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Earliest Known Ancestors

Angus and Nancy McCutchen MacLeod

Generation 2

Alexander and Sarah McIntosh

John N. McLeod

Alexander E. McLeod

Angus McLeod

Catherine M. Mosely

Jane M. Davis

Daniel and Catherine McLean

Norman

Margaret

Nancy and Roderick Bethune

Polly and John McKay/McCoy

Betsy and Norman McLeod




Other MacLeods

MacLeod Main Page

Angus MacLeods

Alexander MacLeods

Daniel MacLeods

Norman MacLeods

James MacLeod (Marg Blakely)

Norman MacLeod (Virginia and Ohio)

Mary McInnis McLeod

Von Hacke Records on MacLeods



Walking with Ghosts..........

a website for the descendants of Angus and Nancy McCutchen MacLeod~~

~~~~~~~



Alexander McLeod and Sarah McIntosh
son of Angus and Nancy McCutchen MacLeod

This page is the intellectual property of the web site owner. It may not be re-published on any website, genealogical database, or any other media without the express permission of same. Visitors are welcome to copy this for use in their own records, however, please remember to give credit where credit is due and to use the following sourcing information: !Source: Lori McLeod Wilke; "Walking with ghosts", Research 2000 - 2009


The Interview with Albert John McLeod cr. 1920

"How are our Boykin cousins?"

"Alexander, with his family, left Scotland and traveled to Ireland (or the Island?) for a time. They sailed from Ireland (or the island?) to Virginia and a brother, Norman, was born on board ship. They eventually migrated to Robeson, North Carolina where another brother named Daniel was born. Alexander with his wife, a McIntosh, left for Old Camden District in South Carolina. Alexander had two grants of land on Beaverdam Branch. He (Alexander the II?) had cousins who were Bethunes. Daniel's descendants remain in the area today" (Sumter/Kershaw).

Interview notes provided to Lori McLeod Wilke by Col. Purdy Belvin McLeod Jr., who received them from the late Jay Frank McLeod, the Interviewer of Albert John McLeod. Albert was a gr grandson of Angus and Nancy McCutchen McLeod. !Source: Lori McLeod Wilke; copyright © 2000-2006 http://www.geocities.com/dillysdillys/AlexOneFacts.htm


YDNA Matches

Galtrigal Branch - the Deduced Ancestral Haplotype of two cousins is a 67-1 match to the Deduced Ancestral Haplotype of our family. Descended from Donald the Faithful Pilot who is credited with helping Bonnie Prince Charlie and Flora MacDonald flee after Culloden, the family occupations are Milling and Fine Carpentry as they are in our own family. Galtrigal is located across the loch from Dunvegan Castle. 95% of the time a Common Ancestor will be found between this Branch and our Family in a generation born about 1700.

Colbost - Norman MacLeod, heriditary Galley Maker (Fine Carpentry) to Dunvegan, born about 1700 in Colbost located near Dunvegan. His descendant is a 67-2 from our family haplotype and a 67 - 1 to the Galtrigal Branch. 95% of the time a Common Ancestor will be found between this Branch and our Family in a generation born about 1700. The descendant tested was born in Scotland.

Norman MacLeod - born before 1775 in Scotland; immigrated to Virginia then to Gallia County Ohio - descendants of this man match our Deduced Ancestral Haplotype on markers 1 - 25 perfectly which is unusual in any one other than close relations; however one of the two descendants tested upgraded to the 67 marker level where his results showed 2 mutations in markers 26 - 37 and 2 mutations in markers 38 - 67. 95% of the time a Common Ancestor will be found between this Branch and our family in a generation born between 1530 AD and 1700 AD. One of his mutations are either unique to his paternal line within the larger related group and another is shared with Colbost above; another mutation is on a volatile marker known to mutate in very recent generations. The testing of other cousins and the upgrading of the cousin who tested only 25 markers could tell us more about this match.

To read more about our YDNA results; see YDNA Page for Angus MacLeod


Scotland - "Alexander, with his family, left Scotland"

Alexander MacLeod/McLeod, who resided on the Horsepen Branch - a tributary of the Beaverdam Branch in Kershaw District South Carolina was born cr 1783 in Scotland. The year of his birth has been estimated from various sources including his own census records and those of his siblings. The 1820 Kershaw District Census stated he was a naturalized citizen of the United States and census records of his children state that he was born in Scotland.

Shortly after his birth , he and his parents Angus and Nancy McCutchen MacLeod/McLeod immigrated - it is believed that he was the only child born to the couple at the time but this is speculation based upon an oral interview done in the 1920's with one of his grandchildren. As was typical of the era (1920's), genealogists were only concerned with the male lines and did not mention the daughters in any great detail - North Carolina census records indicate that there were possibly as many as two daughters born either prior to immigration or in Virginia.

Although our family has always said that Alexander was born on the Isle of Skye, we have found no documentation to prove this to date. However, our participation in the MacLeod DNA Study has revealed a close match with one gentleman whose earliest known ancestor was a Norman of Colbost, a village lying near Dunvegan on the Isle of Skye; Norman of Colbost was born about 1715 and reportedly fought with a battleaxe in the battle of Culloden for the Rassay Branch . The family legend also states that this Norman was an heriditary galley maker for the then chief of MacLeod, Norman the Red Man (22nd Chief). The DNA signature of our family and of this gentleman indicate that our common ancestor was cr. 1715 which clearly indicates an Isle of Skye connection for our Alexander and his parents.


Traveled to Ireland for a time - or was it to the Island for a time?

The interview with Albert John was reported by Jay Frank McLeod to have stated that the small family traveled to Ireland "for a time" before continuing on into a port in Virginia. We have found no evidence that the family went to Ireland nor any reason for a trip there.

The DNA Surname Project shows relationship within 10 - 12 generations with several families of PEI and Cape Breton today, however, most of those family's immigrated in the 1800's as opposed to our immigration in the 1780's. A detour though one of the islands of Canada is not unheard of in the time frame of our family's immigration; our family had close ties with a Christopher McKay in both North Carolina and eventually South Carolina, Mr. McKay of Scotland traveled aboard the Hector in 1770 first to Canada, then to Virginia and then down into Robeson County North Carolina before migrating to Kershaw around the same time as Alexander and his family (cr 1812). It is quite possible that our family followed just such a circuitous route during their immigration and subsequent settling in North Carolina.

It is said that the early Scots in the Carolina's spoke the Gaelic and held church services in both Gaelic and English and that most of the immigrants retained their accents even into the generation of the first born Americans; Nicey Jane McLeod, a granddaughter of Alexander and Sarah, wrote that her father born cr 1810 in South Carolina spoke with a heavy Scottish accent. It is therefore possible that Albert John retained his accent and his "island" was heard as "Ireland" by Jay Frank. Until such time as a ships passenger log is found, this part of the interview shall remain a mystery.


Virginia

Most of the Scots entered the United States through Wilmington North Carolina, yet the interview with Albert John revealed an entry point of Virginia for our family. Although research into ships which sailed into a port in Virginia has not revealed any evidence of this being so, our DNA results appear to confirm this connection to Virginia.

As of December 2008, three men of our family have participated in the MacLeod Surname DNA project and two of them have a perfect 25 marker match with two other gentlemen who descend from a Norman McLeod who appears in Virginia records cr. 1787-1790. This is the same arrival time frame we have determined for our Angus MacLeod, his wife Nancy McCutchen MacLeod, and their son Alexander MacLeod, of whom this page is written. Although this doesn't confirm that the family arrived in the United States via Virginia, it does lend credence to the truth of the statement by Albert John McLeod in the 1920 interview.

At the present level of testing (67markers) a match signifies that Angus MacLeod, our immigrant and patriarch would have been a sibling, uncle and nephew, 1st or 2nd cousin to Norman McLeod of Viginia (aka Norman McLeod of Gallia County, Ohio).

For more information regarding our Virginia Research - Angus MacLeod and Nancy McCutchen


North Carolina

The family apparently arrived in North Carolina from Virginia after the 1790 census was taken as searches to date have not revealed any Angus MacLeods. From later census records however, it is known that four of Alexander's siblings were born in North Carolina between 1790 and 1800.

Those siblings are:

Daniel McLeod, husband of Catherine McLean
Betsy McLeod, wife of Norman McLeod
Mary "Polly" McLeod, wife of John McCoy/McKay
Nancy McLeod, wife of Roderick A. Bethune

Searches of Robeson County tax and census records have revealed no Angus McLeods in the 1790's - records have been found in Richmond County which bordered Robeson. Christopher McKay, a Robeson County resident and the father of John McKay who married Alexander's sister, has been found in several records in that county. John McKay was in Kershaw District South Carolina in November of 1812 when he witnessed the land purchase on Horsepen Branch for Alexander - Christopher McKay was in Sumter County by 1820 living a house or two from Alexander's parents. . It is this family connection that we believed caused the confusion in counties by Albert John McLeod.

It is my theory that the family lived on the border of the two counties, just as they did in South Carolina, based upon this theory, I believe that the family resided in what is now the Scotland County area of North Carolina. (Scotland County formed from Richmond County in 1899). Although previous researchers have spent time in Scotland County, they were looking for Alexander and his brothers Norman and Daniel and were not looking for Angus, their father, believing that he had not immigrated with his sons. New research efforts will be for the name Angus in the 1790's and through 1820 with our adding Alexander and Norman to the searches between 1800 and 1812.

The 1810 Richmond County Census believed to be of Alexander's parents, Angus and Nancy McCutchen McLeod shows only one of their three known sons remained in the home for that census; the age of the son indicates that it was Daniel, the youngest of the three. Searches of the 1810 census for Alexander and Norman have revealed enumerations for men of those names in that same county, but it is so far impossible to claim either enumeration as theirs.

Although searches of the marriage lists of Richmond County North Carolina available on line have to date revealed no marriage for Alexander and Sarah, Albert John McLeod stated to his nephew, Jay Frank McLeod, that his grandparents were married in North Carolina. We know that Alexander was in Kershaw District by November of 1812 as he purchased 250 acres which lay in both Kershaw and Sumter District in that month.

However, since no marriage record has been found in North Carolina AND since there were McIntosh's in Kershaw and Sumter cr. 1810, a possibility exists that Alexander married AFTER his migration into South Carolina. He is not found in 1810 South Carolina census records - and his eldest child was born cr. 1810 but maybe as late as 1813.

The enumeration for one Alexander McLeod in Richmond County shows a male aged 16-26 (born 1784-1794), a female aged 0-5 (born 1805-1810) and a female aged 16-26 born 1784-1794). The adults in this enumeration are in the correct age bracket, however, we have no information on a daughter of Alexander born during the years 1805 -1810 in North Carolina as this census indicates the child's birth year range and birth place. Infant mortality rates being what they were in that era, the possibility that this child died before the 1820 census is possible. But to date, no proof has been found that this in fact is an enumeration of our Alexander and Sarah.

The marriage location of Alexander and Sarah remains unknown as of January 2009.

North Carolina Timeline / South Carolina Timeline


South Carolina!

Alexander and possibly Sarah arrived in the Kershaw District area of South Carolina between 1810 and November 1812. Although they are not found the 1810 Census for the area, later census records show that all five of their known children were born in this state, the first child, John N. born possibly as early as 1810. Book G page 116 Deeds and Conveyances, Kershaw District, South Carolina; Dated November 17 1812, Recorded May 25 1814 accessed and copiedat the Camden County Courthouse in Kershaw South Carolina by Lori McLeod Wilke and David Jay Wilke June 2003

All of the known records of Alexander were recorded in Kershaw District, however research has revealed that almost all of Alexander and Sarah's associations have been found to have been with Sumter District residents, evidenced by his Estate record and the marriages of their children. Deeds and Estate Records of Alexander McLeod, accessed and copied by Lori McLeod Wilke 2000 - 2006, Sumter and Camden Courthouses, Sumter and Kershaw Counties, South Carolina

1810 - A Kershaw District/County Record exists that shows an Alexander McLeod for a Norman McLeod vs. Jeremiah Simmons and David Kitterell." This record has not been investigated at this time, so caution is advised in attaching this to our Alexander and Norman. These 1810 Minutes of the Common Court, although regarding both an Alexander and Norman McLeod, cannot be attibuted to OUR Alexander (h/o Sarah McIntosh) with any degree of certainty to date.

However, an index of the Kershaw District Court of Common Pleas shows several lawsuits involving a Norman McLeod between the years 1810 and 1822 - a copy of one of these lawsuits found in the Camden Archives has some of indication that it may be for the brother of Alexander....another lawsuit "Mary Lackey vs Norman McLeod" cr 1820 is also of interest in our research (See Norman McLeod - descendants of Elizabeth Lackey believe that they are descendants of Norman McLeod, son of Angus and Nancy McCutchen MacLeod - DNA testing may help prove the relationship) April 16, 1810 The Minutes of the Kershaw District Court of Common Pleas Reference to Kershaw Court Minutes from the McLeod Family History compiled cr. 1960 provided by Donald Ross McLeod Jr. / Index of McLeod Court Cases heard in the Kershaw Court of Common Pleas, found June 2006 in the Camden Archives by Lori McLeod Wilke and David Jay Wilke

1812 On November 17th 1812, Alexander purchased from Micajah Woodward 225 acres located "the same more or less situate in the district aforesaid" (meaning more or less in Kershaw District) on Horsepen Branch on the waters of the Scape Or and Black River. The land was part of an December 3 1786/7, 2550 acre grant to Issac Lenoir (State Plats 19:179/plat 099-008 19:279:00). Lenoir had apparently left this portion of his estate to his daughter, who had married Micajah Woodward as her second husband. The land was bordered Southeast by Spann Land; Northeast by Arrants; Northwest by Issac Lenoir's land and Southwest by the Horsepen Branch. The deed was witnessed by John McKay, Alexander's brother in law by 1828. Book G page 116 Deeds and Conveyances, Kershaw District, South Carolina; Dated November 17 1812, Recorded May 25 1814 accessed and copiedat the Camden County Courthouse in Kershaw South Carolina by Lori McLeod Wilke and David Jay Wilke June 2003

The 1821 Mill Map done by Stephen Henry Boykin (improved in 1825) shows that Horsepen Branch, like Beaverdam Branch where Alexander's brother Daniel and his father, Angus, as well as his brother in law, John McKay, owned land, crossed the border of the two counties. This map and the words of the deed "more or less situate", confirmed that Alexander's land likely lay on or crossed the border of Kershaw and Sumter Districts explaining why so many of his business associates were Sumter District residents and not Kershaw. It also explained the presence of his children, although living on inherited land in later years, were found in Sumter as well as Kershaw. The boundary lines of the two counties were changed frequently. Mill Map Found on line at SC Genweb/Book G page 116 Deeds and Conveyances, Kershaw District, South Carolina; Dated November 17 1812, Recorded May 25 1814 accessed and copied at the Camden County Courthouse in Kershaw South Carolina by Lori McLeod Wilke and David Jay Wilke June 2003

It appears possible that Alexander and Sarah owned land in Sumter County on the Beaverdam Branch although records of its purchase have yet to be found. Albert John McLeod, grandson of Alexander, stated in the 1920 interview that Alexander had two grants of land on Beaverdam. I originally believed that the interview had mixed up the Beaverdam ownership, attributing it to Alexander when in fact it had been Daniel who owned land there-recent evidence has been found to indicate that Alexander may also owned land on Beaverdam Branch, which he possibly Deed Gifted to his elder children before his death in 1824. Deeds and Estate Records of the children of Alexander and Sarah McIntosh, research done by Lori McLeod Wilke 2000-2006 /January 1 1841 Alex McLeod to R. James accessed and copied by Lori McLeod Wilke, David J. Wilke and Trish and Elizabeth Brown on June 25th, 2004 at the Camden County Courthouse, Kershaw County, South Carolina.

However, as grandchildren of Angus MacLeod, who appears to have distributed his estate through sales of little cost to his descendants in lieu of a Will, may also have sold or given Beaverdam Branch land to the children of Alexander - while we know the children of Alexander owned land on the branch, to date (January 2009) we have no deeds detailing how they obtained that land.

NOTE: A work done in the 1960's by a professional genealogist who had access to the writings of Nicey Jane McLeod Holland Hughes (written history's location is presently unknown but is said to have been in the possession of one of Nicey's children by Rufus Hughes). In this work, the genealogist mentioned that Alexander's land "lay on the upper reaches of Swift Creek".

No record has been found that shows that Alexander owned land on the upper reaches however, the estate of his son, John N. McLeod (Nicey Jane's father) indicates that a portion of his estate lay on the creek. I have found that not all deeds were recorded, some land purchases are referred to in other deeds - i.e. Angus purchased 57 acres at one point with the only proof of ownership being a letter from seller and the fact that he lived on the land. This information is buried in another deed in which ownership of a large portion of land had changed hands many times - less the 57 acres Angus continued to hold. Therefore, it is quite possible that Alexander and Sarah owned land not only on Beaverdam but also on the upper reaches of Swift Creek and deed gifted these lands to their children who are later seen owning and selling lands on these waters. Further research is ongoing. Resume of McLeods provided to Lori McLeod Wilke by Donald Ross McLeod Jr. October 2000


Location in the present configuration of counties and townships of South Carolina

The book, Lee County Past and Present Volume II gives detailed information of the formation of that county in 1902. Although many of the records of our family concern land that lies today in Lee County, their records are found in the courthouses of Kershaw and Sumter. Later years found family members in Buffaloe and DeKalb Townships of Kershaw County and in Spring Hill and Bradford Springs of Sumter County. These four areas have all been incorporated into what is present day Lee County

  • Todays Spring Hill Township of Lee County includes the Providence, Rafting Creek , and Bradford Springs Townships of old Sumter County and lies West of and South of the Beaver Dam Swamp -
    • Description of Bradford Springs/Spring Hill area - Lies in northwestern Lee County in the northern High Hills of Santee. The High Hills parallel the Wateree River for about 40 miles. The springs were considered to be of great health benefit, its waters being used to treat such illnesses as " Inward Night Fevers, Loss of Appetite, or Debility of the Nerves.....cure any scrofulous Humour, old inverterate Ulcers, Tetters, Ringworms etc" Todays communities include Egypt where Angus and Nancy, Daniel and the Bethune's resided. City Gazzette 1814 article as quoted in the book Lee County Past and Present Volume II page 116
  • Today's Ionia Township of Lee County includes the Buffalo township of past Kershaw County which also lies west of the Scape Or Swamp and Carters Crossing of old Sumter County and north of Beaver Dam Swamp and west of the Scape Or Swamp -
    • Description of Ionia Township area - bounded by the Hickory Hill Township area, in which Alexander II and his owned some property, portions of the Egypt Community appear to lie or bound this area as Lee County Past and Present Vol II states that New Hope Presbyterian Church Cemetery or McLeod Cemetery lies in the Ionia Community.
  • Todays Turkey Creek Township of Lee County includes DeKalb Township of Kershaw County west of the Scape Or and west of Lynches River and the part of old Bishopville Township of Sumter County which lays North of the public road leading from Stokes Bridge on the Lynches River to the Harrison Hall Mill - see the 1821 Mill Map of Stephen H. Boykin for more detailed info (improved in 1825; this area includes the Lucknow Township {incorporated 1897}) - Alexander and Sarah McIntosh McLeods children are enumerated in this area as were Norman McLeod, the husband of Alexander's sister, Betsy McLeod.
    • Nine miles from present day Bishopville and eighteen miles from Camden (Kershaw), Turkey Creek lies on the northern edge of Lee County. Lee County Past and Present Volume II

Naturalization

It has been assumed that an 1813 Court of Common Pleas document listing an Alexander McLeod who had applied for Naturalization was that of our Alexander - the presence of several other Alexander McLeods in Kershaw and Sumter during that period cause me some pause. Searches of the British Aliens registered in the United States (1812) have to date revealed no Alexander or Angus McLeods in North Carolina. This means either a) Angus and Alexander were naturalized by 1812 or b) they were missed during migration from North to South Carolina (first property purchase in SC by Alexander in November 1812).

Alexander's father, Angus McLeod voted in an election in 1799 in Rockingham, Richmond County however, a petition was filed to invalidate his vote due to his being an alien, not naturatilized in that year (see his page for more information) - so we can be fairly certain that if Angus was eventually naturalized, it would have been after 1799. Since he was obviously one who wished to vote, it seems very likely that he in fact, did apply for naturalization after having his vote dis-counted.


1812 - 1824

1812 On November 17th 1812, Alexander purchased from Micajah Woodward 225 acres located "the same more or less situate in the district aforesaid" (meaning more or less in Kershaw District) on Horsepen Branch on the waters of the Scape Or and Black River. The land was part of an December 3 1786/7, 2550 acre grant to Issac Lenoir (State Plats 19:179/plat 099-008 19:279:00). Lenoir had apparently left this portion of his estate to his daughter, who had married Micajah Woodward as her second husband. The land was bordered Southeast by Spann Land; Northeast by Arrants; Northwest by Issac Lenoir's land and Southwest by the Horsepen Branch. The deed was witnessed by John McKay, Alexander's brother in law by 1828. Book G page 116 Deeds and Conveyances, Kershaw District, South Carolina; Dated November 17 1812, Recorded May 25 1814 accessed and copiedat the Camden County Courthouse in Kershaw South Carolina by Lori McLeod Wilke and David Jay Wilke June 2003

Sometime between 1810 and 1812 - John N. McLeod, later the husband of Kitsy Davis is born.

1813 -See above - It is possible that Alexander applied for citizenship on November 17 of this year although this has in no way been proven. Research of citizenship application and receipt of naturalization is difficult, however, by 1820 Alexander's Kershaw District Census shows that he was naturalized and not an alien. Therefore, it is likely that this is his record. November 17, 1813 The Minutes of the Kershaw District Court of Common Pleas/Reference to Kershaw Court Minutes from the McLeod Family History compiled cr. 1960 provided by Donald Ross McLeod Jr. /Copy of the Kershaw Court Minutes obtained from the Camden Archives McLeod Family File on Monday June 30 2003 by Lori McLeod Wilke

Alexander I's early death leaves us few records to give details of his life in Kershaw County. The 1812 land deed proves where some of the property he owned was located and his 1824 estate record give evidence that he operated a small farm or plantation of at least 225 acres, owned three slaves, and had Coopers tools. A Cooper was a maker of Barrels, and a Cooper was considered an "artisan". One could make a modest income from this trade. Estate File # 1775; Estate of Alexander McLeod, deceased, Executors Daniel McLeod and Norman(d) McLeod, Camden Courthouse, Kershaw, South Carolina accessed and copied by Lori McLeod Wilke June 30 2003

At the time of his death, he and Sarah also owned 15 head of sheep and 7 lambs valued at $18.00, 16 head of hogs and pigs valued at $37.00, 18 head of cattle and calves valued at $125.00, 3 yearlings, one British musket, farming utensils, one Grindle horn and a saddle. It would appear that he had plans to raise horses as his estate paid out to Thomas Davis on January 14th 1825 $5.00 for a season of Stud horse and Negro hire. (Note: the amounts each item is valued at may appear small; however, Alexander purchased the 225 acres for $225.00). Estate File # 1775; Estate of Alexander McLeod, deceased, Executors Daniel McLeod and Norman(d) McLeod, Camden Courthouse, Kershaw, South Carolina accessed and copied by Lori McLeod Wilke June 30 2003

In 2000, Trish Sanders Brown, a descendant of Alexander and Sarah's eldest son, John N. McLeod, found what she believes is the original location of Alexander's property. Using the property location found in the 1812 Deed, she found a cornerstone of an old home, evidence of graves, and evidence of a Mill.

Therefore, a possibility exists that Alexander operated a Mill. An 1878 Sumter County Map shows a McLeods Mill located on Horsepen Branch on the border of Old Kershaw and Old Sumter Districts/Counties. It is known that Alexander I purchased property in 1812 from a Micajah Woodward on Horsepen Branch. Alexander's son, John N., later purchased additional Horsepen Branch property in 1843, from his brother-in-law, Darling Davis. Although Alexander I's Horsepen Branch property showed evidence of a Mill and the 1878 Map shows a McLeods Mill on that branch, further research is necessary to prove that Alexander and Sarah operated that Mill. It is possible the mill was added to the property after Alexander I's death by his sons since it is not shown on the 1821 Mill Map. It is also possible that it was not shown on the 1821 Sumter Mill Map because the mill lay in Kershaw District in 1821 and in Sumter District in 1878. Boundary changes were frequent in the area. 1821/1825 Mill Atlas by Stephen H. Boykin @ SCGenweb / 1878 Map of Sumter County provided to Lori McLeod Wilke by Donald Ross McLeod Jr. in 2000 / "Von Hacke Records, Sumter Genealogical Society, Sumter SC," Paragraph on John N. McLeod, McLeod Section of Files -

Lending some proof to the belief that Alexander or his heirs did own and operate a Mill is the paragraph on McLeods Mill and Pond in the book Lee County Past And Present Vol II page 123; which states that a third McLeod Mill was located on the Beaverdam Creek - one must remember that Horsepen Branch on which Alexander's property was bounded, was a tributary of Beaverdam Branch and some of those neighbors who bounded that property were on the Beaverdam Branch (see paragraph above regarding the 1878 Sumter Map).

It is increasingly evident that operating a Mill was a family trade. Angus McLeod of 1820 Sumter purchased land in 1820 which contained a mill on Beaverdam Branch, Daniel received that land from him in 1831 . That Mill operated until approximately 1930. In the Spring Hill, Sumter County Census of 1880, Daniel's son, John Robert is shown as a Miller then having inherited the land and Mill purchased and operated by his grandfather, Angus beginning in 1820. note: Spring Hill was the enumeration location of the present day Egypt Community of Lee County, in 1870 residents were located in the Bradford Springs community Sumter County Land Deed MM 58

Alexander II, (son of Alex and Sarah) is known to have erected a Mill Dam in 1856, which like Beaverdam and Horsepen Branch, crossed the county line (presently runs in Lee County) and his son, Jesse Lazarus McLeod, operated Whites Mill (formerly known as DeChamps Mill in present day Sumter County) from approximately 1890 till his death in 1922. And Alexander's grandson, Albert John became a "pioneer" in Mississippi where he also operated a lumber mill, general store etc. known today as McLeods Park in Hancock County Mississippi. Deeds and Conveyances, Kershaw District, South Carolina; Dated August 28 1856, Recorded September 13 1856/OFFICIAL PROGRAM PRINTED FOR THE "OFFICIAL CEREMONY" "LEGACY OF PARKS" Hancock County, Mississippi, May 9, 1975. Copy provided to Lori McLeod Wilke by Donald Ross McLeod Jr. in October of 2000

1815 - Apr 06 - Alexander McLeod II, later the husband of Harriet Yates is born.

Sometime between 1812 and 1817 - Catherine McLeod, later the wife of John C. Mosely is born.

Sometime around 1817 - Jane McLeod, later the wife of Alfred Davis is born

1820 - Alexander is found as head of household in Kershaw District Alexander McLeod 2 m 0-10 (John N /Alexander II), 1 male 26-45 Alex 2 females 0-10 (Catherine / Jane), 1 f 26-45 (Sarah) - farmer, naturalized, 3 slaves. The census has been alphabetized and therefore neighbors are not listed with any certainty. Sometime between now and January 1824, a fifth child is born, Angus who is named in his father's January 15th Will. Census; Kershaw District, South Carolina, United States of America Census Year 1820, page 151

From all indications, it appears that Alexander was well on his way to establishing himself as a successful citizen of the United States. The 1820 Kershaw District Census states that he was "naturalized, not an alien". This appears to have taken place around 1813/14 as an 1813 Application for Citizenship has been found in the Kershaw Court of Common Pleas. His estate record gives evidence of a marginally profitable farming operation, possibly a cooperage, and may also have operated a Mill. It would appear that his life was then cut short by accident or illness.

Sometime between 1820 and January of 1824, Angus McLeod II was born - he would marry Eliza Ann Arrants cr. 1841.

1824 - On January 15th, Alexander makes his will, stating that he was "very sick and weak in body". He leaves all of his plantation or tract of land to his wife Sarah for the use of her until either her death or remarriage. Although he states that at her death or remarriage the same is to go to his youngest son Angus, the will makes it clear that he had also given land to his elder children. It had been hoped that the estate file would give a better understanding of the extent of his lands and the distribution of his estate, but it did not. He names his two brothers, Daniel and Normand as his co-executors. The spelling of our surname varies between MacLeod and McLeod throughout the will. The will was witnessed by Malcolm Fraser and Jacob Nichols. Alexander died sometime between the writing of the will and its probate on March 8 1824. Kershaw County Genealogical Archives/Camden Recorded 3/8/1824 in WILL BOOK K page 147 Vol. 2, E- D Will of 1/15/1824 /Copy of Will provided to Lori McLeod Wilke by Donald Ross McLeod in October of 2000/ Estate File accessed and copied by Lori McLeod Wilke June of 2003 at the Camden Court House, Kershaw County, South Carolina.

I have often wondered why the will was not witnessed by family members or others whose names appear frequently in our family's records; we do not see Malcolm Fraser and Jacob Nichols again on records after the probation of the estate. Perhaps Alexander was injured in an accident on his farm and it was thought he might not survive long enough for family to arrive and these men were working with him there. It appears that he did survive for a time after writing his will as it was nearly three months later that his estate entered probate.

On March 8 1824, Alexander's brothers, Daniel and Norman appear in the probate court and swear the oath of executorship/administration; both sign the document, Norman with quite an elegant hand. Although these documents were of course transcribed from the originals in the 1930's during the Great Experiment - a great effort was made by the transcriber to differentiate Norman's signature from Daniel's and others - it is obvious then that the signature was in fact such that it stood out on the page for the transcriber - this fact is interesting in light of a lawsuit brought by Francis Boykin against Norman McLeod in which the elegance of Norman McLeod's handwriting is brought as evidence in the case - for more information on the possibilities this brings see Norman McLeod.) From that date until a final accounting of the estate's management was given on February 20 1835, Daniel executed the estate of Alexander. By 1835, all the children of Alexander and Sarah except Angus had reached their majority. Estate File 1775; copied June 30 2003, Camden Courthouse, Camden, Kershaw County South Carolina by David and Lori McLeod Wilke

The appraisers of the estate were Malcom Frazer (Witness to Will of Alexander), Archibald Frazer (Witness to Deed of Alex's father, Angus dated September 8th, 1827 (GG 255 and 256), Joseph Lockart, James Brown, George Turner, and Richard Brown Estate File 1775; copied June 30 2003, Camden Courthouse, Camden, Kershaw County South Carolina by David and Lori McLeod Wilke

On April 17th Daniel McLeod appeared before the court showing that "neccessary for the payment of debts that part of the personal estate" of Alexander McLeod be sold. He requested that the following be sold: a sorrel mare six head of sheep two head of cows and calves The petition for sale was granted and was to be sold "at the late residence of the said deceased" on the "Sixth day of May next". All sales under $4.00 were to be made in cash, all sums above $4.00 a credit was to be allowed unto the "first day of January next, purchaser giving notes with appropriate security "Estate File 1775; copied June 30 2003, Camden Courthouse, Camden, Kershaw County South Carolina by David and Lori McLeod Wilke

On Sept 3 1824, Daniel McLeod appeared again and presented a record of the sales made on the 6th of May 1824. Alexander's brother in law, John McKay was one of those who made a purchase during the sale. Estate File 1775; copied June 30 2003, Camden Courthouse, Camden, Kershaw County South Carolina by David and Lori McLeod Wilke


1824 - 1840

Alexander's brother Daniel continued to execute the estate; the estate file shows that crops continued to be grown as monies were paid to a Joseph (whose last name as written in the Record of Expenditure's is illegible but begins with a C) and to Stephen Lee as "hirelings, to work in the crops". Blacksmithing by William Arrants and/or J. Shriver and metal forging by (what looks to be) J. Barnes of plantation tools continued as did the breeding of mares to Thomas Davis's "stud" and sale and purchase of horses from and to various residents of the area until 1835. Estate File 1775; copied June 30 2003, Camden Courthouse, Camden, Kershaw County South Carolina by David and Lori McLeod Wilke

It would appear that their crop was potatos and that they purchased their corn as on July 22 1825 the estate paid Wm. B. Larkin for five Bushels of Corn at $4.00 and paid a Mr. Swinn (Spann?) for another nine bushels on the same date of the next year. In 1827, it woud appear they purchased potatoe plantings from Gates Goff, indicating their own harvest was lost the year before. Estate File 1775; copied June 30 2003, Camden Courthouse, Camden, Kershaw County South Carolina by David and Lori McLeod Wilke

1830 - Alexander's widow, Sarah McIntosh McLeod is found as head of household in Kershaw District aged 30-40. Living with her are Angus aged 0-10, Alexander II aged 15-20, 1 female aged 15-20 likely to be Jane who did not marry until just before 1840. Their son, John N. McLeod is not found as a head of household in this census; his whereabouts are unknown; their daughter Catherine was likely married to John C. Mosely by this year. Census Research at Ancestry.com Census On Line by Lori McLeod Wilke 2003 - 2006

1835 - On February 20th, the final accounting was given to the Court for the Estate of Alexander McLeod. The estate had been administered by Alexander's brother, Daniel, for almost eleven years. All but the youngest of Alexander's children had now reached their majority and it can be assumed that the estate management was now taken over by them. Later records of the children of Alexander and Daniel indicate that the cousins maintained a very close relationship throughout their adult lives which is evidence that the estate had been managed in such a way as to not cause feelings of hardship or misuse. Later records also indicate that the land was divided amongst the children. After the 1830 census no record has been found of Sarah McIntosh McLeod - it is assumed that she died about the time of the final accounting of the estate but further research is needed.

1838/9 - Two of Alexander's brother in laws begin to sell their property in preparation for migration into Alabama; John McKay, the husband of his sister Polly; Norman McLeod, the husband of his sister Betsy; and, Roderick Bethune, the husband of his sister, Nancy. His parents, Angus and Nancy McCutchen McLeod, had been found in the home of Roderick and Nancy in the 1830 Sumter Census; it is believed that Angus died sometime after April 7 1831 on which date he sold the McLeod Mill Pond property to his son Daniel. The selling of property by three of Angus' sons in law indicates that he was deceased by 1838. By the 1840 census, the McKay's, the McLeod's and the Bethune's are found in Macon County Alabama. Census Research at Ancestry.com Census On Line by Lori McLeod Wilke 2003 - 2006

1840 - Alexander's widow, Sarah, is not found as head of household in either Sumter or Kershaw County. It is assumed that she was deceased by this year as no evidence of her remarriage has been found. Four of their five children are found in the Sumter District census all living near the Beaverdam Branch of the Scape Or River, apparently the two counties were combined at some point for that years census. Census Research at Ancestry.com Census On Line by Lori McLeod Wilke 2003 - 2006

The whereabouts of their youngest son, Angus McLeod, is unknown for this year. Census research has not revealed him as a head of household, he would have been between the ages of 16-20. None of the census enumerations of his siblings show a male of the correct age, neither does the household of his Uncle, Daniel McLeod.

By this year's census, three of Angus McLeod's (II) Aunts had migrated to Macon County, Alabama. In the home of Roderick and Nancy McLeod Bethune is a male in the correct age bracket to have been Angus. Also included in their home was a female aged 60-70 who is the correct age for Nancy McCutchen McLeod. It is believed, but in no way proven, that Angus traveled with his Aunts and Grandmother to Macon, where he remained for only a short time before returning to South Carolina, where he married Eliza Ann Arrants.

From an 1867 Lawsuit regarding the youngest of their sons, it would appears that Angus II did in fact inherit the plantation and house at the death of Sarah or at his own majority. The estate of Angus II was, like many others, disolved after the War Between the States. After his death in the war, Eliza inherited the estate but was unable to keep it profitable. She received as her dower land, 1/3 of the lands which included the plantation home and outbuildings but this property was sold at her own death in 1880. Harriet Yates McLeod, the wife of their son Alexander, purchased the dower property on the steps of the Camden Courthouse bringing the land back into the family. The land was sold again in 1895 to Henry Garrison. To read more ANGUS MCLEOD II.


Burial of Alexander and Sarah McIntosh McLeod

It is not known where Alexander and Sarah McIntosh McLeod are buried. As stated earlier, Trish Sanders Brown, a 4 x's great granddaughter, has walked the property and reported evidence of graves. Research into the area churches and the family members attendance of those churches has not led to any definitive evidence of their religion or place of worship.

Angus and Nancy McCutchen McLeod owned and lived on McLeods Mill Pond (shown on present day maps in the Egypt community of Lee County on or near McCaskill Road) at the time of the deaths of Alexander and Sarah. This property remains in the family today and lies next to the McLeod Cemetery aka New Hope Presbyterian Church Cemetery. A 2004 visit to the cemetery revealed burials took place there early enough to allow a possibility that Alexander and Sarah, Angus and Nancy and possibly Daniel and Catherine McLean McLeod were buried there. If so, their tombstones are not in existence at this time. Search of McLeod Cemetery/ aka New Hope Presbyterian Cemetery by Lori McLeod Wilke, David Jay Wilke, Trish Sanders Brown and Elizabeth Brown in June 2004

Throughout the years following the death of this first and second generation, the descendants of Angus and Nancy began to attend Presbyterian, Methodist and Baptist Churches. These descendants are buried in many of the local churches. To see a burial listing of family visit: Index of South Carolina Burials


Children of ALexander and Sarah McIntosh MacLeod/McLeod

John N. McLeod, husband of Kitsy Davis

Alexander McLeod II, husband of Harriet Yates

Catherine McLeod, wife of John C. Moseley

Jane McLeod, wife of Alfred Davis (brother of Kitsy)

Angus McLeod II, husband of Eliza Ann Arrants (later Boykin)

It appears that Angus McLeod II, inherited the dower lands of Sarah McIntosh McLeod after her death sometime between 1830 and 1840. This land would, in 1864, become the dower lands of Eliza Ann Arrants McLeod after Angus' death while serving as a Confederate Soldier. Their only surviving child, William McLeod, also perished while in service. After the estate was declared insolvent in 1867, Eliza would marry the widower of her first cousin by marriage..Col Stephen Madison Boykin (h/o of Annie McLeod, the daughter of Daniel and Catherine McLean McLeod). A Lawsuit resulted from the administration of the estate....to read more, please see Angus' page.



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