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CANOEING, SAILING
AND MOTOR BOATING.

.

PRACTICAL BOAT BUILDING AND HANDLING

BY

LIEUT. WARREN H. MILLER U.S.N.R.

AUTHOR OF
"RIFLES AND SHOTGUNS," "CAMPING OUT,"
"THE AMERICAN HUNTING DOG," ETC., ETC.

D. APPLETON-CENTURY COMPANY INCORPORATED
NEW YORK MCMXXXVII LONDON 

COPYRIGHT, 1917, 1919, 1928,
BY D. APPLETON AND COMPANY
All rights reserved.

This book or parts thereof, must not be
reproduced in any form without permission of the publishers.

COPYRIGHT, 1911, BY THE FIELD AND STREAM PUB. CO.
COPYRIGHT, 1911, BY OUTING PUBLISHING CO.
PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

 




 

The author sailing the Wee Bee,
an innovation in jib-headed cruising ketches.

 

PREFACE

THIS book treats of the simple things of life on the water, things that any man may enjoy -- canoes, yachts of moderate dimensions, motor boats. The sea is eternal. Its lure is always the same, and men who live on its shores will forever be satisfying that longing to be afloat on it. Those who do not make it a life's business the sea invites to at least come and play. That play is expensive, most expensive, if one insists on a modern racer. There are plenty of books for those who delight in getting somewhere else on the water in the least possible time; this one is for him who would enjoy a more leisurely cruise, look in at strange ports, canoe strange rivers.

There is a deal, however, for the confirmed boat-fusser, for the man who is somewhat handy with tools and likes to build, for the youth whose pocketbook is meager. It is written for the man who wants to own a canoe, a sailboat, a motor boat, yet cannot afford to buy one. Why not build one? The author can never remember the time he was not building a craft of some sort, for the mere fun of it. Most of the cost of boat building is labor. During the past ten years, by way of example, lumber cost for boats has not increased so very much. You can still buy white pine of fair grade for ten cents a board foot; twenty for Number One grade, free from knots. Oak comes at about fifteen to twenty cents. And, when you have said oak and pine, you have covered all the lumber really necessary for a boat. Engines and hardware are not so different in price from what they were. I see no great difference in anchors, cleats, blocks, portholes; can still get a good ten-horse engine for two hundred and fifty dollars, which is just what Go-Sum's engine cost ten years ago. Knockdown boat frames seem to have gone out of favor. I believe there is still a company making a line of them in Bay City, Michigan.

Rigs have advanced considerably in the past ten years. The Marconi jibheaded rig has come to stay. It appears nowadays on boats as small as thirteen feet, in the Gloucester Midget class. The difficulties of a smooth track for the hoist have been ironed out. Mast fittings are on the general market for Marconi shrouds. The jib has a tendency to become larger and to be concentrated in one sail. Scientific tests have proved that it is more efficient, area for area, than the mainsail because the latter's mast cuts off so much of the wind efficiency.

Aside from the supremacy of the Marconi rig -- which may be stepped in any boat formerly carrying a gaff mainsail -- this book is quite the same aid and guide as it was when first written. And it may not be presumed that the writer has stood still, practically, for the last few years; in fact, he cries guilty to having built a new type of sailing cruiser not described in these pages but worthy of mention here, as his own recent contribution to yachting in general.

This cruiser, Wee Bee by name, is 24 feet x 19 feet x 7 feet 6 inches x 4 feet draft, sleeps two men in her 7-foot cabin, and is ketch rigged, with 300 square feet of sail area. Her sails are jibheaded, like the Marconi but hoisted on sliding gunter gaffs cocked straight up. I am no carpenter, but I built her myself, on the urge to own a small but comfortable cruiser that would be "able" on the high seas yet not too much boat. She has been sailing four years and seems a success -- as much as any innovation can be on the eternal and conservative sea. She feeds her crew from a lazarette, or small galley-cabin, placed just forward of the mizzenmast. This holds a two burner galley stove, ice box, water keg with faucet, and racks for plates, provision cans, etc. The cockpit is between the forward bulkhead of the lazarette and the after bulkhead of the cabin. It is 6 feet long and seats three people comfortably on its weather side. An awning goes over it in port, hung from the main boom.

Wee Bee is a dry boat, even in 10-foot waves, very easy to handle, and sails herself, on tacks, with helm lashed. You can drop mainsail and reef any time, the jib and mizzen carrying her along on course. I have done it, again and again, when the wind freshened so as to require another reef. Or, if too strong for any mainsail at all, she does well on jib and mizzen alone. The construction is simply Margaret (described early in this book), with three strakes lapping one above the other, ribs every 2 feet, and a skip jack bottom springing from an oak fin keel of 2-inch stock. She carries 400 pounds of lead on the fin keel and 300 pounds of stone ballast inside.

A cabin feature worthy of mention is that, while it shows 5 feet length above the coaming, it is 6 feet long down where the berths come. This was done to give more seating room in the cockpit, and was managed by bringing up the after bulkhead some 2 feet, then insetting 14 inches, making a cross-seat for the cockpit, and from there raising the after wall and doors of the cabin. The crew's heads go side by side on pillows under that bulkhead seat. We found that a small porthole was needed in the bulkhead so as to give air there at night. Also this bulkhead makes the whole forward part of the boat water-tight.

Wee Bee was knocked down under sail once and filled her cockpit with green water. Dropping mainsail, which can be done instantly with the sliding gunter gaff, she righted and sailed on under jib and mainsail while the crew bailed out. I do not know of any other boat that was ever fairly upset yet got up and went on again without assistance! All due to the cabin and lazarette bulkheads making stern and bow unsinkable.

Finally, as an auxiliary, she carries a 2-1/2 hp. Bridgeport motor, offset 6 inches from centerline to pass the rudderhead with its screw. This engine is located in the cockpit under the steering wheel post but to one side of it. It takes up virtually no room and is a great convenience in calms and crowded harbors.

I built her myself, boat, sails, spars, and rigging, with a lot of fun and no very great work -- and no difficult fits. Her description forms, rightfully, part of this preface, as witnessing what the author has to say for himself that is new as a boatbuilder. Your attention is called to Wee Bee's picture, which forms our new frontispiece. With that picture to guide him, any one should be able to build her duplicate. She is yours, readers! I claim no patent on her at all, and warn off all unscrupulous manufacturers from commercializing her !

W.H.M.
EAST GLOUCESTER, MASS.
 

 
CONTENTS.



 CHAPTER 

PAGE

  
 PART ONE:
 SAILING AND BOAT BUILDING
 

I.

THE SAILING BATTEAU

17

II.

SAIL DORY, DUCKBOAT AND SKIFF

41

III.

CATBOATS AND KNOCKABOUTS

63

IV.

BOAT BUILDING

89

  
 PART TWO:
 CANOEING AND CRUISING
 

I.

HOW TO RIG AND HANDLE AN OPEN CANOE

119

II.

CANOE CRUISING

138

III.

HOW TO BUILD A DECKED CANVAS CRUISING CANOE

160

IV.

CANOE FITTINGS

177

  
 PARTS THREE AND FOUR:
 MOTOR BOAT MANAGEMENT
 AND CONSTRUCTION
 

I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.

CHOOSING YOUR MOTOR BOAT
MOTOR BOAT FITTINGS
CABIN AND INTERIOR FURNISHINGS
YACHT PLUMBING
ALL ABOUT YOUR ENGINE
ENGINE TROUBLES
THE GALLEY OF THE POWER CRUISER
GOING INTO COMMISSION
HAULING OUT FOR THE WINTER
BUILDING A POWER CRUISER FROM KNOCKDOWN FRAMES

189


 ILLUSTRATIONS.

 

 [NOTE: many of the original illustrations are very small and blurred and the dimensions, etc., practically unreadable. I have scanned them as large as practical and will replace them with clearer scans if another copy of this book ever comes my way. -- COD]

 


THE AUTHOR SAILING THE Wee Bee

Frontispiece

  PART I:
  CHAPTER I

  

  THE 13-FT LWL SAILING BATTEAU Margaret


  SAILING BATTEAU Margaret
  SAILING BATTEAU Margaret
  KEEL BOARD FOR 15-FT SAILING BATTEAU
  UNDER FULL SAIL
  WHISTLING FOR A BREEZE
  NAUTICAL NAMES ABOUT A BOAT

 

  PART I:
  CHAPTER II


 
 
  SAIL AND DECK PLANS OF THE
  17-FT WHITEHALL BOAT W.B.



 
 
  BISHOP'S CLASSIC SNEAKBOX
  "CENTENNIAL REPUBLIC"
 

  THE BARNEGAT DUCK BOAT
  THE 17-FT CLUB SAILING DORY Bee


  18-FT DECKED RACING DORIES

  PART I:
  CHAPTER III


  A 16-FT RACING CATBOAT


  A 16-FT LAPSTRAKE CATBOAT FOR BOYS


  FRAME PLAN AND DECK PLAN
  OF 16-FT LAPSTRAKE CATBOAT



  A KNOCKABOUT RIG FOR A 22-FT DECKED SKIFF
  THE POPULAR 15-RATER KNOCKABOUT
  SAIL PLAN OF A 26-FT LOA KNOCKABOUT


  FRAMING PLANS AND DECK PLAN
  OF 16-FT RACING CATBOAT



  KNOTS AND BENDS USED IN SEAMANSHIP

  PART I:
  CHAPTER IV


  BOAT CONSTRUCTION DETAILS


  SHEER PLAN AND BODY PLAN OF 19-FT SAIL DORY
  FRAMING DESIGNS FOR A 19-FT SAIL DORY



  PART II:
  CHAPTER I


  TO SWING CANOE OVERHEAD


  PADDLES LASHED IN POSITION
  CARRYING SINGLE
  SAIL PLAN Waterat IV

  PART II:
  CHAPTER II


  IN CAMP IN A CRUISING DECKED CANOE


  THE SIDE-OPENING GRUB BAG
  DAN BEARD OR CAMPFIRE TENT
  THE FORESTER TENT
  THE PERFECT SHELTER TENT
  THE CANOE TARP CAMP


  GETTING BREAKFAST IN THE CANOE TARP CAMP
  READY TO GO OVERBOARD AGAIN
  THE Varmint UNDER FULL SAIL
  STEM AND STERN CONSTRUCTION, Waterat IV


  THE Waterat IV WITH SAILS AND COCKPIT TENT

  PART II:
  CHAPTER III


  STEM AND STERN CONSTRUCTION, Waterat IV


  FRAME PLAN
  (SIDE) RIBBANDS
  DECK FRAMING
  (BOW) BODY VIEW
  AFTER STRETCHING CANVAS
  ROUNDING THE MARK
  SAIL PLAN
  THE Varmint UNDER AN ASH BREEZE

PART III:
CHAPTERS I, II
(Not online here)


A HUSKY LAUNCH FOR BAYS OR LARGE LAKES
THE HUNTING CABIN LAUNCH
A DEEP SEA MOTOR CRUISER
THE AUTHOR'S DEEP-SEA CRUISER Go-Sum
THE AUTHOR'S LAKE LAUNCH Adelaide
SOME FITTINGS THE MARINE LAW REQUIRES
A GOOD DESIGN OF YACHT COMPASS
THE VIKING TYPE OF ANCHOR WINDLASS
OPEN 25-FT. LAUNCH WITH HUNTING CABIN ADDED
CABIN AND DECK SECTION OF THE Go-Sum
BENDING THE PLANK FOR THE HUNTING CABIN

CHAPTERS III, IV
(Not online here)


CABIN PLAN AND ELEVATION OF THE Go-Sum
CABIN PLAN OF A LARGE OCEAN-GOING CRUISER
ELEVATION OF GALLEY AND TOILET ROOM
DETAILS OF CABIN CONSTRUCTION ON THE Go-Sum
A HOME-MADE FORCE PUMP
ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS FOR JUMP SPARK IGNITION

PART IV:
CHAPTERS V, VI, VII, VIII
(Not online here)


CRANK PISTON AND ENGINE BED
A FOUR-HORSE GRAY 2-CYCLE
COMPRESSION IN 2-CYCLE ENGINE
3-1/2 H.P. FERRO 2-CYCLE ENGINE
GALLEY AND TOILET ROOM PLAN OF THE Go-Sum
CAN, CORK AND BARREL BUOYS
ANCHOR BITT AND CAPSTAN, COMBINED
MUSHROOM MOORING ANCHOR
MOORING TACKLE

CHAPTERS IX, X
(Not online here)


OVERBOARD WITH A PAIR OF SHEARS
CRADLE AND WAYS FOR HAULING OUT
DETAILS OF HAULING-OUT WAYS
THE FIRST DAY'S WORK ON THE Go-Sum
FINISHING THE PLANKING
PLANKING THE Go-Sum

© 2002 Craig O'Donnell
May not be reproduced without my permission.


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