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Lanier Family History

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            The majority of the following history is taken from the book "Lanier" by Louise Ingersoll. This book can be found in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, numbered 929.273 L272i. The microfilm of this book can also be found in the Family History Library, film #0982362. It contains much more information than I have included here. I've mostly just included my direct ancestors, plus a few interesting side lines.
            The (*) starred children indicate a biography further in the history, in numerical order.

            This Coat of Arms is of the Crusading origin. The cross of squares is called an "honorable ordinary" and is one of the symbols of nobility. The cross is also a Crusading emblem, each square denoting a year spent upon the Crusades by the ancestor. The bordure is another honorable ordinary and an additional mark of nobility. The falcon is a heraldic pun, called a "cantling" and is a play upon the name. The lion, the symbol of bravery, is taken from the family residence. It is the Lion of Gascony. In the arms, blue is the color of truth, silver of loyalty, and gold of strength and purity.

             The name of Lanier is derived from the ancient French tongue and means a “Falcon”. So far as written records show, the family is of French descent, and is from the province of Gascony in southern France; however, older records show a Tuscany family in northern Italy of the same name, and several genealogists claim that the family moved from Tuscany to Gascony after the Crusades.
           
The records of the Huguenot Society of London show a John Lanye living in County Surry in 1547; a record of 1 July 1544 gives a John Lanye, laborer, born Normandy, age 50 years, in England 30 years, married an English woman, six children; and a Nicholas Laneares in London in 1550, a denizen.
           
John Lanyer, a musician, arrived in London in 1561 with his wife Joan, and two children; and Nicholas Lanier arrived from Paris in 1561. Both were musicians to the Queen.
           
The Laniers were Protestants who left France to escape the early persecutions. Protestantism began in 1555, and the height of the persecutions was reached in the massacre of St. Bartholomew on the eve of August 24, 1572. It was in 1560 that the conspiracy began. One party hoped to enrich themselves by the estates of the heretics who were executed, or banished. The other party hoped to gain the favor of the masses by punishing the Protestants. The estates of those who fled were sold, their children who remained behind were exposed to the greatest sufferings. France lost thousands of useful and rich inhabitants whose industry, wealth, and skills found a welcome reception in foreign countries. To prevent the emigration of the Protestants, the frontiers were guarded with the utmost vigilance; yet more than 500,000 fled to England, Holland, Switzerland, and Germany.
           
The Laniers were Huguenots to London, and are well recorded in the books of the Huguenot Society of London, but could not be called Huguenots to America, having been naturalized Englishmen for three generations. However, their descendants are eligible to join the Huguenot Society.
           
There were two Laniers who fled France at the same time, in 1561, both settling in the Parish of St. Olave in London. They are John and Nicholas. It is possible they were brothers or cousins. Nicholas is the Lanier we are directly related to.
           

            JOHN LANYER, who died November 29, 1577, was referred to in 1577 as a Frenchman, and a musician, a native of Rouen, France, and an owner of property in Crutched Friars in the Parish of St. Olave, Hart Street, London.
           
On the 18th day of January 1576/77, administration of the goods of John Lanier, late of the Parish of St. Olave, Hart Street, city of London, deceased, was granted to Barbara Laniere, alias Nivelet, wife of Cardinus Nyvelet, his natural and lawful daughter, in person of her said husband. A marginal note said that “John Laniere had not any goods belonging to him in the hands of the Administratix.” The following item will explain the above: “This house, 1575, Sept. 4 burst out in a terrible fire and was consumed to the stone walls.”
           
His widow, Jane Laniere, married second, James Marcadye. There was an Inquisition dated April 18, 1577, concerning his property, in which she was named with two Lanier daughters, Mary, and Celia Brun. Two other Lanier daughters and a son were born after their arrival in London, and all died as infants; their burials are recorded in St. Olaves Parish Register. 

            NICHOLAS LANIERE  was born at Rouen, France, possibly about 1542 and was sober and honest. He served in the court of the late French king, Henry II, having been engaged to serve as messenger, and as a replacement for one Peter Guillaume, one of the Queen of France’s flute players, lately dead. Confirmation of his services under King Henry II is to be found in the lists of “Chantres et autres Jouers d’instruments” of the French King’s Chambers, which include Nicholas Lasnier for the years of 1559 and 1560.
            In 1561, the Earl of Hertford was visiting in Paris, and there met young Nicholas Laniere. He was recommended as a good flute, and also cornet, player. Nicholas came to England that year, settling in the Parish of St. Olave in London.
            Nicholas married Lucreece Bassano in London on February 13, 1571. Lucreece was christened in London on September 24, 1556, the daughter of Anthony and Elena (DeNazzi) Bassano, who were originally from Bassano del Grappa, Veneto, Italy. Perhaps Anthony Bassano was one of the Italian musicians in the Royal Orchestra. Nicholas and Lucreece had 10 children.
            Nicholas Lanier moved to East Greenwich, County Kent, where he was one of the musicians to the Court until his death in 1612. He was a very wealthy man, having extensive holdings in Blackheath, and the surrounding country. This section was south of the Thames, and about five miles east of the London Bridge. One of the many palaces was here, the Royal Hospital, and many other buildings of early importance. In early 1700, an old house was taken down. It was described as being fitted up for a theater, probably by the Laniers who were musicians and dramatists.
            Nicholas Lanier, who was in the Court of King Henry II of France, and also the Court of Queen Elizabeth, and King James of England, was the founder of the Lanier family of musicians, and the ancestor of the American Laniers. Their six sons all were musicians to the Queen and Kings; three of their four daughters married musicians. And of their grandchildren, at least eight of them became members of the Royal Orchestra, making three generations serving the Royal family musically. In 1604 Nicholas Lanier Sr. was named “Musician of the Flutes”, and after his death about 1612, his son Andrea succeeded him “for life”.
           
The will of Nicholas Lanier, Gent., was dated 28 January 1611/12, and was proved July 1612. It reads “To Lucreece my wife, all my lands, and goods; to sons John, Alphonse, Innocent, Jerome, Clement, 12 shillings; to Andrea 20 pounds if he does not have my place; my four daughters, three of whom are unmarried, I leave to the discretion of my wife Lucreece, my sole executrix.”
           
Lucreece died, and was buried in East Greenwich on January 4, 1633/4.

            Children:

*

 1.

i. 

John Lanier, b. by 1565; bur. 5 Dec 1616; m. Frances Galliardello 17 Oct 1585

*

   2.

 ii.  

Alphonse Lanier, b. abt. 1567; d. Nov 1613; m. Emelia Bassano 18 Oct 1592

*

   3.

 iii.     

Innocent Lanier, b. abt. 1569; d. 1625

*

   4. 

 iv.   

Jerome Lanier, b. abt. 1572; bur. 1 Dec 1659; m. (1) Phrisdiswith Grafton; (2) Elizabeth Williford

*

   5.

 v.

Clement Lanier, b. abt. 1580; d. abt. 1658; m. Hannah Collet Mar 1628

 

   6.

 vi.  

Andrea Lanier, b. abt. 1582; bur. 2 Nov 1660; m. Joyce Perry 23 Jun 1628

 

   7. 

vii.

Ellen Lanier, b. abt. 1584; bur. 3 Aug 1638; m. Alphonse Ferrabosco (a musician) abt. 1609

 

   8.

viii. 

Frances Lanier, b. abt. 1586; m. Thomas Foxe (a musician) 4 Feb 1618

 

   9.

 ix. 

Mary Lanier, b. abt. 1588; bur. 13 Oct 1676; unmarried

 

10.

 x. 

Katherine Lanier, b. abt. 1590; d. bef 2 Sep 1660; m. Daniel Farrand (a musician) 28 Feb 1621

 NOTE: The birth dates of Nicholas' oldest three children leave me wondering whether he had been married before he married Lucreece. It would make more sense regarding the dates, especially in light of his son John being married in 1585, only 14 years after Nicholas married Lucreece. However, there is no evidence for this supposition. Also, the birth dates of Nicholas and Lucreece's children leave some question, as the majority would have been in their late 30's when they married, which was not common for a first marriage.

1.

            JOHN LANIER, first son of Nicholas Lanier, was born by 1565. He was a flutist. On October 17, 1585 at the Holy Minories, London, England he married Frances Galliardello. She was baptized November 4, 1566 at the Holy Minories, daughter of Mark Anthony and Margerie Galliardello. Mark Anthony Galliardello was a native of Venice, Italy. He became of the Queen’s musicians, having been sent for by King Henry VIII.
           
Sometime before 1610, John and Frances Lanier had moved to Camberwell, County Surry, probably to be near Frances’ mother, as Margerie Galliardello died there in February 1610/11, her will being dated February 15, 1610 and proved March 9, 1610/11. In the will she names a son Caesar, and her daughter Frances Lanier, wife of John Lanier, one of his Majesties’ Musicians. Her husband, Mark Anthony Galliardello had died in 1585, and the Register of the Holy Minories says of him, “Mr. Mark Anthony Galliardello, a Musician and servant to ye Queen’s Majestie, was buried in good name and fame and most godly respect of all his neighbors, ye 17 June 1585”.
           
They were still living in Camberwell when John Lanier made his will November 21, 1616, which was proved there on December 21, 1616 in the Archdeaconry Court of Surry. The Parish Register of St. Giles church, Camberwell, recorded his burial as “the 5th day of December 1616”. He would have been about 51 years old.
           
His will names his wife Frances, sons Mark Anthony (2nd), John, and Francis; two daughters, Lucretia and Elizabeth, both being due by bond from his son Nicholas Lanier Gent. at their ages of 18; his daughter Judith, wife of Edward Norgate. He requests that he be buried in the Chancel of Camberwell Church “near my mother-in-law, Mrs. Mark Anthony Galliardello”. He leaves to his wife a messuage (which means a dwelling house and adjoining lands including adjacent buildings) and tenement called Suttie Campes, County Cambridge, for life.
           
Children:

 

11. 

  i. 

Mark Anthony Lanier, bapt. 26 Aug 1587; d. 26 Aug 1587.

*

12.

 ii.  

Nicholas Lanier, bapt. 10 Sep 1588; d. 1665/6; m. Elizabeth

 

13.

iii.

Judith Lanier, bapt. 20 Dec 1590; m. Edward Norgate

 

14.

iv.

Mark Anthony Lanier (2nd), b. abt 1592; d. 1660; m. Judith

*

15. 

v.

John Lanier, b. abt 1594;  m. Eleanor

 

16.

vi.

Francis Lanier, b. abt 1596

 

17.

vii.

Lucretia Lanier

 

18.

viii.

Elizabeth Lanier

 2.

            ALPHONSE LANIER, second son of Nicholas and Lucreece Lanier, was a musician, called an instrumentalist. He was also a Captain in the Irish Service. He died November 1613, leaving his wife Emelia (Bassano), who was buried April 3, 1645 at St. James Church, Clerkenwell. Their son, Henry Lanier, was a flutist, having been trained by his uncle Andrea.

 3.

            INNOCENT LANIER, third son of Nicholas and Lucreece Lanier, was a musician. He never married. He was a Gentleman of the King’s Chamber. He died early 1625.

 4.

            JEROME LANIER, fourth son of Nicholas and Lucreece Lanier, was a musician on the sackbut, which was similar to a trombone. He was also an artist of great ability in sketching and painting, as well as in carving many beautiful objects from sardonyx, one of which was a very delicate and fine likeness of the Queen.
            Jerome Lanier married, first, Phrisdiswith Grafton on December 20, 1610. She was the daughter of William Grafton of Lee, County Kent. They had four children. Phrisdiswith was buried November 30, 1625 in East Greenwich.
            Children:

19.

i.

Ellyn, bapt. 25 Dec 1615; d. 26 Dec 1615. At her burial that same day, “1 shilling for 4 hours Knell” was paid to have a bell slowly rung for 4 hours mourning her death.

20.

ii.

William, a musician

21.

iii.

Nicholas, died young

22.

iv.

Bridget

 Jerome married, second, Elizabeth Williford on January 10, 1627 at St. Margaret’s, Westminster. They had nine children who were all registered in the Parish of St. Alphege, East Greenwich.
            Jerome Lanier was buried December 1, 1659, and his wife, Elizabeth, was buried November 23, 1661. Both were buried in East Greenwich.
            Children:

23.

 i. 

Endymion Lanier

24.

  ii.

Elizabeth Lanier, m. Thomas Slade

25.

  iii.

Jerome, died in infancy

26.

iv.

Arundel, died age 2 months

27.

v.

Phrisdiswith, m. Richard Whinyard

28.

vi.

Katherine, m. Bernard Barrancleve

29.

vii.

Amphilis, m. Mr. Seagler

30.

viii.

Frances, m. Mr. Meacham

31.

ix.

Ann, died young

5.

CLEMENT LANIER, fifth son of Nicholas and Lucreece Lanier, was a musician on the recorder, which was a type of flute. He was also a Gentleman of the King’s Chamber. In March 1628 at St. Margarets, Lee, he married Hannah Collet. They had 11 children, some whose baptisms were registered in a very old book of Greenwich and Lewisham. After 1637 other children’s baptisms were recorded in the Parish of St. Alphege, and three baptism dates are missing, those of John, Elizabeth and Charles.
           
It is from Clement Lanier and Hannah his wife that the Laniers of Virginia, and the Barbados descend. In his will of February 1658/9, Clement leaves to his oldest daughter, Hannah, his house and 40 pounds. Money was left outright to Nicholas, Lionel, William and Frances, and also to Elizabeth and Susanna when they became of age or married. The will of Clement names Susanna and Elizabeth as not being of age in 1658, which would make them born after 1638; however, the baptism of Susanna is given as June 10, 1633. Children Lucretia and Charles were dead. But to John and Robert, who had already left home, he left money “when they shall come to demand the same of my Executrix”.
            Hannah’s burial was recorded at St. Alphege as December 22, 1653. Clement Lanier was buried November 6, 1661, both in East Greenwich. His will, proved December 3, 1661 was registered 20 May 1662.
            Children:

 

32.

i.

Hannah Lanier, m. Thomas Swetnam 16 Nov 1665

*

33.

ii.

John Lanier, b. abt Oct 1631; m. Lucreece

 

34.

iii.

Susanna Lanier, bapt. 10 Jun 1633

 

35.

iv.

William Lanier

 

36.

v.

Frances Lanier

 

37.

vi.

Elizabeth Lanier

 

38.

vii.

Nicholas Lanier

 

39.

viii.

Charles Lanier, d. 14 Jan 1651

 

40.

ix.

Lucretia Lanier, d. bef 1658

 

41.

x.

Robert Lanier, bapt. 22 May 1642

 

42.

xi.

Lionel Lanier, bapt. 17 Feb 1643/4; bur. 19 Sep 1665

12.

            NICHOLAS LANIER, son of John and Frances (Galliardello) Lanier, was baptized on September 10, 1588. He was a musician of great talent and was very versatile, being a flutist, composer, painter, etcher, and a connoisseur of art.
           
On July 11, 1626, he was appointed by King Charles I as “Master of the King’s Music”, with a pension of 200 pounds a year. He composed the music for many of Ben Johnson’s Masques, the best known being “Lovers Made Men” for which he not only painted the scenery, but also sang in it. This was given at Lord Hayes house on February 22, 1617. Pepys said of Nicholas, “His music puts me in an ecstasy”.
           
In addition, in 1625, Nicholas Lanier was sent abroad by the King to purchase paintings, statues, and fine works of art. The State Papers of that time record many passes given to him to travel between England, Flanders, and Italy. After the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1642, he had the mortification of seeing the King’s wonderful collection of art which he had done so much to form, dispersed by auction. Many of the paintings were bought by various Laniers who had been in the Royal Service. Nicholas Lanier purchased four paintings at 250 pounds, one being his own portrait by Van Dyck (To view the painting, visit this web-site: http://cgfa.kelloggcreek.com/dyck/p-dyck22.htm). His uncles, Jerome and Clement Lanier, were also purchasers.
           
During the Civil War, the fortunes of the Laniers, and others loyal to the Crown, declined. They lost their appointments (and King Charles I lost his head), suffered privation, even starvation, and often imprisonment. From “Annals of English Court Music” by Willibald Nagel, 1863, page 46, he states, “In 1655, about 50 of those formerly in the service of King Charles prepared a petition, after they had tried all other means in vain, to get bread for themselves and their families, hoping to arouse pity for their plight. They only decided to take this last step after a number of their kin died of starvation.” And from the same book and page we read, “Thomas Lanier (son of Andrea, and grandson of Nicholas Sr.) petitioned King Charles II to be restored to his third post which had been guaranteed him, and also his father, who had been jailed in 1643; they had given their all in the King’s cause.”
           
Nicholas Lanier, Master of the King’s Music, followed the Stuarts into exile on the continent, where his wife joined him in June 1651, having received a pass from the Government for herself and two servants. When Charles II came to the throne in 1660, he restored Nicholas Lanier to his former high position. In 1636 King Charles I had incorporated the musicians under a charter as “Cominalty of Arts and Science of Musicke” in Westminster. King Charles II renewed the charter, and Nicholas Lanier was again the First Marshall.
           
Nicholas Lanier died February 1665/6. The Parish register of St. Alphege, East Greenwich, records his burial as 24th February, Mr. Nicholas Lanier buried away” (i.e. elsewhere). His will names wife Elizabeth, brother John Lanier’s son (later Sir John), and his sister; Sister Dunne and her son and three daughters, and a niece Elizabeth Atkins and her brother and sister.
           
The large portrait of Nicholas Lanier painted by Van Dyck in Genoa, Italy, in 1632 while Lanier was on one of his trips abroad, was responsible for the King urging Van Dyck to go to London. This portrait was among the Art Treasures from the Vienna Collections which toured the United States after World War II. It hangs permanently in the Kunsthistoriches Museum in Vienna. The charcoal sketch of this hangs in the National Gallery of Scotland in Edinburgh. Another portrait of him, painted about 1625 by Jan Liven, was finely engraved by Lucas Voersterman; and his own self portrait hangs in the Examination School at Oxford, England. 

15.

            JOHN LANIER, son of John and Frances (Galliardello) Lanier, was probably born about 1594. He was a musician. He married Eleanor. They were the parents of Frances, Elizabeth, and John, who was knighted by King William about 1688.
           
John and Eleanor lived in Cripplegate, London and in 1625 were affiliated with St. Giles Church there, being buried in its churchyard. However, due to the bombings of World War II, their tombstones were completely destroyed.

           
Children:

 

43.

i.

Frances Lanier, m. Thomas Hubbard

 

44.

ii.

Elizabeth Lanier

 

45.

iii.

John Lanier, d. 29 Aug 1692;

 21.

            JOHN LANIER, son of John and Eleanor Lanier, was a professional soldier, and spent most of his time on the continent. He distinguished himself in a troop of English Auxiliaries in France, and lost an eye at that time. He succeeded Sir Thomas Morgan as Governor of the Isle of Jersey, and was then knighted by King William about 1688. In 1690 he was in Ireland where he led his troops to victory in the Battle of the Boyne. Macauley, in his “History of England”, writes of Sir John’s bravery and success in battle. In 1692 King William III appointed him one of his generals of horse in Flanders, where he was badly wounded on August 3, 1692 at the battle of Steenkirk. He died only a few weeks later on August 29, 1692. He is buried “beside his Lady, inside the Communion Rail” at St. Anne’s church, Soho, London. His Lady was buried September 18, 1691.
           
Unfortunately, St. Anne’s Church was almost completely destroyed in the last war. The façade with square tower is standing, and the right wall is standing, but is in gaping holes. Where Sir John and his Lady were resting is now a parking lot.
           
John’s will names nieces and nephews (a cousin Thomas Lanier, son of Andrea), but no children. This refutes a tradition in print that the Virginia Laniers descended from Sir John, as he obviously didn’t have any children. The will was dated 1 April 1692 and proved 4 October 1692. 

33.

            JOHN LANIER, son of Clement and Hannah (Collet) Lanier, has been estimated to have been born about October 1631 in Lewisham, England, but there is no record. John married Lucreece in England before moving to Virginia: in one of the fragments of Charles City County Records (many records having been destroyed), it shows that John and Lucreece Lanier were transported by Howell Pryce, who received his patent in April 1657, for transporting 47 persons, for which he received 2350 acres of land. Sometimes it was several years before these patents were recorded, in some cases as much as 18 years, so the Laniers were in Virginia by 1656 at the latest.
           
No records have been found in London or East Greenwich of the marriage of John to Lucreece, or the birth of their oldest son, John, Jr., whose birth about 1655 is as yet unknown as to whether he was born in England or Virginia. With the loss of the Charles City County, Virginia records, no answer can ever be found there.
           
John and Lucreece Lanier were not the first Laniers in Virginia. Before 1638 Mark Lanier had been transported by Lieut. Francis Mason to Norfolk, Virginia. In May 1641, Marke Laneere, in testifying for Tristam Mason, deposed that he was 24 years old, making him born about 1617. The record of his baptism has not been found in or around London, but with the name of Mark, he could only be the grandson of John and Frances (Galliardello) Lanier, and the son of Mark Anthony Lanier living in Stepney, London before 1660. Mark Anthony Lanier died in Stepney 1660.
           
John and Lucreece Lanier lived in Charles City County, on the south side of the James River. Most of the records of the county have been lost, but a few fragments remain. The second mention of them is an inquest held in the Court of William Bird, to investigate the death of their infant daughter, Katherine, who was strangled in her bed “on a hot May day”. The verdict was returned June 6, 1665.
           
The next record of John Lanier is in 1676, when he and John Woodlief were sent by the men of Charles City to see Governor Berkeley about getting some help in defense against Indian raids. The Governor refused their request for aid, and called them “fools and loggerheads”. He also claimed, with some justice, that western Virginians killed both friendly and hostile Indians, precipitating the Indians to attack. As a result, a man named Nathaniel Bacon was asked by the colonists to lead a force against the Indians, which was successful. After doing so, he and his followers unsuccessfully urged the governor to make reforms in colonial policies. Governor Berkeley called Bacon a rebel, and Bacon and his followers (of which John Lanier was one) returned and burned Jamestown. Bacon’s Rebellion, as this was known, led to the removal of the governor and to colonial reforms, although some historians dispute many of the charges against Berkeley.
           
With regards to the above-mentioned episodes, John Lanier, Sr. was then 45 years of age. From a manuscript in the Library of Congress, written by “T.M.” (Thomas Matthews) 20 years after the Rebellion when he was at least 60 – 70 years old, he said that (during the rebellion) “he was too old (being about age 40-50) to camp out at Jordan’s Point, and that was left to the young men”. He also wrote that Nathaniel Bacon was not yet 30 and was in command of the group. This seems to show that there could have been two John Laniers involved in the Rebellion; an older one with sufficient dignity and authority to represent the people of Charles City to the Governor, and a younger one of 22 years (perhaps his son) who joined the fighting forces of Nathaniel Bacon.
           
Children:

*

46.

i.

John Lanier, b. abt 1655; d. 1719; m. (1) ?; (2) Mrs. Sarah Edmunds

 

47.

ii.

Katherine, d. 1665, strangled in her bed “on a hot May day” as an infant

 46.

            JOHN LANIER, Jr., son of John and Lucreece Lanier, was born about 1655, probably in England. He married an unknown woman about 1677 in Charles City County, Virginia.
           
Children:

 

48.

i.

Robert Lanier, b. abt 1678; m. Priscilla Washington

 

49.

ii.

John Lanier, b. abt 1680; m. Elizabeth Bird

*

50.

iii.

Sampson Lanier, b. abt 1682; m. Elizabeth Washington

             About 1685 John Lanier married, second, Mrs. Sarah Edmunds, the widow of William Edmunds.
           
Children:

51.

i.

Sarah Lanier, b. abt 1686; m. George Brewer

52.

ii.

Nicholas Lanier, b. abt 1690; m. Mary Shepherd

             In 1683 he and Peter Wyche patented 1482 acres in Charles City County for transporting 30 persons. When Prince George County was formed in 1702, this land was then in the new county, where John Lanier was listed on the Quit Rent Rolls of 1704 as having 700 acres. This land lays a few miles west of Garysville, and southeast of Hopewell, Prince George County, Virginia.
           
John Lanier lived all of his life in what is now Prince George County, and died there about 1719. His will was dated January 5, 1717, and probated April 14, 1719 in Prince George County. He names son Robert, son John, and son Sampson, giving them each a few shillings. To his daughter Sarah Brewer he leaves a cow or heifer of three years old, to his grandson John, “son of my son Nicholas Lanier”, he leaves a long list of various articles, a few of which were a gun, a chest, and rugs. To his son Nicholas he leaves the land on which he lives, all his land on the Otterdams, all his movables and immovables.”

 50.

            SAMPSON LANIER, son of John Lanier, Jr., was born in Charles City County, Virginia about 1682 (by deposition made in Surry County, Virginia, March 21, 1738). He first appears in contemporary records as a "Tithable" in the upper end of Surry County above Stony Run in 1701. He was married some time around 1706 in Surry County to Elizabeth Washington, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth (Jordan) Washington. She was born about 1683 in Surry County, Virginia.
           
Richard Washington's will, dated November 9, 1724, leaves 200 acres of land to his daughter Elizabeth Lanier, "land where she now lives"; he leaves to his son-in-law, Sampson Lanier, 200 acres lying in the Isle of Wight. On March 23, 1732, Sampson Lanier sold the above 200 acres to the Vestry of Nottingham Parish, now Southampton County. On February 19, 1734, Sampson and Elizabeth Lanier sold the 200 acres of land given her by her father, and before 1740 they had moved to Brunswick County, Virginia. Sampson was a Justice, a Vestryman of St. Andrews, and at one time he was on the school board.
           
Sampson Lanier died about May 15, 1743 in Brunswick County, Virginia. Elizabeth died about 1773 in Pitt County, North Carolina.
           
Children:

 

53.

i.

THOMAS LANIER, b abt. 1707; d. Sep-Nov 1745; m. Ann Maclin

 

54.

 ii.

ARTHUR LANIER, b. abt. 1709; d. 1725/1726

 

55.

iii.

SAMPSON LANIER, b. abt. 1712; d. Sep 1757; m. Elizabeth Chamberlain

 

56.

iv.

RICHARD LANIER, b. abt. 1715; d. 1780/81; m. Lucy Briggs

 

57.

v.

ELIZABETH LANIER, b. abt. 1719; d. 1795; m. John Burch

*

58.

vi.

LEMUEL LANIER, b. abt. 1722; d. Mar 1786; m. Mary (Molly) Peebles

 

59.

vii.

JAMES LANIER

 58.

            LEMUEL LANIER, son of Sampson and Elizabeth (Washington) Lanier, was born about 1722 (sixth child as listed in his father's will) in Surry County, Virginia. He was married in Brunswick County, Virginia about 1746 to Mary (Molly) Peebles. She was born about 1726, the daughter of Jehu and Mary Peebles.. She died before 1761, leaving three children.
           
Children:

 

60.

i.

DAVID PEEBLES, b. abt. 1747; d. bef. 12 Mar 1806; m. Mary Hicks

 

61.

 ii.

MOLLY PEEBLES, b. abt 1750; m. John King

*

62.

iii.

SALLY LANIER, b. abt 1753; d. aft. 27 Apr 1807; m. Garrett Williams

             Lemuel married second in 1761, Elizabeth. She was born about 1746. Lemuel and Elizabeth had three children.
            In April 1772, Lemuel bought land in the newly formed county of Pittsylvania, and in 1777, that section became part of Henry County, Virginia. Lemuel was a man of wealth and station, owning many slaves.
            Lemuel's will was dated January 29, 1785 in Henry County, and was probated March 23, 1786.
            Children:

 

63.

iv.

GEORGE WASHINGTON LANIER, b. 1762; m. Elizabeth Hicks

 

64.

v.

ELIZABETH (Nancy) LANIER, b. 12 Sep 1766; d. aft. 1854; m. James Armstrong

 

65.

vi.

BENJAMIN LANIER, b. abt. 1776; d. aft 1860; m. Elizabeth

             His wife, Elizabeth, married, second, Lieutenant John France, a soldier who fought in the Revolution. She died in June 1829 at age 84. 

62.

SALLY LANIER, daughter of Lemuel and Mary (Molly) (Peebles) Lanier, was born about 1753 in Brunswick County, Virginia. She was married about 1772 to Garrett Williams. He was born about 1743 and was an officer in the Revolution, being a First Lieutenant in the infantry. He was also an Ensign in George Rogers Clark's "Illinois Regiment" from January 1, 1779 to June 4, 1780, and then was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in that same regiment from June 5, 1780 to August 1, 1782.
            Sally and Garrett had 12 children. Sally died when her youngest daughter was still a child.
            Children:

 

66.

i.

Osborn Williams, b. 10 May 1773; d. 24 Sep 1854; m. Sally Wade

 

67.

ii.

Elizabeth (Betsy) Williams, b. 1775; m. James Taylor on 29 Dec 1794; lived entire life in Virginia

 

68.

iii.

David Williams, b. 1777; m. Nancy Larrison 15 May 1804

 

69.

iv.

Lemuel Williams, b. 4 Feb 1781; d. 10 Apr 1858; m. Mary Polly Ritchey

 

70.

v.

Ephraim Williams, b. 4 Apr 1783; d. 6 Oct 1853; m. Sally Mae Hutchings

 

71.

vi.

Daniel Williams, b. abt. 1784

 

72.

vii.

John Williams, b. abt. 1786

 

73.

viii.

Polly Williams, b. abt. 1788; m. Jesse Atkinson 27 Dec 1807; lived in Tennessee

 

74.

ix.

Nancy Williams, b. abt. 1790; m. Elijah Trent; lived in Tennessee

 

75.

x.

Sarah (Sallie) Williams, b. 23 Oct 1791; d. 25 Nov 1846; m. Martin Scott

 

76.

xi.

Catherine (Kitty) Williams, b. 22 Nov 1795; d. 27 Jun 1885; m. Samuel Ritchey

 

77.

xii.

Cynthia Williams, b. 1798; d. 7 Dec 1830; m. Seth Williams 27 Sep 1815 in Cumberland County, Kentucky

             After Sally died, Garrett married, second, Winifred Lanier. She was most likely a relative of Sally's, but I haven't been able to find out how they were related. Winifred was born possibly about 1775 in Virginia. There was a marriage bond taken out on June 2, 1808. At some point, possibly around 1814, the family moved to Cumberland County, Kentucky, as many of his sons had moved there previously.
            Children:

 

78.

xiii.

Louisa Ann (or Louisana) Williams, b. 1809; m. William Brown

 

79.

xiv.

Garrett Pegram Williams, b. 1811; m. Rebecca

 

80.

xv.

James C. Williams, b. 1813; m. Sarah Simpson 7 Feb 1838

81.

xvi.

Susannah Williams, b. 1815

 

82.

xvii.

Alfred C. Williams, b. 1818

 

83.

xviii.

Benjamin M. Williams, b. 1821

            Garrett died July 25, 1824 at about age 82 in Cumberland County, Kentucky. There are many conflicting records regarding Garrett and some of his family members. I have attempted to use those that made the most logical sense, but the ones used may not be accurate. If anyone has any further documented information, please let me know.

             For further information, see the histories of the Williams and Scott families.

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