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Asenath Edgerton, daughter of Zebulon and Elizabeth (Tracy) Edgerton.

 

         born:

August 30, 1772; Norwich, New London Co., CT.  (VRp I:515)

died:

October 24, 1836; Franklin, New London Co., CT.  (VR 2:79) (GI)

buried:

Gagertown Cemetery; Franklin, New London Co., CT.  (GI)

 


Asenath Edgerton was born in Norwich (Franklin), Connecticut on August 30, 1772, the youngest child of Zebulon and Elizabeth (Tracy) Edgerton.  Asenath lived in Franklin her entire life; she was never married.

 

Asenath Edgerton was a member of the Franklin Congregational Church; she was admitted to the Church on September 1, 1822, “on profession.” (ChR 1:41).  Her death was also later recorded at the Church.

 

Later in life, Asenath went to live with the Gager family, and was residing there when she wrote a pair of letters (sent as one correspondence) to her sister, Mrs. Ann Wales, who then resided in Newark, Ohio.  The letters, written in September or October 1827, are now in the possession of Mrs. Marion (Doud) Rumsey, a descendant of Ann (Edgerton) Wales.  A transcription of the letters was later reprinted in The American Genealogist (January 1966; Vol. 42, no. 1).

 

Asenath Edgerton died in Franklin, Connecticut on October 24, 1836, aged 64.  She was buried at Gagertown Cemetery.  Asenath’s death was recorded in the Franklin Vital Records (Book 2, pg. 79), and also at the Franklin Congregational Church (ChR 1:449).  The latter record lists a date of October 23rd.

 

Asenath was probably the last of her siblings – only next-younger sister, Rachel, is not known to have predeceased her.  Asenath left a Last Will and Testament, dated at Franklin December 3, 1834.  The will mentions her “nephew Eleazer”, “niece Bethia Bentley”, “Fidelia wife to Eleazer Bentley”, and several members of the Gager family, with whom she was residing.  The will was proved at Franklin on November 9, 1836 before Joseph Kingsley, Justice of the Peace.