. i will check with the south florida historical society. you can look up a yahoo map and see those boundaries.

later my landlord, stuart perlman, who owned lumm's and "caesers world" casino's bought and subdivided the property for the development of the "california club estates". i visited the ives farm house in the 60's with a kid who was supposed to be an ives grandson that lived in that house which is behind the school to the north. i can't remember his name at the moment, but he was a blondish teenager with a black '57 chevy as i recall (we had illegal street drag races in those days). i want to learn more as these stories come up more often as i get older.

Note: Love the story! Unsure of which Dairy this would have taken place at; however, it appears that it was NOT the grandfather of Steve Carlton, so would have been the other Dairy owned by James William and Madie Cason Ives - see below.

vii) Margaret J Ives b. abt 1872 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina source: 1880 Sumter Census d. unknown

viii) Elizabeth Eva "Betty" Ives b. abt 1874 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina source: Sally Brown Partin (daughter of Catherine Ives Brown)/1880 Sumter Census d. abt 1939 in Charleston, South Carolina buried Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, South Carolina Source: Kitty McLeod Barfield oral interview I may have it wrong - checking married to Angus Robert McLeod son of Jesse Lazarus McLeod and step son of Betty's Aunt, Mary Rosa Ives

ix) Maria G. Ives b. abt 1874 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina source: 1880 Sumter Census d. unknown

x) Adele "Dellah" Ives b. March 05, 1877 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina source: Ancestry.com Gene Pool - August 2002/family records/1880 Sumter Census d. March 03, 1965 in Charleston South Carolina buried UDS Cemetery St George married to James Ervin McLeod James Ervin McLeod - brother to Angus Robert McLeod, - son of Jesse Lazarus McLeod and step son of Betty's Aunt, Mary Rosa Ives

Children of Matthew Ives and Julia Ann Freeman Cont'd

3. Joseph Freeman Ives b. Abt. 1834 Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina d. December 12, 1909 Sumter District Sumter South Carolina buried Tirzah Presbyterian Church married to his cousin Sarah Ann Ross b. Abt. 1835 Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina d. April 01, 1902 Sumter District Sumter South Carolina buried Tirzah Presbyterian Church.

4. William Thomas Ives b. Abt. 1834 Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina d. March 14, 1864 KIA Adams Run Fort Wagner (2780 yards from Ft Sumter) married August 01, 1854 to Amanda b. March 14, 1839 in Alabama

1860 Sumter South Carolina Census

William T. - married living at dwelling no. 566, aged 26

Amanda, Wife aged 16 born in Alabama.

The 1860 Census shows that dwelling numbers 541 - 545 were the homes of the Ross and Ives families. William and Sarah Ross, their son James and daughter Mariah Richburg (w/o William H.A. Richburg) and her family occupied dwellings 541 - 543 with William and Julia Ives, their sons William and Charles at dwellings 544 and 545 and 566.

Charles J Ives was now married and 29 years old working as an overseer, with a wife, Elizabeth aged 24 and two children, Robert aged 3 and William M. aged 2. Their dwelling no. was 545, next door to his parents

Military

January 14 , 1862 Enlisted at Columbia, SC and served as Pvt in Co. E, 7th SC Nelsons Battalion, under Captain Gaillard(sp?)

From the book "Ives in the Civil War" by Ken Ives

(ICSR, SR-NC)

William T. Ives.

Born about 1835 near Sumter, SC, he was the son of William Matthew Ives and Julia Freeman, and the twin brother of Joseph Freeman Ives.

"Billy" Ives enlisted 1/14/1862 at Columbia, SC, as a Private, Co. E, 7th Battalion of South Carolina Infantry (aka Enfield Rifles, or Nelson's Battalion).

The earliest record of his service is a regimental return for February 1862 that indicates he failed to return to his unit at the expiration of a 7-day furlough granted on 1/24/1862.

He is also listed as AWOL on muster lists for July/August 1862, but apparently eventually returned to the battalion.

By fall of that year he was listed as being hospitalized in Columbia, SC. He returned to the battalion in early 1863.

On 1/18/1863 he was admitted to General Military Hospital #4 at Wilmington, SC (sic – maybe NC?) for treatment of diarrhea, returning to duty briefly on 2/9/1863. He was soon hospitalized again, this time at Adams Run, SC, where he died of typhoid fever 3/28/1863.

William had married prior to the war (8/1/1854). In 1920 his widow, Amanda (maiden name unknown, b. 3/14/1839) applied for a Confederate pension while living in Clio, SC. In her pension application, Amanda gave the date of her husband's death as 3/14/1864, 2 weeks earlier than the date shown in his military records. If her recollection was correct, then her husband would have died on her own birthday.

7th SC Nelsons Battalion Company E
(Enfield Rifles, or Nelson's Battalion)
Source: James A Gabel http://www.researchonline.net/sccw/history/7thbatt.htm

Had men from Kershaw, Sumter, Richland, Clarendon, Barnwell, Edgefield, Fairfield, Colleton, Lexington, Chesterfield and Orangeburg Districts. Its commander was Captain B. E. Boykin. Because all the companies of the battalion had been raised directly for Confederate service "for the war," they were designated to be equipped with Enfield Rifles, which were in short supply at the time. Thus, the battalion is often referred to as the 7th SC Battalion (Enfield Rifles). The battalion itself is also frequently referred to as Nelson's Battalion or Rion's Battalion as those men were its only commanders.

March 14, 1864 died at Adams Run, Fort Wagner

0355760 bundle 148 pkg 8 - September 25 1863 Will of William listing wife as Elizabeth Amanda Ives and administrator as C.J. Ives (his brother Charles J. Ives)

1869 - Ladies' Monumental Association of Sumter District began to raise funds for a monument to the Confederate Dead of Sumter, SC. William was one of the 341 names listed on the monument at its completion.

June 3, 1920 - His widow, Amanda, re-applied for a Widows Pension at the age of 79 under the Act of 1919. This application gives Amanda's date of birth and marriage to William and her residence at the time of application - Marlboro County, S.C. since August 6th 1916. She had been on the pension roll of South Carolina in Class G#3. Her signature appears to have a different surname than Ives which could indicate that she remarried. William died on her 25th birthday, so remarriage was likely.

Children of Matthew Ives and Julia Ann Freeman Cont'd

5. Margaret Ives b. Abt. 1838 Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina d. unknown Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina sources (1850 Sumter Census age 12)

6. Eugenia Ives b. Abt. 1840 Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina d. unknown Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina sources (1850 Sumter Census age 10)

7. James M Ives b. Abt. 1840 Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina d. July 10, 1863 at Morris Island KIA

Military

Enlisted 1/14/1862 at Columbia, SC, as a Private, Co. E, 7th Battalion of South Carolina Infantry (Enfield Rifles, or Nelson's Battalion)

Killed in Action 7/10/1863 at Morris Island South Carolina CSA

From the book "Ives in the Civil War" by Ken Ives

(CSR, RH, SPR)

James Matthew Ives. Born about 1842 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina, he was the son of William Matthew Ives and Julia Freeman.

He enlisted 1/14/1862 at Columbia, SC, as a Private, Co. E, 7th Battalion of South Carolina Infantry (also known as the Enfield Rifles, or Nelson's Battalion).

Three older brothers, Joseph Freeman Ives, Charles J. Ives and William T. Ives , enlisted at the same time in the same company.

Company muster lists show him present with the unit until 10/20/1862. From that date until about February or March 1863 he was at home on sick furlough. He returned to the battalion for a few months, then left on furlough again 6/2/1863. The exact date of his return is not documented, but he was back with the battalion by early July.

On 7/10/1863 Union artillery and gunboats began a bombardment of Confederate positions on Morris Island, near Charleston, SC. Undercover of the bombardment, a Union infantry brigade made an amphibious landing and captured several positions. In two days of fighting, the outnumbered Confederates inflicted over 300 casualties on the attackers. Private Ives, however, was one of only 12 Confederate casualties. He was killed in action during the fighting on July 10.

7th SC Nelsons Battalion Company E
(Enfield Rifles, or Nelson's Battalion)

Source: James A Gabel http://www.researchonline.net/sccw/history/7thbatt.htm

Had men from Kershaw, Sumter, Richland, Clarendon, Barnwell, Edgefield, Fairfield, Colleton, Lexington, Chesterfield and Orangeburg Districts. Its commander was Captain B. E. Boykin. Because all the companies of the battalion had been raised directly for Confederate service "for the war," they were designated to be equipped with Enfield Rifles, which were in short supply at the time. Thus, the battalion is often referred to as the 7th SC Battalion (Enfield Rifles). The battalion itself is also frequently referred to as Nelson's Battalion or Rion's Battalion as those men were its only commanders.

The Civil War Years
a Day by Day Chronicle of the Life of a nations

by Robert E. Denney

On July 10, 1863, near Charleston Harbor, Federal troops landed on Morris Island for the assault on Fort Wagner under the cover of fire from Ironclads - USS Catskill, Commander GW Rodgers; The Montauk, Commander Fairfax; the Nahant, Commander Downes, and the Weehawken, Commander Calhoun, all ships from the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron.

During the day, the Confederates poured 60 shots into the Catskill, 6 shots into the Nahant, and 2 into the Montauk. Despite the success of the Confederates in repelling the attack, James Ives was among those Confederates killed that day.

On July 11, 1863, Brig. Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore realized a larger attacking force was needed. On July 18th, another assault was made with the gunboats beginning their fire shortly after noon, when the tide permitted them to get within 300 yards of the fort. The 54th Mass, a negro regiment, entered the fight losing 1515 of 6000 men.

Although the Confederate guns were silenced under the Ironclads assault, the Fort still stood and the Federal troops decided a seige was the way to defeat the enemy instead of a frontal attack.

Note: James' brother, William, had died in March of typhoid fever while at Adams Run, Fort Wagner SC. Another broher, Joseph, my 3xgr grandfather survived the war.

Children of Matthew Ives and Julian Ann Freeman Cont'd

8. Henry Ives Abt. 1842 Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina d. unknown Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina sources (1850 Sumter Census - age 8)

9. Mary Ives b. Abt. 1846 Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina d. 1916 married October 20, 1880 L. J. Davis b. unknown d. unknown sources -( 1850 Sumter Census age 4)(South Carolina Magazine of Marriages)


Generation Three

Joseph Freeman Ives b. about 1835 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District South Carolina d. December 12, 1909 Sumter Sumter District South Carolina buried at Tirzah Presbyterian Church South Carolina married Aft. 1865 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina Sarah Ross b. abt 1835 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District South Carolina d. 01 April 1902 in Sumter District now Lee County South Carolina buried at Tirzah Presbyterian Church South Carolina

1850 Sumter South Carolina Census

Rafting Creek area of Sumter District - in home of parents Matthew and Julia Ives

Matthew age 52- planter; Julia Ann 46; Sarah Ann age 20; Charles age 18 occupation Laborer; Joseph F age 16; William age 16; Margaret age 16; Eugenia age 10; Henry age 10; James age 8; Mary age 4.

The 1860 Sumter South Carolina Census

Rafting Creek area of Sumter District - in home of parents Matthew and Julia Ives

dwelling no. 544 - William Matthew aged 61; Julia Ann aged 54; Joseph F aged 26; Margaret aged 22; Eugenia aged 20; Henry aged 18; James aged 16; Mary aged 14

Military

In early 1861, Joseph became a member of The Sumter Volunteers. On April 8, 1861, they became Company D, of the 2nd South Carolina Infantry Regiment. Joe served as an infantryman in all the battles in which the Company, a part of Kershaw's Brigade, participated during the first year of the war. (Sources: Family Story written by Donald Ross McLeod Jr./Additional information provided by Ken Ives, "Ives in the Civil War" J. F. Ives) He enlisted at Sumter, SC, as a private, Co D, 2nd South Carolina Infantry (the "Second Palmetto Regiment") The date of his enlistment is unclear. His name appears on only two surviving muster lists. The first, dated 2/7/1862, states he enlisted 10/5 (year not specified), for six months. The second, a standard bi-monthly muster for March and April 1862, states he enlisted 4/8/1861 for 12 months. The same muster list shows him absent from the company, detailed as a baggage guard. No other details of his service are known. (CSR)

Joseph's great grandson, Donald Ross McLeod Jr. wrote in his Family History:

On April 8, 1862, at the end of his 12 month enlistment, he and twenty other seasoned verterans of Company D., joined with their Sergeant, Hugh Richardson Garden in forming what was to become Garden's Battery of the Palmetto Light Artillery. Joe served as a cannoneer and teamster. Although capable of handling each of the gun crew positions, it was said that he preferred taking care of the horses. Family lore has it that at one point in the war, when he himself was shoeless, he made sure that each horse in his care had shoes.

Ken Ives, in his book "Ives in the Civil War" wrote the following:

46. Joseph F. Ives. He enlisted 4/8/1862 at Sumter, SC, as a private in Captain Garden's Co. of South Carolina Artillery (the Palmetto Light Battery).

After a few months at Columbia, SC, the Palmetto Light left South Carolina in July 1862 for service with the Army of Northern Virginia. They were assigned to Hood's Division, and were first engaged at 2nd Manassas, 8/30/1862.

At Sharpsburg (Antietam) on 9/17/1862 the battery was heavily engaged, losing 1 killed and 12 wounded, as well as losing 13 horses, and having 2 of their guns disabled.

They supported Longstreet's expedition to Suffolk, VA, fighting in an engagement before Suffolk 5/3/1863. The following day, they marched north and rejoined Lee's army. They crossed the Potomac 6/26/1863, bound for Pennsylvania. At Gettysburg they supported Longstreet's attack on the Union left 7/2/1863.The following day, they were again engaged against the Union left. Later in the day, they were shifted to the center, where they participated in the bombardment of Cemetery Ridge in preparation for Picket's Charge.

After Gettysburg, they continued to serve with the Army of Northern Virginia throughout the battles of 1864, in the trenches before Petersburg, and during the Appomatox Campaign.

Joseph appears to have been with the battery from his enlistment until early 1864, serving most of that time as a teamster. In early 1864 he was granted a furlough, from which he returned 5/26/1864. He is listed as present on the battery's muster roll for January/February 1865 (the last surviving muster roll). He was paroled at Appomatox Court House 4/9/1865. A descriptive roll of Appomatox POWs gives his age as 30, indicating he was probably born about 1835.

Joseph was probably present at most of the battles fought by the Army of Northern Virginia from 2nd Manassas to Appromatox, although in no case is his presence proven. His signature on pay vouchers and clothing receipts proves his presence on 4/9 and 7/31/1864, as well as in January, August, September, and December of 1864. (AL, CSR, SHS)

Donald Ross McLeod Jr. wrote:

Joe was furloughed back to South Carolina on several occassions to locate horses for the Battery. While at home, his mother, Julia and his Cousin Sarah Ross, made uniforms for him. Records show that he received cash in lieu of uniforms. This cash he sent home to help maintain the farm in his absence.

During Longstreet's March to Culpepper on October 31st, 1862, Donald Ross, along with several other young men of the 2nd South Carolina, removed their shoes and outer garments and boldly braved the rocks and cold water to wade across the north fork of the Shenandoah River. Young Donald, only eighteen at the time, became ill with pnuemonia and was furloughed home on November 23rd, 1862 and died in his own bed on November 28th.

Joe Ives lost not only his friend and cousin Donald to the cause, but also his twin brother at Battery Wagner. Of the five Ives and Ross son's who served the Confederacy, only two survived, Joseph and 1st Lt. James M. Ross of Nelson's Battaliaon (Enfield Rifles) returned home and lived to ripe old ages. James Ross was Donald's older brother.

On July 3, 1863, Joe Ives was personally thrust into history. In an unprecedented action, Lt. Alex McQueen of Sumter, South Carolina, had taken his howitzer and crew forward with the men of Pickett's Charge. After inflicting heavy damage to the enemy, they were caught in counter-fire from twenty Yankee cannon on Round Top. McQueen and his crew were badly wounded by the devastation which also killed the horses and disabled the howitzer and they were stranded in the middle of the raging battle.

Captain Garden called for volunteers to go with him into the midst of the battlefield to rescue the helpless gun crew. To a man, his men stepped forward. He picked five of his bravest and strongest men, Joe among them.

Joe Ives took a fresh team of horses and with Captain Garden and the other rescuers, made his way through the dead and wounded. After being driven back twice by enemy fire, they reached their comrades. The wounded men and the disabled gun were all returned to the Battery's position on the field at Gettysburg. "Notes of Donald Ross McLeod Jr./Other Sources: Family Stories/Confirmed in the book, "Southern Bronze" by Glenn Dedmondt, the following description of Joseph is contained in the Appendix: "day of enlistment 1862 until the surrender at Appomattox." "Ives, Joseph F.; Private, Enlisted on March 22, 1862, at Sumter, by Captain Garden. Detailed as a teamster. Was part of the team that went forward at Gettysburg on July 3rd, 1863, to rescue the disabled howitzer section. Present at Appomattox. 30 years old, 5'11 tall, dark complexion, grey eyes, and dark hair." More about this book below under the heading "Palmetto Light Artillery"

Joseph Ives continued his service to the Confederacy until the surrender at Appomattox. Although Privates were not issued horses, Captain Garden made sure his Teamster, Joe Ives, had one for his journey back to South Carolina.

Joe's long trek back home from Virginia was uneventful until reaching a deep ravine north of Camden. A foot-log stretched over the ravine was the only way across and his horse refused to get on the log. Joe dismounted, removed his saddle and proceeded across. Upon reaching the other side, he felt a nudge in his back and found that his horse had followed him. Joe remounted and rode on to his home. He and his horse, both veterans of the great war, plowed the sandhills of South Carolina for the next sixteen years.

After Joe's return to South Carolina, he married his cousin, Sarah Ann Ross, sister of Donald and James Ross. Their only son was named James William Ives after Joe's two brothers who did not return from the war. His first grandson, born to his daughter, Rosa Ives McLeod, was given the name Donald Ross McLeod.

Joseph F. Ives is pictured below with his beloved grandson, Donald Ross McLeod (SR), who was my father. (The photograph was taken around 1905.) The original Donald Ross was a cousin of Joe. Donald Ross enlisted in Company D, of the 2nd South Carolina Infantry along with Joe and they fought side by side through the early battles of the war until April 8, 1862 when Joe joined up with Garden to form what became Garden's Battery of the Palmettto Light Artillery.

 

The Palmetto Battery,
Garden's Company of Light Artillery

General Hood's Division, 1st Corps
(Gen'l Longstreet) Army of Northern VA

Gleaned from the Book "Southern Bronz" by Glenn Dedmondt

Over the period of June 15 - July 1 1863, the Palmetto Battery marched 175 miles into the "heart of the Union" (Glenn Dedmondt "Southern Bronze"). By the time of the Battle at Gettysburg, the Battery was left with only one 12 lb field howitzer and three 12 lb Napoleons. Although the howitzer, unable to fire solid shot and with a range of only 1,070 yards was considered to be the least important gun in the battery, Lt. Alex McQueen remained, despite offers to command the Napoleons, gun commander of it. As the battle deteriorated around them, Lee and Col. Alexander called for guns to go forward with the infantry, any crew with fifteen or twenty rounds left. Lt. McQueen immediately went forward through the mangled ruins of men and weaponry, leading the way, actually outdistancing the infantry they were supporting. Only five guns went forward, responding to Lee and Alexanders' requests. Lt McQueen and his men were the forward most positioned.

Twenty Yankee cannon began to bombard the men and the "one solitary gun". The horses were killed and wounded, McQueen was struck in the thigh, and all but one of the remaining six men were injured. The men sought "protection" in order to survive while the Infantry marched on.

Captain Garden said "There for the first and only time during the entire war, I felt compelled to encourage my men by personal example". He called for volunteers to go with him into the "maelstrom". With a fresh team of horses, the rescue crew went to recover their comrades from the enemy fire. The men in the rescue team were Capt. Garden, Sgt. J. Henry Wilson, Joseph F. Ives, Cpl. John J. Green, James Diggs Wilder, all of Sumter County and Lawrence W. Scarborough. Twice they were driven back by the enemy fire but upon arriving found the fifteen year old Bill Grady calmly sitting on the trail protecting his wounded comrades.

After the daring rescue of the howitzer, Garden and the men were forced to abandon it on the long march on July 5th. The Battery also said goodbye to two of their comrades, Robert Small and Thomas McIntosh.

"....the greatest battles in history are composed of many smaller but monumentally more significant battles. And in these personal contests, death is not the determinant of who is defeated and who is victorious. To die bravely for a cause that is just is above all things most noble and the last victory in one's life. Robert Small and Thomas McIntosh laid down their lives in the line of duty for what they believed and gave the most that men can give."......Glenn Dedmondt ("Southern Bronze")

1870 Sumter South Carolina Census page 206 A

Rafting Creek area of Sumter District

dwelling no. 271 - Joseph, aged 35 - personal property value was $165.00; Sarah Ann Ross, aged 32; James W., aged 2, Mary aged 1/2, and Catherine age 1/2.

Next Door dwelling no. 270 his mother;

Ives, Julia A aged 64 Keeping house; Eugenia aged 24 without occupation; Mary aged 21 without occupation ( note: Eugenia should have been 30 and Mary 24)

real estate is valued at $500.00 and personal posessions at $100

The Children of Joseph Freeman Ives and Sarah Ross

1. James William Ives b. Abt. 1868 Rafting Creek, Sumter District South Carolina d. abt 1938 possibly in Ojus, Palm Beach County, Florida married in 1900 in Sebastian Florida to Madie Cason b. January 01, 1880 Jefferson County, Arkansas d. August 1945 Ojus, Palm Beach County, Florida Online: www.ancestry.com Florida Death Index 1877-1998, Name: Madie Cason Ives Gender: F /(Source of birth year and place: various Census Records / (5jamison@bellsouth.net - Ancestry World Tree))


James William Ives (right)

Family of Madie Cason

1920 Census Cason, John R - father

Age: 67 Year: 1920 Birthplace: North Carolina Roll: T625_229 Race: White Page: 19A State: Florida ED: 143 County: Palm Beach Image: 521 Township: West Palm Beach (Ancestry.com On line Census assessed November 2002)

1920 Census Cason, John R - -brother
1920 CensusAge: 37 Year: 1920 Birthplace: Arkansas Roll: T625_229 Race: White Page: 6B
State: Florida ED: 136 County: Palm Beach Image: 306 Township: Delray (Ancestry.com On line Census assessed November 2002)

Florida

When James William Ives, son of Joe and Sarah, grew up, he worked to build the train rails down into the state of Florida. Upon reaching the Miami Dade area, he decided to make his home there. He and his wife, Madie Cason, founded the Ives Dairy with the help of Madie's parents and became active and respected members of the community. A Middle school was named after Madie Ives and a highway after the Dairy (Ives Dairy Road).

After Sarah's death in 1902, Joseph Freeman Ives and his grandson, Donald Ross McLeod Sr., went to live for a time with the James and Madie in Florida. Below, a transciption of a record of Tirzah Baptist Church shows that Joe transfered his letter in 1903. Many of the McLeod family also spent time working and living there. For more information, please see the following pages: James William Ives and Donald Ross McLeod Sr.

Before his death in 1905, Joe returned to Sumter, South Carolina where he is buried with his wife at Tirzah Presbyterian Church.

Record of Tirzah Presbyterian Church in Sumter SC

NAME IN FULL JOSEPH IVES DATE OF ADMISSION DEC 1888 HOW RECEIVED BY PROFESSION DISMISSED WHEN & WHITHER OJUS, FLORIDA 1903 DIED 1905

NAME IN FULL SALLY IVES DATE OF ADMISSION DEC 1888 HOW RECEIVED BY PROFESSION DIED 1902

NAME IN FULL MISS ROSA IVES DATE OF ADMISSION MAY 1889 HOW RECEIVED BY PROFESSION DISMISSED WHEN & WHITHER BAKERS SCHOOL HOUSE MARRIED JESSE MCLEOD

Over the years, many of the McLeods, Ross' and Ives family members spent time working at the Ives Dairy, traveling from Sumter SC, staying for a time and returning to Sumter.

Years later, Donald Ross McLeod Sr. and James began a farming operation on Kramer Island in Palm Beach County, Florida. The operation was actually on an island in Lake Okeechobee. James lived on the Island for most of the year while his wife, Madie, ran the Dairy. James evacuated the island for the Hurricane that devastated the area on September 16, 1928 with all the workers, including Uncle Mingo, a descendant of former slaves who had stayed with the Ives family after emancipation. Uncle Mingo left the boat to fetch something (a pet, it is believed) and James waited as long as he could for Uncle Mingo's return. For the safety of all the others on the boat, James had to leave Uncle Mingo behind. (I remember a book that my parents had at one time that detailed the events of that storm - no one seems to know what happened to the book but you can follow the link above to read about it - other links Fort Lauderdale Daily News Archives / Front page )

Cr. 1930, James and his nephew, Donald Ross McLeod traveled back to Sumter South Carolina to arrange for the clearing of the old family burial ground on Harvest Road, near Ross Farm Road. The markers were still there at that time, however, several years ago, the land was sold and the new owner removed the markers. It is believed that he threw them in to Ives Creek, now known as Bracy Mill Creek

Census Records

1920 Ojus Township, Dade County, Florida Census Enumberated 7, 8, 9th Days of January 1920 Madie C(ason) Ives Owns Property, Married, Age 40, POB Arkansas, Mothers POB North Carolina; Fathers POB Arkansas, Occupation Farm Operator, Dairy/Proprietor, Farm Schd 20, 3 resident farm hands: Ero York; Jeke W?, Arthur ? John Cason Ives Son age 16

1930 United States Census, Roll: T626_308 Page: 9A ED: 2 Image: 0979 Dade Precinct 1 Florida Ives, Madie C Head of Household; age 48; owns property; married, age at 1st marriage 19; POB Arkansas; Race White; Mom POB North Carolina Fathers POB Arkansas; Years since family immigrated 84 (1846), Occupation Proprietor of Dairy, Industry Farm - Farm Schedule 2

The following boarders are listed in the census: Spelling may be incorrect

Bostick, Richard
Barnes, Fanncy-Cook/pri. res
Ero York
Frank C. Davis
Herbert, Buster
Polker, Alen
Thompson, Levy
Bostick, L (illegible)
Scott, Benjamin
Murphy, Melvin
Blair, James
Woodruff, James
L(illegible), Harry
Wooten, Loyd
Walls, William
Ferrel, Daniel
Powers?, Cecil
Rawls, Irvin
Ferrell, John
Lamb?, Milliard

1930 United States Census, Roll: T626_328 Page: 5A ED: 54 Image: 0518 Florida County: Palm Beach Township: Chosen Precinct 37 District 54 Enumerated May 2 1930 James W. Ives Owned property, value $50,000; ownes radio, Farm yes; sex m; race w; age 55, married; age at first marriage 28; POB South Carolina; Mother's POB South Carolina; Father's POB South CarolinaOccupation Farmer Farm Schedule 13; (James was farming Kramer Island at this time)

Child of James and Madie Ives

i) John Cason Ives -born about 1904 in Dade County Florida - graduated 1921 - Dade County Agricultural High School, Florida- 4 members in his class. - Present in the 1920 US Census, Florida, Dade County, Ojus Township, age 16 attending school and working on the Dairy. - Possibly died in Horseshoe, North Carolina where he was a rancher. He married a woman with children but had none of his own. He was to have made his cousins, children of Donald Ross McLeod Sr., heirs of his estate but nothing was ever heard of this after his death. Interview with Madie McLeod Ray June 2002

Email November 2007 Hello, My name is Inna G...and I am writing an article for Dr. Michael M. Krop Sr. High School (MKHS) Newspaper on the history of the local neighborhood around MKHS. I found your website on your family's history, and I wanted to see if you knew the date when Ives Dairy was found and when it closed and why. I would really appreciate your response if you know the above. Thank you, Inna Granovskaya. The Lightning Strike (MKHS Newspaper) Note: the link provided to the article is no longer valid as of June 2011. Archive searches do not result in a hit.

Children of Joseph Freeman Ives and Sarah Ann Ross cont'd

2. Mary Rosa Ives b. May 18, 1870 Rafting Creek, Sumter District South Carolina (Source of birthdate and place: various Census Records/family) d. Aug 05, 1954 Sumter South Carolina buried Tirzah Presbyterian Church (Sources: Photo of Tomb - owner Lori McLeod Wilke; gr granddaughter/Family Records/ Tombstone of Mary Rosa Ives McLeod and Church Records -Tirzah Presbyterian Church, Sumter, South Carolina) married Jesse Lazarus McLeod cr 1896 b. 20 Jan 1847 in Sumter District Sumter South Carolina (Family Bible of Alexander and Harriet Yates McLeod; previous owner Jay Frank McLeod, gr grandson of Alexander and Harriet - current location of Bible unknown) d. 12 Mar 1922 in Sumter South Carolina buried at Tirzah Presbyterian Church (Sources: Death Certificate Photo of Tomb - owner Lori McLeod Wilke; gr granddaughter /Family Records / Church Records -Tirzah Presbyterian Church, Sumter, South Carolina)


3. Catherine Ives b. May 18, 1870 Rafting Creek, Sumter South Carolina (Source of birth date and place: various Census Records/family) d. May 5, 1941 in Sumter South Carolina buried at Bethel Methodist Church in Sumter (Sources: Photo of Tomb - owner Lori McLeod Wilke; gr grandniece /Family Records /Tombstone of Catherine Ives Brown and Church Records -Bethel Methodist Church, Sumter, South Carolina) married to William M. Brown b. Feb 11 1871 d. April 10 1944 buried at Bethel Methodist Church in Sumter (Sources: Photo of Tomb - owner Lori McLeod Wilke; gr grandniece /Family Records /Tombstone of William M. Brown and Church Records -Bethel Methodist Church, Sumter, South Carolina)

Catherine Ives, known to family as Tannie, was the daughter of Joseph Freeman Ives and the twin sister of my great-grandmother, Mary Rosa Ives. Born in 1870, they are both shown as 1/2 or 6 months in the 1870 Sumter Census.

Catherine lived most of her life in Sumter, South Carolina, marrying William H. Brown and helping to raise at least 10 of her grandchildren and two of her twin sister's grandchildren for several years.

Catherine's twin, Mary Rosa, married to Jesse Lazrus McLeod, had one child whom she named Donald Ross after their mother's brother, a Confederate Soldier who died during the war. As an adult, Donald Ross lived and worked in Florida, living near Catherine and Mary Rosa's older brother James William Ives, the founder of Ives Dairy in the Fort Lauderdale and Miami area of Florida. Donald married and had four children, three girls and one son, who was also named after Donald Ross, becoming Donald Ross McLeod Jr.. As an infant, it appeared that Donald Jr. would not survive and he was sent to live with "Aunt Tannie and Pa" at approximately 2 months old. Donald Jr. did survive and lived for the next 6 years with his great Aunt and Uncle, and his great grandmother, Rosa Ives McLeod.

At the age of 6, Donald Sr and his wife, Alice Ophelia Hudson McLeod, came to visit Sumter and decided it was time for Donald Jr. to return to Florida with them. Aunt Tannie traveled with them to help with the child's adjustment, leaving her own family for one year.

1920 Sumter, Sumter County, South Carolina Census.
William and Catherine Brown
February 3 2003. Ancestry.com On Line Census Images

Brown William H. Head Age 48 House #343
Catherine Wife Age 49
Sarah Daughter Age 9

Note: Sarah's future husband, Hazel J. Partin lived at house 344, Catherine's sister, Mary Rosa Ives McLeod and her husband Jesse L., lived at house 346, and her nephew, Donald Ross (and Alice Hudson) McLeod at house 347.

Also Note: Ancestry.com's 1920 Index lists William as Wortleam H Brown. A search using Catherine or Sarah Brown will show "no results". A search of Browns in Sumter Township, Sumter County, South Carolina will bring up "Wortleam H". Searchers will also not find Donald Ross McLeod doing an Index Search. His name is shown on the index as Smald K. McLeod. Again, a search of all McLeod's in Sumter Township, Sumter County, South Carolina is necessary to find his listing.

Comments have been added utilizing the web sites "add comment" feature regarding these errors.

1920 Sumter, Sumter County, South Carolina Census.
Hazel J. Partin - son in law of William and Catherine Brown
February 3 2003. Ancestry.com On Line Census Images

  • Partin, John Head Age 45 House # 344
  • Henrietta Wife Age 42
  • Eliza Son Age 21
  • Eva Daughter Age 19
  • Hazel J. Son Age 17
  • Lilly B. Daughter Age 10
  • Julian Son Age 2
  • Bertha Daughter Age 2(?)

1930 Sumter, Sumter County, South Carolina Census.
William and Catherine Brown
February 3 2003. Ancestry.com On Line Census Images

  • Brown, William H. (79 85) Head Age 59
  • Catherine Wife Age 59
  • Partin, Sally Daughter Age 19 married Hazel Partin - Sally died in 2006 and is buried at the Sumter Cemetery
  • Partin, Hazel A Son In Law Age 27
  • McLeod, Rosa Sister In Law Age 59
  • McLeod, Jessie L Daughter - Adopted Age 9
  • McLeod, Donald Son - Adopted Age 2

Note: Jesse L McLeod passed away in 1922. Donald Ross McLeod Sr., his wife Alice and two of their children were living in Florida although to date, no census listing has been found.The children living with William and Catherine were never legally adopted.

Story from the notes of Donald Ross McLeod Jr.

"One night, Pa heard a commotion out in the chicken coup. He went out in his night shirt to investigate (as I recall it was about 3 a.m). As he opened the gate and stepped into the chicken yard, he immediately knew what the problem was. A fox rushed at him and took Pa's right hand in its mouth. Pa tried to shake the fox loose but the fox held on.

Everyone else in the house had slept thru the earlier commotion in the chicken coup, but we were all awakened by Pa calling for help. Aunt Tanny, Aunt Sally, J.H., Charles and I all rushed out to see what was the matter. Pa called out "get the axe" and Tanny brought it to him. He took the axe in his left hand and finally after a few blows, the fox let go. Pa then proceeded to finish him off.

The Sumter Daily Item (our local newspaper) picked up the story and interviewed Pa. They asked him how long he waited until Tanny came to his aid. His answer was "an eternity". When asked why it seemed so long, he replied, "there wasn't a single mosquito out that night, they were all married and had 10,000 kids and they were all eating on me while the fox held my hand".

Due to the prevelance of rabies in the area at that time, Pa cut off the foxes head and it was sent to Columbia for testing. Meanwhile, J.H., Charles and I decided we wanted a fox skin. We skinned the fox. Then the report came back. The fox was rabid. Being country boys, the three of us had several briar scratches on our hands and arms and had thus been exposed to the rabid fox while removing the skin.

Pa, J.H., Charles and I had to be treated for our exposure to the fox. This treatment meant going to Sumter every day for 21 days where we were given shots in our stomachs, one side of the belly button on one day, the other side the next day."

4. Annie Ives b. September 13 1872 in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina d. May 14 1889 (17 years of age) in Rafting Creek, Sumter District, South Carolina buried at Tirzah Presbyterian Church in Sumter beside her parents. (Sources: Photo of Tomb - owner Lori McLeod Wilke; gr grandniece /Family Records /Tombstone of Annie Ives and Church Records -Bethel Methodist Church, Sumter, South Carolina)



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