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[NI0001] Nickname "Cactus Joe from Idaho"

Ivan graduated from Sullivan Public High School in Sullivan, Missouri in 1945. He enlisted in the Army for about a year and was sent overseas to Germany for most of that time. He married Helen in 1946, shortly before he went overseas. When he returned, he and Helen moved to Dallas, Texas.

Ivan attended Draughon's College in Dallas where he studied accounting and business management. His first job was with Excel Products as Office Manager. He worked for Howard Van Lines, and it was there that he met Woodie Jarmon who owned a van lines in Wichita Falls, Texas, and he hired Ivan to move there and work for him as Office Manager.

Several years later, when the Jarmon brothers started using van lines money to put into oil well ventures, the company began losing money and Ivan resigned from Jarmons. He moved his family to Mobile, Alabama where they stayed for three months and then returned to Texas - to the Dallas area. After eight months, Ivan and Helen moved to Los Angeles, California and stayed about five years. They then moved from Los Angeles to Tampa, Florida.

Ivan worked for Yocam Batteries in Tampa, and they transferred him to Jacksonville as Regional Manager of their branch office in Jacksonville. Ivan left Yocam to work as Controller for Montgomery Ward in Jacksonville. Later, they transferred him to Tallahassee where they were opening a new store.

Ivan and Helen left Florida the end of February of 1972 and moved to San Diego, California. Ivan first worked as Controller for Montgomery Ward in San Bernardino where they were opening a new store. Then, he worked for a Health Food Store in La Jolla. Later, he worked for El Poco Candle and Gift Shoppes. When Mr. Smith died, he started working for Ponto Corp. in Carlsbad. He was Vice-President of Finance at both Ponto and El Poco.

Ivan had open-heart surgery for replacement of a heart valve in 1989, and then retired a year later, in 1990. He continued to work for short periods as a Consultant for Gary Randall with Ponto Corp up until his death on January 1, 1997.

Personal observations on places he lived:
Kansas City, Missouri- It rained 22 days in a row which brought about a sudden departure. Bought a 1934 Pontiac to make the drive to Dallas. Paid $150 down and financed the balance of $200. The car used 26 quarts of oil on the trip.
Dallas Texas- The cleanest city I ever lived.
Wichita Falls, Texas-Arrived in august of 1953 and saw the first rain August of 1953. The dust was so thick, the prairie dogs dug holes 20 feet in the air.
Mobile, Alabama- Best fishing in my life.
Los Angeles, California-Liked the weather, but did not like the people who lived there.
Tampa and Jacksonville, Florida-Not much difference between the two; Ninety degrees in the shade and 99% humidity. Summer rains every day and winter rains every other day. Grew web feet after 13 years.
San Diego, California- Chamber of Commerce City- Perfect everything. America's best kept secret.

San Diego union Tribune, January 4, 1997
EVILSIZER, Ivan P passed away January 1, 1997. Survived by wife Helen M, daughter Sandra J Koscak, son Ivan C "Chuck" Evilsizer, grandfather of Laura J and Tyler J Evilsizer, brother of Charles Evilsizer. Private family interment, Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery


[NI0007] Stephen and Elmina lived in Princeton, Kentucky until about 1920 when they moved to Herrin, Illinois where Stephen had a house built for his family. Their son, Bartus, had died at age two and their daughter, Ruby, was eighteen months old.

Stephen worked in the coal mines and with the railroad. While working with the railroad, he was seriously injured.

Stephen and Elmina left Herrin in 1933 and moved to Missouri where they bought a farm on the outskirts of the town of Sullivan where Stephen became a farmer.

When Stephen died, at age 57, he was buried in the graveyard in Sullivan, Missouri.

Elmina and her brother Andrew were the only two of Benjamin Morrison Board's children by his second wife Dora who lived long lives.

After Stephen died, Elmina moved back to Princeton, Kentucky. Later, she moved to Madisonville, Kentucky. She lived to be over ninety years of age, and when she died she was buried in the Perry Graveyard in Princeton.

Barnes, Stephen
Age: 34 Year: 1920
Birthplace: Kentucky Roll: T625_418
Race: White Page: 28B
State: Illinois ED: 157
County: Williamson Image: 356
Township: Herrin




[NI0008] Elmina and her brother, Andrew, were the only two of Benjamin Morrison Board's children who lived long lives.

After Stephen died, Elmina moved back to Princeton, Kentucky to be near relatives. Later, she moved to Madisonville, Kentucky.

[NI0010] Ruby and Dorothy both left Sullivan, Missouri and went to St. Louis to attend business school after graduation from high school.

Ruby and Dorothy married brothers, the Dorrell brothers; Ruby married Ed and Dorothy married John.

Ruby and Ed lived in the St. Louis area for many years. They later moved to Eureka, Missouri, not far from St. Louis. Several years later, they moved to Cuba, Missouri.

After Ed died, Ruby sold her home and moved to Tullahoma, Tennessee to be near her son, Woodie and his family. Her daughter, Tamra, lived in Cuba, Missouri.

[NI0012] Dorothy Mae and Ruby Evalene married brothers, John and Ed Dorrell, so their children were double cousins.

Dorothy and Ruby went to St. Louis after they both graduated from High School. They attended a business school in St. Louis. They met their husbands in St. Louis, Missouri.

Dorothy and John lived first in the St. Louis area, then later in Warrenton, further out from St. Louis.

John worked as a machinist at McDonald Douglas Aircraft.

Dorothy and John's son, John Leo II, was kidnapped at one time shortly after he and his wife, Sally, were married. The kidnapper, at gunpoint, made John drive him across the country and then later had John drive him back to the St. Louis area. He did not harm John, just let him out of the car somewhere in the area. The kidnapper was eventually caught.

Their son, John, with Sally and only daughter, Kelly, later moved out of the St. Louis area further West. They have since moved to other areas, but have never returned to the St. Louis area except for visits. The two other children, Joanne and Helen, with their husbands, remained in the home area close to John and Dorothy.

Helen and her husband, Darrel, became photographers, making wedding pictures, etc. They had two boys.

Joanne and Gene had one child, Samantha Jo. Gene had a boy, Gordy, by a previous marriage, who was about ten years old when he and Joanne married. Samantha Jo won a lot of Trophies for gymnastics. At one time she planned on being in the Olympics. After Gene died, Joanne remarried.

[NI0021] Bill was in the Army all of his life. He and Rae lived in Kentucky, then Tampa, Floria. They lived a brief time in Indiana, then moved back to Tampa.

[NI0022] Benny was institutionalized for many years.
The Times Leader Princeton, Ky. Dec. 6, 2000

Benny "Teddy" Barnes, 66, formerly of Princeton, died Tuesday, Dec 5, 2000 at Western State Nursing Facility in Hopkinsville, Ky.A member of Grapevine Baptist Church in Madisonville, he was born Oct 23, 1934 in Missouri, a son of the late Stephen and Elmina Board Barnes.He was preceded in death by two sisters, Dorothy Dorrell and Edith Barnes.Survivors include two brothers, Texal Barnes and Charles E. Barnes of Louisville ; and four sisters, Helen Evilsizer of San Diego, Calif., Jeanette Escarego of Tuscon, Ariz., Ruby Dorrell of Tullahoma, Tenn., and Lillian Rae Lucius of Tampa, Fla.Graveside services will be conducted Friday, Dec. 8, at noon at Perry Cemetery in Caldwell County, Ky. with the Rev. Dean Ray officiating.Morgan's Funeral Home, Princeton in charge of arrangements.

[NI0023] The Times Leader Princeton Kentucky January 8th 2003

Charles D. Barnes, 64, of Louisville, died Friday, January 3, 2003, at the University of Louisville Hospital. In accounting and tax preparation for over 35 years, he was founder and CEO of Barnes Bookkeeping and Tax Service, Inc. He was a member of the Eagles Lodge at Lakeland, Fla., the NATP, past governor of NSA past president of the Kentucky Association of Accountants and retired from the Selective Service Board. His professional accreditations included EA, ATA, ATP and ACTA and his practice included clients from 15 states and internationally. He was co-pastor of the Kentucky Spiritualist Temple. He was preceded in death by several brothers and sisters. Survivors include his wife, Darlene B. Barnes; a son, Stephen E. Barnes; a daughter, Beverly J. Barnes; and five grandchildren, Steven Brent Barnes, Audrei Le-Anna Barnes, Charles Stephen Barnes, Gabriella Jerrianna Darlene Barnes and Stephen Jeremy Barnes. Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday, January 8th, at 11:30 a.m. at Pearson's Funeral Home, Louisville Burial rites will follow the ceremony in Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville.

Add'l Info:
Charles was a 1956 graduate of Caldwell County High School, Princeton, Ky.

01/07/2003- Barnes
Charles E. Barnes, 64, of Louisville, died Friday at University of Louisville Hospital. Founder and CEO of Barnes Bookkeeping & Tax Service, Inc., Mr. Barnes worked in accounting and tax preparation for over 35 years. He was a member of the Eagles Lodge in Lakeland, FL and the NATP, past governor of NSA, past president of the Kentucky Association of Accountants and retired from the Selective Service Board. He held the following professional accreditations: EA, ATA, ATP and ACTA. His practice included clients from 15 states and internationally. He was co-pastor of the Kentucky Spiritualist Temple and was a loving husband, father and grandfather. He was preceded in death by numerous brothers and sisters. He is survived by his loving wife, Darlene B. Barnes; a son, Stephen E. Barnes; a daughter, Beverly J. Barnes; and five grandchildren, Stephen Brent Barnes, Audrei Le-Anna Barnes, Charles Stephen Barnes, Gabrielle Jerianna Darlene Barnes and Stephen Jeremy Barnes. Funeral Services will be held at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday at Pearson's, 149 Breckenridge Ln., with burial in Cave Hill Cemetery. Visitation will be from 3-8 p.m. Monday and Tuesday.

Readers' Service Department
The Courier-Journal
(502) 582-4545 or (800) 765-4011, ext. 4545
anorris1@gannett.com

[NI0026] Father- Rusty Beau Duke
Mother Kaprikorn's Dandy Freckles

Monita was a very lovable, passive dog. She never chewed as a puppy. She was the easiest going in most situations. But she never adapted quickly to change. Moving a piece of furniture was stressfull to her. Relocating to a new home took her months of adaptation. We never thought she would live to see New Mexico when we retired, as she had slowed down so much. But she was quite a trouper. After moving to Alamogordo, she became blind and totally deaf but managed to get around by her built-in "radar". She quit barking about 3 years before her death also. She developed some skin cancer leisions that , in themselves, were not fatal, but brought down her immune system to the point of not being able to continue. Her favorite thing to do as a young dog in San Diego was to go "snail hunting" in the back yard. She would spend an hour "stalking" snails, catching them ever so carefully in her mouth and bringing them back to the porch and placing them all in a pile. Of course, while she was out looking for the next ones, they were trying to crawl away. She would then return to "corral them", then lay down and eat them one by one, CAREFULLY breaking open the shells . When she was done, only empty broken snail shells would remain. We would call her "Escargo" dog. For those having no children, our animals ARE our children. Loosing them is just as painful as loosing your child.

[NI0038] James Board was a Welshman. He came from England or Wales with his parents in 1730 when he was ten years old.

James and Jane Ann lived in Franklin Township, Bergen County, New Jersey. He managed his father's Iron Works. He served in the Revolutionary War, and was Commissioner of forfeited estates in Bergen County in 1778 and 1779. He signed an Article including an "Abjuration of the Papacy" May 23, 1755. His house was known as a welcome and hospitable stopping-place for officers and soldiers of the Continental Army.

James was given the authority to administer his father's estate in 1747 after his death in 1745 as Cornelius had appointed his son, Joseph, who was a minor at that time.




[NI0040] Philip and Mary Castleman were married in Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky. It was his second marriage.

He fought in the Revolutionary War and was in actual service in the New Jesey Militia and Rangers about three years. His services were confined to the State of New Jersey and on the North River. He was not in any genuine Battle, but was in a skirmish with the refugees in the English neighborhood. He performed three tours under Capt. Joseph Board and other tours under several other officers. While in service, Philip was stationed at Millstone, Elizabethtown, Newark, Hackensack and the English neighborhood. During part of the time the British occupied New York, he was stationed at Newark and Bergens as a guard. When the Battle of Mammoth was fought, Philip was on the march to aid, but did not arrive in time.

Phillip was a revolutionary war soldier, fighting with the New Jersey Militia. His pension application #S14979, dated 3 Sep 1832, states that he was 71 years old. He was born in Bergen Co., NJ & lived there at the time of the ARW & first called into service on Aug 20, 1776 in the New Jersey Militia..served under Capt. JOSEPH BOARD....removed to Ky from NJ 1789 & now live on the Chaplin (River) in Mercer Co. "No one could prove my services but Peter Huff & Daniel Coovert who were present at many of the places but did not then know me." An affidavit from David Board, made some time after this application (but no date is given), states: He is the son and executor of the Phillip Board estate. Peter Huff and Daniel Covert also gave affidavits stating that they had often heard Phillip speak of his service.

There was a Philip Board who was Surety for the marriage of a Thomas M. Board on September 15, 1800 in Mercer County, Kentucky to Rebecca Hart. Since this could not have been his own son, it was undoubtedly one of his relatives. Philip's own son, Thomas, was born in 1803.

There was, also, a James Board married to Martha Adams, May 21, 1805, in Mercer County, Kentucky. Philip had a son, James, who was born in 1789, but this appears to be too young a person to have married in 1805.

Philip was shown on the 1795 Tax List of Mercer County, Kentucky. At that time, he had no blacks, ten horses, and fourteen cattle. Later, he had a number of slaves as his Inventory at death shows the names of six slaves he owed.

Philip was a farmer and a lender of money. He died at the age of ninety.

When a lad of sixteen, was drafted into militia service for 3 years. After the war he joined a wagon train, taking the newly opened route through VA to KY.

[NI0041] It has not been fully determined who Mary's father was.

In the 1795 Tax List along with Philip Board, there are two Mitchells; Robert and James. Robert has no blacks, three horses, and twelve cattle. James had no blacks, four horses, and thirteen cattle.

James Mitchel, Robert Mitchel, and Edward Mitchel are listed along with Philip Board in the 1800 Mercer County, Kentucky census. In 1820 Mercer County census, only Philip and a Braxton Mitchell are listed.

There was a Jacob Mitchell listed on the Sale Bill of Philip Board, deceased, 1850. There was also a Jacob Mitchell on a Deed with Philip Board in 1814 in Mercer County.

There was a Land Grant of James P. Mitchell in 1834, Mercer County, Scrub Grass Branch.

Mary's last name was spelled Mitchler, Mitchlor, or Mitchell. She evidently died before Philip made his will because her name is not mentioned on his Will which he made in 1844.

[NI0042] Benjamin first lived in Mercer County, Kentucky. When Ben resided with his father, he worked for him overseeing the farm and the slaves. For a while he was living in Boyle County, Kentucky, probably after he had married Sarah Ann Burdette. Her parents lived in Marion County, next door to Mercer. Later, he and his half-brother, Joseph, left Mercer and removed to Caldwell County. He left Mercer after his father died in 1850, probably between 1854 and 1860. Records show that Ben's son, Robert Marion, was born in 1849 in Mercer County.

In Caldwell County Ben and Sarah lived in Princeton where he became a farmer, raising tobacco and sugar-cane and having many slaves. He and his family attended the Flat Rock Baptist Church nearby.

Ben's name was on the Mercer County, Kentucky Sale Bill of August 3, 1850 of his father, Philip, showing that he bought a Sorrel Horse for thirty-five dollars. His wife, Sarah's name was shown, too, for a Loom and Hanging.

Ben's son, Calvin, died while he was serving in the Civil War. His son, Joseph, died of smallpox shortly after coming home from service in the Civil War. He disinherited his daughter, Mary, when she married her cousin, Benny Board, who was a son of his half-brother, Joseph.

When Ben died, he was buried in the old Board Baylor family cemetery on his farm. Sarah was buried in the Pleasant Hill Cemetery.

The estrangement of Ben Board from his father dated back to the late 1840's when he resided with his father and worked for him overseeing the farm and the slaves. According to an incident described in "Evidence in regard to Phillip Board's Will" filed in the settlement of the estate of Phillip Board in the Mercer Co Courthouse, Ben was stricken from his father's will, and subsequently left- this being the last time the two were together. When ben Board left, his nephew Thomas Board took over his position; Thomas being the son of David. Thomas met a somewhat similar fate when Phillip thought the he Thomas did not comply with the contract and refused to pay the money due for the work. Thomas stated that Phillip[ considered Ben Board "ungrateful to his father" and said he would not give him anything after, said that Ben Board was a spendthrift and lazy and that he intended that it was useless to give him anymore of his money."


1880 Census Place: Farmersville, Caldwell, Kentucky
Source: FHL Film 1254406 National Archives Film T9-0406 Page 485A
B. F. BOARD Self M M W 70 KYOcc: Farmer Fa: KYMo: KY
S. A. BOARD Wife F M W 68 KY Fa: VA Mo: KY

[NI0044] Benjamin Morrison Board lived at Donaldson and Princeton, Kentucky where he was a farmer. He lived near Flatt Rock Church with his first family. Later, he gave his eldest son, Frank, land near Flatt Rock Church and built himself and Dora a new "Big House" over in Princeton. My mother said her father had owned slaves.

Ben and Becky had three children who lived. One child had died at birth and another, a girl, had died at age four. All of Ben and Dora's children died young except Uncle Andy and my mother, Elmina. Nora Mae died in infancy; Alemeda was twenty-five; Ella, fourteen; Stella, 31; Rosalie, 8; Lillian, 30; and, Mary Elizabeth, 25. Andrew and Elmina lived to be over 90 years old.

Ben's first wife, Rebecca, was called Becky. He married Dora after Becky died. Dora was an orphan girl living with the Aldridge family on a farm close by the Board farm. Mr. Aldridge took her and raised her after her mother died at childbirth when she was born. One of her brothers, Luther Nuckols, stayed close by while Dora was growing up to make sure she was okay. Luther stayed close by until she married Ben Board.
1880 Census Place: Farmersville, Caldwell, Kentucky
Source: FHL Film 1254406 National Archives Film T9-0406 Page 488D
B. F. BOARD Self M M W 33 KYOcc: Farmer Fa: KYMo: KY
R. A. BOARD Wife F M W 30 TN Fa: TN Mo: TN
B. F. BOARD Son M S W 8 KY Fa: KY Mo: TN
S. F. BOARD Dau F S W 5 KY Fa: KY Mo: TN
D. A. BOARD Dau F S W 2 KY Fa: KY Mo: TN

Ben F Board
1910 Enumeration District: 0013 Color: W
Age: 69 Birth Place: Kentucky
Visit: 0241
County: Caldwell
Relation: Husband
Relatives: Wife Dorgh 39, Kentucky
Daughter Almeda 20, Kentucky
Son Andrew 18, Kentucky
Daughter Elmina 17, Kentucky
Daughter Ella 14, Kentucky
Daughter Stella 12, Kentucky
Daughter Rosa 03, Kentucky
Daughter Mamie NR, Kentucky

[NI0045] Dora Elizabeth was an orphan girl. She was raised by Andrew Aldridge who lived on a farm near Ben Board. Her mother, Julia, had died in childbirth** when Dora was born. Her father, Caswell, kept the three boys and remarried.

Dora's brother, Luther, stayed close by while they were growing up and looked after Dora until she married Ben Board.

Twice-A-Week-Leader Princeton Kentucky December 8, 1937
A gloom of sorrow was cast over the Briarfield community, last Friday morning, December 3rd, at 6 o'clock when Mrs. Nora Board, 66, succumbed at the home of her son, with whom she had resided for the past several years.She was the daughter of the late Caswell and Julia Nuckles and was born in Marion Kentucky, February 5, 1870, remaining there until 16 years of age when she came to Caldwell County where she resided until her death. Nearly 50 years ago she was united in marriage to the late Ben M. Board. This union was blessed with nine children, five having preceded her in death. They were Mrs. Alameda Jenkins, Mrs. Estella Williamson, Eller, Rosalee and Nora Mae Board. Those left to survive are Andy Board, Mrs Mary Payne, Mrs Lillian Gray, all of the county, and Mrs Dock Barnes of Sullivan, Mo.
There are also 20 grandchildren and one great grandchild together with a host of other friends and relatives to mourn her passing. Mrs Board was a devout member of the Briarfield Baptist Church.
Funeral service was conducted at the family residence at 1 o'clock Saturday afternoon by the Rev. H. A. Egbert. Interment followed in the family lot at the Perry Cemetery, (Caldwell County, Ky.), amid an embankment of floral offerings.

[NI0047] Philip became a farmer, occupying and cultivating the soil of "the homestead" at Pompton, New Jersey. When his father had moved from Pompton, he had given Philip his farm and his undivided share of the lands he held with Bayard and Brockholls.

Philip had considerable influence among his neighbors and was their representative in the Legislature for several terms. He married one of the daughters of Isaac Kingsland from whom his father had bought the farm at Belleville.

Philip and Hester had a granddaughter named Hetty, who was the only child of their son, Casparus. Hetty had married William Colfax, who was Captain of George Washington's Life Guard. She became the grandmother of a future Vice-President of the United States, Schuyler Colfax.




[NI0048] Janneke was called Jane.

[NI0049] Arent Schuyler led a Company of Scouts into Canada in 1690. He was employed by the Governor to negotiate with the Minnesink Indians, and he was a Captain in the French and Indian War.

Arent established himself in New Jersey. He moved to New Barbados Neck in 1720 and had estates at Pompton Plains, Belleville, Burlington and Elizabethtown, New Jersey. He also had a copper mine in Bergen County.

At one time, Arent served on a committee for providing fuel and other comforts for the houses occupied by the Indians on their trading expeditions to Albany. He was one of the committee to raise funds by subscription to erect fortifications and prepare defenses against expected attacks of the enemy.

He bought a house on Pearl Street from his mother when he was getting ready to marry Janneke Teller in 1684. It was the house he was already occupying, and he continued to pursue his business as a merchant.

The Colfax-Schuyler house in Bergen County was built by Arent in 1697, and his descendents have occupied the house ever since. Six slim white Doric columns support the porch roof. The entrance had a cross-paneled "witch door" beyond which it was impossible for witches and evil spirits to penetrate.

Arent, fourth son and seventh child of Philip Pieterse Schuyler and his wife Margareta, through whom and his descendants the subject of this sketch traces his ancestry, was born in Beverwyck, June 25, 1662. An entry in the family record written in the Dutch language, translated reads thus: "1662 the 25 june is born our fourth son named Arent van Schuyler. May the Lord God let him grow up in virtue to his salvation, Amen." He began his business career as a merchant in Albany and seems early to have accumulated a competency. His public career, the records show, was a highly creditable one. He took an active part in the French and Indian wars of his day, was commissioned a captain, and soon acquired a reputation for skill and valor. He was the first man of the Dutch or English to lead a hostile force into Canada, heading a scouting party of friendly Indians in 1690, himself being the only white man. They went through the lake and down the river Sorel to Fort Chambly and under its walls they killed two and took one Frenchman prisoner. In the campaign of February, 1693, Arent Schuyler commanded a company of militia when the French and Indians were driven from the Mohawk country by Major Peter Schuyler. He was several times selected to treat with hostile tribes from his wide knowledge of the Indian character and language. Owing to his absence from home on military duties, Schuyler found his business affairs going badly in Albany, and in 1694 determined to remove to New York and resume his occupation as a merchant. Here he remained until 1702, when he took up his residence in Pompton Plains, New Jersey. He made large ventures in real estate in New Jersey, and as time went on became one of the wealthiest men of the neighborhood. He continued his residence in Pompton until 1710, when he moved to a large farm which he had purchased on the Passaic river. On this property a copper mine was discovered, which proved a source of much wealth. He was married three times, his wives being respectively, Jenneke Teller, whom he wedded in 1684, Swantie Dyckhuse in 1703, and Maria Leisler in 1724. At his death in 1730 he left a large estate, personal and real, including ample tracts of land in New Jersey and houses and lots in New York city. He was an officer in the Reformed Dutch Church of Belleville, which he assisted in organizing soon after his settlement on the Passaic, and to which he left a considerable sum in his will.
Casparus Schuyler, second son and fourth child of Arent by his first wife Jenneke Teller, was born May 5, 1695. To him his father had bequeathed five hundred acres of land at Wingworth Point on the Delaware river, within the ancient bounds of Burlington City. Here Casparus made his home and here his descendants for a hundred years lived and died, having little intercourse with the other branches of the family. In the churchyard of St. Mary's, Burlington, stands a simple stone inscribed "In Memory of Casparus Schuyler, who departed this life April 13, 1754, aged 59 years." He appears to have had only one child, a son named Arent after his grandfather.
Arent Schuyler had a son Aaron. Aaron Schuyler married for his second wife Hester Dey, daughter of Colonel Theunis Dey, of Preakness, New Jersey. Theunis Dey was a prominent figure in Revolutionary days, being a member of the Bergen county, New Jersey, Committee of Correspondence, June 25, 1774, and May 12, 1775, a member of the New Jersey Assembly, 1777-1784, colonel, Bergen County Militia, and commissioner of pardons and mustering officer under call of congress. General Washington was his intimate friend and a frequent visitor at his home in Preakness. The house, an old colonial mansion, is still standing and an object of interest in the neighborhood.

[NI0050] Phillip Schuyler came to America in 1650 on the "De Valckenier". The ship that bore him from Amsterdam to New Netherland. He had no official connection with Rensselaerswyck: He came over either as a free agent or as a West India Company Employee.

Philip Pietersen Schuyler and his brother, David, emigrated to America from Amsterdam, Holland about 1650. They had lived in Holland in "Guelderland" where they had been neighbors to the Van Rensselaer Patron. Philip and David were sons of Peter, an Amsterdam baker and his wife, Geertruyt Philips Schuylder. Philip married Margaretta, the daughter of the Resident Director of Rensselaerswyck.

Philip was a general merchant, a dealer in land and a fur trader. He was a gunstock maker, since guns were an important commodity in the fur trade business. It was of course economical to save valuable cargo space by importing only the metal portions of guns, and adding locally manufactured wooden parts here. He was a Commissioner at Ft. Orange in 1655, and a magistrate for many terms, also, a Commissioner at Albany in 1678. He was a delegate to the Mohawk Indians in 1655 and a Vice-Director or Deputy under Governors Stuyvesant and Nichols. He held this position for seven years. He had the first Commission of Captaincy at Albany in 1667, and then at Schenectady in 1669. In 1662, he, with others, laid out "New Village" at Esopus (Kingston). At one time he was one of the nine chosen to assess and evaluate capital of all inhabitants of Albany and Rensselaerswyck.

Philip acquired considerable land. He had two tracts within the manor of the Van Rensselaer. In Albany he owned a number of lots besides his house on North Pearl Street. He had a tract on the Mohawk River and another at Kingston. In New York he owned two houses on the corner of Exchange Place and Broadway and, also, a lot on the corner of Rector Street and Broadway.

All of Philip's children were born at Beverwyck but the tenth child after Beverwyck was changed to Albany. The first child, Guysbert, was apprenticed as a surgeon, but he died young.

For seven years, Philip Pieterse Schuyler held the position of Vice-Director at Fort Orange, appointed thereto in 1655, by Governor Stuyvesant. He was reappointed by Governor Nicholls, and retained the place almost without interruption until near the close of his life. November 1, 1667, he was commissioned Captain of a "Company of Ffoote" at Albany, and two years later was Captain of a company at Schenectady, thus being in command of all the militia of Albany and vicinity. He was acting Indian Commissioner from 1655 to 1658, 1659 to 1662, and 1666 to 1679.7 His arms are painted on a window of the Dutch church in Albany.


Philip was buried from the old Dutch church in Albany where his Arms were emblazoned on one of the windows.

Will of Philip Schuyler
In the name of gad, Amen, Mr. Philip Schuyler old Commissary in Albany at present weak of Body but of sound memory and understanding, and Mrs. Margareta Van Slechtenhorst in good health both as to Body and Mind. Persons of Good repute Residing here. Considering the short and frail condition of human Life the Certainty of Death and doubtfull houre of the same Upon Premeditated and due advice without the Indecement persuasion or misleading of any person do declare to have made ordained and confirmed this their Joynt Respective and reciprocall Last Will and Testament in manner and form following. First bequeathing their immortal souls when they shall part from theri bodies into the Gracious and merciful hands of God their Creator and Saviour and their bodys to Christian burial and also Revoakeing annulling and makeing Void by these presents all and Every such Testamentary. Disposalls as together or apart they before the date hereof may have made or passed and Coming herwwith Expressly to the disposall of their temporary Estate they leave behind so have they the Testators nominated and Constituted and by these Presents do nominate and constitute for his or her whole and sole heirs reciprocally teh longest liuer of them two and that all of all the good moueable and Immoueable actions and creditts mony gold silver Coyned and uncoyned Jewells clothes linnen woolen, household stuff and other nothing in the world expected nor reserved as well in this country in Hollard Gelderland or elsewhere where the same shall by or bee found to dispose thereof as hee or shee should or might do with hes or her patrimonicall effetcs without hinderance or contradiction of any person. Provided always that the longest Liuer of them two stands obliged honistly to maintaine bring up and keep till they come of age or are married their four underaged children namely Arent two and twenty years of age, Phillip seauenteene years of age, Johannes fifteene yeares of age and Margaret eleven yeares of age and them to excercise in all Piety, and that they are brought up to reading writing and as handicraft trade wherewith in their times they may honestly gett their Lliueing and that when they come of age are married with consent of the longest liuer the longest of them two sahll be obliged to give to each of the said underaged children a fifth portion, so much as the longest liuer of them two in good consicense shall find convenient and according to the estate and opportunity that then shall present and further to act as good honest parents ought to doo, and whereto they do entrust each other according to all equity and their ability without being further obliged and that by reason that the testators cannot at present make any certaine account and inventory of their estate not willing nor desireing accordingly that by or concerning their beforesaid child or children any account or inventory of the estate shall be taken under what pretense soever itt might bee from the longest liuer of them two. Tho in case the longest liuer might happen to Dy before the beforesaid four children come of age or are married itt is expressely desried by the testators that such child or children that then sahll be underage sahll bee maintained out of the comon estate till they come of age or are married, and if so bee the estate bee made worst by fire warre...her losse (which God Prevent) so sahll those who have had noe portions in place of and for the portions frist receave each the same of twelve hundred and fifty guilders in beaversm that is for the four children, five thousand guilders in beavers and then shall the whole estate be equally divided amoung the testators eight children by name Gertruyd the wife of Stiphanus van Courtland, Alida the wife of Robert Livingston, Peter, Brant, Arent, Phillip Johannes and Margaret Schuyler among them or their heirs a like to be divided, the one not more than the other, butt in case the longest liuer of the testators might happen to remarry then that party shall be obliged to deliver a true account and inventory of the estate and thereof to sett out part and divide in the whole to witt one ture moyety to the behoo of the testators beforesaid eight children amoung them or their heires equally and alike to bee divided to the one not more than the other and the other half to the behoofe of the longest liuer of them two which inventory the longest liuer shall be bound if there bee occasion to assert upon oath without being any further obliged always provided that the longest liuer shall take and enjoye the interest of the principall belonging to the children during their minority for their maintenance and bringing up, and on the death of one of the child or children aforesaid in their minority their hereditary portion shall be to the behoofe of the surviveing children. and for security of what is above made and bequeathed to the children stands bound, and farmes, lands, houses, and tenements that they the testators have in this countrey so neuer the less if their bee occasion except selling that the longest liuer may enter upon the same and dispose thereof as also their other effects for his or their maintenance. Lastly, they the testators in these presents have shutt out and excluded keeping all due respect the weesmasters of this place and every one where these presents may be of effect from the rule and charge of their said children and goods not willing that they should trouble themselves wherewith but instead of them have appointed as gardian or guardians over the same the longest liuing of them two with power to desire and take one or more persons to oversee with them all the above written the testators declareing to be the last will and testament of them boath desireing that the same after the decease of the first of them may have and take itss full power and effect be itt as testament, Cordicill, donation, legacy or other wayes as itt best may take effect notwithstanding any solemnity in forme or law may be omitted, neglected not inserted or observed, praying all Lourds Courts and authority where these presents sahll take effect that itt may have all possible benefitt and be mee the writer thereof to be made and delivered one or more instruments to conclude all as itt ought.

Done in Albany, at the house of the Testators Upon the first day od May one thousand six hundred eighty and three Old Stile being Tuesday evening about nine of the clock in presents of Mr. Cornelius Van Dyke and Mr. Dirick Wesselles Commissarys of this town as Witnessed hereunto delivered, signed and sealed.

Phillip Schuyler
Margareta Van Slechtenhorst

Cornelius Van Dyke
Derick Wessells
Mee Present
Robert Livingston, Secty

The above instrument was presented for probate at a court held in Albany on the 4th day of March 1684 by the widow Mrs. Margareta Schuyler through her son Arent, and on disposition of the two witnesses was admitted to record and she refferred to the Governor to obtain letters of administration. The court record being attested by Robert Livingston.
__________
Thomas Dougan Lieut. and Governor under his Roy "high" of N Yorke Dependencyes in America. To all to whom this shall or may concern, Greeting, Know ye that att a court held at Albany the fourth day of March last the Will of Phillip Schuyler, late of Albany deceased annexed to these presents was proved who haveing while he lived and att the time of his death goods and chattels rights and crediths within the said towne of Albany and Province. And Margareta Slechtenhorst the widdow and relict being therein appointed his sole and only executrix the Administration of all and Singular the said goods and chattels , rights and crediths. And the said will is hereby committed unto the said Margareta Slechtenhorst well and truly administer upon the same according to the said will and to maek a true and perfect account of her said administration to the time by law required, given under my hand ans seale att ffort james in New Yorke the 8th day of june in the thirty Sixth year of his ma..reign Anno 9 Domin 1684
Thomas Dougan
Past the office
J Spragg, Secty


Appeared before us, undersigned, commissaries, of Albany, etc., Mr. Philip Pieterse Schuyler, our raedsvrunt, and Margareta Slichtenhorst, his wife, dwelling here at Albany in America, who declare that they have appointed and fully empowered by these presents the Heer Johan Baptist Van Renssalaer, merchant at Amsterdam, Holland, with his brother-in-law, Mr. Gerrit Slichtenhorst (who is proposing to depart for Holland) to inquire after the condition and inventory of the estate or a copy of the will which may have been made by the Heer Brant Van Slichtenhorst deceased, father of the aforenamed Margareta and Gerrit Slichtenhorst, (deceased at Nieukerck in Gelderland), and furthermore, their (subscriber's) contingent and hereditary portion in the aforesaid inheritance, to demand, collect, and receive; acquittance for receipts to pass, if need be and the matter demands it, with his aforenamed brother-in-law, to examine, seek out and approve of the condition and inventory of the estate; to compromise, compound and arrange the real estate, lands, houses, and lots, as also the movables which may fall to the subscribers as a part of their inheritance to sell; the aforesaid real estate to establish and vest in the purchaser, the subscribers to disestablish and disinherit from the same, the stipulated purchase money to receive, of the receipts acquittance to pass, and if necessary (there being no hope) their aforesaid rights and claims, in their said inheritance, by justice to demand, collect, and receive from those who have the care of the same, to that end all the terms of the laws to observe to sentence and extreme execution of the same incluys, with power also one or more persons in his place to substitute, having the like or limited power; and further all things to do, transact and perform, either with or without law, as he may think needful and reasonable; promising at all times to hold as true all that by the aforenamed Heer attorney and substitutes of the same by virtue hereof shall be done and performed without any gainsaying, on pledge according to the laws for that case made, provided that the attorney be holden, when requested, properly to answer for his transactions and receipts.

Done in Albany the 3/13 July, 1668.

PHILIP PIETERSE SCHUYLER.
MARGARITA VAN SLICHTENHORST.
Goosen Gerritse.
Jan Thomas.
In my presence,
D. V. SCHELLUYNE, Secretary, 1668.

[NI0051] New York City Wills, 1708-1728

Page 54.--MARGARET SCHUYLER. In the name of God, Amen. I, Margaret Schuyler, widow of Phillip Schuyler, sometime of Albany, merchant, being of sound mind, and considering that there having been some unhappy differences among my children; the youngest of them being apprehensive that by the strict rules of the common law, the will made by my said husband and myself on May 1st, 1683, might not be authentick enough to make such equal division among our eight children. But that PeterSchuyler, eldest son of my deceased husband, Peter Schuyler, might be entitled to all of the real estate. Yet, not thinking that my son, Peter Schuyler, would himself endeavor to take any such advantage, he being present at the making of said will. I give to each of our 8 children an equal part of all real and personal estate. And I being further willing to dispose of the real and personal estate, which, by the extraordinary blessing of God, I have acquired and purchased since the death of my husband. And my son Peter, at my request, being agreed with the seven other children, by deed, dated August 16, 1707, by which all further differences among them are prevented, I do give to my eight children, Gertruy, Alida, Peter, Arent, Phillip, Johanes, and Margaret, and to the three children of my son Brant Schuyler, namely: Phillip, Oliver, and Johanes, all my estate, real and personal. Provided always, that my son Phillip shall have the farm called the Flatts, with the utensils, he paying therefor, the sum of 600, to the rest. And they are all to pay an equal part of 9 bushels of good merchantable wheat yearly, to the Patroon or Lord of the Manor of Rensselaerwyck. Mentions "Cornelia Schuyler, widow of my son Brant Schuyler." I make my sons, Peter and Johanes, and my son in law, Robert Livingston, husband of my daughter Allida, executors. Signed and sealed in Albany in my dwelling house.Witnesses, Iona Rumney, Anthony Caster, John Dunbar. Proved in Albany, June 27, 1711, before William Van Rensselaer, Esq., and of the Judges of the Court of Common Pleas.

[NI0054] Father born Halifax Co, NC, mother born Virginia

[NI0055] In 1606 Tjerck and his wife arrived in Amsterdam, Holland. They came from Emden, Holland. (Ref. Philip Board Book, pg. 134). Much of the population of Emden was Frisian as was Tjerck.
Tjerck 's parents are unknown.

[NI0100] Gene had a son named Gordon Eugene Reid, called Gordy, by a previous marriage before he married Joann. Gordy was 8 or 10 years old, born about 1954, when his father married Joann.[Barnes.FTW]


Gene had a son named Gordon Eugene Reid, called Gordy, by a previous marriage before he married Joann. Gordy was 8 or 10 years old, born about 1954, when his father married Joann.

[NI0116] Mayor of Albany 1719 and 1723

In 1703, he occupied a lot on the south side of State street, formerly Gerrit ancker's, the third east from South Pearl street. He was buried in the church, Oct. 21,
1755.
New York Wills Vov V 1754-1760
Page 66.--In the name of God, Amen, March 27, 1739. I, MYNDERT SCHUYLER, of the city of Albany, "considering the frailty of my body." I leave to my wife Rachel the use and income of all my estate during her life time. After her death, all the monies and bonds which I have at interest are to be continued, and my daughter, Anna De Peyster, is to have the interest during her life. After the death of my said daughter, I leave all my estate to her children, to wit, Anne and Rachel De Peyster, "and such other children as it may please God to give to my said daughter," And they are to have my silver plate, bedding, and household stuff when of age. "All my goods, rights, and credits are to be inventoried and entered in the Publick Records." I make my wife Rachel, and my daughter Anne, and her husband, John De Peyster, and Rutger Bleecker, Hendrick Cuyler, Jr., and Philip Schuyler, executors.

Witnesses, Abraham Cuyler, Nicholas Bleecker, John R. Bleecker.

Codicil, July 28, 1741.--Whereas my daughter Anne, wife of John De Peyster, hath since the making of my will procreated a son named Myndert Schuyler De Peyster, I give to him 30 after the death of my daughter, and one good silver tankard, to be made for him, And all my clothing, and my gun or fusee, and my sword with silver handle, for his prerogative as being my only grand son, And after the death of my daughter I leave to him and his sisters, Anne and Rachel, all my estate. After my wife's decease, all my shop goods and merchandise are to be sold at auction, and my executors are to be assisting and giving the best advice and council to my grand children.

Proved in Albany, before Goldsbrow Banyer, July 24, 1756. Confirmed by Sir Charles Hardy, Governor, August 16, 1756, and Letters of administration granted to John De Peyster and Anne Dow, formerly Anne De Peyster, and now wife of Volkert Pieterse Dow.

[NOTE.--Myndert Schuyler, a member of a famous family, was for many years Surrogate for Albany County, and his son in law, John De Peyster, held the same office.--W. S. P.]


[NI0125] Mayor of Albany 1706

[NI0126] was a trader and in 1694, lived in Claverack; in 1685, he was commissioned
judge of the court of Oyer and Terminer for Albany county;

[NI0128] SCHUYLER, Jacobus, Davidtse, lived on the lot now on the south corner of Broadway and Steuben street. He d. March 22, 1706-7. His first wife was Catalyntje Wendel; he m. secondly Susanna Wendel, June 3, 1704, and had one Ch: Catalyntje, bp. April 21, 1706.

[NI0140] Cornelius D. was a soldier in the Bergen County, New Jersey Regiment in the Revolutionary War. He and his brother, James, moved soon after the war to Chester (then Goshen), Orange County, New York and purchased some three hundred acres in Sugar Loaf Valley. Cornelius and Annas resided there the rest of his life. He was one of the incorporators of the Goshen and Monroe Turnpike Company, 1823-1824.


Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey Vol22 Board, Annas, and Cornelius Board, Bergen 1785 Aug. 27

[NI0141] James was a Private in the Revolutionary War. Soon after the war he and his brother, Cornelius, moved to Chester (then Goshen), Orange County, New York and purchased some three hundred acres of land in Sugar Loaf Valley. James found his wife there and returned to the homestead in Ringwood, New Jersey.

At his death in 1801, his children; Mary "Polly", Anna, Hester, Elizabeth J. and John H. were made wards, being infants under 14 years of age. Guardians were Cornelius Board and William Colfax.

Some of these children found on CD 9 Tree 2290
David Johnson P O Box 211 Alden, IA 50006
dmj@cnsonternet.com

[NI0143] Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey Vol22
Board, Elizabeth, and Henry Post, Pumpton 1780 June 12

[NI0146] Peter and Barbara's residence was at New Germantown in West Jersey.

[NI0147] Aliner was an only child.

[NI0148] James Board's family were living in Marion County, Kentucky, close by Mercer County in 1850. James was not with them as he had died about 1827. One son, Martin and his three young children, were living with them.

In Philip's will, he had left the heirs of his son, James, fifty dollars to be equally divided. That will had been made in 1844.

James was listed in the 1820 Mercer County, Kentucky census along with Philip, his father. In an 1824 Mercer County Tax List, James, Joseph and Philip were all listed. Joseph was also Philip's son.

In the Settlement Papers of James Board, November Term 1827, the Administrator was Nancy Board. She was named as the widow of James Board. Some names on the settlement were Philip Board, Charles Hart, and Jacob Mitchell.

[NI0151] When John and Elizabeth married, the Bondsman was John Neff, Jr. Their marriage was tested by Francis Neff. John later moved to Missouri.

[NI0153] David Board was made Guardian of Thomas's child, Charles, in the Settlement of July 1848. Inventory. shows Charles to be the son of Thomas Board. David lived in Mercer County, Kentucky. When David and Mary married, their Bondsman was James Board.

[NI0154] Joseph Board was a half brother to Benjamin F. Board. Joseph was a Baptist Preacher, also, a tanner by trade. He lived in Hopkins County in 1850 and in Caldwell County, Kentucky in 1860.

[NI0155] Thomas Board's marriage was attested to by James Board.

Thomas Board Settlement was 1834-1836, Administrators were David Board and John W. Cardwell. When Thomas died, John J. Sweeney, husband of Mariah, was the Guardian of Thomas's two children, Martha and Charles. Later, David became the Guardian of Charles. Inventory 1848 shows Charles to be the son of Thomas Board. Samuel Hart and David Board, Administrator, Guardian of Martha, Settlement 1849-1850.

Some names on the Inventory were Emily Hart, P. Board, David Board, Samuel Hart, John B. Thompson, John J. Sweeney, and J. P. Mitchell.

Negroes listed on the Inventory were Louisa, Dock, Lydia and sons of boy Dock.

[NI0156] Church records of baptism for children give name as Lena Ann

[NI0159] Mariah later moved to Missouri.

[NI0160] Mary Board married her cousin, Benjamin Board, son of Joseph. Joseph was a preacher and married the two. Later, she and Benny divorced. The 1880 Harrisburg, Saline County, Illinois census shows her as age 39 and divorced. She is shown as a Dressmaker.

When she and Benny married, her father, Ben F. Board, disowned her for marrying her cousin.

I remember seeing my great aunt Mary Board one time when we lived in Herrin, Illinois.

Mary became a very wealthy person and lived to be over ninety. When she died, she left all her money to charities.


[NI0162] John Burdette Board and Terecy Ann are Wilburn Baker's great grandparents. His mother was one of their daughters, but I don't know which one. I believe it was Effie, but I am not sure. Effie married her cousin, Willis Bradley Board, son of Marion Board, but maybe she didn't stay married to him and later married a Baker. I don't have the marriages of most of John Burdette's children.

Wilburn Baker and Geneva Board are third cousins. Their great grandparents are the same.

1880 Census Place: Farmersville, Caldwell, Kentucky
Source: FHL Film 1254406 National Archives Film T9-0406 Page 475A
J. B. BOARD Self M M W 37 KYOcc: Farmer Fa: KYMo: KY
T. A. BOARD Wife F M W 37 KY Fa: KY Mo: KY
J. W. BOARD Son M S W 14 KY Fa: KY Mo: KY
S. E. BOARD Dau F S W 13 KY Fa: KY Mo: KY
D. B. BOARD Dau F S W 8 KY Fa: KY Mo: KY
M. E. BOARD Dau F S W 4 KY Fa: KY Mo: KY

John Board
1910 Enumeration District: 0013 Color: W
Age: 66 Birth Place: Kentucky
Visit: 0155
County: Caldwell
Relation: Husband
Relatives: Wife Tearessa 67, Kentucky
Grandson Herbert H 21, Kentucky
Granddaughter Flora 21, Kentucky

[NI0164] Robert Marion was a brother of Benjamin Morrison Board. He was a farmer in the Rufus Community of Caldwell County, Kentucky. He and Mary lived in Donaldson in 1900 which is close to Princeton. He was called Marion.

"After Marion died, five of his children continued to live in the Rufus Community of Caldwell County; Jim, Bob, Sallie, Dick and Nona. Dick only left to go to the Veterans Hospital at Marion, Illinois where he died. Nona stayed with relatives and was in a rest home until she died."

"Robert and Mary were buried in the Board Cemetery in Caldwell County. The Board Cemetery is on the Marion Board farm. In 1973 the farm was sold to Jim Schrewsberry with access rights to the cemetery being retained. The log house built by Marion was still standing in 1986. It had been deserted since 1966."

One source for the date of Robert Marion's death was November 24, 1915, and another source was April 24, 1915.
1880 Census Place: Farmersville, Caldwell, Kentucky
Source: FHL Film 1254406 National Archives Film T9-0406 Page 476D
R. M. BOARD Self M M W 31 KYOcc: Farmer Fa: KYMo: KY
M. S. BOARD Wife F M W 29 KY Fa: KY Mo: KY
J. T. BOARD Son M S W 7 KY Fa: KY Mo: KY
W. R. BOARD Son M S W 5 KY Fa: KY Mo: KY
W. B. BOARD Son M S W 3 KY Fa: KY Mo: KY
R. BOARD Son M S W 3M KY Fa: KY Mo: KY

Robbert M Board
1910 Enumeration District: 0013 Color: W
Age: 61 Birth Place: Kentucky
Visit: 0176
County: Caldwell
Relation: Husband
Relatives: Wife Mary 59, Kentucky
Son James P 37, Kentucky
Son Robbert C 30, Kentucky
Daughter Sally 26, Kentucky
Son Richard D 22, Kentucky
Daughter Nonie M 20, Kentucky

[NI0166] B. Frank Board was always called Frank Board.

Ben F Board
1910 Enumeration District: 0013 Color: W
Age: 37 Birth Place: Kentucky
Visit: 0029
County: Caldwell
Relation: Husband
Relatives: Wife Emma 33, Kentucky
Daughter Ida M 07, Kentucky
Son Ben E NR, Kentucky

[NI0167] Sarah Francis' marriage was secured by B. M. Board.

[NI0168] Joseph S Board
1910 Enumeration District: 0013 Color: W
Age: 27 Birth Place: Kentucky
Visit: 0056
County: Caldwell
Relation: Husband
Relatives: Wife Jenie A 34, Kentucky
Son William F 06, Kentucky

[NI0175] The Book "Caldwell County Kentucky History" gave Stella's birth date as 1903, but I must have obtained the birth date from Geneva, Uncle Andy's daughter.

[NI0192] The Times Leader Princeton Kentucky August 28, 1996

Caldwell County
James H. "Jimmy" Williamson, 69, of Wintersville, Ohio, died Monday, August 26th, at his home of cancer. Retired electrician and Navy veteran of World War II, he was a son of the late Archie and Stella Board Williamson, Caldwell County natives. After the death of his father in 1941, he lived in Caldwell County with his grandfather Emerson Williamson and attended Farmersville High School Survivors include his wife, Helen; three sons, James, Terry, and Tommy Williamson; a sister, Aileen DeLong of Columbus, Ohio, and an aunt, Mrs. Melville Sheridan of Caldwell County. Funeral services and burial will be held Thursday, August 29th, in Wintersville, Ohio.

[NI0194] James died young.

[NI0197] Joshua died young.

[NI0199] Thomas Beach Board died young.

[NI0201] Joseph died young.

[NI0204] Nancy, a widow, after David died, married Isaac Kingsland by whom she had six children.

[NI0210] James' s father died when he was yet unborn. He was reared by his Uncle Cornelius Board.

[NI0217] Henry was a drummer in the Revolutionary War. His residence was Pompton, New Jersey.

[NI0219] Capt. Heard moved to Orange County, New York and owned some two hundred acres of land in the town of Blooming Grove. He commanded a Company of Light-Horse Calvary in the Revolutionary War.

After Capt. Heard died Nancy moved to Goshen, New York and took up residence with Anthony Dobbin who married her sister, Ann Board.

[NI0220] Anthony and Ann's house was the popular stopping place of the Governor of the State on occasions of a review of the State Troops, and also of Judges and other men of note. He was the first Junior Warden of Orange Lodge No. 45, F. & A. M. of Goshen, New York at its organization, April 12, 1796.

[NI0239] Original stockholder of Chester Natl Bank in 1845

[NI0241] Gabriel married Mary after Elizabeth died. Mary and Elizabeth were sisters.

[NI0250] Charles lived in Mercer County, Kentucky in 1850. David Board was his Guardian.

[NI0254] Hannah and her son, Irvin, were living with her father, David Board, in 1880 in Mercer County, Kentucky.

[NI0255] Thomas was a farmer. He and Mary lived in Mercer County, Kentucky. In the 1900 census, he was shown as being paralyzed.

Thomas was buried in the Bethel Cumberland Cemetery in Mercer County, Kentucky.

[NI0259] Philip Schuyler Board, son of David, enlisted in the Confederate Army of the Blue Grass by Ten. Kirby Smith with his brother Jacob on 9/2/1862. Philip fled Kentucky after the war was over and was never heard from again.

[NI0260] Jacob Mitchell Board, son of David, was a Civil War Veteran. He resided in Harrodsburg, Kentucky. He was a Captain in the 6th and 9th Cavalries. He was taken as a prisoner of war in February 1864.

[NI0261] Mason may have had a sister, named Nancy. Nancy was living with Mason and Hannah in 1850. She was 38 years old.

I show a Hannah Collier born in 1838 in my records with the Collier children of Mason and Hannah. Since Jon Neill does not show this name with the family in the book he published in 1992 "Philip Board", I really don't know if this Hannah is actually a Daughter of Mason and Hannah.

When he died, Mason was buried in the Bethel Cemetery at Nevada, Mercer County, Kentucky.

[NI0266] Susan was a member of the Bethel Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Mercer County, Kentucky.

[NI0284] Carroll was known as Carl C. Board. He moved to Cincinnati about 1900. Adele, his wife, was a native of Cincinnati, Ohio.

[NI0285] Price and Bernie were identical twins. Price was born near Louisville, Kentucky, the town of New Albany, Indiana.

[NI0286] [Barnes.FTW]


Bernie and Price were identical twins. Bernie died from appendicitis.

[NI0298] William was a farmer. He and Mary lived in Princeton, Kentucky.
Biography in Caldwell Co Times, Princeton KY , Thursday, Feb 22, 1979 (in file)

[NI0299] David and Jane were living in Muhlenburg County, Kentucky in 1900. Her sister, Nancy Tudor was with them.

[NI0300] Never married

[NI0301] Benjamin was called Benny. He married his cousin, my great aunt Mary Board.

[NI0302] 1880 Census Place: Farmersville, Caldwell, Kentucky
Source: FHL Film 1254406 National Archives Film T9-0406 Page 487B
J. T. BOARD Self M M W 38 KYOcc: Farmer Fa: KYMo: KY
H. L. BOARD Wife F M W 55 KY Fa: TN Mo: KY
L. E. BOARD Dau F S W 16 KY Fa: KY Mo: KY

[NI0314] This family info from descendant/cousin Tammy Bowling Fuller jtjcj@chorus.net

[NI0317] [Barnes.FTW]

Levinia's marriage was secured by her father, John T. Board.

[NI0321] [Barnes.FTW]


William was called Hezikiah. He died as a teenager. His brother felled a tree on him.

[NI0323] Joseph Bruce Board lived in Muhlenburg County, Kentucky.

[NI0324] Chester Board
1910 Enumeration District: 0011 Color: W
Age: 26 Birth Place: Kentucky
Visit: 0235
County: Caldwell
Relation: Husband
Wife Grace, 23, b KY

[NI0355] [Barnes.FTW]

James was called Jim.

[NI0360] Joseph W Board
1910 Enumeration District: 0014 Color: W
Age: 43 Birth Place: Kentucky
Visit: 0098
County: Caldwell
Relation: Husband
Relatives: Wife Sarah R 42, Kentucky
Son Kollie 19, Kentucky
Daughter Maner 17, Kentucky
Son Everet 08, Kentucky
Daughter Evalee 08, Kentucky
NR Irah Johnson 20, Kentucky

[NI0363] Mary Ellen is Wilburn Baker's grandmother.

[NI0366] Caldwell County Twice A Week Leader Princeton Kentucky March 7, 1911

Mrs. J. W. Board, died at her home near Rufus Sunday and was buried Monday with her newborn child at the John Wright Perry burial ground. She is survived by a husband and five children, two girls and three boys. Mrs Board was a half-sister of ex-United States Senator DeBoe.

[NI0367] Caldwell County Times Princeton Kentucky July 1956

Mrs. Rose Board, 70, widow of the late Buddy Board, died suddenly Friday, July 13th, at her home in the northern section of Caldwell County. Final rites were held Sunday at Chapel Hill Baptist Church, conducted by the Rev. Edward Woodall assisted by Rev. Bob Beavers, pastor, and interment occurred in that section, directed by Morgan undertakers. Survivors include a son, Owen Towery; a daughter, Mrs. Margaret Crider, and a brother, Victor Kennedy, all of Caldwell County; seven grandchildren, and two step-children, Mrs. Chester Morse, this city, and Everett Board of Detroit; and nieces and nephews.
Many friends join in sympathy to loved ones who remain in this time of great sorrow.
***********
Add'l Info: Source: Caldwell County Ancestors by Watson
b. May 8, 1886
d. July 13, 1956
Burial: Parker-Kennady Cem., Caldwell Co., Ky.
**********

[NI0370] Children of Wm from Branda Shawley, 7075 Arcola, Garden City, MI 48135, CD#11 Tree 3720
Extensive history of the Sigler family is outlined in the History of Caldwell County Ky

[NI0373] Jim remained unmarried. When he died he was buried in the Board Cemetery on the Board farm.

[NI0374] Will was a farmer in the White School Community of Caldwell County, Kentucky. He was a member of the Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church and was a Deacon and Trustee for many years. He was buried in the Young Cemetery in Caldwell County, Kentucky.

William R Board
1910 Enumeration District: 0015 Color: W
Age: 35 Birth Place: Kentucky
Visit: 0098
County: Caldwell
Relation: Husband
Relatives: Wife Mariam C 19, Kentucky
Son James H 04, Kentucky
Daughter Gracy E NR, Kentucky
Son Cecil NR, Kentucky

[NI0380] [Barnes.FTW]



Annie was buried in the Young Cemetery in Caldwell County, Kentucky.

[NI0382] [Barnes.FTW]



Meriam was called Dona. She was buried in the Young Cemetery in Caldwell County, Kentucky.

[NI0383] [Barnes.FTW]

Retta had two children by McGregor, Herman and Melvin. She was buried in the McGregor Cemetery in Caldwell County, Kentucky.

[NI0384] [Barnes.FTW]


James Hershal left Kentucky and went to California in 1929. He did not return until 1965, but returned for several visits between then and his death.

He was living in Sacramento, California. He was found dead in his room on July 18, 1977, but was last seen alive on July 10. He had not been missed by friends as he had made preparation to return to Kentucky for a visit.

He had never married. He was buried in the Creekmur Cemetery in Caldwell County, Kentucky.

[NI0385] [Barnes.FTW]


Gracie was buried in the Creekmur Cemetery in Caldwell County, Kentucky. Both she and Eli died before 1986. They had no children.

[NI0386] William is called Cecil. He and Ava were married by Judge Handberry in Princeton, Kentucky. Ava was an only child.

The Times Leader Princeton Kentucky April 12, 1995

Caldwell County
Cecil Board, 85, of East Young Street, Princeton, died Saturday, April 8th, at 4:08 a.m. at his home following a short illness. Born January 27th 1910, a son of the late William R. and Miram Dona Creekmur Board, he was a member of North Side Baptist Church and a retired employee of the Kentucky State Department of Highways. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Ava Lee Goodaker Board; two sons, Newman Ray Board and Bobby Joe Board, both of Caldwell County; five grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; a sister, Opal Buntin, Caldwell County, and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services were conducted Sunday, April 9th, at 2:00 p.m. at Morgan's Funeral Home in Princeton with the Rev. Tommy Tackett officiating, assisted by the Rev. Ronnie hooks. Burial followed in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Princeton, Ky.

[NI0387] The Times Leader Princeton Kentucky October 14, 1998

Opal Board Buntin, 81, of Caldwell County near Dawson Springs, died Saturday, October 10, 1998 at 6:45 a.m. at Regional Medical Center in Madisonville.A homemaker and mother and member of Mount Pisgah Baptist Church in Caldwell County, she was born November 30th 1916 in Caldwell County, a daughter of the late Will and Donie Creekmur Board.She was preceded in death by her husband, Justin Paul Buntin on August 20, 1997; a son Wendell Ray Buntin; three brothers, and a sister.Survivors include two sons, Paul Buntin of Nebo and James Buntin of Dawson Springs; five grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and two great great grandchildren.Funeral services were conducted Monday, October 12th, at 2:00 p.m. at Beshears Funeral Home in Dawson Springs with the Rev. Frank Hill officiating. Burial followed in Creekmur Cemetery in Caldwell County, Ky

[NI0388] [Barnes.FTW]



Lemon was buried in the Young Cemetery in Caldwell County, Kentucky.

[NI0391] Paul was called Justin. He and Opal had five grandchildren by 1986. They live near Dawson Springs, Kentucky.

[NI0397] The Times Leader Princeton, Ky.Nov. 19, 1997

Mrs Mary Board, 69, of Dawson Road, Princeton, died Monday, Nov. 17, at 1:55 p.m. at Princeton Health Care Manor, following a long illness.A member of Beulah Hill Baptist Church and retired line worker at Arvin Industries, she was born Jan. 22, 1928, in Caldwell County, a daughter of the late Maple and Margie Glass Rickard.She was preceded in death by her first husband, Charlie F. Orange in 1980, and a brother, William "Bill" Rickard.Survivors include her husband, Newman Ray Board; three daughters Wilma Tackwell and Connie Teague, both of Princeton, and Phyllis Watkins of Caldwell County; three grandchildren, Denise Kaiser, Molly Lewis, and Jason Hopper; a great-granddaughter, Kirstin Lewis; two brothers Orvil Rickard and Orbie Lee Rickard, both of Princeton; two sisters, Runnell Egbert and Betty Egbert, both of Caldwell County, and several nieces and nephews.Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday, Nov. 19, at Morgan's Funeral Home in Princeton with the Rev. James McKinney officiating, assisted by Rev. Tommy Tackett.Burial will follow in Princeton Memorial Gardens, (Princeton, Ky.).

[NI0405] Wendal Ray lived about one year. He was buried in the Creekmur Cemetery in Caldwell County, Kentucky.

[NI0441] John Board
1910 Enumeration District: 0013 Color: W
Age: 66 Birth Place: Kentucky
Visit: 0155
County: Caldwell
Relation: Husband
Relatives: Wife Tearessa 67, Kentucky
Grandson Herbert H 21, Kentucky
Granddaughter Flora 21, Kentucky

[NI0442] Collie A. Board obituary - 1949 Posted by cjp on Sun, 16 Apr 2000

C.A. Board, 58, Dies Thursday
Collie A. Board, 58, retired chief of Providence fire department, died at 3 a.m. Thursday at his home in Providence following a long illness. Mr. Board, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Board, was born Nov. 15, 1890, in Caldwell county. He and Mrs. Board, the former Zola Traylor, were married in August 1914.
He had been a member of First Baptist church for 25 years. He served as fire chief for thirteen years until he retired because of ill health. Survivors are the wife; a daughter, Mrs. J. Hoyt Stephens, Birmingham, Ala.; a grandchild; three sisters, Mrs. Robert Kemp, of Dalton, Mrs. Chester Morse, of Princeton, and Mrs. Howard Crider, of Fredonia; and a brother, Everett Board, Detroit, Mich. A brief funeral service was held at the home on Church street at 1 p.m. Saturday, followed by a service at 3 o'clock in Farmersville Baptist church. The Rev. Benjamin Connaway officiated and burial was in Cedar Hill cemetery, Princeton. Cousins served as pallbearers.

The Journal-Enterprise
Providence, Kentucky
Thursday, September 29, 1949
used with permission

[NI0460] Princeton, KY-July 1999
Graveside services for Ruth Board, 92 of Lincoln Park, MI, formerly of Princeton, KY will be at Perry Cemetery, Caldwell, Co. Mrs. Board, a retired beautician died at 4;55 PM Friday at her hoem. She was a member of Friendship baptist Church, Lincoln Park. Surviving are 2 grandsons, Scott Board and Curtis Board, one niece, Joyce Griffin of Altanta, and two gg granddaughters. She was preceded in death by her husband, Lloyd Board, and one son, james Edwin Board. Her parents were Jess harper and Ida Mae Hopper. There will be no visitation. Morgans Funeral Home, Princeton is in charge of arrangements.

[NI0532] Dwight DeLong was an Ohio S.U. Professor.

[NI0543] The Times Leader Princeton Kentucky April 6, 1996

Mrs. Nellie Board, 86, of 70 Nellie Board Road, Fredonia, died Friday, April 5th, at 4:35 a.m. at Princeton Health Care Manor, following a long illness. A housewife and member of Chapel Hill Baptist Church, she was born April 4th 1910, in Caldwell County, a daughter of the late Robert Henry and Mary Elizabeth Murray Canada. She was preceded in death by her husband, Edward Board in May 1984, and a son, Robert Board in August 1993. Survivors include a son, Billie Board of Caldwell County; a daughter, Barbara Sigler Hillyard of Caldwell County; four grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be conducted Sunday, April 7th, at 2:00 p.m. at Morgan's Funeral Home in Princeton with the Rev. Lester Watson officiating, assisted by Rev. Bob Beavers. Burial will follow in Leech Cemetery in Caldwell County, Ky.

[NI0545] The Times-Leader Princeton, Ky. May 17, 2000

Billie Board, 69, of Nellie Board Road, died Saturday, May 13, 2000 at 7:17 p.m. at Caldwell County Hospital Emergency Room of an apparent heart attack.

A veteran, a retired truck driver for Fredonia Valley Quarry and member of Chapel Hill Baptist Church. He was born Oct. 7, 1930 in Caldwell County, a son of the late Edward Board, who died in 1984 and Nellie Canada Board, who died in 1996.

He was preceded in death by his wife Sylvia Turley Board in 1995 ; and a brother, Robert Board in 1993.

Survivors include two sons and a daughter-in-law, Ricky and Carolyn Board and Randy Board, all of Caldwell County ; five grandchildren, Brandi Board-Bannister, Megan Board, Ricky Joe Board, Brandy Mullins and Bennie Mullins ; two great-grandchildren, Brien Board and Beverly Board, and a sister, Barbara Sigler Hillyard of Caldwell County.

Funeral services Tuesday, May 16, at 11 a.m. at Morgan's Funeral Home in Princeton with the Rev. Lester Watson officiating. Burial in Leech Cemetery in Caldwell County, Ky.

[NI0547] The Times Leader Princeton Kentucky September 1, 1993

Caldwell County
Robert Board, 46, of Nellie Board Road, Fredonia, died Monday, August 30th, at 3:20 p.m. at Regional Medical Center in Madisonville, after a short illness. Funeral services will be held today, Wednesday, September 1st, at 1:00 p.m. at Morgan's Funeral Home with the Rev. James H. Beavers officiating, assisted by the Rev. Lester Watson and the Rev. Ronnie Hooks. Burial will follow in Leech Cemetery in Caldwell County, Ky.A Caldwell County native, he was born December 16th 1946, the son of Nellie Canada Board, Caldwell County, and the late Edward Board. Mr. Board was a truck driver for Riley Trucking Company and a member of Creswell Baptist Church. Survivors in addition to his mother, include his wife, Sharon Orlena Board; one daughter, Lisa Reece, Caldwell County; one granddaughter, Tiffany Reece; one brother, Billie Board, Caldwell County; one sister, Barbara Sigler, Caldwell County; and several nieces and nephews.

[NI0549] Gilbert Board died of a heart attack. He was 76 years old. He does not appear in the 1910 census as a child.

[NI0551] JAMES FRANK GUESS
James Frank Guess was born 7-9-1858, the son of John T. and Isabella Smith Richie Guess of Caldwell County.
Frank farmed in the White Sulphur community and attended White Sulphur Baptist Church. He served as deputy tax assessor and then as elected Tax Commissioner from 1913-1925. Because of ill health, they moved to Princeton in 1922 and rented their farm until 1935, when one of their daughters, Katie Mae and Porter Sell, bought it. By the time they sold it 25 years later, the farm had been owned by the family for over 100 years'
Frank married Mattie Ellen Stevens, daughter of Dr. Robert Criswell and Eleanor Elliott Stevens. They had a son, Matt. Mattie died twelve days after his birth. Matt married Nannie Nichols and they had a son, James Nichols of Henderson.
About four years after Mattie's death, Frank married her sister, Sophia Ann. They had nine children.
Jim Ella, their daughter, married Clarence Wood and they had two children, Edmund, who died as a child, and Esther Sophine Stout of Marion.
Lena married Elmer Lamb and they had five children: Juanita Lemnah, Ouida Polatty, Charles, Claude and Leslie Roper. All are now dead except Leslie, who lives in Colorado Springs, Colorado.
Rubye served as tax commissioner and worked in doctors offices and as a practical nurse. Katie Mae married Porter Sell and they have threechildren.Katherine Burke now lives in Cadiz, KY. Murry is serving as vice president of First National Bank in Princeton at the time of his death, and Ralph was killed while serving in the United States Navy during WW 11.
Minnie married Virgil McConnell and they had three children- Joan Baumler, now dead, Hestcr of Detroit and Bill of New Hampshire..
Laura married Russell McGuirk and they had two children, Nancy Gardner of Louisville and Carolyn Turner of Lone Oak. Johnny, another daughter, worked as a book-keeper in llrinceton and later as City Treasurer.
Frank married Ruth Koon and they had four children: Joe Frank, now dead, Peggy of Virginia, John of Nashville and Diana of Nashville. He owned and operated a barbeque restaurant in Princeton. Willie married Bernard Jones and they had two children, Eleanor Hodge of Tullahoma, TN, and Bernard, Jr. of Reno, Nevada. After long illnesses, Frank died in 1927 and sophia died in 1928. Their only surviving child is Katie Mae Sell.
Submitted by: Clair Ellen Hodge 209

JOSEPH GUESS
Joseph Guess, born in Fairfax County, Virginia about 1762, married Constance Taylor in Caswell county, North Carolina in 1787. According to incomplete research, she was the daughter of Richard and Sarah Taylor of Hampshire County, Virginia (now West Virginia).

When Joseph Guess was young, his parents moved to Orange County, NC where he was drafted into the militia and served in the American Revolution under the command of Generals Rutherford and Taylor. After the war, he and his wife settled in Caldwell County and there reared their seven children: James b, n in North Carolina in 1787, Peggy born 1792, Polly born 1795, Francis born 1799, William born 1805, jenny born 1806, and] Nancy born 1810.
James, the first born of Joseph and Constance Guess, and his wife Celia (paternal
great grandparents of writer) had two children, James T b 1837and Nancy. James T. married Elizabeth Rowland, born 1848 in Wilson County, TN. After their marriige in 1865, they had four children: Wiley, Samuel, Elizabeth and Constance. After the death of Elizabeth Rowland, James T. married Jennie Lewis Knight, widow of Robert Knight, and to this union were born: Bradley, Pratt and Owen. Jennie Lewis Knight was the daughter of Henry Lewis and S. A. Satterfield Lewis. When she was married to Robert Knight, three children were born: Alvey, Charley and Alice. Robert Knight died shortly before their last child Alice was born.
Samuel Guess, born 1875, died 1946, son of James T. and Elizabeth Rowland Guess, married Alvey Knight, born 1887, died 1962 in 1900. Her parents were Robert Knight and Jennie Lewis Knight. To this union were born eight children: James Robert born 1902, died 1964, married Clara Doom in 1920; Ural born 1904, died 1941, married Inez Perkins in 1928; Freeman born 1907, died 1959, married Pauline Sowash in 1929; Jennie born 1909, married Russell Sowash inl929; Mae Alice born 191 1, died 1984, married Marvin Armstrong in 1929; Mertie born 1915, married Robert Smith in 1937; Calvin born 1922, married Dorothy McKinney in 1945; Leona born 1927, married Stanley Thomas in 1945.
James Robert, the oldest son of Samuel and Alvey Guess, was a well-known Baptist minister who pastored churches in several counties in Western Kentucky. His last pastorate of twenty years was at Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church in Trigg County.
sources: Revolutionary War record, Caldwell, Crittenden and Livingston Court Records, Geo. Coon Library, and family records.
Submitted by: Mertie Guess Smith 210

[NI0556] 1850Marion Co Census shows Martha age 22 and Elijah age 19 living in household. Since father died in 1825, this cannot be unless death date of father is in error.

[NI0557] Parantage not proven.
Next door in census, age fits with missing child in birth order
Also named first child Joseph, pr. after his father.

[NI0559] Not sure when Agatha A. was born. Census showed 1828, but that was too long after James' death date. Maybe James died in 1828 instead of 1825.

[NI0560] From the Mercer County, Kentucky Deeds of 1786 - 1856, there is a Deed between Martin and John J. Sweeney in 1839, book 22, page 369.

John J. Sweeney married Mariah Board, Philip's daughter in 1826. Martin named one of his children Mariah.

[NI0564]

[NI0565] [Barnes.FTW]

Not listed as a child in Jon Neill's book

[NI0574] held a captain's commission in 1690, at the age of 22 yrs, and led an expedition into Canada; he had great influence with the Indians; was mayor of Albany, 1703-6; in 1712, his house lot was 55 ft. wide (Rynland measure) on the south corner of Pearl and State streets, running back to the Rutten kil.

Page 161.--In the name of God, Amen. I, COLONEL JOHN SCHUYLER, of Albany, being in perfect health. I leave to my son, Philip Schuyler, my grist mill at Saratoga, for his right of primogeniture, reserving to the children of my son, John Schuyler, deceased, the right to grind free of toll; Also my farm at Saratoga, with 1/2 the saw mill, with all the negroes; Also my dwelling house in Albany, with the ground, except 5 feet wide on the south side next to the house of my son John. I also leave to my son Philip, 1/2 of my undivided 1/7 of my lands in the Patent of Saratoga, which with the farm and saw mill I value at 890, and he is to pay to my daughters, Margaret Schuyler and Catalentie Cuyler, each 50. Whereas I released to my son, John Schuyler, deceased, by deed, October 21, 1739, a certain tract of 160 acres, or 80 morgen, being the farm then in his possession; And whereas there is a certain parcel of woodland, adjoining to the same on the south side, containing 8 or 10 acres, I bequeath the same to his heirs. "I leave to my grand daughter Margaret, wife of Colonel Philip Schuyler, the large Picture of my most beloved wife and myself, drawn in one piece, and in one frame." I leave to my daughter Catalentie, wife of Cornelius Cuyler, my large Holland case or linnen Press. I leave the rest of my household furniture to my children, and to my step daughter Sara, wife of Jacob Glen. I leave to my two daughters, 475, and all the rest of my estate to my sons and daughters.

Dated February 29, 174 1/2. Witnesses Isaiah Schuyler, Francis Lansingh.

Codicil. I leave to my daughter Margaret, for life, the use of my house in Albany, and after her death, to my daughter Catalentie.

Dated February 25, 1747. Witnesses, John De Peyster, James stevenson, Peter Lansingh. Proved, August 11, 1747.


[NI0576] Johannes was called John. He married his cousin, Cornelia Van Cortlandt.

[NI0577] [Barnes.FTW]

New York Wills Vol IV 1734-1753
Page 164.--In the name of God, Amen, June 13, 1739. I, PHILIP JOHANES SCHUYLER, of Saratoga, being very sick. I leave to my wife Margaret a negro wench "Belle," and 300. I leave to my brother-in-law, Isaac Wendall, a negro wench. To my nephew John, eldest son of my brother, John Schuyler, Jr., my
riding horse. I leave to my nephews, John and Philip Schuyler, sons of my brother John Schuyler, Jr., 1/2 of my estate real and personal. To my nephews Johanes Cuyler and Philip Cuyler, sons of my brother-in-law, Cornelius Cuyler, the other 1/2 of my estate. I make my brother John Schuyler, and my brother-in-law, Cornelius Cuyler, executors.

Witnesses, Hans Hansen, Gulien ver Planck, John Stevenson. Proved, August 11, 1747.

[NI0578] Page 546.--In the name of God, Amen. I, CORNELIA SCHUYLER, of Albany, widow of John Schuyler, Gent.
I leave to my son, Philip Schuyler, 30, in full satisfaction of any claim as heir at law. I leave to my sons Philip and Stephen all that my farm or tract of land in the Manor of Cortlandt, on the east side of Hudson river, adjoining the farm where Philip Ver Planck now lives, To be divided between them, but my son Stephen is to have the choice. I leave to my daughter Gertruyd, widow of Peter P. Schuyler, all that my tract of land and two dwelling houses in New York on the south side of Queen street bounded west by the lot formerly of Elizabeth Van Cortlandt, east by the lot now, or late, of Gertrude Van Cortlandt, north by Queen street, south by the river, as given to me by my mother, Gertrude Van Cortlandt, by deed October 27, 1719. My executors are to sell so much of my land in North Lot No. 4 in the Manor of Cortlandt as will make 1,800, and pay it to my son, Cortlandt Schuyler, as an equivalent for the houses and lands given to my sons Philip and Stephen and to my daughter Gertrude, "it being my intent that my children shall have an equal share in my estate." I leave all the rest of my estate to my four children, and make them executors. Dated November 29, 1758.

Witnesses, Petrus Stuyvesant, John Stephenson, James Stephenson.

Codicil.--My executors are to sell so much of my estate left to my daughter Gertrude as will make 1,700, and to be put at interest, and the interest on 700 is to be for her benefit, and the interest on 1,000 for the benefit of her two children, Cornelia and Peter Schuyler, And 600 of the principal are to be paid to her daughter Cornelia when of age or married, and 400 to her son Peter. Dated August 26, 1760.

Witnesses, William Ashton, John Stephenson, James Stephenson. Proved, November 24, 1762. Confirmed by Governor Monckton, January 17, 1763. At that time Cornelia Schuyler was wife of Dr. John Cochran.

[NOTE.--The mother of Cornelia Schuyler was Gertrude, wife of Stephen Van Cortlandt. The two houses and lots on Queen street are now Nos. 258-260 Pearl street. They were sold by the executors of Cornelia Schuyler to Jasper Drake, November 13, 1764, for 1,760.


[NI0581] Philip Schuyler lived in Albany, New York. His father died when he was eight years old and he was brought up by his mother, Cornelia. His Aunt Margaret was also influential in his up-bringing. Philip's education equalled that of graduates of Yale College.

Philip was a General in the American Revolution. He was also in the French and Indian War. After serving in the New York Assembly from 1768 to 1775, he attended the first Continental Congress and was appointed a Major in the Continental Army. As Commander of the Northern Department, he recruited an army and strengthened the garrisons at Ticonderoga, Crown Point, and Fort Stanwix. He organized the Quebec Campaign, (1775-1776) but was prevented by ill health from accompanying the expedition.

After the fall of Ticonderoga in the critical Saratoga Campaign, (1777) Philip was superseded by General Horatio Gates. Though cleared by a Court Martial of charges of incompetency, Schuyler resigned from the Army in 1779. He was a member of Congress in 1779 and 1780 and of the State Senate from 1780 to 1789. In 1788 Schuyler was influential in securing New York's ratification of the Federal Constitution, and from 1789 to 1791 he was a United States Senator. He sat again in the State Senate from 1791 to 1797. He returned to the Senate in 1797 as a strong supporter of his son-in-law Alexander Hamilton, but he retired the next year on account of illness.

During the Revolution, Schuyler's fine country home was burned to the ground by General Burgoyne. When Burgoyne's Army was advancing, Schuyler's wife went to Saratoga and applied the torch to the fields of growing grain in order that it could not benefit the enemy. She was known as "Sweet Kitty V.R." and was a woman of strong character and intelligence.

General Schuyler had a genuine love of country which affected all his public actions. He was a trusted leader and had a strong affection for all his family and friends.

By 1767, Philip Schuyler ranked among the nine leading townsmen in Albany in the value of city property.

WILL OF PHILIP SCHUYLER, 1804, ALBANY, NEW YORK

In the name of God, Amen, I, Philip Schuyler of the City of Albany in the County of Albany inthe State of New York, being by the mercy of the Father of all ankind, of sound and disposing mind and memory, do make this my last Will and Testament, hereby revoking, annulling and making void and of none effect, all and every will and wills, testament and testaments, heretofore by me made, executed and declared, declaring this and no other to be my last Will nd testament; To the great Omnipotent Just and Merciful Sovereign, who directs the destinies of created beings, I humbly submit that of my soul for the pardons of my sins, on his free grace, through the mediation of the blessed Redeemer of mankind. -It is my will and I do hereby direct, that the charges of my funeral are defrayed out of my personal estate, that my executors hereinafter named, shall appropriate the residue thereof to the payment of my just debts, that the debts, be paid out of that part of my real estate hereinafter particularly appropriated thereto.
- I give and devise and bequeath unto my beloved Grandson, Philip Schuyler, son of my deceased son, John Bradstreet Schuyler, all that my estate at Saratoga, in the county of Saratoga in the State of New York, comprehended within the limits and bounds following to wit. Beginning on the west bank of Hudsons River and at the south east corner of Lot number three of the first
partition of part of the tract commonly called the Saratoga Patent, which partition was made in about the year one thousand six hundred and eighty-five and which lot number three, I purchased from Abraham Ten Broeck and Dirck Ten Broeck and the south bounds of which lot extends westerly from the said place of beginning along the north Bounds of lot number two of the partition aforesaid, to the easterly bounds of lot number twenty-four of a second partition of the said
Saratoga tract, made in or about the year one thousand seven hundred and fifty; thence northerly along lots number twenty-four, twenty-five, twenty-six and twenty-seven and twenty-eight (all of the said second partition) to the southwest corner of a piece of land sold by me Patrick McDavit and Henry OHara; thence easterly along the same to Hudsons river; thence southerly along Hudsons river to the place of beginning, together with such of the Islands in Hudsons river, situate opposite tot he hereby devised premises as now or may be hereafter belong unto me, and also, together with so much of lot number two of the said first partition of the Saratoga tract as fell to my share in a partition thereof between Cornelius Van Vechten and me, with all and singular, the houses, out houses, mills and other buildings and appurtenances to the said hereby devised premises in any wise appertaining: To have and to hold the said premises and appurtenances to my said Grandson, Philip Schuyler, his heirs and assigns for ever.
I give, devise and bequeath unto my beloved son, Philip Jeremiah Schuyler, and to his heirs and assigns forever, all my part of Lot number thirty- two, all lot number thirty-three and all lot number forty-four which lots are part of the lots mentioned in the second partition of the said Saratoga tract as also, my two mill seats on Batton Creek with the land appertaining thereto and also my House lot in the City of Albany, between Market Street and Montgomery Street, which lot I purchased from John Bogart, but in case I should sell the said lot, during
my life time, then and in that case it is my will that my executors should, if I do hereby direct them to pay unto my said son, Philip, his heirs, executors, administrators or assigns, the sum of two thousand five hundred dollars to be raised by the sale out f that part of my said estate hereinafter appropriated to that purpose.
- I give, devise and bequeath unto my beloved son Rensselaer Schuyler, all that my lot number forty-one, of the said Second Partition of the Saratoga tract, which said lot number forty-one, comprehends the farms on which he resides, the farm leased to John Khumbottom, the farm leased to James Storm, and the farm leased to Abner Fuller, and another farm for which I have already given my said son Rensselaer a Deed: To have and to hold the said lot number forty-one, my said son Rensselaet Schuyler, his heirs and assigns forever.
I give devise and bequeath all the residue of my real estate in the Saratoga tract to my beloved daughters, Angellica the wife of John Baker Church, to Elizabeth the wife of Alexander Hamilton, to Cornelia, the wife of Washington Morton, to Catherine the wife of Samuel B. Malcomb, and to my beloved Grandson, Stephen Van Rensselaer, the son of my deceased daughter, Margaret, late wife of Stephen Van Rensselaer, the Elder, to them their heirs, executors,administrators and assigns forever, as Tenants in Common, in fee simple, each an equal fifth part, and I do hereby authorize empower and request my executors to cause partition of the same to be made as soon as conveniently may be after my decease and in as equitable a manner as they can, and to assign to my said daughters, and to my Grandson Stephen Van Rensselaer their respective shares.
- I give devise and bequeath unto my daughter Cornelia or to her Heirs, executors, administrators and assigns two thousand dollars to be paid by my executors when they shall have paid my debts out of the real estate to be by them sold.
- I give devise and bequeath unto my daughter Catherine or to her heirs, administrators or assigns the sum of five thousand dollars to be paid by my executors, when they shall have paid my debts out of the real estate to be sold by them.- Of course the residue of my real estate whether in possession remainder or reversion, I do hereby authorize and empower my executors to sell so much thereof as shall enable them: first to pay what of my debts may remain unpaid, after having appropriated my personal estate thereunto;
Secondly to pay my son Philip Jeremiah Schuyler, his executors administrators or assigns the two thousand five hundred dollars, if I should during my life time sell the lot in the City of Albany devised and bequeathed to him, but no part of which is to be paid, if he or his heirs should inherit the estate in the Saratoga tract, devised and bequeathed unto my Grandson Philip Schuyler, on the contingency hereinafter mentioned.
Thirdly to pay unto my daughter Cornelia her heirs, executors or administrators the sum of two thousand dollars bequeathed her, except so much thereof as shall be entered in my ledger as paid to her during my life time.
Fourthly, to pay unto my daughter Catherine, her heirs, executors and administrators, and assigns, the five thousand dollars bequeathed to her, except so much thereof as shall be entered on my ledger as paid to her during my life time and all the rest, residue and remainder of my real estate, whether in possession, remainder or reversion, or wheresoever situate, I devise and bequeath unto my dearly beloved Grandson Philip Schuyler, my dearly beloved son Philip Jeremiah Schuyler, my dearly beloved son Rensselaer Schuyler, and my dearly beloved grandson Stephen Van Rensselaer, and my dearly beloved Daughers, Angelica, Elizabeth, Cornelia and Catherine, to them their respective heirs, executors, administrators and assigns, as tenants in common in fee simple, and I do hereby authorize and empower my executors to make or
cause to be made partition thereof between my said children, and grand children in such manner that each ma become entitled to one equal eight part of the value as nearly as me be. - But notwithstanding the devises and bequests aforesaid, in this my will and testament contained. If it should so happen that my said Grandson Philip Schuyler should die before he arrives at the age of twenty-one years and without issue of his body lawfully begotten; then it
is my will and I do give, devise and bequeath the estate in the Saratoga tract, herein before devised and bequeathed unto my said Grandson Philip Schuyler, his heirs, executors, administrators and assigns, unto my son Philip Jermiah Schuyler, his heirs executors, administrators and assigns forever, and in that even neither the estate in the Saratoga tract, in lots number thirty-two, number thirty-three and number forty-four nor the house lot in City of Albany no the two thousand five hundred dollars in case I should sell the said House lot during my life time shall vest in my said son Phillip Jeremiah Schuyler, nor his heirs,
executors, administrators, assigns but the same shall go and I hereby devise and bequeath the same to my said son Philip Jeremiah Schuyler, my son Rensselaer Schuyler, my Grandson Stephen Van Rensselaer, my Daughters Angelica, Elizabeth, Cornelia and Catherine, to them respectively and to their heirs, and executors, administrators and assigns as tenants in common in fee
simple and I do hereby authorize and empower my executors to make or cause partition to be made hereof amongst the said devises assigning to each an equal seventh part in value, as nearly as may be, and it is my will and I do hereby make the like disposition, devise and bequest, as to every other part of my real estate, devised and bequeath in this my will, unto my said Grandson Philip Schuyler in the event that he should die before he attains the age of
twenty one years and without leaving lawful issue of his body. And in case my son Rensselaer Schuyler should die during my life time, and without lawful issue of his body begotten, then and in that case I give, devise and bequeath all the real estate hereinbefore devised and bequeathed to him unto my Grandson Philip Schuyler, son of my deceased son John Bradstreet Schuyler, Stephen Van Rensselaer, my Grandson Philip Jeremiah Schuyler my son and to my
daughters Angelica, Elizabeth, Cornelia and Catherine to them respectfully and to their heirs, executors, administrators and assigns as tenants in common and in fee simple; and I do hereby authorize and empower my executors to make or cause partition to be made thereof amongst the said devises, assigning to each an equal seventh part in value, as nearly as may be. And in case my said Grandson Stephen Van Rensselaer should die before he attains the age of twenty one and without lawful issue of his body begotten, then and in that case I give, devise and bequeath all the real estate hereinbefore devised and bequeathed to him, unto my son John Bradstreet Schuyler, deceased, to Philip Jeremiah Schuyler my son Rensselaer Schuyler, my son and to my daughters Angelica, Elizabeth, Cornelia and Catherine, to them respectively and to
their heirs, executors, administrators and assigns as tenants in common in fee simple; and I do hereby authorize and empower my executors to make or cause partition to be made amongst the said devises assigning to each and equal seventh part in value, as nearly as may be. And in the case my daughter Catherine should die before me and without leaving lawful issue of her Body begotten, then and that case, I give devise and bequeath all the real estate hereinbefore devised and bequeathed to her and also the legacy of five thousand dollars or as much hereof as may still be due thereon at my decease, unto my Grandson Philip Schuyler son of my deceased son John Bradstreet Schuyler, to my son Philip Jeremiah Schuyler, to my son Rensselaer Schuyler,
and to my daughters Angelica, Elizabeth, Cornelia and to my Grandson Stephen Van Rensselaer, to them respectively and their heirs executors, administrators and assigns ass tenants in common in fee simple and I do hereby authorize and empower my executors to make or cause partition to be made thereof amongst the said devises assigning t each and equal seventh part thereof in value as nearly and my be. Notwithstanding in this my last will and testament
hereinbefore contained if it should happen that my son Rensselaer Schuyler should die before me and without leaving lawful issue of his Body and shall leave his wife enceinte and a posthumous child or children should be born to him, that then it is my will that such posthumous child of children should inherit the estate intended for their Father, and in like manner, if my said two Grandsons Philip and Stephen should die before they respectively attain the age of twenty
one years and without issue of their Bodies lawfully begotten and shall leave their respective wife, if any enceinte and a posthumous child or children be born to him or them that then it is my will that such posthumous child or children should inherit the estate intended forth father, anything in this last will and testament to the contrary thereof notwithstanding.
- I do hereby appoint my beloved son Philip Jeremiah Schuyler, son beloved son in law Alexander Hamilton, my beloved son in law Stephen Van Rensselaer to be the Guardians of my grandsons Philip Schuyler son of my late son John Bradstreet Schuyler, and of Stephen Van Rensselaer my Grandson, and of any such posthumous children as they or either of them may have on the events
above mentioned, and to manage the estates of my said Grandsons until they shall respectively become of age, and to receive the rents and profits thereof and to apply such rents and profits to the education and of Stephen Van Rensselaer my Grandson, and of any such posthumous children as they or either of them may have on the events above mentioned, and to manage the estates of my said Grandsons until they shall respectively become of age, and to receive the rents and profits thereof and to apply such rents and profits to the education and maintenance of my said Grand Children in such manner as they the said Guardians shall in their discretion judge meet and proper, and I do hereby also, confer the like power as to any posthumous child or children
of my said Grandsons. And whereas it may happen that doubts may arise as to the devises and bequests in this my last will and testament contained or on some of them and controversies may ensue thereupon in order therefor to avoid law suits and ill will between my children and grandchildren it is my will and most earnest request that in case of such doubts reference should be had to my friends and I therefore recommend the Honorable James Kent and the Honorable Jacob Radclift, Egbert Benson, Esq. Abraham Van Vechten Esq. and John H. Henry or any three of these gentlemen as references to whom to refer on any doubtful occasion, and it is my will that their decision or decisions of a majority of those applied to, should be acquiesced in, by the parties in controversy, and I do hereby appoint my beloved son Philip Jeremiah Schuyler, my beloved son
Rensselear Schuyler and my beloved sons-in-law John Baker Church, Alexander Hamilton and Stephen Van Rensselaer my executors with full powers to them my said executors to dispose of, settle and adjust my estate and the several devises in this my last will contained in such manner as to meet my intentions and promote the interest of the devises.
This my last will is written with my own hand and I have written my name in the presence of the witnesses on the margin of each page. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twentieth day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and three.
Philip Schuyler L.S.
Signed, sealed, declared and published by the said Philip Schuyler as his last will and testament in the presence of us the subscribers hereunto, and who have also seen each other subscribe as witnesses and in the presence of the testator and his request. The following notes being first made to wit.
Page 1 (that) written over the sixteenth line
Page 3 (out) written over the ninth line.
Page 3 (beloved) written over line twenty-one.
Page 3 (forever) written over line twenty-nine.
Page 4 (two) written over an erasure in the ninth line
Page 4 (or to her heirs, executors, administrators and assigns) written over the thirteenth
line.Page 4 (his heirs, executors, administrators and assigns written over line
twenty-two.)Page 4 (daughter) written over line twenty-nine.
Page 6 (Schuyler) written over the first line
Page 6 (neither) written over the second line
Page 6 (four nor) written over an erasure in the fourth line
Page 6 (Cornelia) and (respectively to) written over the twelfth line
Page 6 (respectively) erased out of the thirteenth line
Page 6 (two) erased out of line twenty-eight.
Page 8 (posthumous) written over the fourteenth line.
Page 9 (children) written over an erasure on the second line.
Page 9 (my executors) written over line twenty-three.
Abraham Ten Broeck, G. W. Mancius, Catherine Mancius, Margaret Ten Broeck.
County of Albany SS
Be it remembered that on the fourth day of December in the year one thousand eight hundred and four; personally appeared before me Abraham G. Lansing, Surrogate of the county of Albany aforesaid Abraham Ten Broeck and George W. Mancius of the said County who being respectively duly sworn on their oaths declared that they did see Philip Schuyer, late of the City of Albany, Esquire, deceased, sign and seal the Instrument wrote on this and the four sheets of
paper annexed, purporting to be the last will and testament of the said Philip Schuyler and heard him publish and declare the same, as and for his last will and testament, that at the time thereof he was of sound disposing mind and memory, to the best knowledge and belief of these deponents, that their names subscribed thereto is of their own proper hand writing, and that they did also see Catherine Mancius and Margaret Ten Broeck, the other witnesses thereto
subscribe their names in the presence of the testator. And also, that Philip J. Schuyler, Rensselaer Schuyler and Stephen Van Rensselaer, the of the executors in the said will named, likewise appeared before me and were duly sworn to the faithful performance and execution of the said last will and testament by taking the usual oaths as executors. Abraham G. Lansing. Be
it also remembered that on the eleventh day of December in the year last above written John Baker Church, one other of the executors in the said will named appeared before me, and was likewise duly sworn to the faithful performance thereof. The People of the State of New York, by the grace of God Free and Independent: To all whom these presents shall come, or may concern send Greeting, Know ye, that at the City of Albany, the County of Albany on the fourth day of this Instant December, before Abraham G. Lansing, Esq. Surrogate of our said county, the last will and testament of Philip Schuyler,
Esq. deceased (a copy whereof is hereto annexed) was proved, and is now approved and allowed of by us, and the said deceased having whilst he lived and at the time of his death, Goods, Chattels or Credits within this State, by means whereof the proving and registering the said will and granting administration of all and singular the said Goods, Chattels and credits, and
also the auditing, allowing and final discharging the account thereof doth belong unto us; the administration of all and singular the Goods, Chattels and Credits of the said deceased, and in every way concerning his will, is granted unto Philip Jeremiah Schuyler, Rensselaer Schuyler, Stephen Van Rensselaer and John Baker Church, executors in the said will named, they being first duly sworn, well and faithfully to administer the same and to make and exhibit a true and perfect inventory of all and singular the said Goods, chattels and Credits and also to render a just and true account thereof when thereunto required. In Testimony were of, we have caused the seal of office of our said Surrogate to be hereunto affixed. Witness Abraham G. Lansing, Esquire Surrogate of the said county, at Albany aforesaid, the eleventh day of December in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and four and of our Independence the twenty ninth. Abraham G. Lansing Examined Abraham G. Lansing.

ANNOTATED 1805 CHANCERY DECREE PHILIP SCHUYLER, ALBANY, NEW YORK
Estate of Philip Schuyler, Dec.Chancery Decree
Department of State Docket 35, Page 312 to 315
New York State Archives, Albany, New York
To All to whom these presents shall, Philip J. Schuyler, Rensselear Schuyler,
John B. Church, and Stepehen Van Rensselear, Executors of the Will of Philip
Schuyler, late of the city of Albany, deceased, send greeting:
Whereas the said Testator did in and by his said Will, bearing date the twentieth day of June in the year one thousand eight hundred and three, after three several specific devises to his grandson Philip Schuyler, son of his deceased son John Bradstreet Schuyler, respectively of certain parcels of the lands designated in the said Will as the Saratoga Tract, did devise the residue of his real estate in the said Saratoga tract to his daughters, Angelica, Elisabeth,
Cornelia and Catherine and his grandson Stephen Van Rensselear, son of his deceased daughter Margaret, as tenants in common in fee simple, each an equal fifth part; and did thereby authorize, empower and request his Executors to cause partition of the same to be made as soon as conveniently might be after his decease, and in as equitable a manner as they could, and to assign to his said daughters and grandson the said five devises last named, their respective
Shares: And Whereas the said Executors have caused partition to be made of the said premises so devised to the said five devises by dividing the farms of which the same doth consist into five Allotments, according to the quantity, quality and situation of the said Farms respectively so that the said five devises might have equal shares in value, and the said Allotments be numbered from No. 1 to No. 5 both inclusive, and then to be balloted for: and on such balloting, Allotment No.1 fell to the share of the said Stephen; Allotment No. 2 fell to the
share of the said Cornelia; Allotment No. 3 fell to the share of the said Catherine; Allotment No. 4 fell tot he share of the said Elisabeth; and Allotment No. 5 fell to the share of the said Angelica, and which said several Allotments are as contained in the respective Schedules hereunto annexed;Now therefore know ye, That the said Executors, in the pursuance of the power and authority as above recited, and to the end that the said partition may have due effect and be firm and stable forever, have granted and assigned and by these presents do grand and assign to the said Angelica Elisabeth, Cornelia, Catherine and Stephen the said five devisees, severally, the several farms, lands, rents, reversions, tenements and hereditaments intended and contained in the said Schedules respectively, and which fell to their respective shares as above recited.
In Testimony whereof the said Executors have hereunto set their hands and seals the twenty eight day of January in the year one thousand eight hundred and five. J.B. Church (Seal) R. Schuyler (Seal) Philip J. Schuyler (Seal) Stephen Van Rensselear (Seal) Sealed and delivered the word Elisabeth first interlined by Rensselaer Schuyler and Stephen Van Rensselear Schuyler and Stephen Van Rensselear in presence of Egbert Benson Janes Van Ingen. Sealed & delivered by Philip J Schuyler in the presence of Catherine Duane Egbert Benson. Sealed and delivered by John B. Church in the presence of Egbert Benson, Philip Church. State of New York ss. On the 6th March 1805 before me came Egbert Benson, known to me, who on oath before me made did say that he saw Stephen Van Rensselear, Philip J. Schuyler, Rensselaer Schuyler and John B. Church
execute the within Release and that the deponent subscribed his name as a witness thereto, that the deponent knew the said Stephen Van Rensselaer, Philip J. Schuyler, Rensselaer Schuyler and John B. Church and that they were the same persons described as Grantors in said Release. All which is to me satisfactory evidence of the facts so sworn to, there being therein no material
erasures or interlineations, except as noted, I allow it to be recorded. Thomas Cooper Master in Chancery.Schedules (Annotated)Allotment No. 1
of farms in the residue of the Saratoga Tract, mentioned in the Will of Philip
Schuyler late of the city of Albany. Number of Lot Contents When leased Name of Lessee Name of Assignee Term of Lease *Part of 27 9 Jan 1792 John Burden none 3 lives Part of 27 180 A 5 Dec 1785 Henry Barnheart Samuel Bryant 3 lives
Part of 27 80 A 10 June 1800 Boston Cramp? none 12 years Part of 27 Benjamin Guile none during pleasure of Lessor Part of 27 Amos Gidile Solomon Dunham 3 lives Part of 27 24 Nov 1790 W Scutchion & none 3 lives P Robison
Part of 27 150 A 5 Dec 1785 Stephen Myers Vose Rogers & 3 lives Walker
Part of 27 130 10 May 1893 John McKinstry none 2 lives Part of 27 124 28 Nov 1790 David Reynolds none 21 years Part of 27 28 Nov 1790 James Reynolds none 21 years Part of 27 122 10 June 1800 Abner Scidmore none 12 years
Part of 27 30 Nov 1785 John Juell Giles Slocum 21 years from 1801 Part of 26 15 Dec 1795 Amos Stafford none 3 lives Samuel BryantAllotment No. 2 of farms &c in the residue of the Saratoga Tract mentioned in the Will of Philip Schuyler late of the city of Albany dec. Number of Lot Contents When Leased Name of Lessee Name of Assignee Term ofLease* No 16 124 A 3 Aug 1769 Wm. Anderson none 3 lives No 16 142 A 11 Nov 1782 William Cooper none 3 lives (Designated as Farm No. 8 in General Schuylers Rent book) No 16 192 A 9 April 1783 Increase Green Ephram 3 lives Woodworth (Designated as Farm No 6 in General Schuylers Rent Book ) [See Saratoga Deed Book W at page 36 (1814)
No 16 153 A 6 Nov 1782 Jeremiah Hart none 3 lives No 26 30 Nov 1785 Moses Lewis Jethro Bennet 3 lives No 26 1785 Stephen Myers John Barber 3 lives
No 16 100 A 26 June 1771 John McBride none 3 lives
(Designated as Farm No 9 in General Schuylers Rent Book)
No 26 30 Oct 1785 John Ruger Jacob Deo 3 livesAllotment No 3
of farms &c in the residue of the Saratoga Tract mentioned in the Will of
Philip Schuyler late of the city of Albany dec. Number of lot Contents When leased Name of Lessee Name of Assignee Term oflease*
No 16 170 A 18 Oct 1782 William Mead * Joseph Brown 3 lives
*This is designated as Farm No 3 in General Schuylers Rent Book.
It was leased to John Freeman in 1769.

Schuyler of New York City to Isaac Wing
All that farm, piece or parcel of land Situate in Stillwater part of Lott number 16 Saratoga Patent distinguished by the name of farm G or number seven and being the northwest Corner of Farm F or number six and runs thence westerly along the northern bounds of said lot number 16 52 chains to farm H or number 8 thence along the east bounds thereof to the South east corner thereof thence east along the south bounds of said Lott # 16 to South West corner of said Farm E or # 6 thence along the west bounds thereof to the place of beginning. Containing 192 A
Subject to the lease from General Schuyler to Increase Green bearing the date of 1783.

[NI0585] In the name of God, Amen. I, JAMES LIVINGSTON, of New York, taking into consideration the uncertainty of life and the prudence of making a disposition of my worldly estate while I enjoy my usual share of understanding. My body to be interred in such a manner, and such expense as my executors may think proper. Whereas, I have formerly given to my son Robert 900, towards his advancement, and have since advanced to him 472 10s., I discharge him from all demands, and I also discharge him from all rent for the house he now lives in from the first day of May, in the year 1750, to the first day of May, 1764. I also leave him my large Silver Punch Bowl, and a saddle, and one small Silver Salt; and the further sum of 125 10s., to be paid in six months. I leave to each of my daughters, Elizabeth and Mary, 1,500, to be paid in six months. And as I have already given an advancement of 1,000, in cash, and 500 in an outset, to each of my daughters, Jannet and Margaret, at their marriage, I direct that these sums left to my son Robert and my daughters, Elizabeth and Mary, shall be paid before any division. I leave to each of my daughters, Elizabeth and Mary, the further sum of 100, in consideration of the trouble they have had in taking care of my family since the death of my wife. I leave to my grandson, James Livingston, son of my son Robert, all that my part of a certain parcel of ground and water lot, in Montgomerie Ward, in New York, which was purchased by Robert Benson, deceased, and myself in common, as by deeds may appear. All the rest of my estate, real and personal, I leave to my son Robert, and my daughters, Elizabeth, Jannet, Margaret, and Mary, and if either dies, her share is to go to the rest. I make my children executors.

[NOTE.--James Livingston was son of Robert Livingston, who was son of James Livingston, brother of the first Lord of the Manor of Livingston. He was born December 21, 1701, died September 7, 1763. He married, May 18, 1725, Maria, daughter of Jacobus Kierstede and Elizabeth Lourens. His son, Robert Livingston, married Susanah Smith, daughter of Judge William Smith, and sister of William Smith the Historian and Chief Justice of New York and Canada. The daughter, Janet Livingston, married the said William Smith, Historian and Judge. Mary Livingston was the second wife of Major Thomas Moncrieffe. They were married October 9, 1764. Margaret Livingston married Peter R. Livingston, of the "Manor family." Eliabeth Livingston died unmarried. The house and lot, the rent of which was given to his son Robert, is now No. 23 William Street. This had a large garden in the rear. James Livingston owned a wide lot on the east side of William Street, extending nearly to Sloat Lane, now Beaver Street. The north part of this, with the houses, belonged to his wife, who was the only child of Jacobus Kierstede. It was sold by Thomas Moncrieffe to Alexander Robertson in 1783. The south part, also with two houses, was purchased by James Livingston from one White Timmer. He seems to have given them to his daughter Janet, wife of William Smith. The house and lot, owned in partnership with Robert Benson, is now No. 28 Cherry Street, and No. 27 on the south side of the street, and the same lines extended to Front Street. It was sold by James K. Livingston (the grandson mentioned in the will) to John Beekman, in 1794. The son, Robert Livingston, had many children, among them Judge Maturin Livingston, who married Margaret, the only child of Governor Morgan Lewis. Jacobus Kierstede was son of Dr. Hans Kierstede, who was the son of Dr. Hans Kiersted, who married Sara Roelofsen, daughter of the famous Annake Jans. Elizabeth, wife of Jacobus Kiersted, died January 26, 1760, aged 81. Her daughter, Maria Livingston, died November, 1762.--W. S. P.]

[NI0587] Alexander Hamilton was born in the British Leeward Islands in the Caribbean (probably Charlestown, Nevis). He was the younger son of James Hamilton, an unsuccessful Scottish trader, and his common law wife, Rachel Fawcett Lavien, who was of French and English extraction. He was 13 when his mother died and his father had previously separated from the family, and he was out on his own. He became first a clerk in the store of Nicholas Cruger at Christiansted. At seventeen, he served as proxy for his absent employer. Soon thereafter (1772) his talents were recognized by Hugh Knox, a Presbyterian Clergyman. Cruger and Knox, with the help of Alexander's cousin Ann Lytton Mitchell, sent him to New York for education.

He attended King's (later Columbia) College from 1773 to 1776. Before graduating, he secured an appointment as captain of a New York Artillery company which was soon taken into Continental service.

Alexander Hamilton was the first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. He read law at Albany and had a law practice in New York. He entered the Continental Congress, was a collector of Continental Revenue. Hamilton helped over-come Washington's reluctance to be chosen first President. He resigned from the Treasury in 1795.

Hamilton was challenged to a duel by Burr where he was fatally shot at Weehawken, New Jersey, July 11, 1804, and died the next day.

[NI0588] Religeon-Dutch reformed
Occupation-Businessman, investor, realtor, magistrate, politician
The name Schuyler is from the maternal line. The father like most Dutchmen of the time, had no family name. It was unusual, but not unique for sons to adopt their mothers name.

In 1624 the Dutch established Fort Orange (now Albany) New York. David's oldest brother, Phillip came to America in 1650 and settled at Rensselaerwyck, now known as Albany, near Fort Orange. david came to Rensselawewyck pr. around 1656, following the death of their father. Both brothers thereafter were active in the fur trade, which where fortunes were made.

On the 29th Nov., 1692, he lived near the northeast corner of the city walls by the water side, on the south corner of Broadway and Steuben street, and in 1699 she petitioned for an addition of 14 feet to the north side of her lot, which was refused by the city authorities, because "it will reach too near ye Citty Stockadoes." This lot was occupied in 1709 by Jacobus and Abraham, his sons. His sons who lived
to maturity and had families in Albany were: Pieter; Jacobus; Abraham; David; and Myndert.

[NI0599] New York City Wills, 1708-1728 Results
Page 457.--In the name of God, Amen. I, GERTRUYD VAN CORTLANDT, widow, and executrix of Colonel Stephanus Van Cortlandt; "being of sound mind and perfect memory, and being desirous to settle my temporal affairs that my children after me may have general contentment and satisfaction and to prevent variance and strife." Whereas my husband in his will gave unto me all his personal estate, after payment of the legacies to his children; And, whereas since the death of my husband a legacy has fallen to me by the decease of my mother, Margaret Schuyler , to the value of about 700, And I, since the death of my husband, have purchased several pieces and parcels of inheritance, and also have acquired several bills, mortgages, etc.; And whereas my eldest son, Johanes Van Cortlandt, was considerably indebted to my husband, and I, as a tender mother, did advance and pay several sums for him, and upon his decease took upon myself the burden of administration of his estate and considerably overpaid the value of the inventory, And my married children having had each of them what my husband in his life time appointed to them, I therefore direct that all my personal estate be inventoried, and my real estate sold and converted into money. A just account shall be made of what I have paid for my late son Johanes, to his creditors, and a true balance be found, and the remainder of my estate be paid to my children, except the children of my late son Johanes, and I release them from all claim. I make my sons Philip and Stephen, and my four sons in law, Samuel Bayard, Stephen DeLancey, Killian Van Rensselaer, and Andrew Johnson, executors. Dated December 16, 1718. Witnesses, Thomas Brasier, Johanes Hyer, David Jamieson. Proved, April 15, 1724.

[NI0601] merchant of Albany, was the first mayor of the city, 1686-1694. In 1703, he occupied a house and lot on the east side of Broadway at the "Great bridge," across the Rutten Kil just south of State street. His lot extended back to the river.

Page 284.--In the name of God, Amen, June 28, 1748. I, PHILIP SCHUYLER, of Albany, being in perfect health. It is my will that all just debts and funeral charges be paid. I leave to my two brothers, Jeremey and Peter, all my wearing apparell, both linen and woollen, and my watch and sword. I leave to my sister, Gertruy Lansingh, 50, to be paid by my brother Peter. I leave to my nephew, Peter Lansingh, two large silver saltcellars. I leave to my two sisters, Margaretta Livingston and Gertruy Lansingh, and my nephew, Barent Staats, Jr., all my right in the Patent of Westenhook, to each 1/3 of my 1/9 of said Patent, And my nephew, Barent Staats, is to pay to his sister, Anna Vanderpoel, 50. "It is my will that the present Burying-place be for ever kept and appropriated for that use and no other, and I hereby devise the said ground, containing one acre, for to be the burying-place for all the descendants of my father, Peter Schuyler, deceased, and my father-in-law John Schuyler, deceased, and such other persons as my wife Margarita shall allow to be there buried, and my brothers, Jeremey and Peter, shall allow." I leave to my wife, Margarita Schuyler, 1/2 of two lots lying at Canajoharie, in Albany County, on the north side of Mohawk River, and now in occupation of Hendrick Markell; Also all my real estate at the Flatts, while she remains my widow, and she is to pay all my just debts and funeral charges. "I leave to my brother, Jeremy Schuyler, after the death or marriage of my wife, my Great Island, called the Flats Island, he paying to the Patroon or Lord of the Manor of Rensselaerwyck 4 bushels of wheat yearly, in lieu of all other rents and services." I leave to my brother, Peter Schuyler, after my wife's death or marriage, all the rest of the farm called the Flatts, and he is to pay to my sister, Gertruy Lansingh, 50, and to my nephew, Peter Lansingh, 50, and to the Patroon or Lord of the Manor 4 bushels of wheat yearly, in lieu of all other rents and services. I make my wife executor.

Witnesses, John De Peyster, Nicholas Schuyler, Janes Stevenson. Proved, June 6, 1758, before John De Peyster, Surrogate.

Confirmed by Sir Henry Moore, September 2, 1766.


[NI0602] New York City Wills, 1708-1728

Page 381.--In the name of God, Amen. I, BRANDT SCHUYLER, of New York, merchant, being in health of body. I leave to my eldest son, Phillip Schuyler, 100 pieces of 8, or the sum of 30, lawful money of New York, in consideration of his birthright. I leave to my sons Phillip, Oliver, and John Schuyler, all that my lot of land, with all the privileges, situate in the East ward of New York, lying between the grounds of Mr. James Emott and Mr. William Huddlestone. I also leave them 100, and to each of them a silver tankard of 12 value. I leave to my wife Cornelia all the residue of my estate during her widowhood, but if she marries she is to deliver a full inventory, and give one half to the survivors of my children. If she dies my widow, then all my estate is to go to my three sons. My eldest son shall have his choice if he likes it, to take the dwelling house I now live in, and my bolting house and appurtenances, and he is to pay to his brothers two thirds of its value. If all my three sons should die under age, "which God in his mercy Prevent," then the whole estate is to be divided into three parts--one part to my wife's brothers and sisters, and the other two parts to my own brothers and sisters, and my eldest brother, Colonel Peter Schuyler, to have the real estate, upon paying its value to the rest. I make my wife, Cornelia, executor, and my brother in law Johanes Van Cortlandt, and my cousin, Andrew Teller, and my cousin, William Nicoll, guardians of my children. Dated, January 11, 1700/1. Witnesses, John Kip, Teunis De Kay, Isaac Kip, Jacobus De Kay. Codicil, 25 of (???), 1702, confirms the above, and makes Colonel Peter Schuyler ,Geritt Schuyler, and "my son, Phillip Schuyler" executors. Proved, April 18, 1723, and Cornelia Schuyler continued as executor.

[NOTE.--The lot left to his three sons, is now Nos. 218-224 Pearl Street, New York. This was a lot "from high water mark to low water mark," granted by the city to Colonel Brandt Schuyler, September 7, 1692, being 95 feet wide. Phillip Schuyler, the eldest son, died in 1722. Captain Brandt Schuyler died in 1702. His wife, Cornelia, was a daughter of Colonel Stephanus Van Cortlandt. John and Oliver left no descendants. Phillip married Ann Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. Samuel Staats. He left children, Brandt, Ann Elizabeth, wife of John Joris Bleecker, and wife of Switz, and, wife of William Lupton.-- W. S. P.

[NI0605] Childrens names and birth dates from Fredrick W Pyne, (descendant of Cornelia and Johannes Schuyler), 7997 Windsail Ct, Frederick, MD 21701, CD#10 Tree 3301

Eldest son, was born in New Netherlands, May 7, 1643. In the public service, under the English rule, he filled every prominent office in the province, except that of Governor. At the early age of thirty-four he became the first native American Mayor of the city of New York, and held that position from the year 1677, when he was Lord of Cortlandt Manor, until his death, November 25, 1700. In 1678 he was first Judge of the Court of Admiralty; member of the Governor's Council, Province of New York, 1680 to 1688, and 1691 to 1700; Secretary of the Province, 1688; Chancellor of the Province, 1696; Receiver-General, 1687 to 1698, and Chief-Justice of the Province, 1700. He began his military career in 1668, as an Ensign in the King's County regiment, then became Captain, and later Colonel of the regiment.

On the death of the husband of his sister Maria, Jeremias van Rensselaer, in 1675, Stephanus assisted in the administration of the affairs of Rensselaerwyck, during the minority of Kiliaen van Rensselaer, the son, who was but twelve years of age at the death of his father.

In the present counties of Westchester, Putnam and Dutchess, Stephanus van Cortlandt purchased, in 1683, large tracts of land from the Indians, and obtained for them a patent from Governor Dongan, two years later. This was afterwards called the Manor of Cortlandt, and Stephanus was the first and only Lord of the Manor.6 He married, September 10, 1671, Gertrude, the daughter of Philip Pieterse and Margaritta (van Slichtenhorst) Schuyler, and their daughter, Elizabeth, married Rev. William Skinner.

[NI0614] Casparus Schuyler, second son and fourth child of Arent by his first wife Jenneke Teller, was born May 5, 1695. To him his father had bequeathed five hundred acres of land at Wingworth Point on the Delaware river, within the ancient bounds of Burlington City. Here Casparus made his home and here his descendants for a hundred years lived and died, having little intercourse with the other branches of the family. In the churchyard of St. Mary's, Burlington, stands a simple stone inscribed "In Memory of Casparus Schuyler, who and his two sons, the Rev. Louis Sanford Schuyler and the Rev. Philip Schuyler. The Rev. Dr. Anthony Schuyler and the Rev. Hamilton Schuyler and two sons of Anthony Schuyler's sister Caroline, the wife of the Rev. Duncan Mann, the Rt. Rev. Cameron Mann, missionary bishop of North Dakota, and the Rev. Alexander Mann, D. D., rector of Trinity Church, Boston, and successor in that parish to Dr. Phillips Brooks. Other male members of the family now living have vindicated their blood and made their names respected in literature and public life. Montgomery Schuyler, son of the Rev. Anthony Schuyler, is a well known journalist and litterateur, having been connected in an editorial capacity with the New York World, the New York Times, Harper's Weekly and other journals. Besides his contributions to newspapers and monthly periodicals, he is the author of several books and has a wide reputation as a critical writer on architectural subjects. Of his two sons, one is a member of the faculty of Yale University, and another is in the diplomatic service attached to the embassy at St. Petersburg as first secretary. Professor William Schuyler, son of the Rev. Dr. Montgomery Schuyler, is well known in educational circles and is the author of several works of value in that line, besides being a successful writer of fiction. Through marriage the Schuylers are related to most of the prominent Knickerbocker families, including the Van Rensselaers, the Van Cortlandts, the Beekmans, the Livingstons, the Schermerhorns and the Roosevelts.
The Rev. Hamilton Schuyler, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church of the city of Trenton, New Jersey, was born in Oswego, New York, April 3, 1862. He is a son of the late Anthony Schuyler D. D., who was rector of Grace Church, Orange, New Jersey, for thiry-five years. Mr. Schuyler belongs to the well known family of that name, being seventh in descent from Philip Peterse Schuyler, the founder of the family, who came to this country from Holland and settled in Albany, marrying in 1650 Margareta Van Slichtenhorst, the only daughter of Brant Arentse Van Slichtenhorst, resident-director of the Colony of Renssellaerwyck. Mr. Schuyler received his early education at St. John's School, Manlius, New York, and after a business career of some years studied at Oxford University, England, and the General Theological Seminary of New York. He has held positions in Calvary Church, New York, Trinity Church, Newport, Rhode Island, and was for several years dean of the Cathedral, Davenport, Iowa, under Bishop Perry. He began his rectorship in Trenton, February, 1900. The parish at that time was laboring under a heavy debt, all of which has been discharged. Many valuable improvements have been made to the church property under his successful pastorate. Mr. Schuyler is devoted to the study of literature and has himself written extensively. Among his productions are "A Fisher of Men," being a biography of the late Rev. Churchill Satterlee, son of the Bishop of Washington," and "Studies in English Church History," besides sermons, pamphlets and poems. As a poem writer he won several years ago by his poem "The Incapable" the two hundred dollar prize offered by the late Collis P. Huntington for the best production antithetical to Edwin Markham's "The Man With The Hoe." Mr. Schuyler is a member of the New Jersey Society of the Sons of the Revolution and the Holland Society of New York. He has traveled extensively in Europe and the Orient. In January, 1906, he was appointed by the Mayor a Trustee of the Free Public Library of Trenton.

[NI0616] Will in NY No Date, from NY City Wills 1708-1728 from ancestry.com
names wife Margaret,children, Eliz, Robert, George, Jane and bro-in-law Casparus Schuyler

[NI0629] The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 22
page 25
Mrs. Mary Alice Garrison Booth.
DAR ID Number: 21071
Born in St. Louis, Missouri.
Widow of John N. Booth.
Descendant of Lieut. Isaac Garrison and of Isaac Kingsland.
Daughter of Daniel R. Garrison and Ann Coats Noye, his wife.
Granddaughter of Oliver Garrison (1778-1840) and Catherine Mahala Schuyler Kingsland, his wife, m. 1803.
Gr.-granddaughter of Isaac Garrison and Elizabeth Covert, his wife, m. 1763; Philip Kingsland and Catherine Creely, his wife.
Gr.-gr.-granddaughter of Isaac Kingsland and Johanna Schuyler, his wife.
Isaac Garrison, (1738-1816), served as second lieutenant in the Orange county regiment under Col. Jesse Woodhull, 1776. He was cannoneer at Fort Montgomery, where he and his son Beverly, a boy of twelve, were taken prisoners. They were exchanged when the fort was captured. He was born in Garrison's landing; died in Orange, N. Y.
Also No. 17722.
Isaac Kingsland, (1710-1803), served as a minute man in the Bergen county, New Jersey militia.
View full context

State of New Jersey Index of Wills, Inventories, Etc

Kingsland, Isaac. Vol. 1, pp. 5-6, 26-28, 65-68,
109-112, 122-123. B. F of Deeds, p. 529.
Essex. W. 1697. Inv. 1697.

[NI0633] The Van Ness Heritage and Allied Geneologies.

The birthdate for Theunis,18 Oct 1826, son of Jane Blanchard Dey, i s written in the family Bible, called the Jane Blanchard Bible, by hi s mother in 1732 when she was age 36. The date disagrees with the da te given in Van Ness.

Preakness and the Preakness Reformed Church by George Warne Lablaw, p astor of the church, New York, 1902;974.923, L112p, BYU;states Colone l Theunis Dey owned 1,000 acres total, and his land extended into Lit tle Falls.Discussion of the Dey Mansion."Colonel Theunis Dey was on e of the most distinguished citizens Preakness has ever had. He wa s colonel of the Bergen County Militia, in the early part of 1776, hi s son Richard (Derrick), being Captain of the same regiment. Afterwar ds Major, and still later General. Colonel Theunis Dey was in the Ne w Jersey assembly 1761-5, 1768-76, and in 1779; and in 1780-1, he rep resented Bergen county (this was all Bergen County then) in the counc il, returning to the assembly in 1783. In 1780, his wife, Hester Sch uyler Dey, and daughter-in-law, Mrs. Richard Dey, were appointed on t he committee of Bergen County ladies to raise funds for the relief o f the American troops." Diposition of the homestead 20 Dec 1801 fro m Davod Dey, his son, to Henry Berry.

DAR #19667 "Theunis Dey (1726-1787) was a member of the Provincial Co ngress and on the Committee of Safety. He was appointed colonel of t he Bergen county militia 1776, and was mustering officer 1780. His h ouse at Preakness was the headquarters of the Commander in Chief...."

History-Land;Anthony Dey;"Godwins of New York and New Jersey" by H. L . Peter Rounds, p. not numbered; "The Dey family, large land owners i n the City, wanted to keep Abraham (Godwin) there, and Anthony Dey of fered to sell him the south side of Dey Street, from Broadway to th e low water mark on the river, for 600L, which could be paid off by h is carpentry.. Feeling the strip of land was too expensive, he move d his family to Totowa about 1755, becomming the first white settle r there."

DAR member #17718, Miss Alice Gertrude Cartwright, born in Ithaca, Ne w York; a direct descendant of Colonel Theunis Dey.

History of the Treman, Tremaine, Truman Family in America vol1
62600. COL. THEUNIS DEY. (Dirck3, Theunis2, Dirck1.) 62201. He was born in 1725 (o. 1726), near Preakness, N. J. Colonel of the Bergen County Regiment, 1776. He built some years before the Dey house at Preakness, N. J., which house was for three months during 1780, the headquarters of Gen. Washington. He married, in 1751, Hester Schuyler (daughter of Philip Schuyler and Hester Kingsland [daughter of Hon. Isaac Kingsland, member of the Council, and Elizabeth Kingsland, of New Barbadoes Neck, N. J.], son of Arent Schuyler and Johanna Schuyler or Swan VanDuykhusen or Maria Schuyler, son of Philip Pieterse Schuyler, born 1628, the first of the name in this country, who married, Dec. 12, 1650, Margaret, daughter of Herr Brandt Arent VanSchlectenhorst, of Nieuw Kerk in Gelderland.) She was born April 12, 1725. Records at Trenton, N. J., say: Theunis Dey, (heir-at-law of Dirck Dey, deceased, of Bergen County), gives deed Nov. 19, 1770, to Peter Romer and others, trustees of the Low Dutch Reformed Church at Pompton. Witness, Ester Dey, Junior. Charter Trustee of Rutgers College." His will is dated Nov. 30, 1786; proved July 30, 1787. It is on record in the office of the Secretary of State at Trenton, N. J. Colonel, Bergen County, New Jersey Militia, February 28, 1776; served to close of war; member of New Jersey Assembly, 1777-84; Member of Bergen County Committee of Correspondence during the Revolutionary War.

[NI0636] Descendants of Abraham, his son Abraham, and his son Abraham from "Original Records of the Schuyler Family New Brunswick NJ June 1877 From the family Bible of Abraham pgs165-167

SCHUYLER, Abraham Davidtse, in 1709, resided upon the lot which his father had occupied on the
south corner of Broadway and Steuben street. In 1684 he was master of the sloop Hopewell plying between New York and Albany. In his will, made Dec. 15, 1709, he speaks of the five following children, of his wife and his brothers-in-law Wessel and Samuel Ten Broeck. He m. Geertruy Ten Broeck, Nov. 11,
1691. Ch: David, bp. Nov. 30, 1692; Christina, bp. July 21, 1695; Dirk, bp. July 28, 1700; Abraham, bp.
Aug. 27, 1704; Jacobus, bp. March 23, 1707.

[NI0644] known as "The American Lady"

Abstracts of Will, Vol XII 1782-1784
Page 33.--In the name of God, Amen. I, MARGARET SCHUYLER, widow of Collo Philip Schuyler, late of The Flatts, County of Albany, deceased; being in good health of body. All my just debts and funeral expenses to be paid. I leave all my real and personal estate, or otherwise, unto Geertruy, wife of Doctor John Cochran, Philip Schuyler, Stephen I. Schuyler, to the children of Cortlandt Schuyler, deceased, Henry Cuyler, Philip Cuyler, Cornelius Cuyler, Abraham C. Cuyler, Elizabeth Van Courtlandt, widow of James Van Courtlandt, deceased, and Margaret Low, wife of Isaac Low, a tenth part to each legatee or the children of such legatees as are now deceased. I make Philip Cuyler and Stephen I. Schuyler, executors.

Dated February 21, 1782. Witnesses, Mynd Roseboorn; and John A. Wendell, Mat Visscher, Esq., both of the City of Albany. Proved, January 26, 1783.


[NI0646] b. 1654; came to N. Y. about 1675; m Alida, widow of Domine
Nicholas Van Rensselaer, dau. of Col. Philip Pleterse Schuyler, of Albany, ancestor of the Livingstons of America. First Lord of the Manor of Livingston, granted 1686, by Gov. Dougan, a tract of land in Duchesss and Columbia counties, N. Y.; confirmed by Royal Charter of King George I, 1715, known as Livingston Manor.

Page 277.--Whereas ROBERT LIVINGSTON, husband of Alida Schuyler, late widow of the deceased Dom Nicholas Van Rensselaer, hath, by virtue of Letters of Administration granted to his wife by Sir Edmond Andross November 30, 1678, shown a general account concerning the administration, with an inventory showing the amount to be 3,440 guilders, 3 styvers, in Beavers, charging the estate with money paid to creditors, being 2302 guilders, 4 styvers, sewant, and 3,549g., 4 styvers, beavers, as by accounts, all of which we have examined, and especially the account of Captain Philip Schuyler, father-in-law to said deceased Van Rensselaer, because of the near relation. Upon application of Robert Livingston, the account is approved December 30, 1680. Martin Gerritsen. Johnes Provoost.





[NI0651] [Barnes.FTW]

Unsure this is the Peter buried in the Schuyler Cem, but the date of birth was the only close.

[NI0655] Abstracts of Wills Vol VI 1760-1766
pg 408--In the name of God, Amen, I Mary Kennedy , of New York, widow of Hon. Archibald Kennedy, Esq, being sick and weak. Wheras, by an antenuptial agreement with my late husband, I am authorized to dispose of oe1,000. I leave tthe same to my son-in-law (stepson) , Captain Archibald Kennedy, on condition that he manumits and makes free ny old and faithful negro woman called "Juba" and pay oe100 for her support. And this being done, I leave him all my remaining estate and make him executor. Dated 4/9/1764 Witnesses, Lambert Moore, Charles Williams, Alexander Colden. Proved, May 23, 1764.

[NI0659] Peter Schuyler was born in 1710 and died in 1762. He was the son of Arent and his second wife, Swantie Van Duyckhuysen. This Peter was the best known of all the family. He was the half-brother of the Philip Schuyler who married Hester Kingsland.

Peter was interested in Military affairs while his older brother, John, superintended their father's mines. He had command of the province troops against the French of Canada and in different campaigns. He was commissioned a Colonel on September 7, 1746 as a Commandant of the New Jersey Militia to invade Canada during the French and Indian War. The expedition was abandoned, but Governor Clinton declined to abandon the forces. Colonel Schuyler's forces suffered greatly for want of a surgeon and medicines as well as for food and clothing. He wrote the Governor of New Jersey that unless they were paid their dues and better provided for, his men would desert. The Governor assured him that he had that day ordered "two speckled shirts and one pair of shoes for each man," but nothing was said about other necessary clothing, provisions, medical attendance or pay. Col. Schuyler couldn't be an indifferent spectator while his fellow soldiers were suffering, so he paid his men out of his own resources.

Of Peter it was said, "He was a frank and open person, of much generosity and in all relations was what he seemed to be. He was tall and hardy, rather rough, but yet after knowing him, one discovered a great sincerity. He applied himself in whatever appeared of service to his country. In conversation, he was above deceit yet seemed to enjoy friendship with its true relish."

[NI0668] 69. Jane5 Callison (Robert4, James3, [Unknown]2, [Unknown]1 Robert Callison is the uncle of John Callison who is the ancestory of Marilyn (Therkild@aol.com)

[NI0676] Source shows marriage to Bula Harper c 1920
This Baker marriage is probably for sister of Elvis
Need verification

[NI0694] Merchant, removed to NY 1686, but returned. Mayor of Albany 1694-5 and 1709-10.

[NI0702] Staff Officer for General Washington, and their grandson Schuyler Colfax, Jr, Vice President of the US under Ulysses Grant

[NI0725] These descendants from Theresa Finocchiaro
3086 Woodbridge Estates
St. Louis, MO 63129
FINO3086@aol.com

[NI0726] Thomas married his first cousin, Lucy, the daughter of Mariah.

Thomas was once the Mayor of Mexico, Missouri.

[NI0732] William went to California in 1849, then back to Missouri until 1852 when he returned with his brother David to California.

[NI0755] In 1879 Boyle moved to Aliceton.

[NI0759] Page 284.--In the name of God, Amen, June 28, 1748. I, PHILIP SCHUYLER, of Albany, being in perfect health. It is my will that all just debts and funeral charges be paid. I leave to my two brothers, Jeremey and Peter, all my wearing apparell, both linen and woollen, and my watch and sword. I leave to my sister, Gertruy Lansingh, 50, to be paid by my brother Peter. I leave to my nephew, Peter Lansingh, two large silver saltcellars. I leave to my two sisters, Margaretta Livingston and Gertruy Lansingh, and my nephew, Barent Staats, Jr., all my right in the Patent of Westenhook, to each 1/3 of my 1/9 of said Patent, And my nephew, Barent Staats, is to pay to his sister, Anna Vanderpoel, 50. "It is my will that the present Burying-place be for ever kept and appropriated for that use and no other, and I hereby devise the said ground, containing one acre, for to be the burying-place for all the descendants of my father, Peter Schuyler, deceased, and my father-in-law John Schuyler, deceased, and such other persons as my wife Margarita shall allow to be there buried, and my brothers, Jeremey and Peter, shall allow." I leave to my wife, Margarita Schuyler, 1/2 of two lots lying at Canajoharie, in Albany County, on the north side of Mohawk River, and now in occupation of Hendrick Markell; Also all my real estate at the Flatts, while she remains my widow, and she is to pay all my just debts and funeral charges. "I leave to my brother, Jeremy Schuyler, after the death or marriage of my wife, my Great Island, called the Flats Island, he paying to the Patroon or Lord of the Manor of Rensselaerwyck 4 bushels of wheat yearly, in lieu of all other rents and services." I leave to my brother, Peter Schuyler, after my wife's death or marriage, all the rest of the farm called the Flatts, and he is to pay to my sister, Gertruy Lansingh, 50, and to my nephew, Peter Lansingh50, and to the Patroon or Lord of the Manor 4 bushels of wheat yearly, in lieu of all other rents and services. I make my wife executor.

Witnesses, John De Peyster, Nicholas Schuyler, Janes Stevenson. Proved, June 6, 1758, before John De Peyster, Surrogate.

Confirmed by Sir Henry Moore, September 2, 1766.

[NI0761] Page 176.--"This is the last will and Testament of JOHN BRADSTREET, Major General in his Majesty's Army, as follows." I appoint Col. Philip Schuyler to take all my books and papers and to settle and transmit my public accounts to Charles Gould, Esq., of London. And I discharge the said Col. Schuyler from all demands and debts, except 1000, "which shall be paid to Elizabeth Bradstreet, daughter to my wife." I leave to John Bradstreet Schuyler, son of said Col. Schuyler, the farm of which I have a lease in fee, and is now possessed by Tonycliff; also my army books and apparell. I leave all my horses and carriages to Mrs. Schuyler, wife of said Col. Schuyler, "and I give to his daughter, Margaret Schuyler, all the money due to me from Parson Johnson, of Corrys Bush." All the rest of my estate, real and personal, I leave to my two daughters, but they are to pay to their mother 100 sterling yearly. I empower my executors to make partition of my landed estate, and to sell for the benefit of my daughters. I leave to Doctor Bruce 100, for his trouble and kindness to me. My watch I give to Mr. Gould, as a mark of my friendship. "I leave Funeral expenses to the Discretion of my executors." I appoint for executors, Col. Philip Schuyler and William Smith, Esq., "who penned this will according to my dictate."

Dated September 23, 1774. Witnesses, Adam Gilchrist, tailor, William J. Allman, Francis Grant, "both apprentices to Doctor William Bruce, Surgeon, aged 19 and 20." Proved, in New York, September 30, 1774. (Names of wife and daughters not given.)

[NOTE.--General Bradstreet died Sunday, September 25, 1774, "at his house in Broad street." This was probably on the west side of Broad street on the north corner of Beaver street.--W. S. P.]


[NI0766] Stephen Van Rensselaer, the last patroon of Albany, died, aged 80. His death was the result of the infirmities of age, and had been anticipated for nearly two years past. Gen. Van Rensselaer was the only son of Stephen Van Rensselaer (known as the Old Patroon), by his first wife, who was a daughter of Gen. Schuyler, of Revolutionary fame. Alexander Hamilton, who was his uncle by marriage with another daughter of Gen. Schuyler, drew up the leases on which the Manor of Rensselaerwyck was rented. This manor extended twenty-four miles along the Hudson river, and twenty-four miles east and west. The deceased succeeded to the western half of the manor, the eastern half being left to William P. Van Rensselaer, the first born of the old patroon's second wife, Miss Patterson, of New Jersey. These lands were nearly all leased under perpetual leases, most of which were recently purchased by Colonel Walter S. Church, of this city. Probably the most valuable of the lands not thus encumbered are what is now known as the Lumber district, and the real estate near the city. The entail of the manorial property ceased with the death of his father. This will now be divided among the children, except twenty-five hundred acres between the Troy and Shaker roads, north of the Manor House, in which he had a life estate, and which now reverts to his half-brother, William P. Van Rensselaer. The surviving children of the deceased are Margaret, wife of Wilmot Johnson, of New York; Cornelia, wife of Nathaniel Thayer, of New York; Catharine, widow of Mr. Berry, of New York; Justina, widow of Dr. Howard Townsend; Harriet, wife of Capt. Crosby, U. S. A., and Eugene, the only surviving son. The widow of the deceased, who was Miss Bayard, the daughter of a former distinguished merchant of New York, still survives him. Gen. Van Rensselaer never sought official honors. He lived a quiet and unobtrusive life; but he leaves behind him an enviable reputation for the sterling virtnes which distinguished the race from which he was descended. The Manor House was always the home of an elegant and refined hospitality. He was liberal in his benefactions, and dispensed his wealth freely to all charitable objects and to the church, of which he was for many years a prominent member.--Argus.

Mr. Van Rensselaer never mingled in the active concerns of public business, with the interest that his father had manifested. The only public positions held by him were those of an alderman and of majorgeneral of this division of the military of the state, for some years previous to 1840. In the latter capacity he evinced much adaptability and skill, and his activity and zeal are well remembered by his compeers in life. His manners were quiet, social and unobtrusive. His friendships warm and active. He was liberal, generous and charitable.--Journal.

Funeral of Stephen Van Rensselaer. This funeral was very largely attended May 29, and the services were unusually impressive. The following were the bearers: Governeur Kemble, of Cold Spring; Jacob H. Ten Eyck, Esq., Hon. Erastus Corning, Harmon Pumpelly, Esq., H. H. Martin, Esq., Major Gen Jno. Tayler Cooper, Hon. John V. L. Pruyn, of Albany; Henry Burden, Esq., of Troy; Howard Boyd, Esq., Gen. S. V. R. Talcott, Charles Van Zandt, Esq., Col. John O. Cole, of Albany. Officiating Clergymen: Rev. Drs. B. W. Clark, W. B. Sprague of Albany; Rev. Dr. Vermilye, of New York; Rev. Dr. Kennedy, of Troy.-- Physicians: Thomas Hun, M. D., James P. Boyd, M. D.--Argus.

The remains were enclosed in a solid mahogany casket, covered with black broadcloth, ornamented with a narrow silver band forming a panel on each side, end and top. The plate was in solid silver in the form of a shield, bearing the following inscription in old English: "Stephen Van Rensselaer, born March 27th, 1789, died May 25th, 1868." At 3 o'clock the casket was brought down in the grand hall by four of the domestics acting as porters, and a prayer was offered by Rev. Dr. Clark. The procession moved to the First Reformed Church in the following order in carriages: Porters, clergy, physicians, elders of the church, deacons, hearse, relatives, servants, friends. The clergy, physicians and bearers wore white linen scarfs, and the servants were clothed in black clothing and black kid gloves. The service at church consisted of reading portions of scripture by Dr. Kennedy, sermon by Dr. Vermilye, prayer by Dr. Clark, benediction by Dr. Sprague. The remains were conveyed to the family grounds in the Albany Cemetery. The attendants filled thirty carriages.--Argus.

[NI0775] Aileen's daughter died of cancer in 1981 or 1982.

[NI0777] Page 453.--In the name of God, Amen. I, DAVID SCHUYLER, of Canajohary, in Albany County, being of perfect mind. "I leave to my eldest son, Peter D. Schuyler, 10 shillings for his birthright, and then the further sum of 40s. besides his equal share with my 9 children by my second wife, in the mines and minerals at Canajohary." "And because I do not hereby will my said son, Peter D. Schuyler, any more, I keep the reason to myself." I leave to all the children by my second wife each one full share of all my lands and pretensions at Canajohary, at the lake Conjadaroga. Also a full share of the mines and minerals. I also give to all the children by my second wife, viz., John, Adonijah, David, Philip, Jacob, Anna, Margaretta, Alida, and Catharine, all my estate in Albany and New York and Rensselaerwyck and in Surinam. "My daughter Catharine is to have 30 paid to her by her brothers and sisters, and they shall help her if in want; and they shall help one another if necessity requires." And those who are able to use my lands shall do so for the support of their mother and my smaller children. And when my younger children are old enough to pay their share of debts, they shall repay them. And if they do not help, then my wife has power to lease land. I appoint Sir William Johnson, Baronet, Sylrant Van Schaick, Esq., the old Mayor Peter Schuyler, and Dominie Johan Kaspar Lappeus, Abraham Yates, High Sheriff, Johanes Degormay, and Conrad Matyse, executors, "and I impower them to see Justice done to the heirs." Dated April 3, 1759.

Witnesses, Hendrick Ecker, Caspar Boner, Joseph Meyer. Proved in Albany, February 10, 1764. The executors having resigned, Letters of Administration are granted to John Schuyler.

[NI0787] [Barnes.FTW]

Father's will states John, and Adonijah as two separate children

[NI0798] During the Revolutionary War, JACOB served as a private in the First Regiment of the Tyron County Militia under Lt. Col. Samuel Clyde and Capt. Jost Deggert. DAVID,JOHAN JOST,NICOLAS,PETER P and DAVID JR SCHUYLER also served in the same regiment.

Jacob was taken prisoner by the British during the Rev. War. There are two accounts of his capture. The 1st account was given in a letter written by ELIAS SCHUYLER(a grandson of Jacob) to his daughter in 1893 which appeared in the Chicago Inter Ocean in 1896. "JACOB SCHUYLER" was one of the guards stationed at Ft. Herkimer. His family was in the fort and he worked his farms nearby as occasion offered. While in the fields, he was surprized and captured by the indians and taken prisoner to Canada, leaving his wife and five small children, the youngest a babe of 3 months."

The second account :
In the fall of 1780 JACOB SCHUYLER was stationed at Fort Stanwix under Capt. Walter Vrooman. The Capt. was ordered to take a detachment ot Chittenango Creek and destroy boats and stores left there by Sir John Johnson's forces of Tories, Canadians and Indians. The force had descended on the Mohawk Valley from LaChine, an Island on the St. Lawrence River, and laid waste to Schoharie Valley. Gen Robt. Van Renselaer pursued Sir Johnson to Herkimer and from there sent orders to Ft, Stanwick. Captain Vrooman accomplished his mission but was surprized on Oct. 23 while at dinner by a detachment of Col. John Buttler's Rangers who were sent to intercept them by Sir Johnson. Among the captured were JACOB,DAVID and HON YOST SCHUYLER. Capt. Vrooman and his party were taken to Montreal, Canada and held two years.
According to military records, JACOB was a prisoner fromn 10-23-1780 till 5-21-1783.

[NI0823] From: insjohn@yahoo.com (John P. Cowan)
I'm doing research on my ancestors which happen to be the Schuylers of New York fame. My maternal great great grandfather was James Monroe Schulyer - born May 1, 1812. His parents were Peter and Elizabeth. However, I'm showing that James' wife was Phoebe Jane Allen - not Mary Jane Decker as you show. Do we have the same James Monroe Schuyler?

[NI0847] This Robert Livingston Jr is sometimes referred to as "The Nephew", to keep him from being confused with Robert Livingston, the Lord of the Manor of Livingston. See the Livingston Genealogy by Florence Van Rensselaer, and the Livingston Register by the Friends of Clermont.

[NI0850] Catherine was called Sweet Kittie V R.

Catherine was descended from Kilian Van Rensselaer, the older man who did not come to America, but had large land holdings in America.

1805 General Schuylers decedents estate is settled by a Chancery Decree, supra, and Catherine Schuyler Malcom inherits Farm # 3
Catheine Schuyler Malcom sells the farms in her Allotment under the Chancery Decree, supra. Not all of her Grantees record their deeds.

[NI0930] Oct. 21. Cateline, of Willem Groesbeek. Wit.: father, David Schuyler, Pieter D; Schuyler. By Cateline Schuyler.

[NI1009] Dear Sandi,

I am interested in some history on the VanRensselaer Family. I am in the process of researching my genealogy and came across a family bible. In this family bible was a packet which contained a locket of golden blonde hair and the inscription Alexander van rensselaer
1814 - 1878
son of
Stephen van rensselaer
1764 - 1839

It seems that my great great great grandmother, Rachel MacBeth worked as a governess for the van rensselaer family before she was married. But she would have been much younger than Alexander as she was only in her mid twenties when she married in 1856. Or maybe I am being a bit naive and it
could actually be the elder Alexander's hair?

Did Alexander have any children that she could have governessed for? and if so would there by any record of her employment there (Maybe in a census?)

I cannot find any record of her before she married my great great great grandfather, John Wilson before the year 1856.

Marylu Kelly
mkelly@balnwk.com (Kelly, Marylu)

[NI1015] New York City Wills, 1708-1728
Page 167.--KILLIAN VAN RENSSELAER. In the name of God, Amen. I, Killian Van Rensselaer, of the manor of Rensselaerwyck, Gentleman, being of sound memory. My body is to be buried in the burying place to the northward of the Old Fort at Albany. I leave to my eldest son Jeremiah all that my manor of Rensselaerwyck with all the rights and appurtenances, and every part and parcel thereof, together with the said burying place or lot of pasture ground now in the possession of John Rosie. And all my stock of negroes, cattle and utensils (except as I give to my wife and younger children) to him and his heirs male, and in default of such, then to my second son Stephen. I leave to my wife Mary the use of all my estate during her widowhood, and she is to give my sons the best and most liberal education that this Province and Boston can afford, and to take care for their maintenance and that of my daughter. But if she marries she shall have the use of the Island, and the pasture over against, now in possession of Andries Ganse. And also the saw mill standing on Normans Kill, now in the possession of Dirck Harmense Visher. Also 3 negroes, 12 horses, and 10 cows, and liberty of cutting saw logs and timber on the manor. My plate, jewels, and household goods are to be divided into three parts, one-third to my wife and two-thirds to my children. My daughter Mary is to have 500 from the rents of the manor, 300 when she is of age, and the rest after my wife's decease. Also 200 acres of woodland. But if she or her heirs sell the same, the purchaser shall be obliged to pay to the Lord of the manor, the tenths, according to the custom of the manor, but if they hold it they are to pay three shillings rent. I leave to my son Stephen the sum of 500 from the rents of the manor when he comes of age. I leave to my son Jacobus the creek called Scotack Creek, on the east side of Hudsons River, about eight miles below Albany, with a grist mill on said stream. And my heir-at-law is to put him in possession when of age, and he and his heirs are to pay to the Lord of the manor as a rent forever one hundred good and merchantable deal boards yearly. I also leave him all the woodland lying on or near said creek, that is to say all the woodland lying between the bounds of Johanes Beekman and Moss Van Buren, running all the way from the river into the woods till it comprehends 1,500 acres, with right to cut saw logs and timber for said mill out of any part of the manor, and liberty of commonage of pasture. Also 200 acres more of woodland in any part of the manor. But if he or his heirs sell the same the purchasers are to pay to the Lord of the manor the tenths according to custom; But if they retain it they shall pay three shillings rent. I leave my fourth son, John Baptist Van Rensselaer, 300 acres of land upon Pastin Kill to the north of Van Bruyhns farm, with the meadow that lies by it, with right of commonage, with right of cutting fire-wood and fencing; I also leave him 500 out of the rents of the manor. The 300 acres of land are to be taken at the head of the kill and its branches. I leave to my daughter Gertrude 500, part when of age, and part at the death of my wife. Also 200 acres of good woodland. I also leave to my son Stephen 300 acres of land at Hosick, being lowlands lying on Hosick Creek. The above legacies are secured by the rents of the manor. I leave to Rensselaer Nicoll, the youngest son of my sister Anne Nicoll, all that farm at Bethlehem now in possession of William Van Allen, with the island called Nieffes Island, beginning at the south side of Bethlehem Creek and extending to the bounds of Barent Peterse Coeymans, and backwards into the woods from Hudsons River, one English mile, And the farm on the north side of Bethlehem Creek, 10 or 12 acres, as in fence, where the house and barn of Coysome lately stood, with the right of keeping a saw-mill on the south side of the creek, where a saw-mill now stands, with privilege of bringing to the said mill 300 logs yearly. And he and his heirs are to have no further claim as heirs of my sister Anne. I release to my brother, Henry Van Rensselaer, the tenths of his land in the manor for 21 years, and to my nephew, Rensselaer Nicolls, and my other nephews, Jeremiah and Peter Schuyler , the tenths for their lands during the minority of my heir. My executors are to build a grist mill on the Fifth Kill near my now dwelling house on which my other mills now stand. It is my will that none of my heirs shall lease any old settlements or the mills for a longer period than for their own lives; my executors are not to lease for a term of years any land within two miles of Hudson River on the north side of Fifth Kill between the said kill and the Stone Kill which lies to the north of the farm of Colonel Peter Schuyler called the Flats. Nor any meadow fit to make hay; but they shall be and remain for the encouragement of new settlers. I appoint my wife Mary, my brother, Henry Van Rensselaer, and my brother-in-law, Philip Van Cortlandt, and my friend, John Collins, of Albany, executors. "This my last will, being written on twelve sides of three sheets of paper, sewed together with blue silk, the ends of said silk being fixed in hard wax under my seal, and being signed by me on every sheet in the presence of the witnesses in New York." June 11, 1718. Witnesses, John Troop, Oliver Teller, T. Meeks, David Jamieson. Codicil, September 4, 1719. My son, John Baptist Van Rensselaer, and his heirs may build a saw-mill on Pastin Kill on the east side of Hudson River. Witnesses, Hendrick Hanson, I. Baker, Abraham Staats, Melgert Van Dusen. Proved, May 10, 1720. [NOTE.--Mary, wife of Killian Van Rensselaer, was daughter of Colonel Stephanus Van Cortlandt

[NI1021] Abstracts of Wills Vol IV 1744-1753
Page 190.--In the name of God, Amen. I, STEPHEN VAN RENSSELAER, of the Manor of Rensselaerwyck, in the County of Albany, Gentleman, being very sick. My body is to be buried in the new burying place, nigh the Manor House, a little above the middlemost Grist mill, to the south of the Fifth kill, where I desire a vault to be made for my corpse to be laid in. I dispose of my temporal estate as follows: I leave to my only son, Stephen, all that my Manor of Rensselaerwyck, with all my stock of negroes, horses, and cattle, and implements of husbandry, to the said Manor belonging. I leave to my wife, Elizabeth, the use and profits of my whole estate during her widowhood, and the minority of my son and heir. If my wife should re-marry or die during the minority of my son, then my executors are to receive the property and use it till he be of age, and they are to provide for the maintainance and education of my children. All my plate, jewels, bills, bonds, and goods are to be inventoried and appraised by my executors, and 1/2 of them to be given to my wife, and 1/2 to my daughter Elizabeth, when she is of age or married. I leave to my daughter Elizabeth all my share of a certain tract of land in Albany County, called Watoms-patch, and also a lot of land in the Manor of Rensselaerwyck, fronting the road that leads to the Manor house, lying between the lot of Volkert Vanderberg and Abraham De Freest; Also a lot behind the lot of Jeremiah Schuyler, where he now lives, running up westerly, ranging with the street from the northwest corner of said Schuyler's house, 35 feet, and so southward, keeping the same breadth as far as the vacant ground goes, not as yet given or granted to any other person; Also 1/2 of a stream and saw mill where Christian Scham used to live on it formerly, on the east side of Hudson river, in the said Manor; And also 150 acres of land convenient to said mill, with the privilege of cutting and carrying away logs for the saw mill; Also free liberty of Commonage of pasture in the Manor; Also 300 acres of land at Hosick, lying upon Hosick creek, being the land that was given to me by the will of my father, Killian Van Rensselaer. If she or her heirs shall sell the said mill and land, then the purchaser shall pay yearly, forever, the tenths to the heir at law in possession of said Manor; But if she or her heirs retain the said lands, they shall only pay for each tract the sum of 3 shillings yearly in lieu of all rents. If my wife should marry she shall have the use of the Island and the pasture over against it, now in possession of my mother, after the decease of my said mother; I also leave to my wife, Elizabeth, the Bowery on Conagone, now in possession of Hendrick Jong, during her life. But if she should be in want for her maintainance, she may sell it. Otherwise, the said farm shall return to my son, Stephen, and my daughter Elizabeth. I also leave to my daughter Elizabeth a lot of ground adjoining to the north of the lot of Isaac Fiele, lying on the west side of the road that leads from the Town to the Manor house, being 40 feet in breadth, and as long as the said Fiele's lot. I make my wife Elizabeth and my brother Jacobus, and John Baptist Van Rensselaer and my brother in law, Gerardus Groesbeck, executors of this will.

"Done at my Manor House, the 24th day of June, 1747." Witnesses, Symon Deryder, Peter Schuyler, Jr., John De Peyster. Proved before Myndert Schuyler, Esq., in Albany, July 27, 1747.

[NI1024] [Barnes.FTW]


Page 350.--In the name of God, Amen, August 15, 1754. I, JACOBUS VAN RENSSELAER, of the Manor of Rensselaerwyck, Gent. I leave to my dearly beloved brother, John Baptist Van Rensselaer, all my estate both real and personal, goods and chattels. But if he die without issue, then to the children of my sister Gertruy, wife of Adonijah Schuyler, and Anna, wife of John Schuyler. I make my said brother and my brothers-in-law, John Schuyler and Adonijah Schuyler, executors.

Witnesses, Peter Winne, Edward Williams, John R. Bleecker. Proved in Albany, May 28, 1762.

[NI1026] Jan. 6, 1763. CATHARINE SCHUYLER.
Page 123
To be Sold at Public Vendue,
On the Premises, on Monday the 28th Day of March next,
THE advantageously situated Farm and Plantation, late of ADONIAH SCHUYLER, deceased at Elizabeth-Town Point; whereon is a good Dwelling House, Barn, Out-Houses, a large Orchard, together with the Ferry, and Road from the Sound, to the Upland of Staten-Island, and the several Privileges belonging to the same. The Title is indisputable, and a Deed will be given to the Purchaser, by John Schuyler, and Gertrude Schuyler, Executors of the last Will and Testament of the said Adoniah Schuyler, who have Power to sell the same..--The New York Gazette, January 10, 1763.

[NI1042] That is the same line I am from. My Great-grandfather was John and great grand mother was Teresa. My grand mother was Dora Bell Dorothy, M David Grant DeBoe.
My grandmothers siblings were Mary Ellen Board Sigler, Elizabeth Board Ison, Buddy Board, Bertha Board Blackburn, Effie Board Board
David and Dora Board DeBoe had 8 children. Carrie DeBoe McDowell, Ethyl DeBoe Parker, Carlos m Vera Kennedy,Bertha m Dewey Traylor, Lora m Brady Sigler, Johnnie (My Dad) m Roberta Jones, Virginia m Jewell Stewart and Abraham Agustus (Buster )m&d Gladys Lowery My niece by marriage, Joi Walker has written a book on her 10 years research on the Schuyler and Board Families.
One of our great aunts (Schuyler) married Alexander Hamilton. We have the same Schuyler grandmother as George Bush. It is very fascinating. If her book is not in the Coon Library it soon will be. I have a copy.
I live in KY and am spending the winter in Tampa so I am writing this from memory as all my records are back in Pikeville.
My cousin, Greg Watson, has catalogued all the cemetery's in Caldwell Co. There are 6 books. He does not have all of them printed yet but I have 2 of them so far
Hilda DeBoe (Cayce) Payne

[NI1051] New York City Wills, 1708-1728
Page 115.--In the name of God, Amen. I, PHILIP SCHUYLER , of New York, merchant, being weak in body. I leave to my eldest son, Brandt Schuyler , when he is of age, my negro boy Jacob, in full for his birth right. I leave to my wife Anna Elizabeth, all my estate during widowhood or while my two sons, Brandt and Samuel, remain unmarried, and I leave all my estate to them after the decease of my wife. If my mother, Cornelia Schuyler , should happen to die before my sons are of age, my executors are to make a division of the estate of my father, Captain Brandt Schuyler , deceased, with my brothers, Oliver and John, "in same manner as if I were living." I make my wife, Anna Elizabeth, my brother Oliver and my brother in law, Isaac Guerneur, executors. Dated January 18, 1722. Witnesses, Cornelius Clopper, John Le Montes, Daniel Abeel. Proved, December 1, 1725.

[NI1057] [Barnes.FTW]

Evansville Courier-Press
Evansville, In.
August 22, 2000

Louise Watson,76 died Sunday, Aug. 20, 2000 at Caldwell County Hospital, in Princeton, Ky. She retired as a line worker for Arvin Industries and was a member of Donaldson Baptist Church. Born Dorthy Louise Sigler, May 21, 1924, she was the daughter of the late Brady Francis Sigler and Lora Novella Deboe Sigler. Survivors include a daughter, Caldwell County Court Clerk, Toni Watson, two sons, Gregory L. Watson of Caldwell County, and Fred Watson, Sr. , of Princeton, Ky. ; and eight grandchildren, Laceon, Gerad, Jonathan, Jennifer, Fred Jr., Christopher Jon, Taylor and Caleb Watson Her husband John Laceon Watson, died in 1977. Services Tuesday, Aug 22, at 2 p.m. at Morgan's Funeral Home in Princeton. Burial in Sugar Creek Cemetery in Caldwell County, Ky.

[NI1084] This lineage from David Schuyler and Catlyn VerPlank from Dennis B Ardinger, 130 Meadow Dr, Bridgeville, PA 15017-1214 and is viewed on CD#10,tree # 4468

[NI1151] Caldwell County The Times Leader Princeton Kentucky January 3, 1996

Mrs. Beatrice Sigler, 84, of Farmersville Road, Princeton, died Monday, January 1st, at 5:30 a.m. at Crittenden County Hospital in Marion, following a short illness. A member of Chapel Hill Baptist Church and a homemaker, she was born November 14th 1911, in Caldwell County, a daughter of the late Arthur G. and Maple McConnell Sullivan. She was preceded in death by her husband, Raymond Sigler in 1986, and two grandchildren. Survivors include a son, Jerry Sigler of Caldwell County; three daughters, Marjorie Howton and Carolyn Cruce, both of Caldwell County, and Jean Dillingham of Princeton; six grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and a sister, Kathleen Board of Caldwell County. Funeral services will be conducted Wednesday, January 3rd, at 1:00 p.m. at Morgan's Funeral Home in Princeton with the Rev. Lester Watson officiating, assisted by Rev. James H. Beavers. Burial will follow in Pleasant Hill Cemetery in Caldwell County, Ky.

[NI1152] [Barnes.FTW]

left no descendants

[NI1153] left no descendants
Page 161.--In the name of God, Amen. "Be it known and manifest unto all people that I, JOHN SCHUYLER, of New York, son of Major Brandt Schuyler, deceased, being at the present moment in good health, have thought fit to make these presents to be my last will." I leave to my brother, Oliver Schuyler, all my wearing apparell, and gold and silver belonging to my body. "And all that my now dwelling-house in New York in the street commonly called and known by the name of Queen street for the term of two years." My man slave and my woman slave are to be set free. I leave to my nephews, Brandt Schuyler and Samuel Schuyler, the sons of my brother, Philip Schuyler, deceased, all that my aforesaid dwelling-house and lot after the two years have expired. Whereas, I own 1-16 part of a certain tract of land, of which I formerly owned 1/2, and 1/2 of which I have already given to my nephew, Brandt Schuyler, containing in all 7,000 acres in the Province of New York (and is a part of the reassumed lands formerly granted to Captain John Evans), in company with David Provoost, John Cruger, and others. I bequeath the same to my nephews, Brandt and Samuel Schuyler. Whereas, I own 1/4 of 3,000 acres, being part of the said reassumed lands, in company with Allen Jarrett and Cornelius Low; I give the same to my said nephews, and also all the rest of my estate, real and personal. I appoint my loving sister-in-law, Anna Elizabeth Schuyler, widow of my late brother, Philip Schuyler, and mother of my said nephews, and my loving nephews, John Schuyler, son of Colonel John Schuyler, of Albany, and Frederick Van Cortlandt, of New York, my executors.

Dated July 10, 1728. Witnesses, John McLenan, Frederick Sebring, Abraham Gouverneur. Proved, August 21, 1731.

[NOTE.--The large tracts of land mentioned are in Orange County, the house and lot in Queen street is now No. 220 Pearl Street, New York.--W. S. P.]

[NI1181] Abstracts of Wills Vol VII 1766-1771 pg 134
Page 284.--In the name of God, Amen, June 28, 1748. I, PHILIP SCHUYLER, of Albany, being in perfect health. It is my will that all just debts and funeral charges be paid. I leave to my two brothers, Jeremey and Peter, all my wearing apparell, both linen and woollen, and my watch and sword. I leave to my sister, Gertruy Lansingh, 50, to be paid by my brother Peter. I leave to my nephew, Peter Lansingh, two large silver saltcellars. I leave to my two sisters, Margaretta Livingston and Gertruy Lansingh, and my nephew, Barent Staats, Jr., all my right in the Patent of Westenhook, to each 1/3 of my 1/9 of said Patent, And my nephew, Barent Staats, is to pay to his sister, Anna Vanderpoel, 50. "It is my will that the present Burying-place be for ever kept and appropriated for that use and no other, and I hereby devise the said ground, containing one acre, for to be the burying-place for all the descendants of my father, Peter Schuyler, deceased, and my father-in-law John Schuyler, deceased, and such other persons as my wife Margarita shall allow to be there buried, and my brothers, Jeremey and Peter, shall allow." I leave to my wife, Margarita Schuyler, 1/2 of two lots lying at Canajoharie, in Albany County, on the north side of Mohawk River, and now in occupation of Hendrick Markell; Also all my real estate at the Flatts, while she remains my widow, and she is to pay all my just debts and funeral charges. "I leave to my brother, Jeremy Schuyler, after the death or marriage of my wife, my Great Island, called the Flats Island, he paying to the Patroon or Lord of the Manor of Rensselaerwyck 4 bushels of wheat yearly, in lieu of all other rents and services." I leave to my brother, Peter Schuyler, after my wife's death or marriage, all the rest of the farm called the Flatts, and he is to pay to my sister, Gertruy Lansingh, 50, and to my nephew, Peter Lansingh, 50, and to the Patroon or Lord of the Manor 4 bushels of wheat yearly, in lieu of all other rents and services. I make my wife executor.

Witnesses, John De Peyster, Nicholas Schuyler, Janes Stevenson. Proved, June 6, 1758, before John De Peyster, Surrogate.

Confirmed by Sir Henry Moore, September 2, 1766.



[NI1183] [Barnes.FTW]

Page 508.--In the name of God, Amen. I, STEPHEN VAN RENSSELAER, Esq., Proprietor of the Manor of Rensselaerwyck, being in a reasonable state of health. "I commit my Body to the Earth, to be buried in a manner decent and suitable to my rank, at the discretion of my executors." Upon the remarriage of my wife or upon the first legal possession of my Manor, by virtue of this will. I give to my wife Catharine all that my Island, commonly called Martin Gerritsen's Island, situate in Hudson river, to the southward of the city of Albany, and now in possession of Col. John Bradstreet, by lease under me, being part of my Manor; Also a homestead on the main, opposite the upper end of said Island, bounded north on the city line, south by the land of the heirs of Fletcher Holland, and extending from the river, westward till it takes in 100 acres. These are to her for life in lieu of dower. I leave to Philip Livingston and Abraham Ten Eyck, Esquires, all my Manor, with all and singular, the lands and improvements. In Trust, for my eldest son, Stephen Van Rensselaer, and his heirs male; and in default of such heirs, then to my son Philip and his heirs male. And in default, then to the heirs male of the succeeding sons. In default then to heirs male of my sister Elizabeth, wife of Abraham Ten Broeck, Esq. And in default then to male heirs of my aunt, Gertrude Livingston, and in default to the male heirs of my aunt, Anne Schuyler, and in default to my kinsman, John Van Rensselaer, Esq. I leave to my son Philip all my house and lot in the first ward in Albany, near the English Church. And all my lands in the Patent commonly called Walomscock Patent, granted to Edward Collins, James De Lancey, and others, June 15, 1739, situate on the east side of Hudson river; Also a lot in my Manor, on the west side of the highway that leads from Albany to Walter Vliet (Watervliet), bounded east by said street or highway, north by the lot of Lucas Van Vegten, south by the lot of Peter Dox, being 110 feet front and 40 rods long; Also a tract in my Manor on the east side of Hudson river, at a place called Scotack, bounded on the river, and to run east between the lands of John Beekman and Johanes Van Bueren, until it makes 1,500 acres. With a grist mill and sawmill on Scotack creek, with the privilege of getting logs on any part of my Manor. I also leave him out of the rents of my Manor, the sum of 1,500. I leave to my daughter Elizabeth, a certain lot of ground on the west side of the highway that leads from Albany to Water Vliet, bounded north by the lot laid out for Casparus Van Vie, east by the highway, being in front 200 feet Rhineland measure, and 31 rods in length. I also leave her 500 acres on the east side of Hudson river on and near Pooston Kill, and towards the head of said creek, to be laid out by my executors. With a sawmill and ground for a dam and 30 acres adjoining; Also a farm now in occupation of Philip P. Schuyler, on the west side of Hudson river, bounded east by the river, south by Steen hook, north by Jonas Oothout's land, west by Cornelius W. Vandenburgh, and to include the vacant land and farm now in tenure of Johanis Van Arneem. I also leave her 1,500 out of the rents of my Manor. I leave to my son Philip and my daughter Elizabeth all my land in the Manor of Cortlandt, in Westchester County. I leave to my wife the income of my estate until my son Stephen is of age, and she is to maintain, educate, and bring up my children, in a manner suitable to their birth, and also pay all debts. If my wife marries, she is to have 1,000, and a chariot and pair of good horses. I make my wife Catharine and my father-in-law, Philip Livingston, Esq., and my brother-in-law, Abraham Ten Broeck, Esq., and my friends, John Ten Eyck, Esq., of Albany, and Gerardus Groesbeck, executors.

Dated August 30, 1769. Witnesses, Philip Schuyler, Lucas Van Veghten, Peter Silvester.

Codicil. I leave to my son Philip the east half of a certain tract of land on said Manor on the west side of Hudson river, north of the limits of the city of Albany, and in the rear of certain lots laid out, and about the land called Jan Fonda's land. Beginning at a pine tree on the west side of a street 5 rods wide, which runs north and south, and in a line which runs northwest from the southeast corner of Peter Yeate's land, "where a large great gun or cannon is fixed in the ground, and is distant on a northwest course from said great gun 280 rods, Rhineland measure." And runs from the said Pine tree North, 45 degrees West 80 chains, then N. 45 E. 18 chains 5 links, then South 45 degrees West 18 chains 5 links to beginning, and containing 147 acres. Reserving a road 5 rods wide through it. I leave to my daughter Elizabeth the west half of the same. I leave to my son Philip and my daughter Elizabeth a certain house and lot in Schenectady, the lot being 50 feet wide and 200 feet long, as sold to me by Nicholas Groot, August 9th, last.

Dated September 7, 1769. Witnesses, Thomas Hun, John Ten Broeck, Rutgert Bleecker. Proved, July 16, 1770, before Peter Lansing, Surrogate.

Confirmed by Governor Tryon, August 19, 1775.






[NI1237] [Barnes.FTW]

Of the "manor Family"

[NI1238] died unmarried

[NI1247] The Terhune Family Bible lists a dau for Phillip - Eleanor b. 1776. I have serious doubts about this (at least the date). Phillip didn't marry until 1788, and would have been only 16 at the time of Eleanor's birth.

[NI1248] Philip Van Brugh Livingston, born 1710, was son of Philip Livingston, born Albany, N. Y., 1686, second Lord of the Manor, and Catharine Van Brugh, daughter of Peter Van Brugh and Sarah Cuyler; and Philip Livingston was son of Robert Livingston1, first Lord of Manor, and Alida Schuyler, daughter of Philip Peterse Schuyler and Margaretta Van Schlechtenhorst. Robert Livingston, who came to America in 1674, was son of John Livingston, a Scotch clergyman, born 1654, of Roxburgshire, of the family of Livingstons of Callendar.

[NI1317] 1850 Ky Census Records taken October 10, 1850 shows child named Mary age 4/12 placing the birth June, 1850. Name and age different from Book record.

[NI1377] From: Zekescot@aol.com
Would like to exchange info on this lineage. I am a direct descendant of Elizabeth Board and Elijah Gates Chatham thru their son Alfred Thomas II. My gr/fa was Ilee Chatham.
Ozell D. Scott 3476 Johnston Rd., Hernando, MS 38632-9230

[NI1534] From: CbontaIII@aol.com
Now that you mention it, I do vaguely recall my dad and a couple of other old timers talking about a second marriage. Maybe I can find it in the Boyle County Courthouse records. My great grandfather. either fell or was pushed into an empty cistern that he was repairing. There are conflicting stories and I don't know who to believe. Anyway, before the injury, he was a very prosperous and intelligent farmer and trader - especially mules. After the injury, his mental functioning was permanently impaired and he spent the rest of his life in a sanitarium.

[NI1537] Henry was not married and had no children. He was shot to death by his brother in law, Walter Sevier.

[NI1538] From: CbontaIII@aol.com
Charles Cunningham Bonta was my grandfather. It did not come to my attention that his middle name was Cunningham instead of William until after I was an adult and had college and military records as Charles W. Bonta, III. He also had a paternal uncle named Charles Cunningham Bonta.He was born March 15, 1883 and died June 3, 1913 Most of the early family are buried at the Presbyterian Church Cemetery on US 68 on the hill above Nevada, KY. He had some brothers and sisters that you are unaware of that died in infancy and early childhood. I also have their names, birthdates, and date of death as well as information on his sister Jenkie Bonta Sevier, her husband, Walter, and her children (Virginia, Wanell, Walter Granville SevierJr., Josiah Collins Sevier) .I also have information on my grandfather's brother, Henry, my father's siblings, and other paternal ancestors all the way back to my great great grandparents. I will share names, birthdates, and dates of death to the extent that I have them. When I get the time, I plan to expand out the family tree on ancestry.com. However, right now I'm busy with higher priorities. Are you a relative or a genealogist? You don't have to answer, of course. I was just curious.

[NI1608] Descendants of Mary are from Ozell Scott Zekescot@aol.com

[NI1734] Chester Board
1910 Enumeration District: 0011 Color: W
Age: 26 Birth Place: Kentucky (age 66?)
Visit: 0234
County: Caldwell
Relation: Husband
Relatives: Son John R 41, Kentucky
Daughter Bettie 33, Kentucky

[NI1746] The info I have is from the Kingsland Book by Louis Kingsland. It states that he was born May 20, 1744 in Pompton Plains, New Jersey and died on April 26, 1818 in Orange County, New York. Married to Catherine Creely in 1770. It also states that he served on Washington's staff in the Revolutionary War. It seems everyone served on Washington's staff.The records in the Library of Congress which contain all of Washington's corresspondance make no mention of him.

[NI1757] Second Wife of Phillip Schuyler

[NI1789] Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey Vol22
Board, Elinor, and Peter Dey, Bergen 1786 May 9

History of the Treman, Tremaine, Truman Family in America vol1
63065. PETER DEY. (Theunis4, Dirck3, Theunis2, Dirck1.) 62605. He was born March 17, 1760, at Preakness, Bergen Co., N. J. He married, in 1786 (M. L. dated May 9, 1786), Eleanor Board (daughter of Major David Board, an officer of the Revolution, and Hannah Kingsland [daughter of Isaac Kingsland of New Barbadoes Neck, N. J.], son of Cornelius Board who bought lands and owned iron works in the Town of Ringwood, Passaic Co., N. J., as early as 1737). (See History of the Board Family in this volume.) Soldier in his father's Bergen County Regiment in the Revolutionary War. He removed about 1811 to the Town of Fayette, Seneca Co., N. Y. He died June 4, 1833 (o. 1835). She died in 1801.

Children:


63066. Hannah. Born June 12, 1787. Bap. Feb. 1, 1789. Married
Anthony Dey. 70200.
63067. Mary. Born Dec. 12, 1788 (o. 1789). Bap. Feb. 1, 1789. Married
Dr. Daniel Hudson. 70135.
63068. Esther. Born in 1790. Died young.
63069. Hester Schuyler. Born Nov. 30, 1790. Bap. March 27, 1791.
Married David Hudson. 70150.
63070. Jane. Born Aug. 29, 1798. Married Ben. Johnson. 70170.
63071. Eleanor. Born in 1800. Married Ebenezer Mack. 14800.

[NI1815] Charles Howell was a Doctor.

[NI1827] [Barnes.FTW]

Ten children

[NI1886] [Barnes.FTW]

James Board Durland, Nancy's son, married Sarah M ANDREWS, daughter of George F Andrews and Mary Elizabeth Holbert, m 19 Dec 1849. George F Andrews was nephew of William Mapes Rysdyk, owner of the famous horse "Hambletonian" who was progenitor of all the famous Harness Racing Horses in America. It's quite a story, and I'll be happy to give you more details if you want them.

Thanks again,

John
john.phillips4@virgin.net (John Phillips)

[NI1909] Page 64.--ANN MARY SCHUYLER, widow of Dirck Schuyler, of City of New York. To Mary, daughter of Abraham Schuyler, deceased, of New Brunswick, New Jersey, the interest on 50 during her natural life, and at her death the said sum of 50 to be equally divided among the children that she may then have living, share and share alike; to William Bradford, Sr., of Philadelphia, 10; to Schuyler Bradford, 50; to Rachel Bradford, 50; to Elizabeth Ogden, widow of Jacob Ogden, deceased, 150; to Ann Mercier, 100; to Heleana Van Wyck, widow of Theodorious Van Wyck, 100; to Abraham Schuyler, son of Abraham Schuyler, of New Brunswick, 100; to Abraham Schuyler, son of Dirck Schuyler, of Albany, 150; to Dirck Schuyler, son of Jacobus Schuyler, of Albany, 150; to John Van Vorhies, son of John Van Vorhies, of New Brunswick, 50; to William Ogden, son of Jacob Ogden, deceased, 10; to William C. Bradford, son of Cornelius Bradford, 150; to Theodorious Van Wyck and Piere Van Cortlandt Van Wyck, sons of Abraham Van Wyck, deceased, each 25, to be paid to them when they shall arrive at the age of twenty-one years, and in case of the death of either of them before reaching legal age the sum of 25 given to them to be paid to the survivor, and in case they both die before the age of twenty-one the said sums given them to be paid to the children of Theodorious Van Wyck, share and share alike; to Mary Van Wyck, daughter of Theodorious Van Wyck, one equal half part of the money received for the sale of my two lots of land lying in the Bowery of the City of New York; my negro girl, Elizabeth Clerk, to be set free after she arrive at the age of twenty-one, and in case I die before she arrives at that age it is my will she live with Elizabeth Ogden until she arrive at twenty-one years she then to receive 30; to Abraham Schuyler, son of Abraham Schuyler, of New Brunswick, my silver tankard and silver-hilted sword; to Elizabeth Ogden, all my household furniture and wearing apparel; to Harmon Ling, the young man that now lives with me, my smallest chocolate mill and one hundred of the chocolate pans. If after paying my debts and funeral charges my estate should not amount to the sum given or legacies, each one to be paid in proportion so given them--if a remainder, the same to be divided among my executors share and share alike. I appoint Cornelius Bradford, Peter Mackie, of New York City, executors.

Dated April 11, 1786. Witnesses, John King, Jr., Abraham Willson, Shopkeeper; Nathaniel Monroe, jr. Proved, May 6, 1786.

[NI1944] [Barnes.FTW]

This family found at Genealogy.com
The Bergen family pg 290

[NI2067] [Barnes.FTW]

listed in 1850 Census, could be new wife and not child, since there is a child in the household 6 months old. Or, wife could have died in childbirth.

[NI2078] He was the son of Dr. John Johnstone and his wife, Eupham Scot, and was born in Perth Amboy, December 20, 1694. Some authorities state that he was born in New York, but I feel convinced that Perth Amboy is correct, because his father was not only a very large land holder in New Jersey, but held numerous offices in the State about that time, which would indicate a residence here, and certainly he was particularly identified with New Jersey, except for a few years, 1714-1719, when he was Mayor of the City of New York. During that period Dr. Johnstone and his family lived in that promising metropolis, probably in Gold street, where he owned some lots.

Andrew Johnston, having by this time grown to be a man, went into business in New York as a merchant. He married early, and his bride was Catherine Van Cortlandt, one of the lovely daughters of Stephanus Van Cortlandt, the first American-born Mayor of New York. Her mother was Gertrude Schuyler, daughter of Philip Pietersen Schuyler, and her uncle was Peter Schuyler, that splendid old statesman and patriot, whose military genius and unbounded influence with the Indians saved the State of New York from the horrors of a French and Indian invasion at a time when it was in no condition to resist one.

[NI2081] [Barnes.FTW]

The Rev. Hamilton Schuyler, rector of Trinity Episcopal Church of the city of Trenton, New Jersey, was born in Oswego, New York, April 3, 1862. He is a son of the late Anthony Schuyler D. D., who was rector of Grace Church, Orange, New Jersey, for thiry-five years. Mr. Schuyler belongs to the well known family of that name, being seventh in descent from Philip Peterse Schuyler, the founder of the family, who came to this country from Holland and settled in Albany, marrying in 1650 Margareta Van Slichtenhorst, the only daughter of Brant Arentse Van Slichtenhorst, resident-director of the Colony of Renssellaerwyck. Mr. Schuyler received his early education at St. John's School, Manlius, New York, and after a business career of some years studied at Oxford University, England, and the General Theological Seminary of New York. He has held positions in Calvary Church, New York, Trinity Church, Newport, Rhode Island, and was for several years dean of the Cathedral, Davenport, Iowa, under Bishop Perry. He began his rectorship in Trenton, February, 1900. The parish at that time was laboring under a heavy debt, all of which has been discharged. Many valuable improvements have been made to the church property under his successful pastorate. Mr. Schuyler is devoted to the study of literature and has himself written extensively. Among his productions are "A Fisher of Men," being a biography of the late Rev. Churchill Satterlee, son of the Bishop of Washington," and "Studies in English Church History," besides sermons, pamphlets and poems. As a poem writer he won several years ago by his poem "The Incapable" the two hundred dollar prize offered by the late Collis P. Huntington for the best production antithetical to Edwin Markham's "The Man With The Hoe." Mr. Schuyler is a member of the New Jersey Society of the Sons of the Revolution and the Holland Society of New York. He has traveled extensively in Europe and the Orient. In January, 1906, he was appointed by the Mayor a Trustee of the Free Public Library of Trenton.

[NI2124] Abstracts of Wills Vol IV 1744-1753
Page 486.--In the name of God, Amen. I, SAMUEL BAYARD, of New York, merchant, being in perfect health, "and desirous to settle things in order." I leave to my son Stephen Bayard, all that my lot of ground and house thereon standing, wherein he now lives, being on the south side of Dock street, in New York, having to the west the house and ground of Abraham DePeyster, Esq., and to the east the house and ground of the heirs of Andrew Teller, and south to the Dock and wharf; Also all that my farm or plantation called Hoboken, with the right of Commonage thereunto belonging, lying in the township of Bergen, in New Jersey, with all the utensils of husbandry. I leave to my 2 grand children, Nicholas Van Dam and Margaret Van Dam, the children of my daughter Judith Van Dam, deceased, all that my corner house and lot of ground, in New York, on the west side of the street called Bergers Path, and on the south side of Duke street, and now in the possession of my son in law, James Van Horne. I give to my daughter Gertrude, wife of Peter Kemble, all that my house and lot of ground, lying in the city of New Brunswick, in East Jersey, bought by me from Geritt Onklebergh, and formerly belonging to Enoch Vreeland; Also my black ebony cabinet; Also 300. I leave to my son Nicholas Bayard all that my house and lot on the east side of Broad street, in New York, now in tenure of Robert Tod, between the houses of Stephen DeLancey, and the house of Philip Van Cortlandt. I leave to my son Samuel Bayard; all that my house wherein I now live in New York, with the lot of ground extending from Duke street to Princes street, with the store houses, yard, and stables; Also the house and lot adjoining lying on the south side of Princes street now in the tenure of Thomas Griggs; Also the garden and lane I now occupy lying on the north side of Princes street, between the houses of Daniel and Andrew Gautier, and runs back of both their yards. I leave to my daughter Margaret, wife of James Van Horne, all that my 2 houses and lots of ground by me bought from Jacobus De Kay, lying in New York, in the Dock ward, extending from Dock street to Duke street. I leave to my daughter, Anne Bayard, all that my house and lot lying on the north side of Wall street, by me bought from the children of Cornelia Norwood; Also a lot of ground lying on the north side of Wall street, bounded south by the street, east partly by Abraham De Peyster, and partly by my own land, north by the heirs of John Gornie, and Dirck Van Tuyl, and west by Abraham De Peyster, being 25 feet wide, and 122 feet long, and is called one lot, which is No. 5 on the map, which is annexed to an Indenture of Partition made June 3, 1718, between Colonel De Peyster and myself; I also give her 150 if she is unmarried at my decease. I leave to my son Samuel and my daughters Margaret and Ann, each 500. I leave to my 6 children 6/7 of all the rest of my estate, and 1/7 to the children of my daughter Judith Van Dam, deceased, viz., Nicholas and Margaret Van Dam. I make my wife Mary, sole executor.

Witnesses, Josias Jeffery, Isaac Chordavoine, Anna, Margaret Eckers. Proved, January 30, 174 5/6.

[NOTE.--Samuel Bayard was one of the most important men of his time, and the representative of the well known Huguenot family. The house and lot "on the south side of Dock street," left to his son Stephen, is now No. 86 Pearl street. The corner house and lot left to Nicholas and Margaret Van Dam, is the south corner of Stone street and William street. The house and lot on the east side of Broad street, left to his son Nicholas, is next south of the famous Fraunces Tavern. The house and lot left to his son Samuel, is No. -- Stone street, and next east of the narrow lane called "Jews alley;" it extended through to Princes street (now Beaver street). The east part of South William street was opened through this lot and lots adjoining. The garden on the north side of the street was opposite to the above lot. The two houses and lots "extending from Dock street to Duke street," and left to Margaret Van Horne, are now No. 85 Pearl street, and No.--Stone street, in the rear. The lot on Wall street, "bought of the children of Cornelia Norwood," and left to Anne Bayard, is now No. 58 Wall street. The other lot, called "No. 5," is now on Wall street near Nassau street. Samuel Bayard married a daughter of Colonel Stephen DeLancey, who gave them the lot on Broad street.--W. S. P.]

[NI2138] [Barnes.FTW]

Removed to Savannah, Georgia, and was a prominent physician there and one of the incorporators of the Georgia Medical Society in 1805.

[NI2145] [Barnes.FTW]

Minister to France from Texas

[NI2151] [Barnes.FTW]

Abstracts of Unrecorded Wills, Vol XI, Prior to 1790
In the name of God, Amen. This the first day of August, 1727. I, RIP VAN DAM, JR., of New York, merchant, being in perfect health. I direct all debts to be paid. I leave to my only son, Nicholas Van Dam, 5, when he is of age, in consideration of his birthright. I leave to my wife Judith, for her support, and to bring up my children, all my personal estate, plate, and goods. If she marries, she is to have one half. I leave to my wife, the use of all my real estate for her support and to maintain my children. After the death of my wife I leave all my estate to my two children, Margaret and Nicholas. If both die, then I leave half to my wife, and the other half to my brothers and sisters. I make my wife and my father-in-law, Nicholas Bayard, executors.

Witnesses, Francis Pelletreau, Nicholas Vaughton, Anthony Ham. Proved, July 10, 1728.

[NOTE.--The residence of Rip Van Dam, Jr., was one of the lots of his father on the southwest corner of Maiden Lane and Nassau Street. His father-in-law, Nicholas Bayard, left to the two children of his daughter Judith, who married Rip Van Dam, Jr., the house and lot bounded north by Stone Street, and east by Hanover Square.--W. S. P.]

[NI2160] The Times Leader Princeton, Kentucky June 3, 1998

Mrs. Frankie Geneva Sigler Boaz, 87, formerly of Hawthorne Street, Princeton, died Friday, May 29, 1998, at 9:07 p.m. at Caldwell County Hospital Emergency Room following a long illness. A homemaker and member of Chapel Hill Baptist Church, she was born June 1st 1910, in Caldwell County, a daughter of the late Willie and Mary Allen Board Sigler. She was preceded in death by her first husband, Leonard Barnes, and her second husband, Fulton Boaz; two children, Deloris Gail Barnes and Martha Maxine Barnes; two grandchildren, Terry Lynn Thomason and Jeffery Alan Thomason; two brothers, Elvis Sigler and Raymond Sigler, and two sisters, Reta Baker and Lera Sigler.Survivors include a daughter, Milladean Thomason of Caldwell County, a brother and sister-in-law, Talmadge and Vernell Sigler of Caldwell County and several nieces and nephews.Funeral services were conducted Sunday, May 31st, at 2:00 p.m. at Morgan's Funeral Home in Princeton with the Rev. Arrice Taylor officiating, assisted by Rev. Lester Watson.Burial followed in Liberty Church Cemetery in Caldwell County, Ky.

[NI2198] The colonist of this name, the Rev. William Skinner (1687-1758), was said to be a Scotchman named McGregor who, being compromised in Scotland during the rebellion of 1715, fled to this country under the name of Skinner, and settled first in Philadelphia. Later, he went to London and took orders, and on his return to the colonies settled in Perth Amboy, N. J., where he became the first pastor of St. Peter's Church. He married, June 8, 1726, Elizabeth, the daughter of Stephanus and Gertrude (Schuyler) van Cortlandt, whose daughter, Gertrude, married JAMES PARKER I.

[NI2200] JAMES PARKER, the son of John and Janet (Johnstone) Parker, was Captain of the Provincial Troops in 1746, and filled a vacancy in Governor Franklin's Council in October, 1764. He was Mayor of Perth Amboy in 1771, and appointed Delegate to the Provincial Congress 1775, but did not serve. During the Revolution, he was neutral. He was invited to be a candidate for Congress in 1789, but withheld his consent until too late. He married, in 1763, Gertrude, the daughter of William and Elizabeth (van Cortlandt) Skinner, who was born in 1737, and died in 1811. Their son was James Parker II.

[NI2211] [Barnes.FTW]

Became a noted statesman, was nominated and elected on the ticket with General U S Grant as Vice President of the United States. He was the founder of the Daughters of Rebekah branch of Amercian Odd Fellowship

[NI2212] Inherited homestead farm of his grandfather, Martin Ryerson

[NI2228] BUSH, Prescott Sheldon, 1895-1972
Senate Years of Service: 1952-1963
Party: Republican

BUSH, Prescott Sheldon, (father of George Herbert Walker Bush, grandfather of President George W. Bush), a Senator from Connecticut; born in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio, May 15, 1895; attended the Douglas School of Columbus, Ohio, and St. Georges School, Newport, R.I., 1908-1913; graduated from Yale University in 1917; enlisted in Connecticut National Guard in 1916 and served as captain of Field Artillery in American Expeditionary Forces 1917-1919; engaged in hardware business as a warehouse clerk in St. Louis, Mo.; moved to Greenwich, Conn., in 1924; engaged in banking business in New York City 1926; moderator, Greenwich Representative Town Meeting 1935-1952; trustee, Yale University; unsuccessful Republican candidate for the United States Senate in 1950; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of James OBrien McMahon in 1952; reelected in 1956 and served from November 4, 1952, to January 2, 1963; was not a candidate for reelection in 1962; resumed his career in the banking and investment field; died in New York City, October 8, 1972; interment in Putnam Cemetery, Greenwich, Conn.

Bibliography

American National Biography; Herskowitz, Mickey. Duty, Honor, Country: The Story and Legacy of Prescott Bush. Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 2003.

[NI2282] [Barnes.FTW]

GROESBECK, Hannes, and Elizabeth Van Brakel, "beide van Schagtekook," m. Nov. 22, 1752. Ch: Neeltie, bp. Aug. 20, 1754; Geertje, bp. Aug. 21, 1757; Gysbert, b. May 9, 1760: Johannes, b. Sept. 15, 1762; Gerrit, b. Feb. 17, 1765; Neeltie, b. Feb. 28, 1768.

[NI2300] [Barnes.FTW]

Nicknamed Tiger Tail by Seminole Indians of Florida. He originally lived in Orlando while married to his wife (name unknown). When they divorced he moved and became part of the Seminole tribe of South Florida

[NI2302] Killed in an automobile accident when Cuba was 2 years old. Minnie remained unmarried until her death

[NI2303] [Barnes.FTW]

Family researcher
Amanda Cherrie Massey Mixon
2590 Dale Ann Dr
Haines City, FL 33844
Cherrie77777@aol.com

[NI2331] TheTimes Leader Princeton Kentucky March 11, 1995

Caldwell County
Mrs. Sylvia Board, 67, of Nellie Board Road, Princeton, died Wednesday, March 8th, at 4:20 a.m. at Crittenden County Hospital in Marion following a short illness. A member of Chapel Hill Baptist Church and a housewife, she was born November 2nd 1927, in Caldwell County, a daughter of the late Albert Ewing Turley who died in 1976 and Ida Winn Turley who died in 1967. Survivors include her husband, Billie Board; two sons, Ricky Board, Caldwell County, and Randy Board, Lyon County; five grandchildren; a sister, Mrs. Hattie Belle Beavers, Princeton, and several nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were conducted Friday, March 10th, at 1:00 p.m. at Morgan's Funeral Home in Princeton with the Rev. James H. Beavers officiating, assisted by the Rev. Lester Watson. Burial followed in Leech Cemetery in Caldwell County, Ky

[NI2378] The Times Leader Princeton, Ky. Dec 31, 2003

Teresa Prowell, 46, of Princeton, died Wednesday, Dec. 24, 2003, at 4 p.m. at her home of natural causes. A homemaker and member of the Way Station, she was born July 20, 1957, in Louisville, a daughter of J.W. DeBoe of Tampa, Fla., and Janet Baker Smith of Caldwell County. Survivors in addition to her parents include a son, Jerret Prowell of Marion; a daughter, Randi Noel of Princeton; a granddaughter, Haley Noel; her grandmother, Izetta Baker of Princeton; grandfather, Ernest Baker of Princeton; an aunt, Wanda Walker of Princeton; and two brothers, Corey Wiggington of Nashville, Tenn., and Jeffrey Wayne Wiggington of Carrollton, Ga. Funeral services will be conducted Monday, Dec. 29, at 1 p.m. at Morgans Funeral Home in Princeton with the Rev. David Brown officiating. Burial will follow in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Princeton, Ky. Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Sunday at the funeral home.

[NI2399] The Times Leader
Princeton Kentucky
March 15, 2003

Sharon Sue Board, of Nellie Board Road, Fredonia, died Wednesday, March 12, 2003, at 7:56 p.m. at Western Baptist Hospital in Paducah, following a short illness. A homemaker, she was born November 17th 1948, in Detroit, Michigan, a daughter of the late Arnold and Mamie Davis Lane. She was preceded in death by her husband, Robert Board, in 1993. Survivors include a daughter and son-in-law, Lisa and James Reece of Caldwell County; Tiffany Reece; two sisters, Shirley Sawyer of Taylor, Mich., and Sandy Ward of Caldwell County; and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be conducted Saturday, March 15th, at 1:00 p.m. at Morgan's Funeral Home in Princeton with the Rev. Mark Faughn officiating. Burial will follow in Leech Cemetery in Caldwell County, Ky.

[NI2402] The Times Leader Princeton Kentucky July 21, 2001

Mrs. Marie Blackburn Young, 85, of the Marion Rd., Princeton, died Wednesday, July 18, 2001, at 5:50 a.m. at Caldwell County Hospital in Princeton, following a long illness. A retired serger operator at Cumberland Manufacturing and a member of First Baptist Church in Princeton, she was born December 22nd 1915, in Caldwell County, a daughter of the late George Walter Blackburn Jr. and Bertha Mae Board Blackburn. Survivors include a daughter and son-in-law, Nancy and Virgil Jones of Princeton; two grandchildren, Brian Jones of Lexington and Anita Black of Dawson Springs; and three great-grandchildren, Elizabeth and Alan Black and Brandon Jones. Funeral services were conducted Friday, July 20th, at 1:00 p.m. at Morgan's Funeral Home in Princeton with the Rev. J. Bill Jones officiating, assisted by the Rev. Tom Hughes. Burial followed in Cedar Hill Cemetery, Princeton, Ky.

[NI2405] The Times Leader Princeton Kentucky January 13, 1993
Jimmy Sigler, 56, of Enon Road, Princeton, died Sunday, January 10th, at 8:45 a.m. at Regional Medical Center, Madisonville, after a short illness. Funeral services were held Tuesday, January 12th, at 1:00 p.m. at Morgan's Funeral Home with the Rev. Noble Cobb officiating, assisted by the Rev. R. H. Riley.
Burial followed in Leech Cemetery in Caldwell County, Ky. A Caldwell County native, he was born April 16th 1936, a son of the late Arbie Glenn Sigler Sr. and Waunita Coleman Sigler.Mr. Sigler was a carpenter and construction worker and a member of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America Local No. 357 in Paducah.Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Barbara Jean Board Sigler; one son and daughter-in-law, Keith and Sharon Sigler of Caldwell County; one sister, Marie Darnell of Princeton; several nieces and nephews; and one uncle, Marvin Sigler of Caldwell County.Pallbearers were Jackie Guill, Allen George, Ronnie Coleman, Don Coleman, Lester Watson, Danny Sigler, Billie Board and Robert Board.

[NI2407] Sunday, May 11, Mothers Day, we lost our dearly beloved Sander Rose. Our hearts are broken into a million pieces. I cannot even begin to describe the grief we are experiencing.

As you know, we have been fighting an infection in her head of some foreign object that she somehow breathed up her nose. It has been migrating throughout her sinus passages since last December. It settles in one place and then abcesses. Her head swelled up like a baseball and we took her in to have it lanced open and drained, hoping to flush out whatever foreign body was inside. We always hoped it would be flushed out each time, but we were not successfull. It is more than likely microscopic or as small as a grass seed. Since December she has had 4 of these "lancings" using drain tubes.

Sander has been overly sensitive to anesthesia. Each time she had one of these "lancings", she would take several days to recover from the anesthesia. Normally dogs recover within 24-48 hours. She took days and one time over a week for recovery, experiencing diarreah, vomiting, lack of appetite, etc.

The last time we took her in, the vet did a more aggressive surgery and managed to eliminate the foreign body. He flushed her head and sinus cavities with a saline solution and said that "lots and lots" of blood, puss, and debris was washed out. After 5 days, she was still not eating, still vomiting, etc so we took her back. Knowing she had hard times recovering from anesthesia, we were not TOO concerned. Her white blood count was up to 30K so expecting she still had infection, they gave us injections to give her daily of an antibiotic. The next day, she passed out for some reason and began walking like she could not stand up. Calling the vet, he said to give her a dramamine until we could get her there the next day. Her blood tests showed her red blood count was down to 26 from a normal 40. They kept her there to complete more tests and found that afternoon she had a fatal blood disease called AIHA "Auto Immune Hemophylic Anemia". It is most common in female middle age spaniels. It is fatal and we were not given much hope from the start. She was too week to begin with to try and fight it from the anesthsia reaction. The passing out was from the lack of oxygen to the brain. (Red blood cells produce oxygen) By the next day her red blood count was down to 15, then the next day 9. At 10 they reccommend a blood transfusion, but they don't usually work. The body sees the new blood as a "foreign" thing and tries to fight even more, wearing itself down. We had been traveling every morning to Las Cruces ( 75 miles from our home) to see her and give her some love and support. The only thing a transfusion MIGHT accomplish is to give her body a few extra days while her red blood count came up. We made the decision that if her red blood count dropped lower than 9, we would do it. The next day it was up to 15, so we became optimistic. The underlying problems were too enormous. Due to the massive amounts of injections of steroids, she developed stomach ulcers and began vomiting blood. Being in critical anemia, her organs were failing. It had not helped that she had not eaten in 12 days. This was Sunday and the office was closed. The on-duty emergency vet said we could come to visit her Sunday afternoon, as she seemed depressed that we did not go to see her earlier. Before we had a chance to go see her, the vet called back to say she had passed away. He thinks it was heart failure.
We can second guess ourselves and say a lot of "woulda, coulda,shouda" but it wont bring her back. We both feel responsible for her death. The hurt is beyond words. We buried her in the back yard under her favorite tree, about 15 feet from her mother, Monita

[NF005] Married by W S Randolph, Judge, Caldwell County Court

[NF029] Biography in Historical Society of New Jersey register Vol II says third wife name Maira Leisler

[NF103] [Barnes.FTW]

Mercer Co Marrage record has name as Martha Wade

[NF143] [Barnes.FTW]

S.A.R. shows marriage as 12 Dec 1749. According to Nelson's "New jer sey Biographical and Geneological Notes," 1916, p. 30, there is a mar riage license dated 12 Dec 1749.

[NF305] Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey
Marriage Licenses.
The Marriage Ceremony
Males. K
Divorces By the Court of Chancery.
page 229
Kingsland, Isaac, Bergen, and Johanna Schuyler, Bergen 1741 June 3

[NF423] New York Marriages 1600-1784 have marriage recorded Vol IX Pg 74 3/26/1765, Albany, NY

[NF735] [Barnes.FTW]

Cousins

[NS40441] naming heirs Thomas, Chas, Rachel, Christian, Judith

[NS25821] Published by Jan and Naomi McPeek, Nov 2003- Aarons books, Salem, Oh- Obtained from 1921 R G Dun Mercantile Agency Refeence Book


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