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Lisburn Standard - Friday, 2 August, 1918

Birth

PRIESTLEY -- July 26, at Wood House, Driffield, East Yorks, the wife of Capt. Herbert S. Priestley, M.G.C., of a daughter.

Marriage

TYRRELL--FITZGIBBON -- July 21, 1918, at Christ Church, Leeson Park, Dublin, by the Rev Percy Phair, M.A., Captain Guy Yelverton Tyrrell, M.C., R.A.F., youngest son of the late Robert Yelverton Tyrrell, S.F.T.C.D., and Mrs. Tyrrell, 4 Sandford Terrace, Dublin, to Emma, daughter of the late Henry FitzGibbon, M.D., and Mrs. FitzGibbon, 16 Northbrook Road, Dublin.

Deaths

BEATTY -- July 30, at Liberton Cottage Hospital, near Edinburgh, Kathleen Jane, second daughter of the late Thomas Beatty, 6 Novara Terrace, Bray.

CARR -- July 28, at Carr Lodge, Newcastle, County Down, Susan, wife of William Carr, and fifth daughter of the late James Douglas, Ballymena.

Roll of Honour

TAGGART -- Missing since 16th August, 1917, now reported killed in action on that date or since, Rifleman John M. Taggart, R.I. Rifles, youngest son of the late James Taggart, Lisburn. -- Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Mother, Brother, and Sisters. S. H. TAGGART, Saintfield Road, Lisburn.

Clippings

SOME EXTRACTS FROM THE

RECORDS OF OLD LISBURN

AND THE MANOR OF KILLULTAGH.

-- -- --

Edited by JAMES CARSON.

-- -- --

XCIV.

-- -- --

BISHOP JEREMY TAYLOR.

"Belfast News-Letter," Sept. 14, 1871.

The name of Jeremy Taylor, son of a Cambridge hairdresser, will live with the language in which was written that brilliant series of Divinity he left to the world, but little, however, is known of the inner life of the famous Bishop of Down and Connor. More than a century and a half after his death, the celebrated divine, Reginald Heber, wrote a sketch of his life, which was much read, and though superior in style to any previous work on the on the same subject, and abounding in passages of high eloquence, it is very abscure in those points of Bishop Taylor's history in which his admirers feel so much interest. Of his early career we have still to learn some details connected with his doings while private chaplain to Archbishop Laud; and how little is known of his persecution in the days of the Protectorate!

But strongest of all is the barrenness of that chapter of Taylor's history that professes to tell of his life and labours during the years he performed the duties of lecturer to the loyalists on Lord Conway's estate at Killultagh. That appointment he received through the influence of his friend, the famous John Evelyn, and his equally attached patron, Lord Edward Conway. About the close of June, 1658, Dr. Taylor left London with his wife and family, and, after various perils by sea and land, he arrived at Portmore, where in the wing of the ancient fortress erected there by O'Nial, and which for more than one hundred years had stood sentinel on the borders of Lough Neagh, a suite of apartments had been prepared far him by Lord Conway's agent. Nothing could have exceeded the romantic beauty of Taylor's residence, and there it was that, comparatively humble as was his position, he spent some of the happiest days of his life. From that period until January, 1661, when he was raised to the Episcopal Bench as Bishop of Down and Connor, we find hardly any record of his movement beyond the mere fact that he visited Lisburn every week, and delivered a lecture there in the church where the Cromwellian soldiers were wont to attend worship. But that was the busiest time of his ministerial existence. He preached every Sunday to the loyalists in the ruins of the sacred edifice from which Kill-ul-Tagh took its name: he lectured in Ballinderry, Soldierstown, and Derriaghy once a fortnight; and during his spare time toiled hard in the composition of his works on Divinity. The absence of lengthened details in the biography of Bishop Taylor is the more to be regretted when such abundant material for that purpose was to be found in the public records of the day. And besides those documents, there is the highly interesting work, entitled "The Rawdon Papers," published many years ago, abounding in passages relating to Taylor. There is also "Evelyn's Diary," a book that reads like one of Scott's novels, and in which are graphic sketches of a most exciting period of national history, many of these especially referring to the greatest divine of the seventeenth century. But so little use have his biographers made of such sources of information, that we are told little more of him that if his diocese had been seated in Timbuctoo.

We have said that Dr. Taylor was appointed Bishop of Down and Connor in January, 1661, and soon afterwards he left Portmore and went to reside at a handsome cottage which his patron, Lord Conway, had erected for him in one of the most picturesque spots that could well be conceived. Bishop Taylor's country house is still standing in Magheralave, and the little study, with its oak wainscoting and handsome windows, as shown to us some years ago, are in themselves sufficient to call forth many recollections of the great man who has been rightly called the Shakespeare of Theology. Besides this cottage, the bishop had a town house, situated in Castle Street, Lisburn, nearly opposite the entrance to the Cathedral. His favourite son died in a few months after he got settled at Magheralave, and was buried in the ground attached to Lisburn Church, but no stone marks the spot where moulder the ashes of the favourite child. This event gave a sad shock to the already weakened constitution of the bishop; still he entered on his enlarged sphere of duty determined to do the work effectually. Lord Conway had then commenced to build a castle at Portmore, and on the site of the ancient stronghold already alluded to. This magnificent pile was more like a fortress than a nobleman's mansion. The stables alone occupied a range of one hundred and fifty feet. These were two stories high. Storage to contain provisions for one year's consumption of two troops of horse was amply provided for, as well as accommodation for all the soldiers. At present not one stone of the castle is to be seen. Some portion of the stables remains and part of the garden wall, but the deerpark, with its two thousand acres of land, has long since been turned to better purposes than feeding an antlered herd. In the vicinity of the castle, and close by the shores of Ireland's splendid lake, a summer residence was erected for Bishop Taylor, and there, during the remaining years of his life, he spent a part of each season. Lord Conway and his lady resided at the castle for a great portion of each autumn. And during these times it was usual for them to visit all parts of the estate. His lordship took great delight in marking the progress of improving tenants, and never failed to encourage by something more than mere laudation every work of agricultural advancement. Bishop Taylor occupied a farm of forty Plantation acres, and while his friends remained at Portmore he was always a favoured guest at Lord Conway's table. From this time he continued to labour diligently in his diocese; he visited every parish, and occasionally preached in some of the churches; but how few of these are standing at this day! The ancient Temple of Down exhibits no assaults of time; Lisburn Cathedral yet rears its head in lusty strength; but the old Corporation Church of Belfast, with its high-peaked, straw-covered roof, and castellated gables, is only known in history.

The income of the Bishop of Down and Connor was large, and his household outlay moderate, and all his savings were invested either in works of improvement or deeds of charity. He had the Cathedral of Down completely remodelled, he spent large sums on that of Lisburn, and the other places of worship under his control were not forgotten. The See of Dromore was then one of the least valuable in point of income in Ireland. Its venerable church had fallen into decay, and although that See had no immediate claim on him, he undertook to repair the sacred edifice, and had all the work done at his own private cost. But, unfortunately for the Church of which he was so bright an ornament, his end rapidly approached. On the 24th of July, 1667, he caught fever while attending one of his town parishioners, and in his own study in Castle Street, Lisburn, expired after a few days' illness. His last words were, "Bury me in Dromore," and, in accordance with that desire, his remains were, interred there on the 6th of August, 1667. None of his sons survived him; but his widow and daughters lived long afterwards. Edward Harrison, of Magheralave, who sat for Lisburn in two Parliaments, was his grandson; and William Todd Jones, who represented the same borough from 1783 to 1971 [sic], was also a descendant of the famous bishop.

Edmund Gosse, in his Life of Jeremy Taylor (1904), introduces some new matter, and disposes of several ancient fictions regarding the history of his family.

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ANNALS OF ULSTER -- 1790-1798,
by Samuel M'Skimin.

Edited by E. J. M'Crum -- 1906.

This work was first published in 1849 under the title "Annuls of Ulster, or Ireland Fifty Years Ago." It again appeared in 1853 as "A History of the Irish Rebellion." The present edition, 404 closely-printed pages, contains an introduction, notes, and appendix by Mr. M'Crum, and a biographical sketch of M'Skimin.

Samuel M'Skimin was the well-known historian of Carrickfergus. He was born in the year 1775, and died in 1843. Being 23 years of age when the Rebellion broke out, and having had personal knowledge of much that he describes, he must be regarded as an original authority.

The volume only deals with the Rebellion in so far as it relates to Ulster, and in its pages will be found a vivid and minute account of the rise and doings of the United Irishmen in the North, chiefly in the County of Antrim, and the events that led up to the disastrous year of '98.

From the abrupt manner in which the Annals terminate it is evident that Mr. M'Skimin had not completed his narrative at the time of his death. The Battle of Ballynahinch, and Henry Monro, of Lisburn, are merely mentioned, and no particulars whatever given regarding them.

Referring to Lisburn and the events connected with the Rebellion, it is stated:

In the towns of Belfast, Lisburn, and Carrickfergus the disaffected were awed into submission by their numerous garrisons, yet several zealous adherents from these towns passed into the country and were actively engaged in the insurgent ranks.

(Next week: History of Killultagh, by Rev. Mr. Dundas, B.D.)

=========================

THE WAR.

-- -- -- --

GOOD NEWS CONTINUES.

-- -- -- --

ALLIES ADVANCE ON 20-MILE FRONT.

-- -- -- --

The news from the front continues good, and gives us fresh heart and encouragement on the threshold of the fifth year of war. Yesterday Franco-British forces achieved striking successes on a front of rather over 20 miles, stretching from Plessier-Huleu (north of the Ourcq) to Romigny (between the Marne and the Ardre, two miles south-west of Ville-en-Tardenois).

East of Plessier-Huleu they carried a height north of Grand Rozoy, and pressed through the villages of Beugneux, Cranmoiselle, and Cramaille, an advance of nearly two miles.

South-east of Fere-en-Tardenois, Cierges and Meuniere Wood were taken; while further to the east Romigny fell to the Allies. In these operations 700 prisoners were taken. From 15th to 31st July 33,400 prisoners were taken on the French front.

Sir Douglas Haig reports raids and artillery duels at many points of the front. Our aviators have bombed Treves and Duren, while during the 31st July 35 enemy machines were brought down.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

IRELAND AND CONSCRIPTION.

Important Announcement at Newry.

Speaking at a recruiting meeting at Newry yesterday, Captain Stephen Gwynn, M.P. (representing the Irish Recruiting Council), said that Ireland had a plain duty to the divisions that she had sent into the field, and that neither Ulster nor the rest of Ireland had done its duty, or its divisions would not have been so largely manned by Englishmen to-day. What each area had to do was to find its allotted part of the 50,000 men. In a few days the quotas would be published. If the Belfast area, consisting of the city of Belfast and the counties of Antrim and Down, found the quota, there would be no conscription in that area, and he could state that positively. The quota for the Belfast district would be a large one, just as would the quota for Dublin district be a large one. So far as conscription was concerned, the decision as to exemption could evidently not apply to anything less than one of the ten areas, but for practical working he would suggest that the sub-areas, in consultation with the central committee for the area, should endeavour to strike sub-quotas for the sub-areas, and the results would be published periodically.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

CERTIFICATES OF HONOUR PRESENTED AT MAGHERAGALL.

On Wednesday evening the ceremony of presenting certificates of honour to the relatives of soldiers from Magheragall district took place in the Rectory grounds. Tea was provided in the schoolhouse for the relatives and the Magheragall Flute Band, and afterwards the certificates were presented by Mr. Thomas Richardson, Springfield, by whose forethought they had been suitably framed. The band contributed a number of selections which were greatly appreciated. The following received certificates:--

Miss Caskey, Lissue, for Thomas Caskey, N.I.H.
Mrs. Dodds, Knockmore, for Edward Dodds, A. and S. Highlanders.
William Dickson, Brookhill, for Charles Dickson, R.I.R.
David Geddes, Magheragall, for David Geddes, R.I.R.
Mrs. Gratton, Ballycarrickmaddy, for James Gratton, R.I.R., and Albert Peel, R.I.R.
Mrs. E. A. Hawthorne, Drumscill, for Albert Hawthorne, R.I.R.
Mrs. E. Hawthorne, Mullaghcarton, for Charles Hawthorne, R.I.R.
Mrs. Hudson, Drumscill, for Frederick Hudson, sergeant North Staffs.
Mrs. Hunter, Kilcorig, for James Hunter, Canadians.
John Martin, late of Magheragall, for Alexander Martin, New Zealanders; William Martin, second-lieutenant R.I.R.; and John Martin, A.S.C.
Mrs. M'Curry, Ballyellough, for Thomas M'Curry, R.I.R.
Mrs. Moore, Kilcorig, for William Moore, R.I.R.
Mrs. Munn, Knockmore, for Henry Munn, sergeant, R.I.R.
James M'Murtry, Ballymave, for William M'Murtry, R.I.R.
Mrs. M'Donald, Knocknarea, for William M'Donald, R.I.R.
Mrs. Russell, Ballymacash, for James Russell, R.I.R.
Mrs. Turkington, Moneybroom, for Joseph Turkington, R.I.R.
Mrs. Tolerton, Knocknarea, for James Tolerton, R.I.R., and Thomas Tolerton, R.I.R.
Robert Spence, Ballymave, for Thomas Spence, Canadians.
John Tolerton, Mullaghcarton, for Robert Tolerton, R.I.R.
Mrs. Turtle, Magaberry, for Thomas Turtle, R.F.A.
Mrs. Watson, Knocknarea, for Joseph Watson, R.I.R.

It was also mentioned that the following had already obtained certificates in Lisburn:-- Mrs. T. Greer, Kilcorig, for Wm. Greer, A.S.C.; Mrs. M'Comb, Ballymave, for Edward M'Comb, sergeant R.I.R., and Robert M'Pherson, R.I.R.; Mrs. Patterson, Knockmore, for Alexander Patterson, N.I.H.

On the same day the annual Sunday School treat was held, and was greatly enjoyed by the children.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

CRUMLIN SOLDIER'S BAR TO D.S.O.

Lieut.-Colonel Stanley R. M'Clintock, D.S.O., Gordon Highlanders, son of Colonel Charles E. M'Clintock, J.P., Glendaragh, Crumlin, has been awarded a bar to his D.S.O. medal

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While in command of his battalion this officer, when the enemy had broken through the front, support, and reserve lines, took up a defensive position with his battalion headquarter details, and held up the attack. Later, while in command of the remnants of his battalion, he showed great tenacity in holding on to the last during the various stages of the withdrawal.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

DERRIAGHY MAN KILLED IN ACTION.

Private Thomas John M'Carroll, R.I.R., has been killed in action in France, in his 26th year. He had been at the Dardanelles, where he was wounded. He was sent to France on his recovery, was again wounded on 24th March last, and had just returned to the front trenches one week when he wan fatally wounded. He was a member of Derriaghy Parish Church. His commanding officer writes of him:-- "He was one of the very best men in the company, and one whom I will find it hard to replace. He was always cheerful and did his work splendidly."

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

HILLSBOROUGH FAMILY'S PATRIOTIC RECORD.

Mrs. Agnes Ginn, Ballykeel, Artfinny. Hillsborough, has just been notified by the War Office that her husband, Corporal Joseph Ginn, R.A.M.C., is now a prisoner of war in Germany. The family of which he was a member has a splendid military record, as besides himself six of his brothers served in the South African campaign, one being killed. For the splendid part played by the brothers in that war the family hold a very high record in honours, possessing no fewer than 20 medals and 44 bars. When the present war broke out the six surviving brothers nobly responded to their country's call, and Private Herbert Ginn (whose sister, Mrs. M'Kebrey, resides at 25 Ninth Street, Belfast), made the supreme sacrifice on the 1st July, 1916, and another brother who is serving with the Canadians was in hospital for a considerable time suffering from gas poisoning. Their father and mother received £5 from the late Queen Victoria for having seven sons and a son-in-law in the South African war.

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ANOTHER LISBURN MAN COMMISSIONED.

Mr. Simon Logan, who prior to volunteering was foreman printer in the "Lisburn Standard" Office, has been given a commission in the Royal I. Fusiliers. Second-Lieut. Logan served at the front for a period with the North Irish Horse.

=========================

LISBURN PROBATE CASE.

At the Belfast Assizes the question of the validity of the will of the late Samuel Blakely, leather merchant, Lisburn, was determined by Mr. Justice Gordon sitting without a jury.

Mrs. Annie Johnston, a sister of deceased, objected to the will, chiefly on the ground that deceased's widow benefited so largely under it. She had entered a caveat against the will, but failed to prosecute her opposition. The will was made some six years before Mr. Blakely's death.

The Judge, having heard the evidence, pronounced in favour of the will and admitted it to probate. Under the will deceased left £100 to Mrs. Baird, a sister; certain legacies to Sloan Street Presbyterian Church, and the remainder to has wife.

 

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Lisburn Standard - Friday, 9 August, 1918

Birth

GORMAN -- July 26, at The Crescent Nursing Home, Upper Crescent, Belfast, to the wife of Captain William Leonard Gorman, Royal Irish Rifles, a son.

Death

THOMPSON -- August 3, 1918, at his residence, Bertha House, Belfast, the Right Hon. Robert Thompson, P.C. D.L., M.P.

Roll of Honour

YOUNG -- July 30, at 14 Stationary Hospital, Boulogne, Margaret Cameron Young, V.A.D., youngest daughter of the late Thomas Young, of 37 Newington Avenue, Belfast.

Clippings

SOME EXTRACTS FROM THE

RECORDS OF OLD LISBURN

AND THE MANOR OF KILLULTAGH.

-- -- --

Edited by JAMES CARSON.

-- -- --

XCV.

-- -- --

HISTORY OF KILLULTAGH.

Rev. W. H. Dundas, B.D.

"Lisburn Standard," January 28, 1916.

The name Killultagh is used in three senses. First, it is the name of a townland in the parish of Ballinderry containing less than 700 acres, the fuller form of which is Derrykillultagh. Secondly, there was the territory of Killultagh, an old term which is found long before the division into baronies and counties. It may be defined as the district lying between the River Lagan and Lough Neagh; it contained the parishes of Magheragall, Ballinderry, Aghagallon, Magheramesk, and the portion of Blaris north of the Lagan (Reeves). Sir Foulke Conway received a grant of this territory about 1608 A.D.; And the lands of Derrievolgie, with other portions, were afterwards added to the Conway property, so that it included most of the adjoining parishes of Derriaghy, Lambeg, Glenavy, Camlin, and Tullyrusk. This property was called the Manor of Killultagh, afterwards known as the Hertford estate. It corresponds roughly to the Barony of Upper Massereene, of which name various explanations have been given. Sir Phelim O'Neill's chaplain writes it "Massereghna," which is said to mean the "Queens Hill;" Dobbs (Description of County Antrim, 1683) says: "It is Irish Base O Reen, some Irish kings daughter or princess being drowned in that river;" yet again Massereene is said to mean "the beautiful portion" (Dubourdieu's County Antrim).

Killultagh is in Irish Coill Ultagh, the forest or wood of Ulster; Ulster being here used in its narrower sense as corresponding to the counties of Antrim and dying. There is ample evidence that it deserved its name. Sir G. Carew describes it as "a safe boggy and woody country upon Lough Eaugh" (Neagh); and Sir Henry Bagenall speaks of it as "a very fast countrey full of wood and bogg" (1586). There was a note on the corner of an old map of Down (1590) which reads: "Alonge this river (the Lagan) be ye space of 26 myles groweth much woodes, as well hokes (oaks) for tymber as hother woode, which may be brought in the bale of Cragfergus (Carrickfergus) with bote or drage" (Ulster Journal of archæology, vol. iii., old series). South of the Lagan lay a similar district called the territory of Killwarlin, which included the parish of Hillsborough and the neighbouring part of Blaris, Moira, Dromore, Dromara, and Annahilt. Kilwarlin belonged to a branch of the Magennis family called the MacRories. In 1575 Ever MacRory made a surrender of it to Queen Elizabeth and took out a patent for the same, which was in the possession of George Stephenson, Esq., of Lisburn, in 1847, whose maternal ancestors were of this race (Hills MacDonnall's of Antrim).

The O'Neills.

Killultagh belonged to a branch of the O'Neills, the descendants of Hugh Boye O'Neill. It contained three forts -- Inisloughin (near Trummery House, which, by the way, was built by Captain Spencer about 1652); Portmore, besides Lough Neagh; and one on a mound above the Lagan close to Lisnagarvy. There is a very interesting account of the march of Shane O'Neill against the MacDonnell's of N. Antrim in 1565, part of which I shall quote:-- "He kept his Easter at Fedan (now Fews in the South of County Armagh), when he took his journey Tuesday in said Easter week towards the Skotts, which day he rode xvi. miles and camped that night at Dromemoer (Dromore). The next morning he cut all the Passes or Woods that lay in his way from thence (called Kyllewarline of the M'Cuilin's and Kylultagh of Claneboye, which was xii. mile long) that 10 men may go in a rank, till he came within Claneboye a mile beyond the Pass and camped that night at my Moynnimrock. The morrow being Thursday, he rode towards Gallantry, a mile from Edenduffcarrig (Shane's Castle), where he camped the night" (MacDonnell's of Antrim).

Killultagh in the 16th century was the scene of continual warfare between the Irish and English. In 1515 a proposal was made that fresh English colonists should be sent to Ulster "in order that all the noble issue of Hugh Boye O'Neill be avoided clere and expelled from the Green Castell (opposite Greenore) to the Bann, and be assyneyd and sufferyd to have their habytation and dwelling in the great forest Kylultagh and the Phewx, which habytation and places they hathe and dwellyth often before nowe by compulsion." At a later period the English Government tried to arrange terms, but the O'Neills were very slippery to handle. In 1592 Cormock O'Neyll McBryan was the Captain or Chief of Killultagh, and was desirous of surrendering his estate to Queen Elizabeth and receiving it again to hold in the English fashion. But in 1593 Mr. Solicitor Wilbraham, then newly returned with the Lord Chief Justice of Common Pleas from the Ulster Circuit, writes:-- "We find less obedience and appearance than was the last year. Cormock MacNeill, Captain of Killultagh; Neale McBrian Fertagh, Captain of the Ardes; and McCartan possess their several countries by tnistry and seek no letters patent so long as they may ravin at their pleasure upon the tenants; in no place in this country are the tenants permitted to depart from their lords but at the lord's pleasure, and so thralled in misery. . . . In all our Assizes we endeavoured to manifest to the rude people the merciful proceedings of her Majesty in trials of life for their offences by indifferent jurors which they seemed to admire and embrace." The same year there is a report of "a great prey taken from the Captain of Killultagh." In 1596 Sir Ed. Moore and other Commissioners were at Newry, to draw in the woodmen of Killultagh and Kilwarlin, but none of the woodmen came in to them. It appears from a document of 1597 that some of the chiefs were quite willing to surrender their lands and take them again to hold under Elizabeth, but they were in very difficult position. The English officers and governors did not desire any such settlement, because they used to receive 40, 50, or 200 cows in one place, from the Irish, apparently as a kind of blackmail. Neither did the supreme lord of the Irish, O'Neill Earl of Tyrone, wish it, for it would overthrow his power and make the inferior chiefs depending on her Majesty alone; "he hath feared this course, and hath therefore suppressed all them who attempted the same. He murdered for this matter the Lord of Killultagh" (Cal. State papers). Cormock, who met this fate, was succeeded by his son, Bryan McArt. The latter joined his uncle, Hugh O'Neill, in his rebellion, but was defeated by Sir A. Chichester, and in 1602 the fort of Inisloughin was taken. That was the end of power of the O'Neills in these parts.

In 1605 Conn O'Neill agreed to surrender one-third of his lands to Sir Hugh Montgomery and one-third to Sir James Hamilton in return for their assistance in securing for him the King's pardone. Killultagh was included in Hamilton's portion, and soon after it was transferred to Sir Foulke Conway, who was in possession in 1608. The outlawed Irish, however -- the woodkerne or tories, as they were called -- lurked in the forests and bogs, and naturally tried to hold or get back some of what had been their own. About 1605 it was reported that "Killultagh by reason of strength of bogs and woods was the shelter and lurking place of most of the idle men, thieves, murderers, lawless kerne (with entrance of Bande, i.e., the Bann), which at present are not free of them." In 1610 Killultagh and Braslowe (i.e., Clanbrassil, the district about the mouth of the Upper Bann were it enters Lough Neagh) are described as "a strong fortress, a den of rebels, and as thievish a country as any in Ulster." And two years after the British settlers in County Armagh complained of the robberies daily committed by the kernes of Killultagh and the other wooded countries around.

In this forest there were wild deer in abundance, and also wolves. There are many references to the latter in the Conway Correspondence. On one occasion (1657) George Rawdon, Viscount Conway's agent, was forwarding some dogs to Chester, "which," he says, "it is a pity to send them out of the country. They have been above the Collen and about Mr. Dynes and had some courses with wolves which exceedingly infest the country." I believe there is a place called the Wolf-Bog in the neighbourhood of Colin or the White Mountain, probably because it was a haunt of these animals. Rawdon writes a little later: "I have two more that are kept to hunt the wolf upon every occasion when he commits spoil, and then the people come still to borrow them out." In 1665 they were troublesome and other place -- "the keeper and gunmen are watching the wolves that haunt the Tunny Park almost every night." It would be interesting to know when the last wolf was killed in Killultagh. An old parishioner of Magheragall told me a quaint story concerning one: I give it exactly as I recorded it at the time. "J. H.'s mother lived at Horner's Hill. A wolf once came limping and holding up its paw. She took a thorn out of its foot. Next morning a fine heifer was on the street. No one ever claimed it. Some people said that the wolf brought it." It reminded me of Androcles and the lion.

A memorandum on the Cess of Killultagh (1659) gives the total area as 29,984 acres, of which less than half (14,166 acres) was arable land. The rest consisted of great mosses by the lough side (2,038 acres), other mosses on mountains (1,922 acres), unprofitable land on mountains not 6d per acre (4,320 acres), other mountainous land under 12d (3,120 acres), woodland by lough side set at same rate (4,417 acres).

(To be Continued.)

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THE WAR.

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SIR DOUGLAS HAIG STRIKES.

-- -- -- --

GOOD DAYS WORK IN THE WEST.

-- -- -- --

7,000 PRISONERS AND 100 GUNS TAKEN.

-- -- -- --

By the launching of an offensive on the Amiens front yesterday morning Sir Douglas Haig is believed to have forestalled a big enemy stroke. French troops co-operated, and the advance made was very satisfactory. Tanks and cavalry took part in the operations.

Speaking in the House of Commons yesterday evening, Mr. Bonar Law said:-- The House will be interested to learn the latest information in regard to the attack which took place this morning. The attack was launched at dawn by the Fourth British Army, which comprises English, Australian, and Canadian troops, and by the First French Army, both of which were under the command of Sir Douglas Haig. The attack was on a front of something like 20 kilometres, from Morlancourt to Montdidier.

We have just been in communication on the telephone with Headquarters, and the result will give satisfaction to every member. They had obtained at three o'clock all the points they had set before them as their objectives when the attack began. At that hour we had already captured upwards of a hundred guns, and 7,000 prisoners are already in the cages. (Cheers.)

So far as I can judge from examining the map in the places we have been told are ready reached, it represents an advance of between four and five miles, and in one case it is an advance of seven miles. This ground is immediately in front of Amiens, and its strategic importance is obvious to everybody. I do not desire any way to exaggerate the importance of this achievement. It is quite possible -- it is regarded as probable -- that the Germans on account of previous attacks had intended to retire. But this attack has come upon them as a complete surprise, and has upset whatever plans they had formed.

I will only say further that affords me, as I'm sure it does every member of the House, the greatest satisfaction to feel at this stage of the Session that this is a result which, without exaggeration, is an indication of the complete change in the military position which has taken place in the last few weeks. (Cheers.)

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LISBURN PETTY SESSIONS.

FOOD CONTROL PROSECUTIONS.

This court was held yesterday, before Messrs. W. G. Moriarty, R.M. (president); William M'Ilroy, J.P.; W. J. M'Murray, J.P.; Edward Donaghy, J.P.; William Davis, J.P.; John M'Gonnell, J.P.; Robert Griffith, J.P.; and Augustus Turtle, J.P.

District-Inspector Gregory, R.I.C., and Mr T. J. English, C.P.S., were in attendance.

Larceny of Onions.

George M'Quillan, Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn, summoned a neighbour woman named Margaret M'Clure for, as alleged, stealing a quantity of onions (value £3), his property.

Mr. W. G. Maginess appeared for complainant, and Mr J. T. M'Connell for defendant.

Katherine M'Quillan and Sarah M'Quillan, daughters of complainant, swore to seeing defendant pulling the onions out of the garden about 10-30 on the night of the 1st inst. They watched her into her own door, and saw her put the onions in the yard. They shouted to the defendant, but she made no answer.

The defence was an absolute denial of the theft. Defendant's mother and aunt swore that Mrs. M'Clure was at the latter's house on the night in question until 11-40, and could not possibly have been near M'Quillan's place at the time stated.

Their Worships retired to consider the case, and were a considerable time out of court. On returning,

The Chairman said that the majority of the magistrates convicted. The fine would be the nominal one of 1s, but defendant must pay 10s conversation and costs.

Slaughtering of a Immature Cattle.

The Department of Agriculture prosecuted Samuel Chambers, flesher, for slaughtering an immature heifer, in contravention of the Maintenance of Live Stock (Ireland) (Cattle) Act, 1915.

Mr. William Anderson (Messrs. Moorehead & Wood, Belfast) appeared for the Department, and Mr. W. G. Maginess for the defendant.

Mr. Maginess said he thought he could shorten the case. Chambers had bought two heifers at Robson's; one had four broad teeth and the other only two. If Chambers had known he would have got a permit to slaughter the heifer at the time. The whole thing was an oversight; there was no question of evading the Act, and he (Mr. Maginess) thought the smallest possible fine would meet the case.

Mr. Anderson said the case had been fairly met. So far as the penalty was concerned, that was a matter for the discretion of their Worships. The Department however, instructed him to ask for the maximum cost of 20s in cases of that sort. By bringing prosecutions like that was the only way the Department have preventing the slaughter of immature animals.

Defendant was fined 10s and 10s costs.

Food Control Prosecutions.

District-Inspector Gregory prosecutor James Thompson, grocer, Bow Street, Lisburn, for selling a quantity of tea at a price in excess of the maximum price fixed by the tea (Maximum Prices) Order.

Constable Newman said he accompanied a Food Control Inspector to Thompsons on the 4th July and examine the books. They found on three occasions -- 25th and 27th June and 2nd July -- tea had been sold to Mrs. Connor, Antrim Road, at 1s 10d. No weight was mentioned, but Thompson stated that half a pound had been sold on each occasion. The control price was 2s 8d a lb.

Thompson said he never sold tea at more than 1s 4d per half-pound to Mrs. Connor. It was an error in the book.

Mrs. Connor (called by the District-Inspector) stated positively that she never paid more than 1s 4d per half-pound for tea to Thompson. She admitted that 1s 10d was charged up in the passbook.

Their Worships dismissed case on the merits.

A similar charge was preferred against James Dowie, grocer, Bow Street.

Mr. Maginess, for the defendant, pleaded guilty. He said that Mr. Clenaghan, knowing Dowie had some old tea, begged him to give him some at 2s per half-pound. Dowie did so. Dowie had originally paid at the rate of 4s 6d for it. Mr. Clenaghan was in court to prove that statement. He would gladly take more of the old tea at 2s per half-pound if he could legally do so. Mr. Maginess added that the costs of court might meet the case.

A fine of 2s 6d and costs was imposed.

Fishery Prosecution.

John Neill, Sloan Street, was prosecuted at the instance of Constable M'Donald that on the 23rd April he entered upon the lands of Old Warren for the purpose or under the pretence of fishing in the River Lagan, without authority in writing from the proprietor or occupier of such lands, in contravention of the statutable enactment in that behalf.

Mr. J. T. Moon (Messrs. Cruikshanks, Leech, and Davis, Coleraine) appeared for the complainant, and Mr. W. G. Maginess for the defence.

Complainant said he was in a field at the Lagan at Old Warren when he saw three men approach the river, two of them being on the opposite bank. He watched them for some time, and saw something being drawn across the water. They were setting a net, and Neill was assisting. In reply to his enquiry Neill said he didn't think they were doing any harm in fishing for pike and brime.

Mr. Moon, in answer to the Chairman, said the other men were not summoned because they were wounded soldiers. The Conservators had so instructed.

Mr Maginess contended that there was no evidence adduced to convict his client, and

Their Worships dismissed the case on the merits.

Larceny of a Bicycle.

Thomas Denton was charged with, as alleged, the largely of a bicycle, the propriety of Shaun Adair, Bow Street. It appeared that on the 28th May the latter left his machine at the gateway near his own house, and during his absence it was taken away. He identified the bicycle produced, though it had been repainted and otherwise altered.

Constable M'Donald deposed that when arrested at his mother's house at Lisnatrunk defendant said he had bought a bicycle for 5s, but from whom he did not know.

Mr. Maginess, for the defence, explained that the defendant was of weak intellect, and the belief was that he did purchase the machine from some person.

Mr. Bell, with whom the defendant worked, gave him an excellent character, adding that he would keep him on his employment.

Their Worships, taking into account the extenuating circumstances, dismissed the case.

 

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Lisburn Standard - Friday, 16 August, 1918

Birth

CAMPBELL -- August 9th, at Lawnbank, Ballysillan, to Lieutenant William Campbell, D.S.C., R.N.R., and Mrs. William Campbell -- a son.

Marriage

BEATTIE--BUSTARD -- August 7, at St. James's Church, Belfast, by the Rev. F. W. Warren, M.A., Alfred Henry, youngest son of Mr. George Beattie, 21 University Street, Belfast, to Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Mr. James Thomas Bustard, Oldpark Road, Belfast.

Death

ROLLESTON -- August 13, 1918, at his residence, 13 Holywood Road, Belfast, James, dearly-loved husband of Mary Rolleston.

In Memoriam

CHERRY -- Killed in action August 16th, 1917, Sergeant James Alexander (Jim), Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, only son of James Cherry, Bow Street, Lisburn. Sadly missed by Father, Mother, and five Sisters.

M'CULLAGH -- In loving memory of Alexander Henry M'Cullagh, 2nd Lieut. Inniskillings, killed in action near Ypres on 16th August, 1917, son of Wm. J. M'Cullagh, Upper Ballinderry. "Faithful onto death."

TOPPING -- In loving memory of our dear son, Corporal Henry Topping (18838), R.I. Rifles, killed in action on 16th August, 1917. Also his Uncle Sam on same date.
     Upright and just in all his ways,
          Honest and faithful till end of his days:
     Forgotten to the world by some he may be,
          But dear to our memory he ever will be.
Ever remembered by his loving Father and Mother, Sisters and Brothers; also his brother Thomas (Irish Guards). HENRY and MARY TOPPING. 6 Walton Place, Longstone Street, Lisburn

QUINN -- In loving memory of our dear mother, Jane Quinn, who died on 15th August, 1914, and was interred in Lisburn Cemetery. Ever remembered by her loving family, D. and H. WILLIAMS. EDITH, DORIS, and BERTIE QUINN.

Clippings

SOME EXTRACTS FROM THE

RECORDS OF OLD LISBURN

AND THE MANOR OF KILLULTAGH.

-- -- --

Edited by JAMES CARSON.

-- -- --

XCVI.

-- -- --

HISTORY OF KILLULTAGH.

Rev. W. H. Dundas, B.D.

"Lisburn Standard," January 28, 1916.

(Continued.)

The Irish in Killultagh.

Before passing to the British settlers I shall give from the State Papers a list (about 1640) of the Irish in Killultagh -- Neale Galt O'Neale, formerly Lord, who married first a daughter of M'Quinlin, Lord of the Route, second, O'Neale's daughter, Una ny Neale; third, the Lord of Iveagh's daughter, Rose ny Magennis. The following, except that they paid a token of rent, had freedom of Killultagh: -- The Magillmuryes, MacRories, Hamels, McTrealawnies, Heaghians, Greemes, Hillins, MacVeaghs, Macavagans. Lists follow (1) of the true inhabitants of Killultagh: -- The Magillreawies, McShanes, Lawries, O'Mulhallons, McQuaids, McRobins, and others (sic). (2) A note of those that are but strangers of other countries dwelling in this country of Irish: -- McCaines, Magrues, Magowrans, McStranogs, Makeaghrakes, O'Doones, Makeaghalies, O'Deenans, O'Quins, McGeeans, O'Mildownes, O'Kanes, Tallons, Gribins, O'Mullcrewy, with their strange, followers -- the O'Closes, O'Lorkans, O'Forfyes, O'Connorys, O'Conwaeles, O'Monans, Mageralls, McRories, O'Mulveanies, O'Prontyes, Marlies, McVoloonyes (?), McDonnells, Hinneries, MoQooicks, Flannegans, Maghagans.

Killultagh was a territory by itself and belonged neither to Antrim nor Down until 1605. At first it was proposed to joint it to Down and then divide the latter into two counties, butt on account of the Lagan separating it from Down it was afterwards felt that the Sheriff of Antrim could more conveniently look after the interests of the inhabitants, and in that year it was joined to Antrim. At this time it is said that there was no bridge over the Lagan, though one is shown, on a map about twenty years later. The parishes of Killultagh were often reckoned in the Diocese of Down until even a later date.

Sir Foulke Conway's

family belonged originally to Flintshire, in Wales. His father had purchased the Manor of Ragley, in Warwickshire, about the end of Elizabeth's reign, and it is supposed that most of the settlers, came from those parts, sailing from Bristol. There was a tradition among the people that their fathers came from the "apple counties," and certainly the love of orchards is much more marked in the districts settled by English than in those planted by the Scotch. There were also some settlers from Wales, and many came from Yorkshire at a later period with George Rawdon. A letter written in 1697 says:-- "There is in the North of Ireland an estate which was formerly Lord Conway's. It was first purchased by Sir Foulke Conway for about £500. The rent roll is now about £5,000 a year. The land does not lie upon the sea, the ground is very indifferent, 'twas altogether a wood, as the name denotes; and yet in the memory of men now living has been thus improved by a colony of Yorkshire people and others brought over and settled by Lord Conway and managed by Sir George Rawdon" (Ulster Journal of Archæology, vol. iii., old series).

Ulster at the Plantation was what Canada is at present -- a country which emigrants were invited to enter and clear and make productive. There were pamphlets, too, setting out its attractions, though in rather different terms from those of to-day, as the following extract from Blennehassett's pamphlet (1610) shows:-- "Art thou a gentleman that taketh pleasure in hunt? The fox, the wolf, and the woodkerne (i.e., the wild Irish) do expect thy coming."

Sir Foulke took a prominent part in the affairs of the country. In the absence of Lord Chichester he acted as Governor of Carrickfergus and a great part of Antrim and Down, and as Commander-in-Chief of the Fleet on Lough Neagh, or Lough Sidney as it was also called. There is a good story told by Dobbs of how Sir Moses Hill entertained him on one occasion at Chichester Castle, the ruins of which can be seen at Whitehead. Hill having invited the Governor of Carrickfergus (Sir Foulke) to the country, "ordered his butler the night before that he should, when they came to hard drinking, have some bottles of water in readiness for him, and ply the Governor with wine. The butler (being an Irish boy), instead of observing his master's commands, when the hard time came gave His master wine and the water to the Governor, so as Sir Moses could not rise out of his chair when the Governor took leave of him, and thanked him for his meat more than his drink, which put Sir Moses into a great passion, not apprehending then how he bad been served; but next morning, examining his boy, he was sensible that he drank wine and the Governor water. And threatening to have the butler hanged, he received no other answer from the latter but an oath, and that he knew no reason why he that had paid for the wine should drink water, and the Governor drink wine that had paid nothing for it. Which answer it seemed served the boy's turn, for I myself have seen him, a little odd but brisk man, and lived eight or ten years after the breaking out of the Rebellion of 1641."

Sir Foulke Conway died in 1624, having seen the Church of St. Thomas, now the Cathedral of Christ Church, Lisburn, opened for divine service in 1623. He was succeeded by his brother Sir Edward, Baron Conway of Ragley, who got the title of Viscount of Killultagh in 1637 and built the Castle of which the remains still exist in the Castle Gardens. His son Edward, the second Viscount, succeeded in 1630 and died in 1655; and his son, also named Edward, who built the castle at Portmore, died in 1683. The property then passed by his will to Popham Seymour, who took the name of Conway, and was attainted by the Irish Parliament in 1689; and afterwards to his brother Francis, the ancestor of the Marquises of Hertford.

Bishop Taylor and Philip Tandy.

The first Viscount also established a school at Lisnegarvy. Writing to this son in 1629 he says:-- "The school is not yet too full of scholars for one man to manage, even though he does the work-of the church also. If God prosper it, I will see that it is given the whole time of one man." His advice to his son was very concise and to the point:-- "Be just in all matters of the Church, and endeavour to increase my revenue as best you can." In another letter the same year he says:-- "With regard to the parson of Blaris' claim for tithe within Killultagh, take advice of counsel on it at any cost. I want to provide you with a Bible and a bell." There are many references in the Calendars of State Papers to disputes with various clergy about the tithes, and an examination of the originals in London might reveal many interesting particulars.

The schoolmaster referred to above may have been Philip Tandy, who held the position in 1635. He had charge also of Lord Conway's valuable library, as a letter to Rawdon shows (1635):-- "I am setting Lord Conway's books in alphabetical order, and give all the time to them that I can spare from my school. I classify them also by volumes and sciences. In the Christmas holidays I unchested the chested books and put them in the drawing-room, where they are often aired by good fires. I lately tried to have an usher (assistant teacher), but my school is not large enough to maintain one." Possibly he may have been curate as well. In 1637 he was appointed vicar of Magheragall in succession to William Chambers, and vicar of Glenavy in 1638. He probably held both together, for in 1633 Meredict Gwilliams was vicar of Magheragall, Ballinderry, and Glenavy -- surely a sufficiently large area for one man! The incomes were very small; that of Magheragall amounted to £10 a year. In the Commonwealth Papers he is noted as receiving a salary of £60 a year from 1658 as schoolmaster in Lisnagarvy, in addition to his tithe. The mention of the; tithe shows that he was still in charge of some parish, though it could hardly be Magheragall, where the Inquisition held at Antrim 1557 found that Mr. Andrew Weeke received the tithes from 1650 "until these last two years that Mr. Gellis, a preaching minister, supplied the cure thereof and received the vicarial tithes. Of late Mr. Moore, a preaching minister in Sallary, hath supplied the cure."

Thomas Haslem was also schoolmaster in 1655, and in receipt of £40 salary; he held the position as well as the curacy of the Cathedral for many years after the Restoration.

William Chambers, writing in 1655, has this mysterious sentence in a postscript: "Mr. Tandy's flame is quenched." What is the meaning of it? We meet him again in 1658, when a Mr. Hyrne writes: "I do not quite like Mr. Tandy, and hope you will get Dr. Taylor's opinion on him before you grant him what I hear he desired in his letter." Major Rawdon, writing from Hillsborough, says: "Dr. Taylor preached excellently this morning. Mr. Tandy is also considered a rare preacher and is liked in the parish." Dr. Taylor was the famous Jeremy Taylor, afterwards Bishop of Down and Connor; and in connection with him Tandy made the great mistake of his life. He joined in a charge against Dr. Taylor of having christened Mr. Breare's child with the sign of the Cross -- i.e., of having used the baptismal service appointed in the Prayerbook. It was a serious accusation in those days, as is shown by the fact that a Bishop of Durham was imprisoned for six months about the same time for using this same service. A warrant for his arrest was issued to the Governor of Carrickfergus, and he was sent to Dublin for trial, but his powerful friends appear to have been able to save him. Mr. Breare, here mentioned, lived, I believe, at Brookhill. Dr. Taylor's own reference to this affair is as follows:-- "I fear my time in Ireland is likely to be short, for a Presbyterian and a madman have informed against me as a dangerous man to their religion and for using the sign of the Cross in baptism. The worst event of the information which fear is my return into England." Evidently there were two accusers, and It is open to debate whether Tandy was the Presbyterian or the madman. Probably he was the Presbyterian, for Lord Conway writes that "Mr. Tandy may have enough of these (Anabaptists and Quakers) to set himself against without troubling his peaceable and best neighbours." Conway felt the charge as if it were a personal injury. "I hope when you come over you will take him (Tandy) off from persecuting me, since none knows better than yourself whether I deserve the same at his hands. The quarrel is, it seems, because he thinks Dr. Taylor is more welcome at Hillsborough than himself." Conway, however, treated him very generously afterwards, and the State Papers show that the Viscount employed him as an agent till his death, and he even made provision for his wife and children. Tandy mentioned later that he had a "poor little £30 a year for two small agencies," and delicately hints to Lord Conway that he occasionally spent a little money in the transaction of his affairs. Some of us find a difficulty at times in bringing a letter to a neat conclusion, but I think the following could hardly be surpassed:-- "'Tis now midnight, and (forgive me, my Lord) I am weary, but not of being your Lordship's most humble servant." He died between 1664 and 1666.

(To be Continued.)

=========================

THE WAR.

-- -- -- --

EVERYTHING GOES WELL FOR ALLIES.

-- -- -- --

GERMAN PRISONERS STILL BEING BROUGHT IN.

-- -- -- --

71,000 BAGGED IN A MONTH.

-- -- -- --

So far everything has gone well with the Allies since Sir. Douglas Haig launched his attack yesterday week, and further interesting developments are imminent. There was a good deal of local fighting yesterday, in which the Canadians on the northern wing and the French at Lassigny have made advances. The Press Associations states that the whole of the Lassigny ridge has paused into French hands, with fresh big captures in prisoners and guns.

The total number of prisoners captured by the British Fourth Army since the morning of 8th inst. is now given officially as 21,844. During the same period the prisoners taken by the French First Army amount to 8,500, making a total of 30,344 German prisoners captured during the operations of the Allied armies on the Montdidier-Albert front. Since Foch struck back at the Marne a month ago the Allies have captured over 71,000 prisoners and 1,175 gnus.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

MENTIONED FOR VALUABLE SERVICE.

The names of the following, among others, have been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War for valuable services rendered in connection with the war:--

Major A. P. Jenkins, Royal Irish Rifles. Major Jenkins, who commanded the local battalion of the Ulster Volunteer Force prior to the war, was dangerously wounded and taken prisoner at the opening battle of the Somme on 1st July, 1916. He was repatriated in September, 1917, and is at present with a reserve battalion of the Rifles. His elder son, Second-Lieut. Garret P. Jenkins, was killed in action last year.

Captain F. R. M. Crozier, Royal Irish Fusiliers, son of the late Mr. Francis R. M. Crosier, of Carrickbrennan, County Down. This officer, who is a solicitor by profession, was wounded in the Suvla Bay operations in August, 1915, and again figured in the casualties while serving in the Near East in September, 1916. His brother, Lieut. W. M. Crosier, 9th Batt. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, fell in action at the opening of the battle of the Somme on 1st July. 1916.

Amongst the names of ladies who have been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War for valuable nursing services is that of

Miss A. E. M. Melville, matron of the County Antrim Infirmary, Lisburn. Miss Melville takes a deep interest in the wounded placed in her charge, and the fact that she has been mentioned for valuable services will give much pleasure to both her patients (past and present) and friends.

Amongst the names brought to notice by the Chairman of the Joint War Committee of the British Red Cross Society and Order of St. John of Jerusalem in England for valuable services rendered in connection with the establishment, organisation, and maintenance of hospitals is that of

Mr. E. J. Charley, J.P., of Seymour Hill, Dunmurry, a member of the Ulster Joint Committee, and a former High Sheriff of the County of Antrim. Few families have done more for the war than the Charley family.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

BOARDMILLS OFFICER RESIGNS OWING TO WOUNDS.

Lieut. L. J. M'Candless, Notts and Derby Regiment, has relinquished his commission on account of ill-health caused by wounds, and has been granted the hon. rank of lieutenant. This officer is a son Rev. J. L. M'Candless, Boardmills.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

SOUTH ANTRIM VOLUNTEER KILLED.

Captain W. P. Vint, M.G.C.

Captain William Percival Vint, Machine Gun Corps, killed in action on 5th August, was a son of the late Mr. William Vint, Belfast, and Mrs. Vint, 14 Rectory Grove, London, S.W.4, and a grandson of the late Mr. Jonathan Vint, Willowfield, Belfast. Captain Vint was in business in South America when the war broke out, and he immediately came home to enlist. His first commission was in the 11th Battalion of the Royal Irish Rifles (South Antrims), but he transferred to the Brigade Machine Gun Corps. He was home on leave twelve months ago. He was invalided home suffering from shell-shock, and had returned to the front a few months ago. Captain Vint was a particularly popular young officer on the South Antrim Volunteers, and many of the local battalion, who, like himself, afterwards joined the Machine Gun Corps, have grateful remembrance of his many kindnesses.

=========================

DUNMURRY PETTY SESSIONS.

Held on Wednesday before Mr. E. J. Charley, J.P. (chairman) and Mr. James Moore, J.P. Edward Magee summoned Hugh Cowan, of Andersonstown, to recover possession of a house and premises. Complainant stated that the defendant had been in his employment, but left about 26th May last and continued to hold possession of the house, and he required it for the man employed to take Cowan's place. Mrs. Cowan stated that they had been unable to get a house to suit them. The Bench made an order for possession on or before 31st August.

=========================

LISBURN MAN FINED AT BELFAST.

Improper Use of Petrol.

Patrick Rice, Longstone Street, Lisburn, was prosecuted in Belfast Police Court on Wednesday for using petrol improperly and for driving a motor bicycle without a licence, and James M'Cann was summoned also, for improperly using petrol. District-Inspector Redmond prosecuted, and Mr. Michael Lavery, Lisburn, defended.

It appears that Rice was stopped by a policeman when on his way to Belfast. When asked for a licence he produced one which was out of date, and said he thought it was still in force. He said he was driving the machine for Mr. M'Cann, of Lisburn, to a purchaser in Belfast.

The defence put forward By Mr. Lavery was that M'Cann had purchased the bicycle some weeks ago with the intention of reselling it. He found a customer in Belfast. Rice carried on a bicycle shop in Lisburn, and up to the 1st June of this year had a driver's licence. M'Cann thought the licence was still in existence, and engaged him to deliver the motor in Belfast.

M'Cann was fined 10s and costs, and Rice was ordered to pay 2s 6d and costs in each case.

 

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Lisburn Standard - Friday, 23 August, 1918

Birth

BAILLIE--GAGE -- August 18, 1918, at 89 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin, the wife of Cecil Bailie-Gage, Lansdowne Lodge, Dublin -- a son.

Marriage

HARMAN--IRVINE -- On the 19th Aug., in London, William R. S. Harman, Commander R.N., to Flora Fitzmaurice, only daughter of Lord Muskerry.

Death

LAMONT -- August 20th, at her residence, Rineen, 38 Bawnmore Road, Belfast, Annie E., widow of the late Rev. J. D. Lamont, Methodist Minister.

Roll of Honour

M'MILLAN -- Killed in action on 30th July, 1918, Lance-Corporal John M'Millan (16770), 14th Battalion R.I. Rifles (Y.C.V.s), dearly-beloved son of the late Joseph and Margaret M'Millan, Castle Street, Lisburn. Deeply regretted by his loving Brothers and Sisters.

Clippings

SOME EXTRACTS FROM THE

RECORDS OF OLD LISBURN

AND THE MANOR OF KILLULTAGH.

-- -- --

Edited by JAMES CARSON.

-- -- --

XCVII.

-- -- --

HISTORY OF KILLULTAGH.

Rev. W. H. Dundas, B.D.

"Lisburn Standard." January 28, 1916

(Continued,)

Sir George Rawdon -- Battle of Lisburn.

The most influential man in Killultagh in the 17th century was undoubtedly Sir George Rawdon. He was born at Rawdon Hall, near Leeds, and held office under the first Viscount Conway, who was Secretary of State. After his death Major Rawdon came to Ulster and took up the management of the estate. He was a prominent man in the confused politics of his time, an officer of the British Army in Ulster, and M.P. for Belfast in 1639. Although he was a Royalist at heart, he nevertheless was able to work with the Republicans and Cromwellians when they were in power. Probably some would cal him a trimmer, but trimmers may be useful in times of upheaval and ever-changing fortunes of parties. In 1639 he was employed as a Commissioner for administering the "Black Oath" to all the Scotchmen and women in the province, and says "he was never in so troublesome a business in his life." This was an oath of obedience and loyalty to Charles I., and was intended to defeat the National Covenant. In 1640 he got a lease from Conway of certain manors and lands which must have included Brookhill; it is said to have received its name from Sir Francis Brooke a colonel in Elizabeth's army. In the following year, on October 23rd, the great Rebellion began. There was much fighting in Killultagh, but having examined the Depositions in Trinity College Library I do not think there were many massacres; by this time the English were too strong in the district. Lisnegarvy became a plane of refuge for the flying Protestants, and on Sunday, November 28th, the Irish made a fierce attack upon it because it barred their way to Carrickfergus. Sir George Rawdon was in London on October 23rd, and at once left on hearing the news. The roads were almost impassable in many English shires, and it was three weeks before he reached a Scotch port. He landed at Bangor on November 26th, and got to Lisnegarvy late next evening, where he found the men drawn up in the market place expecting the rebels. There is a most interesting account of the affair in the Cathedral Vestry-book. The Irish leaders, Sir Phelemy O'Neill, Sir Conn Magennis, and Major-General Plunkett, met at Brookhill, where they seized a brick house of Mr. Rawdon's. They had eight or nine thousand men drawn from Armagh, Tyrone, Antrim and Down, and other counties in Ulster, with two field pieces and plenty of ammunition, having seised 50 barrels of powder in the castle at Newry, which they surprised the first night of the Rebellion. The defenders of Lisnegarvy consisted of five companies newly raised, "poor stript mea that had made their escape from the rebels." Lord Conway's troop of horse, a squadron of Lord Grandison's troop (the rest of them having been murdered at their quarters in Tanrogee), and about 40 of a country troop newly raised, and two small field pieces taken out of Lord Conway's house (State Papers). During the fight they, received some reinforcements, consisting of the Earl of Donegal's troop and a company of foot commanded by Captain Boyd, and also powder sent by post in mails in horseback and after the other from Carrickfergus. Scouts sent out discovered the enemy at Mass, but Immediately they quit their devotions and beat drums and marched directly to Lisnegarvy, "and before ten o'clock appeared drawn up on the warren and sent out two divisions of 6 or 7 hundreds apiece to compass the town, and pieced their field pieces on the highway to it before their body, and with them and their long fowling pieces killed and wounded several of our men as they stood in their ranks in the market place, and some of our musketeers were placed in windows to make the like return of shot to the enemy. A squadron of horse with some musketeers was commanded to face the division that was marching on the north side and keep them at a distance as long as they could, which was so well performed that the other division which marched by the river on the south side come in before the other, time enough to be well beaten by the horse, and more than 200 of them were slain in Bridge Street and in their retreat. By this time the enemy had forced in our small party on the north and was marching down Castle Street, which our horse (so) well charged there that at least 300 of the rebels were slain in the street and in the meadows behind the houses, whereby they were so much discouraged that for almost two hours their officers could not get any more parties to adventure a second assault upon us. About one o'clock fresh parties were issued out and beaten back as before, and so till night, when they fired all the town, which was in few hours turned to ashes, making a fresh assault in the confusion and heat of the fire." Captain Boyd and 25 or 26 men were slain; Sir George Rawdon was wounded and had his horse shot under him; also Captain St. John and Captain Burley and about 30 men. The slain of the enemy were found to be more than thrice the number of the defenders. About 10 or 11 o'clock their two generals quit their station and marched away in the dark, their two field pieces were thrown into the river, or in some moss-pit, and could never be found. In their retreat they burned Brookhill House, in which were Lord Conway's library and other goods to the value of £5,000 or £6,000, and they carried off or destroyed some 1,000 ozs. of ancient plate which has been placed there for safety (Young's Town Book of Belfast). The Cathedral record adds -- "It is to be remembered with much regret yt ye loss and overthrow did so enrage ye rebels yt for sevl days and weeks after they murder'd many hundreds of Protestants whom they had kept prisoners in ye Counties of Armagh, Tyrone, and other parts of Ulster."

The following Depositions referring to the 1641 Massacre bear on this subject:--

Margett Erwin, living at Brookhill, in Co. Antrim, aged 30 years or thereabouts, deposed -- "At he beginning of the Rebellion the Lord of Aghadowey, in the Co. of Antrim, with one Mr. Houghton and her master, being fearful of the enemy, left her with his children and went to Lisnegarvy, and most of his fears was of Cullo M'Nogher, because there was some falling out between them formerly. She heard Cullo M'Nogher, who made his braggs and boasted, and swore that if he had Mr. Houghton there he would do the like to him, and that he did not care for the killing of any Englishman -- whelps, and said that he had been at Lisnegarvy with Sir Phel., and that he mist his brother, but if his brother was lost he would kill Mr. Houghton's children and dash their heads against the stones; but one James M'Gilmurry answered him and said he should not kill the poor innocent children, but he said he would for they were of the English blood. This examinee further saith that a little after the defeat the enemy got at Lisnegarvy that there came to the house the said Cullo M'Nogher, Edm. M'Gilmurry, and others, and the said Edmund took this examinee out of doors and told her that they had been killing five women and two boys between Ballinderry and Glenavy by their own houses, who said he was sorry for a gritty youth who was there killed with flaxen hair; he made such a pitiful cry and the youth ran away, but the they followed him and knocked him down and killed him, and hanged the women, one being Jane Carudders and (?) Ed. Hogg's wife Margarett Cassee, Ed. Hogg's -----, and Jennett Bell, and further saith not."

Turlogh Marchy, of Ballinderry, deposed -- "John Carudders and Edw. Hogg, two of his neighbours, told him that their two wives were killed and two women more the first winter in the Rebellion at Ballyelwash, in the parish of Ballinderry, and that Owen M'Irelany and Nellie M'Irelany and two of the Davyes and others were actors in the said murders." (I cannot identify this place; it appears as "Ewaysh," and was part of Sir Fulke Conway's property, at an Inquisition held at Carrickfergus in 1625.)

In 1646 we find Major Rawdon buying horses in England for Colonel Hill's cavalry in Ulster; he paid £7 10s apiece, and was allowed 30s apiece for taking them from London to Liverpool. In 1649 He got a new lease of Brookhill, now rebuilt, for sixty years, from Lord Conway, in return for his services, with the six townlands of Ballymoney, alias Kilcorig, Ballynadolly, Ballyeloughy, Ballycarrickmaddy, Ballycloughmelough, and Ballymeoner (Ballymave), also 50 acres of Aghenahogh and Knocknedawney lying outside the park pale, and 80 acres of the townland of Magheragall, together with the water mill or millstead, and free liberty to build up a watermill or windmill upon some or any of them. Rent to be 52s (an acre) a year; after the death of George Rawdon to be raised to £80. He does not appear to have lived much there, as in 1654 he was getting a house built in Lisburn, having married in that year as his second wife Dorothy Conway, sister of the second Viscount.

In 1657 Lady Conway was in ill-health, and was in search of a very curious remedy which was to be made from the moss which grew on dead men's skulls. Rawdon was asked to procure it for her, and in June he wrote -- "I have sent almost all Ulster over for moss of slain men's skull and have got none yet but two. I expect better accounts shortly of the matter from others. There is enough in churchyards, but these are not valued as to our Lady's purpose by our chirurgeons" (surgeons). Next month, however, he had got a good proportion of most. Dobbs says (1683) that in a churchyard on an island in Lough Begg (near Toome) may be had stores of moss that grows on dead men's skulls, useful in staunching blood and said to be a great ingredient in making sympathetic powder.

In the same year he acted on a Commission appointed by the Cromwellians for rearranging parish boundaries, so that each minister might have £100 or at least £80 a year, and yet not so large that any part should be above three miles from the church. The Presbyterians, however, were suspicious of Rawdon and esteemed him "one of the horns against the Kirk." The effect of the recommendations of these Commissioners would have been to add a part of Magheragall to Lisburn, a part of Ballinderry to Glenavy, and to make a new church and parish called Lackey (near Megaberry) for the remainder of Magheragall, Ballinderry, Aghalee, Aghagallon, and the Chapellry of Magherameske; but the restoration of Charles II. in 1660 saved these parishes from extinction. Rawdon was then summoned to London, and for his services he secured a grant of several thousand acres in the territory of Moira which had belonged to the O'Laverys. He was elected M.P. for Carrickfergus, and was made a baronet with the title of Sir John Rawdon of Moyra House.

(To be Continued.)

=========================

BELFAST SHIPBUILDING PROGRESS.

Acknowledging his unanimous election to the chairmanship of the Belfast Harbour Commissioners, in succession to the late Right Hon. R. Thompson, M.P., Mr. H. M. Pollock, J.P., president Belfast Chamber of Commerce, said it was a matter of satisfaction that, unlike most of the dock and harbour authorities of the kingdom, the Board had not been obliged to ask authority to increase harbour dues on vessels and goods beyond the statutory maxima. With regard to shipbuilding, he mentioned that while before the war the Queen's Island weekly wage bill was £25,000, last week £75,000 was paid to a total of 21,500 men; and Messrs. Workman & Clark's yard had made relative progress.

=========================

THE WAR.

-- -- -- --

BRITISH TAKE ALBERT.

-- -- -- --

5,000 PRISONERS IN TWO DAYS.

-- -- -- --

OUR RAIDS IN GERMANY.

-- -- -- --

The war news continues splendid. Sir Douglas Haig, who attacked on a ten-mile front north of the Ancre on Wednesday morning, yesterday extended his battle line, attacking south of the river Ancre with the object of capturing the high ground between Bray and Albert. The assault was singularly successful, advancing two miles in front of six. Albert was captured was 1,400 prisoners taken.

North of the Ancre the enemy counter-attacked heavily, notably at Miramount and Achiet-le-Grand, but was thoroughly thrashed. The total of prisoners so far is over 5,000. Bitter fighting is in progress.

In the Ypres-Bethune section there has been a lot of miscellaneous fighting, all to our decided advantage.

The French report progress on the whole battle front between the Mats, Oise, Ailette, and Aisne. Over 200 guns have been captured since Tuesday.

The Independent Air Force have heavily bombed five German towns -- Frankfort, Cologne, Treves, Mannheim, and Coblenz -- with much success.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

SHORT PRESS OPINIONS.

The "Daily Chronicle" says:-- The German lines (where British attacks at the Ancre were made) were held in great depth, with a battle zone placed several miles back along the line formed by the cuttings and embankments of the railway between Arras and Albert. When they reached this line the tanks were stopped, and our had plenty to do to repel counter-attacks from the German reserves. Thus we failed to get through to Bapaume, which is only a few miles further on, and our success was deprived for the time being of any strategic consequence.

The "Times" says:-- Now that the assault upon their line has extended so greatly the enemy are not in the happy position of being able to hurry their reserves to a single menaced sector, nor have they now very large reserves at their command. While they are evidently determined to hold our ground, if they can, north of the Somme the French are tearing away large portions of their front further east. Looked at as a whole, the situation developed during the last five weeks suggests that the Germans cannot continue to depend upon piecemeal efforts at defence, and may soon have to make some larger decisions in the hope of stabilising their line in the West.

There are clear signs (the "Daily News" comments) the General Foch has no idea of playing into the enemy's hands by letting his infantry run ahead of their guns on to the main defensive positions. He is not fighting against time, and there is more important to save lives than to save days.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

ANOTHER LISBURN SOLDIER KILLED.

Lance-Corporal John M'Millan, R.I.R.

It is with personal regret, a regret that will be shared by many of our readers, that we learn of the death at the front of Lance-Corporal John M'Millan, R.I.R. (Y.C.V.s), son of Mr. Joseph M'Millan, Castle Street, Lisburn. Lance-Corporal M'Millan made the supreme sacrifice on the 30th July, death, caused by a big German shell, being mercifully swift. Prior to volunteering Lance-Corporal M'Millan was a clerk at Hilden in the firm of Messrs. Wm. Barbour & Sons. He was a keen all-round athlete, and was actively identified with Lisburn Rugby Club, Roseville F.C., and South Antrim Hockey Club. He was a lieutenant in the 23rd (Railway Street Presbyterian Church) company of the Boys' Brigade, in which company he continued to take a keen and appreciative interest to the end. He went to the front with the Ulster Division in October, 1915, and up till the 30th ult. had escaped anything like serious injury. His brothers and sisters have received many kind letters of condolence in the trouble.

C.Q.M.S. Fox, returning a letter which Miss I. M'Millan had sent her brother, says:--

It is not a very pleasant task I have set myself, to break the news to you of your brother's death on 30th July, 1918; more especially after the recent sad loss you sustained through the death of your father, which, I understand, took place only a few weeks ago. You will, I hope, accept my deepest sympathy, and also that of his comrades. Your brother was extremely popular, and since he joined this battalion and being posted to B Company was my company clerk. He and I have always been the best of friends, and had he been a brother of mine I could not have got a great shock them when I received the news that evening. Your brother, with a number of others, was in company headquarters, when a shell came and buried the lot. Some of them were fortunate to escape with bruises, &c, but I am sorry to say six succumbed out of the lot. If it is any consolation to you to know, your brother was buried close to here, and a nice cross has been erected over him. The Presbyterian clergyman will -- if he has not already done so -- write to you; I gave him your address yesterday. I know all this will prove poor consolation to you. If there is anything I can do for you in the line of information I shall only be too pleased to do so.

Captain (Rev.) W. H. Hutchison, C.F., wrote:--

It is with deepest regret I have to inform you of the death of your brother, which occurred on 30th July. He was with some others in a frontline shelter when an enemy shell penetrated, and death was mercifully sudden. His body was brought back and interred with military honours in a little French cemetery here.

Allow me to tender my sincerest sympathy -- a sympathy all the deeper because I hear you lost your father some six or seven weeks ago. Your brother was one of the best, a loyal comrade, an excellent soldier, and a true man. He really died that others may live, and thus revealed the spirit that was in him. He was very popular with all ranks, and his loss is deplored not only because of his services but for all he was in himself. I pray that the God of the fatherless, the Comforter and Redeemer, may sustain you in your double bereavement. The officers present with me join in truest sympathy.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

STONEYFORD SOLDIER WOUNDED.

Mr R. Totten, Stoneyford, Lisburn, has received intimation that his son, Rifleman Joseph Totten, R.I.R., has been severely wounded in action.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

LIEUT. S. WARING RELINQUISHES HIS COMMISSION.

Temporary Lieut. Sam Waring has relinquished his commission on account of ill-health contracted on active service, and has been granted the honorary rank lieutenant, 21st August, 1918. Lieut. Waring, who was given a commission in 1914 in the South Antrim Volunteers (11th R.I.R.), is a son of Mr. Lucas Waring, Bellbrook, Glenavy. He was thrice wounded, and was in addition gassed in the spring of last year. He was mentioned in dispatches for gallantry in action.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

SOLDIER HERO NOW PRISONER IN GERMANY.

Lance-Corporal Samuel M'Kee, Royal Irish Rifles, son of the late Mr. John M'Kee, North Street, Newry, has been awarded the certificate of the Ulster Division for "his devotion to duty, especially during the successful daylight raid on the enemy trenches near Wytscheete on the 3rd June, 1917, when he captured two prisoners and brought back a dead comrade to the British trenches." Lance-Corporal M'Kee is now a prisoner of war in Germany, where his brother, Rifleman George M'Kee, is also in captivity. Both were members of the Ulster Volunteers, and joined the Ulster Division on its formation. A brother of these two soldiers, a painter to trade, is employed on the Downshire Estate, and lives in Hillsborough.

=========================

Ireland and the Army.

-- -- --

The Call of the Irish Regiments.

-- -- --

Arms of the Service an Irish Man Can Join.

-- -- --

It is in the ARMY, and the fighting branches of it, that Irishmen have won their greatest laurels, and have the chance to win still greater TO-DAY.

INFANTRY. -- The Irish Regiments do not need to advertise. British Generals can testify to their work; and after the War the best testimonial an Irishman will be able to give of his fighting qualities is that he has served in one. And so when recruits are now so urgently been called for, it is up to every Irish fighting man, able and anxious to do is his bit, to rally to the collars which the valour of his countrymen has covered with immortal glory.

Every Irishman over 18 8/12 years, if accepted for service in the Infantry, may join the particular regiment of his choice, whether Irish, English, Scottish, or Welsh; the Irish Guards being especially offered, provided he attains the necessary physical standard. For those under 18 8/12 special arrangements have been made for their Graduated Training.

CAVALRY. -- The mounted soldier has not had the same chance of distinction as the foot soldier, but what he has to do he has done well, and in this branch of the Service there is also an opening for men over 40 years of age of Grades 1 and 2. Choice of Cavalry Regiments is again given, including North, and South Irish Horse.

ROYAL ARTILLERY: R.H., R.F., and R.G.A. -- All that has been said about the work of the Infantry applies equally to the Gunners. They have been magnificent in this war, and Irishmen have formed a big proportion of the numbers. The Irish Infantrymen, backed up by the Irish Artilleryman, is irresistible. This regiment is open to all Irishmen between the ages of 18 8/12 years and 40 years who are in Grade 1. A special opening is also offered in the R.G.A. for men over 40 years in Grade 2.

MACHINE GUN CORPS AND TANK CORPS. -- The Irishman who loves his fighting with a spice of machinery to flavour it can get it in either of these Corps. For the Tank Corps a technical training is not necessary, though very desirable. Owing to that particular training which Recruits have to undergo for the above Corps, they are posted to special Training Reserve Brigade, and are eligible provided they are between the ages of 18 2/12 years and 40 years and in Grade 1.

ROYAL ENGINEERS. -- The Sappers have had to fight more than once in this war, and will likely have to do so again. That will be no disqualification and an Irishman eyes. The main function of the R.E. is to make things easier for the fighting man to do has fighting. To this end their various branches invite skilled and unskilled Tradesmen, Telegraphists, Artificers, Motor Cyclists, Railwaymen, Stevedores, Technical Engineers, &c. Particulars of eligibility and trade tests may be obtained from any Recruiting Official.

ARMY SERVICE CORPS. -- Like the R.E., the A.S.C. has had to take its risks in this war. But its chief function is the transport and supplies. Skilled Motor Drivers of the M.T. will be examined by an A.S.C., M.T., Officer as to their suitability and eligibility at each Reception Depot. Men suitable as M.T. learner-drivers will also be examined as to their suitability. They must be in a grade other than Grade 1, and not below 25 years of age. "H.T.," "Remounts," require men accustomed to horses, who are in a grade other than Grade 1 and not below the age of 30 years. "Supply" accepts men as Bakers, Butchers, and Clerks, subject to a Trade Test, who are in Grade 3 and not below the age of 25 years.

R.A.M.C. -- The R.A.M.C. does not fight, but it earns V.C.s. As well as stretcher-bearers and hospital orderlies, it needs men who are Dental Mechanics, Pharmacists, Masseurs, or the like, provided they are of a grade other and than Grade 1 and not below the age of 30 years.

ARMY ORDNANCE CORPS. -- Men who are experienced in the receipt, storage, and issuing of goods of all descriptions, and in accounting for them, are useful for this Corps, but must be in a grade other than Grade 1, and not below the age of 30.

ARMY VETERINARY CORPS. -- Recruits for this Corps should have a knowledge of horse management in civil life, and must be in a grade other than Grade 1, and not below the age of 30.

THE LABOUR CORPS. -- This is the Corps for the men whose age, health, ignorance of trade, unfit them for the fighting line or any of the special units mentioned above. All is needed is that a man should be able to handle a pick and shovel, or to do the ordinary work of a labourer in civil life.

Recruits will Corps must be of Grade 3, and no man of this grade who is certified to be able to do a full day's work in the Army will be rejected.

PAY. -- The minimum rate of pay from all branches of the Service is 1/6 a day, with free kit, rations, and separation allowance. Engineer Pay, Corps Pay, &c., will be issuable to certain men in the Royal Engineers, R.A.M.C., A.O.S., and A.V.C. The rates vary from 3d to 2/- a day, according to the qualifications of the man and the Corps he belongs to.

SPECIAL NOTE. -- The above qualifications and limitations as to age and category are subject to alteration, according to the immediate exigencies and demands of the Service, and must only be taken as a general guide.

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Lisburn Standard - Friday, 30 August, 1918

Birth

ALEXANDER -- August 19, at 5 Victoria Villas, Ballyclare, to Rev. J. C. Alexander and Mrs. Alexander -- a son.

Marriage

LOGAN--HULL -- August 21, at the Parish Church, Aghalee, by the Rev. F. B. Aldwell, M.A., LL.B., rector, Samuel G. Logan, J.P., Annaville, Aghalee, to Charlotte Letitia (Tissie), eldest daughter of the late Henry Hull and Mrs. Hull, "The Oaks," Soldierstown, Aghalee.

Deaths

LAWTHER -- August 24, at his residence, 14 Wilmont Terrace, Lisburn Road, Belfast, James, second son of the late William Lawther, Moira.

SIMPSON -- August 30th, 1918, suddenly, at her residence, Brackenbank, Tullynacross, Lambeg, Margaret Jane, dearly-beloved wife of John Simpson. Her remains will be removed for interment in the Family Burying-ground, Hillhall, on Sunday afternoon, at 3-30. Friends will please accept this intimation. JOHN SIMPSON.

Roll of Honour

SINTON -- Killed in action on 21st inst., Captain Edwin Sinton, M.C., R.F.A., youngest son of the late Samuel Sinton, Bessbrook, County Armagh, and late of Belfast.

ROYAL ULSTER MASONIC LODGE, No. 274.
SINTON -- With deepest sorrow the W.M., Officers, and Brethren of above Lodge received the news of the death of our much esteemed brother, Captain Edwin Sinton, M.C., R.F.A., who was killed in action on August 21, 1918. A. M. M'KEOWN, W.M.; JOHN M. HARRIS, P.M., Secy.

In Memoriam

DALTON -- In sad and loving memory of my dear son, Private David Dalton (17680), Machine Gun Corps, who died on August 31st, 1917, from wounds received in action, and was interred in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe.
   Peacefully sleeping, resting at last,
         Earth's weary pains and troubles are past;
   Jesus has taken him home to His breast,
         Sleeping so sweetly, ever at rest.
-- Sadly missed by his sorrowing Mother, Brothers, Sisters, and Uncle (one of his brothers on active service). Mace, Lisburn, Co. Antrim.

DALTON -- In sad and loving memory of our dear brother, Private David Dalton (17680), Machine Gun Corps, who died on August 31st, 1917, from wounds received in action, and was interred in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinghe.
   Our Brother's fight is over,
         His earthly race is he run;
   'Twas by Thy grace and power
         The prize of life he won;
   He now is sweetly sleeping,
         His spirit rests with Thee,
   And though Thy saints are weeping,
         Their song is "Victory."
-- Deeply mourned by his loving Brother and Sister-in-law, SAMUEL and EMILY DALTON, Also his little Nephew and Niece, DAVID and NOREEN. Wahroonga, Australia.

Clippings

SOME EXTRACTS FROM THE

RECORDS OF OLD LISBURN

AND THE MANOR OF KILLULTAGH.

-- -- --

Edited by JAMES CARSON.

-- -- --

XCVIII.

-- -- --

HISTORY OF KILLULTAGH.

Rev. W. H. Dundas, B.D.

"Lisburn Standard," January 28, 1916.

(Continued.)

Ecclesiastical.

I have not yet found the name of the rector or vicar when the church was built, put Alex. Forbisson is said to have been rector in 1628. At the Royal Visitation of 1633 Chambers is given as curate (probably William, who was appointed vicar of Magheragall in 1635), and in 1637 James Hamilton was made rector. He lived in the troubled times when the Covenant was being forced on the people; and, according to Adair, a Presbyterian writer of the time, he with another "gave the greatest trouble to the Presbytery, as they obstinately adhered to their former courses and denied the Covenant and the authority of the Presbytery. Upon which these hirelings were suspended and thereafter restrained from the exercise of the ministry." The Cathedral register bears Silent testimony to this fact. It contains no entries of baptisms from December, 1646, to 1664. Hamilton was described in 1647 as "deprived by the Presbytery and lurking where he can be entertained" (List of Clergy of the Province of Armagh, Carte Papers). Rawdon said in 1657 that "Mr. Hamilton, who was presented to Blaris, is still alive, but doth not much look after it. I do not know what he may do."

In 1651 the Parliamentary Commissioners sent one Andrew Wyke, an Anabaptist, to preach the Gospel in the North. Adair, who with other Presbyterian ministers had a controversy with him at Antrim, describes him as void of human learning, never educated that way, but a tradesman and imprudent. However, he seems to have made a good impression in Lisnagarvy at first. "The Commissioners," writes Rawdon, "have sent us a rare minister, one Mr. Wyke, a most powerful preacher, so that the congregation at Lisnagarvy is very great and look upon it as a great mercy and providence." Wyke was a prime favourite with the Government, which looked after his interests well. When he first came the Privy Council wrote that he was to have a piece of land so that he could keep a horse and some cows, as an encouragement to other ministers and a provision for his family in case of death. Nest year he got £200 to build a house and 100 acres for a dairy and to provide corn for his family. In 1654 he obtained a portion of the lands of Dromore, not exceeding 100 acres, with a lease for seven years. In 1657 he was in receipt of a salary of £150 and the tithes of Blaris, Lambeg, and Derriaghy, and he had the tithes of Magheragall from 1651 to 1655. This was no bad provision for "a man of meek spirit," as the Commissioners described him. However, Mistress Dorothy Rawdon took a strong dislike to him. She wrote to her brother soon after her marriage in 1654 -- "We are arrived (at Hillsborough) anxious to get to our final destination at Lisnegarvy, which is not yet finished. We shall have to live in one end of it until it is finished. There is nothing I dislike here but Mr. Wilkes, whom I never can like. You would very much oblige me if you sent a good minister here, as it is hard to live by such a one as he." Her first impression may not have been far wrong, for Rawdon says neat year -- "Unless Mr. Wyke will do punctual duties besides preaching I do not see how he could be called by the people and presented by the patron." I fear there was no improvement, because in 1658 Rawdon kept the tithes of Lisnegarvy from him, and petitioned that they might go towards building a free school in the town. "Wkye went up with the Lord Chief Baron, but prevailed not, and now does not much account he can stay at Lisnegarvy." In 1658 he was moved to the united parishes of Donaghcloney and Tullylish, but next year the English inhabitants of Magheralin parish petitioned that he might be appointed their minister. We catch a last glimpse of Andrew Wyke in 1663 under changed circumstances; he with other Independent and Presbyterian ministers was put under guard at Carrickfergus for supposed complicity in Blood's Plot; and there we must leave him.

In 1662 Charles II. raised the church to the dignity of the Cathedral Church of Down and Connor, as a recognition of their loyalty. A letter from Rawdon to Conway in 1664 refers to difficulties which had arisen in this connection -- "It will, I think, be very hard to effect this Cathedral work, for I have received a letter last post from my Lord Primate, who says he finds this is not an age to build cathedrals since it is so hard a matter to get one removed; that the judges upon second consideration were of the opinion that the doing of it by bill was a diminution of the King's prerogative, and what they cannot do may be done by a short bill after. Lord Massereene, moreover, is in hopes if the bill passes of having something inserted for his benefit, he being tenant from the Bishop for the lands on which the ruinous walls stand. I think your lordship will not be very sedulous to undertake the work till further consideration."

At this time there was a tax called Hearth Money of 2s for every hearth or fireplace. The lists of those who paid it in 1666 and 1669 are in the Record Office, Dublin, and are most valuable as giving the names of the inhabitants at that time. In Magheragall parish there are 91 names, and only one was the happy possessor of two fireplaces -- Mr. Edward Breare, who, no doubt, lived in the principal house at Brookhill. I did not fully copy the list for Lisburn through want of time, but I noticed that Lord Conway had 23 hearths; Wm. Clee, Captain Roma, Roger Jackson, and Wm. A. Hoole had four each.

In 1689 Killultagh was in the hands of James' army for several months. But the arrival of Schomberg in August soon changed the state of affairs. During the following winter he fixed his headquarters at Lisburn; his army encamped at a place known as "The Trench," about a mile from Drumbeg. It was surrounded by a high ditch and a deep fosse several miles extent, which encircled the present properties of Trench House and Belvidere House. The horse and artillery encamped at Brookhill. The ground there was pallisaded, without a trench, and the stakes remained for a long time afterwards. A portion of the ground was eventually converted into a farmyard by "Commodore" Watson. The "Park" adjoining the camp lay in a direct line between Brookhill and the Trench, and was surrounded by a wall. It is still called the Park (U.J.A., vol. iv., Old Series).

In July following was won the Battle of the Boyne, which is noted in the Cathedral Register (in the section for marriages) as follows:-- "God Allm: fought for King W: and gave him a remarkable victory over ye Irish at the Boyne near Tradathye 1: day of July, in 4 days after Tradath and Dublin did yield without blood." (Tradath, Drogheda.)

Bishop Taylor's connection with Lisburn cannot be gone fully into here. He lived at Portmore, Hillsborough, and for some time in a house off the Magheraleave Road, on the left-hand side, part of which is still occupied and part is in ruins. He also resided in a house in Castle Street, where he died in 1667.

(To be Continued.)

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BRITISH OFFICERS' ESCAPE FROM GERMANY.

Tunnel That Took Nine Months to Dig.

Lieut. J. Keith Bousfield, M.C., son of Mr. W. R. Bousfield, K.C., of Hendon, has given an account of the prison camp at Holzminden in July.

The fugitives included two lieutenants-colonels, and the German authorities offered £250 for each prisoner brought back. It was afterwards claimed that 17 were retaken. Lieut. Bousfield, who is 29 years of age, was shot down in an areoplane in April, 1917, and was finally interned at Holzminden.

"When I got to Holzminden," he said, "I found that some of the boys had started to dig a tunnel under the grounds of the camp. The tunnel started from behind a barricade, and although there were two sentries posted outside, they never heard us, so quietly was the work carried out. It took nearly nine months for the tunnel to be completed, and it was then about 60 yards in length and barely 2 foot in diameter.

"On July 23 we crept one by one through the tunnel. Altogether 29 of us got away, and we separated immediately we got clear of the grounds. Three of us went forward across a hostile country bristling with danger at every town. We travelled by night and hid by day. We had plenty of food with us. I had a compass and a good map. We were 13 nights on the tramp, and covered 180 miles altogether before we reached a neutral country.

"When we were about twenty miles from our journey's end we were spotted by a German sentry. Of course we made a dash for it. He fired, but did not hit us. We scattered, then, and I never saw the other two men again. I continued my journey alone, and reached a friendly country at last. I can tell you I was very pleased to get there."

Lieut. Bousfield was received by the King on his arrival in London, and awarded the M.C. for his bravery in the battle of the Somme. 1916.

=========================

A DOMINICAN AWARDED THE M.C.

The well-known English Dominican, Father Raymund Devas, O.P., the author of "Dominican Martyrs of Great Britain," and "The Dominican Revival in the Nineteenth Century," who has been serving for some time on the Western Front as chaplain to the forces, has been awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in visting the front line trenches during heavy fighting, where his coolness and courage assisted greatly in maintaining the confidence and moral of the men.

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DEAD OFFICERS' KIT.

Theft Charges.

Henry Toomey (18), carman, Wilson Street, Gray's Inn Road, has been remanded at Bow Street, London, charged with being concerned in stealing and receiving articles valued at £50 from Cox's Shipping Agency, St. Martin's Lane, W C.

Mr. Freke Williams; for Cox's, said they distributed officers' kits and belongings sent home, from the front. The articles in the charge were the property of dead or wounded officers, and if anything should be held sacred it was such property.

Inspector Alfred Burton stated that when arrested Toomey said: "I did not 'pinch' anything. A chap asked me to let him drive on my round with me. He was inside the van."

Thomas Sussex (17), of Barclay Street, Camden Town, was also remanded on a charge of stealing goods from a parcel addressed to a wounded officer.

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Mr. William Fancett, of Maidstone, the last survivor of the committee who worked for Disraeli during his candidature there, has died, aged 103.

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THE WAR.

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ANOTHER SPLENDID WEEK.

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BAPAUME OURS -- FRENCH ENTER NOYON.

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ENEMY BEING BEATEN BACK ON EIGHTY-MILE FRONT.

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This has been another wonderfully successful week for the Allies. Bapaume is ours, the French have entered Noyon, and the Huns are being pushed back to the Hindenburg line. Sir Douglas Haig's tale of over 26,000 prisoners and 100 guns in a week is a sufficient commentary on the enemy claim that his withdrawal is voluntary and according to plan.

The fighting is being followed up on an eighty-mile front; still prominent French writers are suggesting that even this gigantic struggle is a mere diversion, a sort of side-show, and that Marsha! Foch has a great stroke ready elsewhere. Be that as it may, we have every right to feel thankful for the splendid and continued successes during the past month. It is estimated that since the 18th July the Anglo-French armies have taken over 100,000 prisoners and 2,000 guns, and that is certainly something to be going on with.

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ROLL OF HONOUR.

Captain E. Sinton, M.C., R.F.A.

Captain Edwin Sinton, M.C., Royal Field Artillery, killed in action on 21st inst., was the youngest son of the late Mr. Samuel Sinton, Bessbrook. Before the war he was manager of the Royal Avenue Picture House, Belfast. He enlisted in the North Irish Horse early in the war, and was soon promoted to a commission in the artillery, with whom he won the Military Cross during the present year. Deceased was married about a year ago to Mabel Alice, youngest daughter of Major F. Blackwell, R.E., who is at present in the nursing service at Oswestry. Captain Sinton, who was a personal friend of our own, served in the Boer war, for which he held both the Queen's and King's Medal. No better fellow, keener soldier, or truer patriot has fallen in the war. We had almost omitted to say that he was educated at the Ulster Provincial School, Lisburn.

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SECOND-LIEUT. HERBERT SCOTT, R.A.F., MISSING.

Second-Lieut. Herbert Scott, Royal Air Force, elder son of the late Mr. Joseph Scott, Bolton, and grandson of Mr. Charles Scott, Strawberry Hill, Lisburn, is reported missing since the 23rd inst., a telegram from the Secretary of the Air Ministry to this effect reaching Mr. Scott Labour Exchange office in Blackpool. He went to the front after undergoing his training on the 1st of the present month. His only brother, Second-Lieut. Fred Scott, who originally joined the Royal Garrison Artillery, is now a commissioned officer in the Royal Air Force at the front. Two years ago the father of these young officers died, and in March last their mother was also taken from them by the hand of death, the sad news of the latter event reaching her son Fred as he came out of the fighting line (whither he had been with supplies) with General Gough's army in March last. It was only on Thursday last that Miss Clara Scott, Strawberry Hill, Lisburn, aunt of the missing officer, got a letter appointing her next-of-kin; the following day the officer himself was posted as missing.

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Sergeant W. B. Gray, R.A.F.

Information has been received that Sergeant William B. Gray, Royal Air Force, son of the late Mr. John A. Gray and Mrs. Margaret Gray, Milltown Cottage, Belfast, and grandson of the late Mr. Thomas Gray, Giant's Ring House, Ballylesson, Lisburn, has died of wounds received in action on 15th inst.

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DIED IN GERMANY.

Mr. Thomas Griffen, 41 Sloan Street, Lisburn, has been officially notified that his son, Rifleman Albert Griffen, Royal Irish Rifles (Lewis Gun Section), has died in Germany. Deceased was reported missing on 24th March. His brother, Sapper William Griffen, R.E., is on active service since 1914.

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ANOTHER U.V.F. MAN WOUNDED.

Intimation has been, received of Sergeant J. M'Farland, Hussars, being wounded and in hospital in France, suffering from a gunshot wound in the shoulder. He is the eldest son of Mr. James M'Farland, Aughnahough, and before enlisting was employed in the firm of Thomas M'Mullen & Co., druggists and chemists, Ann Street, Belfast. He joined the North Irish Horse, from which he was transferred to the Hussars. He was a member of the Lisburn Battalion U.V.F., and of Lisburn Temperance L.O.L. 152.

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WAR HONOURS.

Among the names that have been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State by the Chairman of the Joint War Committee of the British Red Cross Society and Order of St. John of Jerusalem for valuable services rendered in connection with the war is that of Nursing Member Mrs. E. Airth Richardson, Barford Hill V.A.D. Hospital, Warwick. Mrs. Airth Richardson is the wife of Colonel R. Airth Richardson, of Lambeg and Warwick. Colonel Richardson, who is at present at Aberdelgie, Lambeg, is an ex-Mayor of Warwick, and has won distinction in the war. He will, by the way, be one of the speakers at the recruiting meeting in Lisburn on Friday evening week.

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FURTHER MILITARY MEDAL AWARDS.

A supplement to last night's "London Gazette" contained a list Of non-commissioned officers and men who have been awarded the Military Medal and a bar to that decoration. The recipients of the bar include Sergeant R. M'Neill, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, Lisburn.

His Majesty has approved of the award of the Military Medal to -- L.Corpl. Isaac Lord, Irish Guards, and Sapper W. Coulter, R.E., Lisburn.

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CAMOUFLAGE.

A Scottish Soldier's Yarn from Jaffa.

The other evening we were enjoying a quiet game at the "bools," when Tam Samson, home on leave from France, stepped on to the green. Tam is now a veteran of four years' service. Going out to Gallipoli with the Yeomany, he came through that fateful campaign unscathed, and was equally fortunate in the fighting in Palestine. His division is now in the main theatre of war, where, as Tam says, "the fechtin' may no' be bonny, but it's gey bluidy." Tam was always a "boy," and at spinning a yarn he was hard to beat. Soon he had his old chums gathered around him, whilst he related some of his experiences in the Holy Land. In reply to a query as to whether he had tasted any of the famous Jaffa oranges when in that town, he gave forth as follows:--

"Oranges, did ye say, boys? Faith and I did, nu' they were guid. We had a rare bar over these same oranges, at least some o' the chaps in my company had. Ye see, it was like this. They sell them sitting crouched up by the roadside, an' dirty, black deevils they are, just like monkeys. The money they use is mostly paper money, piastre notes, and they sell the oranges at something like ten for a piastre. Well, you must understand we were using S-----'s jams at the time, and they had fine gaudy labels on the jars. That gied one o' the boys a notion. (I'll no' say wha the boy was.) He carefully soacked a label off a jam jar, and it soon dries out there. He then went up to the ould Johnny who was selling orange beside the camp, an' says to him, holding out the label, 'Englees money, oranges; and, faith, the old boy grabbed hold, and handed over the fruit. You bet, for the next few days there was a big run on jam jars, and the auld geezer did a rare trade. Ay, but the show was soon spoiled, boys. Ye see, the S.-M. bought some fruit, and gied Johnny a gey big note in payment. Some o' us boys were hanging around at the time, an' I tell ye we began to snigger when we saw the auld deevil put his hand into the breast o' his dress, and then commence counting out the jampot labels as change. It was as guid as the pantomime to listen to them, but the 'heid yin' soon saw how the wind lay, an' we had to pay for oor joke efter a'. But, boys, it was worth it." T.A.

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AIRMAN KILLED IN IRELAND.

Lieut. Ruxton, R.F.C., said to be a native of Ardee, sustained fatal injuries yesterday by a fall from an aeroplane in an Irish county. Deceased, with a sergeant, was testing a new machine, and had only got up about 70 feet when it crashed back to earth. The sergeant was badly injured, and both were immediately removed to hospital, where the lieutenant died.

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SHOT DEAD WHILE "PLAYING AT SOLDIERS."

A Lambeth inquest exonerated a boy named Arthur Prior, who, while "playing at soldiers," fatally shot a companion named Percy Hodges (14). Revolvers (one of which proved to be loaded) were used in the play, and the weapon went off while two of the lads were in handgrips. Prior said he had seen "that sort of thing at the pictures."

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A TRAMORE MYSTERY.

The name and address "E. Morris, 22 and 23 Henry Street, Dublin," were on a coat-tag, and "Elvery's, Dublin," was marked on an overcoat, portion of clothing found at the seashore at Tramore. In the pockets were a sum of about £5, and a copy of a Dublin paper dated August 15. It is supposed that the owner had attended Tramore races, and that he was drowned while bathing.

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At Dungannon Revision Sessions the Nationalists were successful in placing on the register ten votes (five Parliamentary and five Local Government) for a cottage in Donaghmore district occupied by Mr. J. M'Garrity, his son, grandson, and other members of the family.

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SOLD "DEAD" BROTHER'S BIKE TO LISBURN MAN.

Sergeant Rourke on the Alert.

In the Belfast Custody Court on Tuesday a remand for a week was granted in a case brought against Hugh Gilmore, stated to belong to Rathfriland, who was charged with the larceny of two bicycles belonging respectively to William Morrow, Belfast, and Joseph Scott, Lisburn.

The bicycles had been stolen from doorways in which they had been left by their owners while on business. Accused had been seen trying to mount a bicycle in Lisburn by Sergeant Francis Rourke, who became suspicious that "all was not well," and when the man rode off the sergeant despatched Constable Mullen after him. Gilmore was later charged with the larceny of the machines, one of which he had sold to a Lisburn dealer, telling the latter that the machine belonged to a dead brother.

 

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