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Personal History of Joseph William Engstrom (1867 - 1949)

Personal History of Joseph William Engstrom written in 1950 by his daughter, Golda Engstrom Leishman.


J. William Engstrom

Table of Contents

1 Table of Contents
2 Personal History
2a Birth, Parents, Siblings and Marriage
2b Recollections of His Daughter
2c Death and Funeral
3 Obituary for Joseph William Engstrom
4 Genealogy program generated data for Joseph William Engstrom
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Personal History


Table of Contents

Birth, Parents, Siblings and Marriage

My father, Joseph William Engstrom, was born December 16, 1867, in Grantsville, Utah. His parents had accepted the gospel of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Sweden and immigrated to Utah. His mother's mother and brother came with them to Utah and made their home with them.

When my father was just a few months old the family moved to Huntsville, Utah. His father was a shoemaker by trade. He had One brother and four sisters. Three of his sisters died when they were very young.

He was married to Emmeline Anderson April 22, 1891. They were the parents of eight children, four boys and four girls. All grew to maturity and survive them.


Table of Contents

Recollections of His Daughter

I believe the first recollection I have of anything, was when I was three years old. I awakened one night to find myself being carried in strong arms. Without opening my eyes, I knew they were my father's arms and I felt safe and secure, not even wondering where we were going. When sleepily, I opened my eyes, I looked up at a black sky, with millions of stars. Soon I noticed that we were walking down a narrow pathway, edged on each side with rose bushes which caught at our clothes as we walked. I knew then that we were going to my grandmother's house, and I dropped off to sleep again and knew no more till morning. In the morning my father came to get me, and I was told that I had a baby brother.

All through my childhood, I had this perfect trust in my father and a feeling of security whenever he was around. He had a strength about him which seems somewhat strange since he was so gentle. I never remember his being angry except on a two occasions and then he was justly angry. He was always patient, kindly and had a fine sense of humor which made him good company for his large family. I remember his helping each of us to the top of a load of hay to give us a brief ride when he was on his way home from the farm. We would watch eagerly for him and when it was about time for him to come home we would walk down the road to meet him. He would stop the horses and get down from the high load of hay and lift us one by one to the top. When he left in the morning we went with him in the empty wagon as far as he would allow us to go and then we walked home.

When I grew older, I went with my father to the farm as often as I could. I would stay all day, riding the hay rake, mowing machine or whatever he was working that day. I'm sure it took a lot of his time to bother with me but he seemed to enjoy having me with him. At noon we would open a very appetizing lunch and spread it out under the trees. Nothing ever tasted so good as those lunches. Sometimes when I hadn't gone in the morning with him, I would take a hot lunch to him, driving a little brown pony hitched to a buggy. This was also something I loved to do. After our lunch, my father and I always tried a little fishing before going back to work. There were two streams running through our farm. One was a swift little brook filled with delicious little brook trout. They were easy to catch and we could always have a supply of them. But the other stream was larger. In one place logs and stones had formed a dam across the stream, forming quite a Little pond. It was very shaded at this spot, and the stream was quiet and clear. We could see large fish swimming around which my father said were speckled herring. It was fascinating to watch them but I never remember being able to catch them. We would bait our hooks and toss our lines in, and lie on our stomachs and watch the large fish circle our bait and dart away. Some of the larger ones my father said came back every year. "There is the same fellow that was here last year," he would whisper to me, and I would be very still, not daring to breath, wanting to catch the fish but half hoping he would still be smart enough not to take our bait. Finally, when Dad felt he must get back to work, we would leave reluctantly and hope for better luck next day.

Those were joyful summer days. My parents worked very hard and all of the children had tasks to perform but there was always time for some fun too. We had the entire country side in which to roam and on occasions my parents took us on wonderful picnics. I remember distinctly the beautiful spots by the side of the river where we would stop to eat a delicious picnic. On occasions we would go on a very long trip which took us far into the mountains to a saw mill where my father sometimes worked. It was a beautiful spot and we children loved it. My parents loved it too. I remember how good it seemed to see them relaxing from their work and having fun with us.

I still think of the autumn with nostalgia, and yet with a feeling of loneliness. When the wind would blow the first leaves off the trees, it gave me a feeling of sadness. The trees would be bare for a long time. No more picnics by the river, no more fishing in the streams at the farm, but the harvest time never-the-less always thrilled me. My father would be busy putting vegetables in a pit to be stored for winter. Large tables were in the sun where mother had apricots and corn drying. Like the squirrels, we were preparing for winter. Fruit peddlers came to town to bring us the fruit which we couldn't grow in our town because of the short season and cold nights. My father made frequent trips to Ogden and always came home with delicious boxes of fresh fruit and often a string of bananas. These were put in the cool cellar where we were allowed to eat all we wished.

The first snow was always a thrill, though I felt sorry for my father, who would be up in the cold dark mornings to take care of the cattle and horses and milk the cows. He would sometimes go to the mountains to get a load of wood which was always a great worry to mother. I remember seeing her sit at the sewing machine on those long winter evenings waiting for dad to come home. At intervals she would leave the machine to look anxiously out of the back door and up the road to see if he was coming'. Those were hazardous trips. We hear stories of snow slides and men being trapped in them. It was usually late at night after we children had long been in bed before my father would return. I would be asleep, but would awaken often to the whir of the sewing machine or my Mother's voice calling "Will" from the back door. What a wonderful feeling it was when I would hear the sound of the sleigh on the frozen snow and his answering call as he drove into the barnyard. Now I could sleep securely.

We always had the most marvelous Christmas tree that could be found, Dad would take a day to go to the mountains to pick out the one he considered the very best. It had to touch the ceiling, and our ceiling was a high one. Sometimes he teased us by hiding the tree in the attic of the barn when he got home from the mountains and telling us that he couldn't find one. Then someday when we came home from school, there would be the tree set up in the parlor in all its glory. He had spent a day of hard work in the bitter cold to get the tree but was repaid by the joy it gave us.

As a child I was ill a good deal and also seemed to have more injuries than the other members of the family. Once when I scalded my leg when my mother was away from home, I was in great pain. I remember my father walking the floor with me all night and praying for me. It seemed to be the only thing he knew to ease my pain until he could get to Ogden the next day to get my mother. My father always administered to us when we were ill. It was the first thing we thought of doing. We seldom called a doctor except in case of accidents. He and mother were completely united. in their faith and I am sure this was the reason we survived our many illnesses. Their faith instilled the same feeling in us, and when my father prayed for us we always knew we would be made well.


Table of Contents

Death and Funeral

My father died August 12, 1949, after a brief illness. He was loved and respected in the community in which he lived all his life, as was evidenced by the large number of people who attended his funeral, and the many wonderful tributes that were paid him by the speakers. One of the speakers was President David O. McKay, who had known my father and mother all their lives, having lived in the same town and gone to school together. I shall never forget his sermon and the effect it had on my mother. Her head and shoulders were bowed in grief over the loss of her life-long companion, and as President McKay spoke of my father and at times directed his words of comfort to mother, we could see her head and at times directed hi s words of comfort to mother, we could see her head and shoulders lift and a smile came over her face. He spoke of my father as being humble, honest, dependable, kindly, of serving his church and family to the best of his ability, and he summed up his remarks by saying that these were the things that make men great, and then added "Will Engstrom was great man." We were all very proud and happy to have these wonderful tributes paid to him by President McKay.


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Obituary for Joseph William Engstrom

J. W. Engstrom, Pioneer, Dead

Huntsville - Joseph William Engstrom, 80, Utah pioneer and Huntsville farmer, died Friday at the family home of causes incident to age.

He was born Dec. 16, 1868, in Grantsville, a son of Magnus and Eliza Jenson Engstrom. On April 22, 1891, he married Emeline Anderson in the L. D. S. Logan temple.

When a young boy he settled in Huntsville, where he owned and operated a farm.

An active member of the L.D.S. Huntsville ward he held various posts including Sunday school and ward teacher and at time of death was a member of the high priests quorum, Ogden stake.

Surviving are his widow and the following sons and daughters: Mrs. Ross H. McCune, Mrs. Wilford Wheelwright, Mrs. G. A. Gillette and William LeRoy Engstrom, Ogden; Mrs. L. J. Leishman, Los Angeles; Darwin and Lloyd Engstrom, Cheyenne, Wyo; Don Engstrom, Nyssa, Ore.; 16 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren.

Services will be conducted Monday at two p.m. in the L. D. S. Huntsville ward by Bishop Marlowe Stoker. Burial will take place in the Huntsville cemetery directed by the mortuary, Twenty-fouth at Adams, Ogden.


Table of Contents

Genealogy program generated data for Joseph William Engstrom

Joseph William Engstrom "Will" was born on 16 Dec 1867 in Grantsville, Tooele, Utah, United States. He died on 12 Aug 1949 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States from Myocordial depgeneration due to senility. He was buried on 15 Aug 1949 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States.
He worked as Farmer in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States.

Will married Emeline Anderson, daughter of Peder Andersen and Caroline Jensdatter, on 22 Apr 1891 in Logan, Cache, Utah, United States. Emeline was born on 20 May 1873 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 3 Aug 1952 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States from Coronary occlusion due to hypertension. She was buried on 6 Aug 1952 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States.

They had the following children.

  1 F Cara Leone Engstrom "Leone" was born on 5 Mar 1892 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 25 Oct 1967 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She was buried on 28 Oct 1967 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
      Leone married Ross Hamilton McCune, son of Henry Frederick McCune and Elizabeth Temperance Grace, on 26 Dec 1914 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. Ross was born on 9 Oct 1887 in Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States. He died on 27 May 1987 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried on 30 May 1987 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
Ross worked as Chiropractor in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
  2 F Ora Lucretia Engstrom was born on 10 Nov 1893 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 8 Jan 1965 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She was buried on 12 Jan 1965 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
      Ora married Wilford Wheelwright "Wif", son of Thomas Bristow Wheelwright and Eliza Whitear, on 10 Apr 1918 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. Wilford was born on 22 Sep 1895 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 5 Nov 1952 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried on 8 Nov 1952 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
Wif worked as treasurer and co-Owner of Wheelwright Lumber Company in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
  3 F Golda Engstrom was born on 9 Jul 1896 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 22 Jun 1989 in Grass Valley, Nevada, California, USA. She was buried on 30 Jun 1989 in Palos Verdes, Los Angeles, California, USA.
      Golda married LeRoy James Leishman, son of James Henry Leishman and Elizabeth Jane Simpson, on 12 Sep 1917 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. LeRoy was born on 15 Mar 1896 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. He died on 9 Oct 1974 in Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, United States. He was buried on 14 Oct 1974 in San Pedro, Los Angeles, California, United States.
LeRoy worked as Inventer and Patent Attorney.
  4 M William LeRoy Engstrom "Roy" was born on 27 Oct 1899 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 24 Mar 1991 in St. George, Washington, Utah, United States. He was buried on 1 Apr 1991 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
Roy worked as Southern Pacific Railroad conductor in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
      Roy married Hazel Kemp, daughter of Elias Enoch Kemp and Isabelle Mandsley, on 10 May 1924 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Hazel was born on 3 Nov 1903 in St. George, Washington, Utah, United States. She died on 7 Feb 1995 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She was buried on 13 Feb 1995 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
  5 F Marvel Afton Engstrom was born on 30 Aug 1904 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 21 Jun 1984 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She was buried on 25 Jun 1984 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
      Marvel married Gilbert A. Gillette "Bud" on 16 Jul 1937 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. Bud was born on 20 Mar 1905 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 26 Dec 1977 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
  6 M Darwin Engstrom was born on 29 Jul 1908 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 23 Jul 1990 in El Toro, Orange, California, United States. He was buried on 28 Jul 1990 in Cheyenne, Laramie, Wyoming, United States.
Darwin worked as Public Accountant, Firm: Engstrom and Engstrom in Cheyenne, Laramie, Wyoming, United States.
      Darwin married Helen Isabel Manning, daughter of Emmett McCord Manning and Elizabeth Vass, on 28 Dec 1934 in Cheyenne, Laramie, Wyoming, United States. Helen was born on 11 Nov 1913 in Cheyenne, Laramie, Wyoming, United States. She died on 23 Dec 1991 in Laguna Hills, Orange, California, United States. She was buried on 30 Dec 1991 in Cheyenne, Laramie, Wyoming, United States.
  7 M Donovan Ray Engstrom "Don" was born on 4 Oct 1910 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 20 Jan 2002 in Nyssa, Malheur, Oregon, United States. He was buried in Jan 2002 in Nyssa, Malheur, Oregon, United States.
Don worked as School teacher and Dairyman in Nyssa, Malheur, Oregon, United States.
      Don= married Margaret Mary Bartholomew, daughter of Ammon Bartholomew and Sylvia Pearl Rose, on 25 May 1946 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Margaret was born on 15 Jul 1922 in Slaterville, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 17 Nov 2002 in Nyssa, Malheur, Oregon, United States. She was buried on 23 Nov 2002 in Nyssa, Malheur, Oregon, United States.
  8 M Lloyd Junior Engstrom was born on 22 Jun 1917 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States.
Lloyd worked as State Insurance Auditor in Denver, Denver, Colorado, United States.
      Lloyd married Dona Claire Roberts, daughter of Don Carlos Roberts and Claire Poyer, on 8 Apr 1952 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. Dona was born on 17 Mar 1930 in Vernal, Uintah, Utah, United States. She died on 16 May 1994 in Denver, Denver, Colorado, United States. She was buried on 20 May 1994 in Thornton, Adams, Colorado, United States.