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Personal History of Emeline Anderson Engstrom (1873 - 1952)

Personal History of Emeline Anderson Engstrom (1873 - 1952), Written in 1952 by her daughter, Golda Engstrom Leishman.

Her first name was also spelled Emmeline, Emmaline, or Emaline. Her father used and 'e' in his last name, 'Andersen' while she used and 'o' or 'Anderson'


Emeline Anderson Engstrom Photograph

Table of Contents

1 Table of Contents
2 Personal History
2a Parents, Birth and Marriage
2b Remembrances of her Daughter
3 Obituary
4 Genealogy program generated data for Emeline Anderson Engstrom
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Personal History


Table of Contents

Parents, Birth and Marriage

My mother's parents, Peter and Caroline Andersen, were born in Denmark. They were pioneers in Utah. My grandmother crossed the plains with one of the handcart companies. She and my grandfather settled in Huntsville, a little town nestled in the hills in Ogden valley. Huntsville is about a fourteen mile drive from Ogden, through Ogden canyon, one of the most scenic trips in Utah.

My mother was born May 20, 1873, in Huntsville, and was named Emmeline. She spent most of her childhood here, and it was here that she met my father William Engstrom. They were married in the Logan Temple, April 22, 1891, and they also made their home in this lovely valley. Their first child was born when mother was just eighteen.


Table of Contents

Remembrances of Daughter

My father built a small house on an acre of land just two blocks from the center of town, which at that time included the church, school, store. As the family grew, rooms were added to the house, which was never large enough to accommodate our fami1y of eight, four boys and four girls. It took a great deal of managing to keep our home in the order that my mother insisted upon.

It would be impossible to write a story of my mother's life without constantly speaking of my father, for there was such a oneness about them it is hard to think of one without the other. My father was a quiet, gentle and kindly man, eager to cooperate with Mother and help carry out the things she was constantly thinking of to help improve our home and way of living.

Mother ran our house systematically, each day had its special task and Saturday was a particularly busy day. The house was cleaned, the baking and cooking that was needed for Sunday was done, the children were all bathed before going to bed and the Sunday clothes laid out ready to wear. My father was put to work shining and mending our shoes so that everything was in readiness for Sunday School. Sunday was indeed a day of rest at our house.

Mother's life was devoted to her Church and family while we were sma1l, in fact I might say it always was. She worked in the Relief Society and Primary and sang in the ward choir. She loved to sing and usually sang as she worked, and my sisters and I also acquired the habit of singing as we worked. Mother would start a song and soon we were all joining in although we might be in different parts of the house. I've wondered since how it sounded to passers by, with our voices coming from different parts of the house. There was always lots of work to be done but mother tried to make our work as pleasant as possib1e, so often in the summertime we would all be sitting in the yard under the trees in apparent leisure, when actually we were peeling peaches, pears, or stringing beans or shelling peas. In the afternoons she would always have us all get "cleaned up." Then we would do the sewing that had to be done. Often she would bring the sewing machine outside and we would all be chatting and sewing. Some of our neighbors remarked that they didn't see how we found time for so much leisure.

All seasons of the year held their particular type of beauty and mother made us conscious of it. I remember being awakened by her to hurry and come down stairs to see the beautiful pictures Jack Frost had painted on our windows. To hurry and come down to see how the snow had piled up on the telephone wires during the night, and in the spring, to look out of my bedroom window and see a robin's nest, and then to see the blue ergs, and later the baby birds. It was a pleasant way to be awakened, but of course it couldn't always be that way. Mother made all of our holidays eventful.

My father's farm was about four miles from our home, no distance at all in these days of automobiles, but in the horse and buggy days it was quite a little trip. In the hot summer weather when the season was busiest for the farmers and my father would leave so early to go to the farm, mother would cook a hot dinner to send to him, and it was often my privilege to deliver it and share it with him.

In Huntsville, where we all spent our childhood, we were able to 1ive a very happy and free

life, but with eight of us living a free life, riding horses, and participating in the many activities of country life, mother's courage and ability to act in an emergency was put to many tests. In our 1ittle town there was only one doctor and often no doctor and no telephones. I remember when one of my brothers was hit with a baseball and came home with a broken nose, Mother seemed to know just what to do and acted quickly. By the time the doctor arrived she had things under control and. the doctor just examined the nose and said "I couldn't have done better myself.." But more often mother relied on her faith and prayers to help us through our many accidents and illnesses. When I fell off a horse and suffered a compound fracture in my elbow, it was the opinion of several doctors that my arm could not be saved. Mother insisted that my arm would be alright and had me taken home from the hospital in Ogden, and her prayers combined with the skill of our town doctor saved my arm. Years later, when this doctor had long ago left Huntsville, I have passed him on the streets in Ogden, and if he was in the company of another doctor, he would stop me and roll up my sleeve and explain to the other doctor how the impossible had been accomplished. He never failed to give mother a great deal of credit for so tirelessly and determinedly following his instructions. But mother always placed the credit where she thought it rightfully belonged. Through her great faith, her prayers had been answered.

Mother loved all the beautiful things in life. Most of the material things which some of us come to think of as the beautiful things, were not within her reach, but she surrounded our home with a much more lasting beauty. Our yard in summertime was a bower of trees and flowers. Even the ditch bank in front of our yard was given a grooming. In the spring our house shown with fresh paint and varnish, and new wallpaper, most of which she and my father did themselves.

When it was time for my two older sisters to start to high school, it presented a major problem to my parents. There was no high school in Huntsville and no transportation to Ogden. High school at that time didn't seem to be a necessity or requirement. But mother was determined that her children were to go to high school, so that winter began the first breaking up of our family. My sister was sent to Ogden to stay with an Aunt and attend the Weber Academy, but as more of us were getting of high school age that didn't continue to be practical; so for several years my parents moved to Ogden each winter so that the children could attend high school and still remain home. I know now that this was a great effort and sacrifice on their part.

When getting to high school was no longer a problem, college loomed up as an even greater one, but this obstacle was also surmounted. But mother's fondest hone was to send her boys on missions, and two of them did fulfill missions. My mother did many things to augment my father's earnings in order to keep the boys on missions and to send them to college. She cooked the school lunches, took in a boarder and did various other things to help. When the war came and her two youngest sons were called into service, she and my father planted a tree for each in their honor, still on the acre that their first little home was built. There were many things around the house that were planted with a purpose.

For several years my father and mother have come to California to spend a month or two with my husband and me, and mother came alone the two winters after my father died. They loved the beauties of Southern California. The flowers, shrubs, and trees here were a never ending source of delight to mother. The day before their departure to return home would find her busy in our yard, gathering slips and plants to take to Utah, and many of the plants from her garden are now growing in our garden. Mother often told us that it was good to get our feet on the ground and it pleased her a great deal when we bought our home and had a small garden to work in.

When my father died, August 12, 1949, Mother was faced with another problem. It was impossible for her to live in the old home with its many inconveniences, and yet the ties that bound her there were too great to break. Perhaps she foresaw this and that was the reason why some years ago she had urged my father to sell the old home and the two of them leave and make a new home in Ogden.

After remaining in Huntsville for a year after my father's death, she sold the old home and moved to Ogden where a son and three daughters were living. She lived in a small apartment there but still carried with her, her love of beautiful surroundings. Her windows were filled with plants and the service porch was a bower of plants and flowers. Her landlord, noting her love for flowers, built a large window box by her kitchen door, which was soon trailing morning glories and geraniums. Everything had a nice coat of paint; the step ladder that leaned against the house, the flower pots and even the dustpan hanging neatly on the wall. While living here she was a member of the sixth ward and attended the Relief Society and other meetings. She also did some temple work at this time.

Mother died August 3, 1952, at the age of 79. I'm happy to put on paper a few of the things I remember about her.


Table of Contents

Obituary


Table of Contents

Genealogy program generated data for Emeline Anderson Engstrom

Emeline Anderson was born on 20 May 1873 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 3 Aug 1952 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States from Coronary occlusion due to hypertension. She was buried on 6 Aug 1952 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States.

Emeline married Joseph William Engstrom "Will", son of Mans Svensson aka Magnus Engstrom and Caisa Lisa Jansdotter, on 22 Apr 1891 in Logan, Cache, Utah, United States. Joseph was born on 16 Dec 1867 in Grantsville, Tooele, Utah, United States. He died on 12 Aug 1949 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States from Myocordial depgeneration due to senility. He was buried on 15 Aug 1949 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States.
He worked as Farmer in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States.

They had the following children.

  1 F Cara Leone Engstrom was born on 5 Mar 1892 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 25 Oct 1967 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She was buried on 28 Oct 1967 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
      Leone married Ross Hamilton McCune, son of Henry Frederick McCune and Elizabeth Temperance Grace, on 26 Dec 1914 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. Ross was born on 9 Oct 1887 in Nephi, Juab, Utah, United States. He died on 27 May 1987 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried on 30 May 1987 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
Ross worked as Chiropractor in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
  2 F Ora Lucretia Engstrom was born on 10 Nov 1893 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 8 Jan 1965 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She was buried on 12 Jan 1965 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
      Ora married Wilford Wheelwright "Wif", son of Thomas Bristow Wheelwright and Eliza Whitear, on 10 Apr 1918 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. Wilford was born on 22 Sep 1895 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 5 Nov 1952 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He was buried on 8 Nov 1952 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
Wif worked as treasurer and co-owner of Wheelwright Lumber Company in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
  3 F Golda Engstrom was born on 9 Jul 1896 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 22 Jun 1989 in Grass Valley, Nevada, California, USA. She was buried on 30 Jun 1989 in Palos Verdes, Los Angeles, California, USA.
      Golda married LeRoy James Leishman, son of James Henry Leishman and Elizabeth Jane Simpson, on 12 Sep 1917 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. LeRoy was born on 15 Mar 1896 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. He died on 9 Oct 1974 in Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, United States. He was buried on 14 Oct 1974 in San Pedro, Los Angeles, California, United States.
LeRoy worked as Inventer and Patent Attorney.
  4 M William LeRoy Engstrom "Roy" was born on 27 Oct 1899 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 24 Mar 1991 in St. George, Washington, Utah, United States. He was buried on 1 Apr 1991 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
Roy worked as Southern Pacific Railroad conductor in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
      Roy married Hazel Kemp, daughter of Elias Enoch Kemp and Isabelle Mandsley, on 10 May 1924 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Hazel was born on 3 Nov 1903 in St. George, Washington, Utah, United States. She died on 7 Feb 1995 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She was buried on 13 Feb 1995 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
  5 F Marvel Afton Engstrom was born on 30 Aug 1904 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 21 Jun 1984 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. She was buried on 25 Jun 1984 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
      Marvel married Gilbert A. Gillette "Bud" on 16 Jul 1937 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. Bud was born on 20 Mar 1905 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 26 Dec 1977 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States.
  6 M Darwin Engstrom was born on 29 Jul 1908 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 23 Jul 1990 in El Toro, Orange, California, United States. He was buried on 28 Jul 1990 in Cheyenne, Laramie, Wyoming, United States.
Darwin worked as Public Accountant, Firm: Engstrom and Engstrom in Cheyenne, Laramie, Wyoming, United States.
      Darwin married Helen Isabel Manning, daughter of Emmett McCord Manning and Elizabeth Vass, on 28 Dec 1934 in Cheyenne, Laramie, Wyoming, United States. Helen was born on 11 Nov 1913 in Cheyenne, Laramie, Wyoming, United States. She died on 23 Dec 1991 in Laguna Hills, Orange, California, United States. She was buried on 30 Dec 1991 in Cheyenne, Laramie, Wyoming, United States.
  7 M Donovan Ray Engstrom was born on 4 Oct 1910 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States. He died on 20 Jan 2002 in Nyssa, Malheur, Oregon, United States. He was buried in Jan 2002 in Nyssa, Malheur, Oregon, United States.
Don worked as School teacher and Dairyman in Nyssa, Malheur, Oregon, United States.
      Don married Margaret Mary Bartholomew, daughter of Ammon Bartholomew and Sylvia Pearl Rose, on 25 May 1946 in Ogden, Weber, Utah, United States. Margaret was born on 15 Jul 1922 in Slaterville, Weber, Utah, United States. She died on 17 Nov 2002 in Nyssa, Malheur, Oregon, United States. She was buried on 23 Nov 2002 in Nyssa, Malheur, Oregon, United States.
  8 M Lloyd Junior Engstrom was born on 22 Jun 1917 in Huntsville, Weber, Utah, United States.
Lloyd worked as State Insurance Auditor in Denver, Denver, Colorado, United States.
      Lloyd married Dona Claire Roberts, daughter of Don Carlos Roberts and Claire Poyer, on 8 Apr 1952 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States. Dona was born on 17 Mar 1930 in Vernal, Uintah, Utah, United States. She died on 16 May 1994 in Denver, Denver, Colorado, United States. She was buried on 20 May 1994 in Thornton, Adams, Colorado, United States.