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THE FAY FAMILY PAGE
    
Descendants of Joanna Fay and Ephraim Munger
Who's Where in the Early Census Data
Edward Revisited: Additions and Corrections to Orlin
Joanna and Eunice
Johanna Fay and Ephraim Munger
Amasa Munger
Directory for the Munger Connections
   
1790
UNION, TOLLAND COUNTY, CT
Ephraim
   
It should be possible to find Ephraim in the census of 1790. According to the list of children and their birthplaces which we are following, he should be in Union again in March of 1789 and he should remain there for several years. Yet there is no "Ephraim" Munger. There is, however, an "Edw" Munger, who has the right household members for Ephraim. There is one male over 16; 5 under; and three females. Females would be Sarah, Elizabeth and Joanna. The older male is, of course, Ephraim. And the others are sons David, Ephraim, Rufus, Jothan, and Solomon. My guess is that the census taker made a mistake in writing down the name. There is NO Edward Munger that we know of in Union at that time.
   
   
1800
UNION, TOLLAND COUNTY, CT
Ephraim
   
This has to be our Ephraim, but it doesn't quite match. The females are Sarah and Joanna, that much is clear. The older male is Ephraim. However, there are only four boys. The younger three have to be Solomon, Jotham and Eliab. That means that the older is David, Ephraim, or Rufus. Since I cannot find any of these in the census, I do not know which one is still at home, but I would guess Rufus; he is only 19, and did not marry until 1810.
   
   
1800
CAZENOVIA, CHENANGO COUNTY, NY
Amasa
   
Amasa is 25; Sally is 23. Maria is 1. Sally seems to have been put into the wrong age category. This could be just a simple mistake - the transcription for this particular census is much less precise than many.
   
   
1810
PEPPERELL, MIDDLESEX COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS
Amasa
   
Amasa is 35; Sally is 33. Russell is 5, and Henry is 8. Roxalana is 1, and Maria is 11.
   
   
1820
HURON, HURON COUNTY, OHIO
Amasa, David, Eliab; Ephraim?
   
The 1820 census shows Amasa, David, and Eliab in Huron, Huron County, Ohio. By 1825, Ephraim and his sons are in Milan, Ohio, about 20 miles from New London, where Ephraim died April 21, 1825. Gardner says that Ephraim lived with Amasa in Ohio, and the census record does show an older male in Amasa's household. In 1820, Amasa would be 45, David would be 44, and Eliab would be 36. There are also an older male and female in Eliab's household, but it does not seem possible to identify them; possibly the parents of Eliab's wife. There is a comment on page 273 of the Munger book that "Probably Eliab Munger had other children [than Zolvin, who is listed], but no further records are available." This census of 1820, and the one of 1830, present conclusive evidence that there were in fact more children.
   
Amasa is 45, Sally is 43. Luke is 8, Russell is 15, and Henry is 18. Roxalana is 10. Maria married in 1819 and is in her own household now.
   
   
1830
MILAN, HURON COUNTY, OHIO
Amasa, Eliab
   
Amasa is 55, Sally is 53. Luke is 18, Russell is 25, and Henry is 28. Roxalana is 20. There seems to be another daughter who is not on the list. She is 5-10, so born between 1820 and 1825. In 1820, Sally would have been 42; not impossible certainly. She could also be a granddaughter visiting. Russell married in February, 1830, and it could be that the woman 20-30 is not Roxalana, but is Russell's wife. Both Almira and Roxalana seem to disappear; they may both have died young.
   
   
1840
PRAIRIE RONDE, KALAMAZOO, MICHIGAN
Amasa, Russell, Henry
   
Amasa is 65, Sally is 63; they are living with Russell, who is 35 and has a young family. Henry married in 1839, and has one young son.
   
   
1840
CLINCH, VAN BUREN, MICHIGAN
Luke
   
Luke married in 1835 and settled in Michigan, close to his first cousin Zolvin Munger, the son of Eliab. By 1840, Luke has two sons (Russell and LaFayette) and one daughter (Esther, age 5). The entries under 10-15 and 30-40 are mistakes corrected by the census taker. He wrote the "1" in the wrong column, realized his mistake, and changed it to a "0", writing the numbers in the correct columns. The totals for the columns confirm this.
   
   
With the census of 1850, it becomes easier to follow the families as their lines continue.