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George (1746-1813) and Margaret (McAfee) Buchanan
His ancestors and descendants

       There are several books that outline the Buchanan genealogy much more fully than I have here. Since those books are available through the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, I have only included my direct ancestors here. An asterisk (*) by a name means it is my direct ancestor and that there is a biography on that person following their parents.
           
The following is a list of the books I used in compiling this information. They are all available on microfilm from the library: 

·        “Buchanan – The Family History of James Buchanan, son of Alexander Buchanan of Pennsylvania 1702-1976” by John A. Blakemore.

·        “Buchanan and Gillespie of SW Virginia” by David B. Trimble

·        “SW Virginia Families” by David B. Trimble

·        “Buchanans of Early Augusta County, Virginia” by Paul C. Buchanan

·        “Virginia Connections” compiled by Judy B. Anderson

       It has been noted in other family histories that these Buchanans were cousins to President James Buchanan. As yet there has not been any definitive link between these families. The tie-in would have been back in Ireland or Scotland, and we don’t have any hard evidence of who that common ancestor would have been. 

Clan Buchanan

            JOHN BUCHANAN, Sr., of Scotland, possibly had 5 sons, two of which went to Ireland about 1674. It is reported in one record that his wife was named Jean. This connection is not very definite at all, and is disputed in several histories.
           
Children:

*

1. 

i. 

Alexander Buchanan, b. abt 1650; d. abt 1728; m. ? in Ireland. Came to Chester County, PA abt 1702, later moved to Augusta County, Virginia.

 

2.

ii. 

Samuel Buchanan, b. abt 1662, went to Ireland, then came to Chester County, PA abt 1702

 

3.

iii. 

William Buchanan

 

4.

   iv.

George Buchanan

 

  5.

     v.

Archibald Buchanan

  1.

            ALEXANDER BUCHANAN, b. abt 1650 in Scotland possibly to John Buchanan (above). He and his brother Samuel went to Northern Ireland about 1674. Alexander married in Northern Ireland and there had three sons we know of. On or before 1702, he and his three sons, James, Archibald and Samuel, had crossed from Ireland to Nottingham Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. He later moved to Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.
           
Alexander died somewhere about 1728 – 30.
           
Children:

*

   6.

    i.

James Buchanan, m. (1) Martha Allison; (2) Mary Reside

 

   7.

   ii.

Archibald Buchanan, m. in Pennsylvania and remained there. He is thought to have been the sheriff of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1740.

 

8. 

 iii.

Samuel Buchanan, m. Martha Edmiston. He had a number of children. They lived near the Old Providence Church in Augusta County, Virginia, then moved to the Lodi section of Washington County, Virginia, between the Middle and South Fork of the Hoston. Some descendants lived in Washington County, Virginia; others went to Tennessee and on west.

6.

            JAMES BUCHANAN, was born in Northern Ireland to Alexander Buchanan. He came with his father and two brothers to America about 1702. They settled first in Nottingham Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Later he moved to Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He married, first, Martha Allison about 1725 in Pennsylvania. She was born about 1706 in Northern Ireland, daughter of Alexander Allison. The Allisons came to America about 1720, settling for a while in Nottingham Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania.
           
James was listed as being among the very early settlers in Augusta County, Virginia, having settled in the Walker’s Creek section around 1745. He served on the Shawnee Expedition as a Sergeant. He was a Colonial Soldier. He owned a great deal of property, having acquired it several hundred acres at a time. He served as a Justice of the Peace in Augusta County, Virginia for 20 years.
           
Martha died about 1740 – 42 in Augusta County, Virginia.
           
Children:

 

   9.

    i.

Alexander Buchanan, b. abt 1726; d. 1798; unmarried. Served as a lieutenant in 1753/54 and as a sergeant under Capt. William Preston in the French and Indian War in 1755/56 and received land for his service. On September 26, 1786, the Wythe County Court recommended that he be appointed a justice of the peace. On May 25, 1790, it recommended he be appointed a militia lieutenant. He died in Wythe County, Virginia, leaving his property to the children of his brother, Robert.

 

10.

   ii.

Archibald Buchanan, b. abt 1728; d. wp 7 Oct 1806; m. Mrs. Agnes (Bowen) McFerrin

 

11.

 iii.

John Buchanan, b. abt 1730; m. Martha Buchanan

 

12.

 iv.

James Buchanan, b. abt 1734; d. abt 1759, killed by Indians during the French and Indian War.

 

13.

  v.

William Buchanan, b. abt 1736; d. wp 2 Sep 1805; m. Isabella Montgomery.

 

14. 

 vi.

Janet Buchanan, b. abt 1738

 

15.

vii.

Rebecca Buchanan, b. abt 1740; m. William Hall

 

16.

viii.

Robert Buchanan, b. abt 1742; d. 7 Jan 1809; m. Margaret McCutcheon

            James married, second, Mary Reside, in about 1742 in Augusta County, Virginia.
           
Children:

*

17.

    i.

George Buchanan, b. abt 1746; d. June 1813; m. Margaret McAfee.

 

18.

   ii.

David Buchanan, b. 15 Jul 1749; d. Aug 1818; m. Susannah Ware.

            James wrote a will on June 9, 1761. On March 19, 1765 James’ will was proven. It reads as follows:

  “In the name of God, Amen, I, James Buchanan of the Parish of Augusta and Colony of Virginia, farmer, being sick and weak of body but of sound disposing memory, blessed be God for his mercy and seeing it is appointed for all men to die, have made this ninth day of June, and in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and sixty. 1. I first do commit my soul to Almighty God the giver and my body to be buried in such decent manner as my executors shall cause and to what worldly goods it pleased God to bestow upon me I dispose of them in the following manner and first my will is that all my lawful debts by me contracted be hastily paid by my estate as also that all debts due me may be collected by my executor and Secondly, I give and bequeath to my son Alexander Buchanan one two-year old heifer to be paid him of my estate also my silver sleeve button. Thirdly I give and bequeath unto my son Archibald Buchanan twenty shillings current money to be paid of my estate. Fourthly I give and bequeath to my John Buchanan my blue strait coat and the jacket belonging to said coat and Fifthly I give and bequeath to my sons William and Robert Buchanan to each of them 100 acres of land I now dwell on to be surveyed off the estate and of my said tract not to take any of the new cleared grassland that is farmed to them and their heirs and assigns forever and I order my executors to make them a deed for all said land and Sixthly I give and bequeath unto my well beloved wife Marey Buchanan the house I now dwell in and the one third the new cleared land and wood land; all her life if she does not marry if she marrys I order her to clear said place and have no further claim to said land as also I give to my well beloved wife the bed I now lie on with what cloath belongs to said bed and Seventhly I give and bequeath to my sons George Buchanan and David Buchanan two hundred fifteen acres where I now dwell with all the improvements thereunto belonging that is to each of them one hundred seven acres and a half reserving their mother’s right to the one third during her life and I order my executors to make them a deed forever for said lands and Eighthly I give and bequeath unto my daughter Rebecky Buchanan two cows and two calves and one two year old and one yearling. One bed and the chair belonging to said bed also I give to my dearly beloved wife Marey Buchanan my sorrel mare. I also give unto my son George Buchanan my black horse and as to the rest of my cows and sheep I order them to be equally divided between my well beloved wife Marey Buchanan and my sons George Buchanan and David Buchanan also my sheep equally devided between the said three persons also my great pot to my wife and the rest of my household goods to be devided as my wife shall see proper and Ninthly and lastly I constitute and appoint my well beloved wife and my son Alexander to be my executors to execute this last will and testament and hereby disannul and make void all other wills and testaments made by me and do publish and declare this to be my last will and testament as witness my hand and seal the day and year above written.

Signed James Buchanan.

Signed, sealed and delivered to us Daniel Harmon, James McCown and William Scott.”

17.

            GEORGE BUCHANAN, son of James and Mary (Reside) Buchanan, was born about 1746 in Augusta County, Virginia. He married Margaret McAfee about 1767, daughter of James and Jane (McMichael) McAfee. She was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania about 1746. (For further information on the McAfee family, see the History on the McAfee's).
           
On June 10, 1770, he bought 163 acres on Catawba Creek in Botetourt County, Virginia from his father-in-law, James McAfee. George sold the land back to James McAfee on May 15, 1772. He later moved to what is now Washington County, Virginia.

            In his father's will, which was proved in 1765, he had received 107 acres of a parcel of land on Walker's Creek in Augusta. In November of 1782, while living in Washington County, he and his brothers, who had also received parcels of the same property on Walker's Creek, deeded that land to their brother David, which amounted to 415 acres.
            About 1782 George and Margaret moved  their family to Salt River in Mercer County, Kentucky. On July 11, 1794, he gave a power of attorney to Arthur Campbell to receive a deed from James Wood for 200 acres on Cedar Creek in Washington County, Virginia, receiving the deed from Mary Wood on November 10, 1794.
            George died in May 5, 1813 in Mercer County, Kentucky. We don't have a death date for his wife, Margaret.
            Children:

 

19.

    i.

James Buchanan, b. abt 1766; d. 1838; m. (1) Rebecca Armstrong

 

20.

   ii.

John Buchanan, b. 17 May 1768; m. Margaret Guant

 

21.

 iii.

Alexander Buchanan, b. 1769; d. 1806; m. Nancy McAfee

 

22.

 iv.

George Buchanan, b. 16 Oct 1771

*

23.

  v.

Mary (Polly) Buchanan, b. 4 Oct 1773; d. 27 Jul 1847; m. William Provine (aka Purviance)

 

24.

 vi.

Janet Buchanan, b. Abt 1775; m. James McCampbell

 

25.

vii.

Margaret Buchanan, b. abt 1777; m. William Ewing

 

26.

viii.

Nancy Buchanan, b. abt 1779; m. Thomas Gilkerson

 

27.

  ix.

Anne Buchanan, b. abt 1781; m. Joseph Woods

 

28.

   x.

Dorcas Buchanan, b. abt 1783; m Joseph Woods (different than above Joseph)

 

29.

  xi.

William Buchanan, b. abt 1785; d. 1830

23.

MARY (Polly) BUCHANAN, daughter of George  and Margaret (McAfee ) Buchanan, was born on October 4, 1773 in Botetourt County, Virginia. She moved with her family to Washington County, Virginia.
            About 1782, when she was 9, her family moved to the Salt River in Mercer County, Kentucky where she grew up. On July 30, 1801, at about age 27, in Mercer County, Kentucky, she was united in marriage to William Provine (or Purviance as it is noted in their marriage record). He was the son of John and Mary (Mitchell) Provine and was born either in Virginia, or North Carolina, about 1773, the exact date we do not know. He came with his father’s family to Kentucky in 1789, and with them settled in Madison County, in what was known as the Paint Lick neighborhood (now in Garrard County).
            William and Mary Polly Provine were land owners in Madison County, Kentucky, and the old records of the court at Lancaster preserve a number of transfers between William Provine and others. We find one dated March 31, 1806, in which “William Purvance and Mary his wife transfer 193 acres of land to Samuel Reed for $1447.50.” We note in the records that the name of William Provine was spelled once “Purvance” and once “Provence” (that is, by the clerk) but when they affixed their own signatures they spelled their name “Provine”.
           
When Indiana Territory was opened for settlement, it was not long before William Provine
and his wife Mary, along with his mother and two sisters, made their way across the Ohio and entered those lands about 1807, where William was a county surveyor.

           
They settled in what is known as Clark County, Indiana, some twelve or fifteen miles northeast of the town of Jeffersonville. The exact location of their land was on Tract No. 198 of the grant, on the waters of Fourteen Mile Creek, and is embraced in the boundaries of the present township of Washington.
           
They were one of the early pioneer settlers of this county, and are mentioned a number of times in the history of Clark County, known as  “Ohio Falls Cities and Counties.”

           
In 1808, just below the junction of the East and West Forks of Fourteen Mile Creek, William erected a grist mill; he made the dam of brush, afterwards adding an overshot carding machine. The mill stood on the right bank of the creek. It afterwards passed into the hands of the Walker family, hence the site is known as Walker’s Mill.
           
The first wagon road in the township was from the town of Westport on the Ohio River to Provine’s Mill. As a result his mill  was the neighborhood Post Office from 1808 to 1817, at which time it was moved to the new village of New Washington.

           
So troublesome did the Indians become, and so fearful was the attack at Pigeon Roost in Clark County in 1812, that for safety, William Provine
erected for his family a blockhouse fort. Soon afterwards, however, the Indian troubles ceased. In 1812 he entered the army in its defense against England, but was twice relieved from active duty in order that he might, by working his grist mill, provide food for the soldiers. It was believed by the army that he could best serve his country in this way, as his mill at that time was perhaps the only one north of the Ohio River, and west of Cincinnati.
           
On October 9, 1815, William and Mary (Buchanan) Provine
were called upon to mourn the death of their firstborn, Peggy, who died at the age of 13. And a few days later, on October 16, 1815, William Provine, himself, died, at the age of 42. The father and child were both buried in the newly opened graveyard in the neighborhood, now for long years known as the Walker graveyard. This burying place was originally laid off in the midst of a dense beech woods, and the two Provine graves are supposed to be among the first by which the spot was consecrated.

           
His wife, Mary (Buchanan) Provine, died in Clark County, Indiana on July 27, 1847.
           
Children:

30.

    i.

PEGGY PROVINE , b. 17 Sep 1802; d. 9 Oct 1815.

31.

   ii.

JOHN G. PROVINE , b. 8 Sep 1804; d. 19 Oct 1821.

32.

 iii.

ALEXANDER B. PROVINE , b. 7 Nov 1806; d. 3 May 1853; m. (1) Sallie Walker ; (2) Jane Anderson .

33.

 iv.

SALEM FINDLEY PROVINE , b. 3 Feb 1809; d. 1 Oct 1831; unmarried.

34.

  v.

MARY POLLY PROVINE , b. 12 Feb 1811; d. 14 Mar 1888; m. WilliamCampbell Walker .

35.

 vi.

GEORGE W. PROVINE , b. 5 May 1813; d. 11 Apr 1898; m. Mary McClarry

36.

vii.

WILLIAM PROVINE , b. 23 May 1816; d. 24 Apr 1903; m. Paulina Scott .

              For further information on this Provine family and their descendants, see “John Provine Family History”.

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