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The Magazine of the Central Presbyterian Association - 1919

CPA Magazine Masthead

CPA Magazine January 1919

General Notes.

We were pleased recently to have a visit from Sandy McLellan who has reached home after his period of captivity in Germany. He is looking in the pink, and wishes to be remembered to all his old friends whom he has not yet. 2nd Lieut. Norman Irwin of Bangor, has also arrived home after his incarceration, fit and well.

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We regret to have to announce the deaths of Messrs. W.J. Finlay, of 13, Lisburn Ave., and W.A. Young, of Chichester Road, both of whom passed away recently with tragic suddenness. Both were staunch supporters of the Association, and will be much missed. To the sorrowing relatives we tender our respectful sympathy.

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Mr. John W.C. Coulter, Army Pay Department, who is a Roll of Honour member, and the elder son of the Rev. D.S. Ker Coulter, Gilnahirk, has been promoted to the rank of lieutenant. This officer, who belonged to the Black Watch Territorials, has been on active service since the outbreak of war. He was a member of the Belfast City Accountant's staff, and was recently brought under the notice of the Secretary of State for War for his valuable services in the Army Pay Department.

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Congratulations to Captain J.H.A. Patton, 15th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles (North Belfast), attached Brigade Headquarters, who has been awarded the Military Cross in recognition of his gallantry and devotion to duty in Flanders. This officer is the eldest son of Mr. John Patton, 27, Wellington Park, Belfast, a director of the Ulster Bank. He received his earlier education at the Royal Belfast Academical Institution, and was a student at Trinity College, Dublin, when war was declared in 1914. He obtained his commission in the Royal South Downs on 15th August, 1914, and has seen a good deal of active service with the Ulster Division, this being his fourth winter on the western front.

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Our roll of honour has been further depleted by death. Capt. H.G. Morrow, M.C., having been killed in action , and L/Cpl. R.M. Lindsay, the much loved son of Mr. Wm. Lindsay, an esteemed member of the Governing Body, passing away from wounds received in action. We expect that an end has now come to such announcements, and at this time our sympathies are extended anew to all who have suffered the loss of dear ones through the war.

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THE C.P.A. AND THE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.

Since Christmas Eve the spacious rooms of the Central Presbyterian Association in the Howard St. portion of the Assembly Buildings have been placed at the disposal of the Service Club, whose premises in Waring Street were inadequate to accommodate the large number of sailors and soldiers in the city for the holidays. Some nights as many as 60 men have slept in the premises, and up to the end of the year over 400 men have been housed, the beds being supplied from the Service Club. This happy thought of utilising the C.P.A. rooms for our gallant visitors originated with Mr. Joseph Duncan, J.P., a Vice-President of the Association, and Mr. Duncan has been most assiduous in organising the arrangements for the comfort of the men. Members of the Committee, with Mr. W.T. Ewing, the General Secretary, and indeed the membership generally, have spared no pains to make their guests feel at home, and the fine facilities offered by the well-equipped reading and recreation rooms, as well as the comfortable sleeping quarters, have been greatly appreciated by the men, many of whom are overseas soldiers, and who also have been the guests of members of the C.P.A. in their homes.

An entertainment was given to the men in the Minor Hall on New Year's night. Tea was provided, the catering being carried out most satisfactorily by the Irish Temperance League, under the personal supervision of Mr. C. Birch, the business manager. Mr. John Sinclair, President of the Association, occupied the chair, and a variety programme was contributed by the following:-- The Misses Henderson, Miss M'Ilveen, the Misses Craig, Miss I. M'Burney, Messrs. George Fawcett, J. Birrell, T. Wetherspoon, R. Ross. and Master L. M'Ilveen. Mr. J.O. M'Cleery, Hon. Secretary of the C.P.A.; Rev. T.A. Smyth, M.A.; and other friends were present and gave valuable assistance. At the Watchnight service in the Assembly Hall, on the appeal of Mr. David Irwin, J.P., who presided, a generous offering was made, portion of which is being devoted to the Service Club, which is doing so magnificent a work.

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Our Noble Dead.

His was the proudest part,
He died with the glory of Faith in his eyes,
And the glory of love in his heart.

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Captain HUGH G. MORROW, M.C., Royal Irish Rifles.

The above gallant officer, who was killed in action on 20th ult., was the only son of Mr. Andrew Morrow, Balmoral, Belfast, and formerly of Lisburn, Secretary of the County Down Committee of Agriculture. This officer served his apprenticeship with Messrs. Ross Bros., Ltd., Linenhall Street, and obtained his commission in July, 1916. For his gallantry at the Battle of Cambrai in November, 1917, he was awarded the M.C. His colonel was killed on the same day. His major, writing to Mr. Morrow, says-- "He fell at the head of his men, gallantly leading them against a machine-gun, which was holding up the advance. He was well ahead of his men when he was shot. He will be much missed in the battalion, in which he was very popular with all ranks. The men of his company had the very highest opinion of him, both from the point of view of his bravery and skill as a leader, and also from the personal point of view. He died a soldier's death at the head of his men, and fell fighting in the greatest cause man has ever fought for. We tender to the sorrowing relatives our sincere sympathy.

L/Cpl. R. MAURICE LINDSAY, Royal Irish Rifles.

A large circle of fiends and acquaintances have heard with sorrow that L/Cpl. R.M. Lindsay, who was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Lindsay, 105, Eglantine Avenue, Belfast, died in the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital, France, from wounds received in action. Deceased was employed in civil life, by the Liverpool and London and Globe Insurance Company. Enlisting in November, 1915, he received a baptism of fire during the Dublin rebellion. Throwing up his promotion; he volunteered for active service, and was sent to France in June, 1916, as a Lewis gunner, attached to a battalion of the Royal Irish Rifles. Badly wounded by shell fire near Ypres in August, 1917, he was sent home to hospital. During his convalescence he studied signalling, and was being trained as an instructor when the call to active service again came in April last. Attached as a signaller to another battalion of the Rifles, he was badly wounded in the chest about 21st October, and died on the 5th ult. at the age of 22. He was a young man of great promise, sterling Christian character, and loveable disposition. Our deepest sympathy is extended to the bereaved parents and other friends.

 

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CPA Magazine February-March 1919

General Notes.

Welcome home to Charlie Pavis, who has resumed his duties in the Billiard Room, consequent on his demobilisation after four and a half years' service in the forces. Devotees of this branch of our activities should find greater comfort and efficiency as a result of the change, and we are hopeful of a large increase in the receipts.

We offer our sincere consolations to the following of our members who have recently suffered bereavement:-- Mr. H. Stephens Richardson, on the death of his father; and Mr. William Stoops, who mourns the loss of a gifted son.

Congratulations to Mr. H.T. Barrie on his appointment to the Vice-Presidency of Board of Agriculture in Ireland. He should fill the post in a worthy manner and add to his already wide reputation.

Mr. Percy Clarke has gone to London to take up an important business appointment there for Lindsay, Thompson & Co. We wish him much success in his new position.

Sergt. A. M. Stephenson, one of the fine soldier sons of Mr. W. R. Stephenson, has been. awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field. We congratulate him, and express the hope that he will soon be amongst us again.

Rev. John Gailey, B.A., has received intimation that Mr. J. H. Hutchinson, the Principal of Ballysillan Schools, has been specially promoted as from 1st April, 1918, to the rank of First of First Grade. This is the third occasion within an unusually short period on which Mr. Hutchinson has received a special promotion. The school is making fine progress under Mr. Hutchinson, and we congratulate him as one of our number on this further honour.

The cold hand of death is perpetually at work in our midst. We have to mourn the loss of Mr. Joseph Rea and Mr. W. K. Rodgers, who were both held in much respect amongst us. Our deepest sympathy goes on to the bereaved relatives.

On January 7, at Malone Presbyterian Church, Mr. Robert Winnington, who is the popular Organist of Duncairn, was united in solemn wedlock with Miss Mary Victoria Adelaide Boyd. Revs. Dr. A. J. Wilson and James Haire, M.A., being the officiating clergy. Best wishes to the happy couple for a prosperous future.

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Obituary.

DEATHS OF MR. R.W. CORRY, J.P. AND REV. PROF. T. HAMILL, M.A., D.D.

We have to mourn the loss by death of two of the Vice-Presidents of the Association, both of whom passed away since our last issue.

Mr. R.W. Corry, J.P., had reached an advanced age, and latterly had withdrawn himself from his former activities. He was a simple minded man and one of blameless reputation. The Church in general and Elmwood in particular will miss him very much, and as an Association we part with him sorrowfully as one who took a keen interest in all our affairs and supported our work in a most generous fashion. He passed away peacefully on January 3.

The death of Rev. Prof. Thos. Hamill, M.A., D.D., which took place on February 17, is an event that has occasioned widespread regret. For some time his health had not been very robust, but few expected the end to come so suddenly. He was a staunch believer in the work carried on by the Association, and at all time gave us the benefit of his influence and support.

The following resolutions were passed by the Governing Body and forwarded to the bereaved relatives:--

The Governing Body of the Central Presbyterian Association places on record its great regret at the death of Mr. R.W. Corry, J.P., one of its oldest members and Vice-Presidents.

The late Mr. Corry was a generous supporter of the Association, and took a keen interest in its welfare. He will be much missed in the commercial, Church and philanthropic life of the community, and on behalf of the Association, the Governing Body tenders to his bereaved family and friends their sincere and respectful sympathy.

The Governing Body of the Central Presbyterian Association places on record its sincere regret at the death of Re. Prof. T. Hamill, M.A., D.D., a Vice-President of the Association, and a distinguished leader of Christian thought in the community.

His demise will be regretted throughout the whole Church, and in no section of it more than in our Association, which always found in him a loyal friend and fervent well-wisher.

We tender to the bereaved widow and family our deep sympathy with them in their great sorrow.

 

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CPA Magazine April 1919

General Notes.

We are pleased to again congratulate Lieut. J.W.C. Coulter, son of the Rev. D.S.K. Coulter, on his latest promotion to temporary Captain. This is his third honour within a very brief space of time, and we will not be surprised to hear of more to follow.

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We offer to the following our deepest sympathy in their bereavement:-- Mr. T.I. Cole and his brothers, who mourn the loss of their mother; and Messrs. W.A. and Jack Corry, whose father passed away suddenly.

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Our Noble Dead.

"One who never turned his back.
But marched breast forward;
Never doubted clouds would break.
Never dreamt though right were worsted wrong would triumph;
Held we fall to rise, are baffled to fight better,
Sleep to wake."

CAPTAIN JOHN BROWN, M.C.

Captain John Brown, M.C., 1st Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, who was reported wounded and missing on 21st March, 1918 (the day on which the great German offensive opened), is now officially reported to have been killed on the battlefield at Contescourt on that date. This gallant officer was the second son of Mr. Samuel S. Brown, Ailsa Terrace, Strandtown, the Assistant Postmaster of Belfast. He was a devoted member of the Association, belonging to a family the male side of which are all in our membership. On the opening of the war in August, 1914, he was in the employment of Messrs. Richardson, Sons, Owden. Ltd. He obtained a commission in the East Belfast Battalion on the formation of the Ulster Division, and was wounded in the shoulder at the opening of the Battle of the Somme on 1st July, 1916, being awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in action upon that occasion. While home on leave in September following he gained the bronze medal of the Royal Humane_Society for his bravery in saving a boy from drowning in the River Lagan. On recovering from the effects of his wound he returned to the front, and received a bar to his Military Cross early in 1917. A young man of splendid physique -- he was well over six feet in height -- Captain Brown invariably set a fine example of courage and initiative, and he enjoyed the warm regard of the officers not only of the East Belfast Volunteers, but also of the distinguished line battalion in which he was serving when he fell in action. As unassuming as he was daring, he inspired the men under his command by his skill and resource in leadership, and his personal popularity with the rank and file was unquestioned. The widespread sympathy of our membership will be extended to Mr. S. S. Brown and the other members of the family in their bereavement.

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Obituary.

Rev. Dr. CHARLES DAVEY.

Profound and widespread sorrow has been created, by the death of the Rev. Charles Davey, D.D., minister of Fisherwick Presbyterian Church, which occurred with startling suddenness. For some time he had been troubled with bronchitis and asthma, and it was in a spasm caused by this affection that he passed away. He was a Vice-President of the Association and always took a keen interest in all its affairs. His removal makes the third death in our list of Vice-Presidents since our last annual meeting.

In the early eighties there were two young Ulstermen whose services as evangelists were in much demand throughout the province. One was Mr. Charles Davey, the other Mr. Robert Montgomery. Both entered the ministry of the Presbyterian Church, and both have finished their course. Mr. Davey was a native of Carrickfergus, where he received his elementary education. When he decided to proceed to the ministry he became a student in Queen's College, Belfast, and in 1884 he graduated B.A. in the Royal University. After a session in the Assembly's College, Belfast, he proceeded to Princeton, and completed his course at the Presbyterian College London. At the General Assembly in 1887 he was received as a licentiate from the English Presbyterian Church, he having declined a tempting offer to become assistant to the Rev. Dr. Donald Fraser, of Marylebone Church. On 16th August 1887, he was ordained in First Ballymena Church in succession to Rev. George Hanson, who was removed to Rathgar. He was installed in St. Enoch's Church on 7th January, 1892, as assistant and successor to Rev. Dr. Hanna, and on 7th September, 1900, he was called to Fisherwick Place Church as successor to the late Rev. Dr. H.M. Williamson. In 1917 he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from the Presbyterian Theological Faculty, Ireland.

Dr. Davey's energies were mainly concentrated on the various congregations which he served, and no minister was ever more faithful in this respect than he. Perhaps the outstanding feature of his preaching was the winsomeness with which he presented the Gospel. This characteristic was very noticeable in his career as an evangelist, and he retained it to the end. He did not take much active part in the public work of the Church and city, though he was a Life Governor of the Royal Victoria Hospital, and on the Board of the Ulster Institution for the Deaf and Dumb and the Blind.

In 1889, he married a daughter of the late Mr. James Beatty, Ballymena, who, with three sons and three daughters, survives to mourn his loss. The eldest son is Rev. Prof. J. Ernest Davey, Assembly's College; the second is Captain C. Fred Davey, M.B., R.A.M.C., at present in India; and the youngest, Tom, returned after the armistice to prosecute his studies in Queen's University, Belfast, with a view to the ministry. The third son, W. Edwin, was killed on active service in the late war. The sympathy of every branch of our Association will go forth to Mrs. Davey and her family in their bereavement.

Mr. ALFRED FISHER.

The announcement of the death of Mr. Alfred Fisher, manager for Messrs. Lindsay,Thompson & Co. Ltd., of Prospect Mill, Crumlin Road, will be received with sincere regret. The deceased succumbed .on Tuesday, March 18, at his residence, Dunowen, Cliftonville Road, to an attack of pleurisy, following influenza. He entered upon his apprenticeship in the mill some twenty-seven years ago, and succeeded his father, Mr. John Fisher, in the managership on the death of the latter in 1907. Mr. Alfred Fisher was greatly esteemed by his employers and by the workpeople under his charge. He was a member of Duncairn Presbyterian Church, and served on the committee. As a member of our Association he was one of the many who support us consistently without deriving any personal benefit, and always showed a keen interest in all our efforts. He leaves a widow and four young children, with whom deep sympathy will be felt in their bereavement.

 

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CPA Magazine June 1919

General Notes.

We have to convey our expressions of condolence to Mr. Andrew Tweedie, who mourns the loss of a beloved daughter; Mr. Wm. Mitchell, the talented leader of Rosemary Street Choir, on the death of his respected father; also to Mr. S. Y. M'Donald, who recently lost his beloved life partner.

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In Memoriam

Rev. WILLIAM WYLIE.

It is with the deepest regret we announce the death of Rev. Wm. Wylie, senior minister of Downshire Road congregation, Newry, which took place on 9th May, in the eighty-third year of his age, and the fifty-fourth year of his ministry.

Mr. Wylie, as a minister of the Church, was an outstanding figure, and nothing could excel his intense enthusiasm and boundless energy in carrying out the various duties of his sacred office. As a preacher he occupied a position peculiarly his own, and even to the last notwithstanding his advanced age, he was able to command the interest and attention of the largest congregations.

It was of quite recent date that he became a member of our Association, and he will be much missed by his many friends in our midst.

To the bereaved relations we extend our sincere and sorrowful sympathy.

 

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CPA Magazine August 1919

General Notes.

Our deepest sympathy is extended to Mr. S. D. Bell, who is laid aside as a result of the overturning of his motor car when returning from the Portstewart Convention. It was a terrible occurrence, entailing the lamented death of Mr. Wm. Hogg, of Dublin, who gave his warm support to the War Memorial during Assembly week; and caused injuries also to Mrs. Bell and Mrs. Hogg. It is our earnest wish that Mr. Bell will soon be about again, fully restored to his usual vigour and health.

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We note that permission to retire has been granted to Rev. J. R. M'Cleery, who has ministered to First Killyleagh for the past 36 years, and had almost attained his jubilee. He carries into his retirement our best wishes.

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Our sincere sympathy is extended to Mr. James Rea on the death of his father, Mr. Wm. Rea, who was for many years a missionary. He was predeceased by his son, Mr. Joseph Rea, quite recently. We also offer our condolences to Mr. C. K. Gibson on the lamented death of his wife; and to Mr. James Lyons, whose son passed away during the month.

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Our best wishes to Mr. S. H. M'Bride, who was married to Miss Jean Thompson on the 2nd ult. in Fisherwick Church, the officiating clergyman being the Rev. J. M. M'Ilrath, B.A., of Donegal Road.

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Those who attended the W.E.A. Leotures last winter on our premises will be saddened by the news of the death of Mr. M. W. Robieson, M.A., while bathing at Padstow. Mr. Robieson as a lecturer had few equals, and we regret we will see his face and hear his voice no more.

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Congratulations to Mr, A. M'M. W. Segerdal on seeming his medical degree at the recent Queen's University examinations. We wish for him a successful future.

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Obituary.

MR. ALEXANDER M'MONAGLE.

The death of Mr. Alexander M'Monagle, 38, Cliftonville Avenue, Belfast, removes a very familiar figure from the sphere of journalism in the North of Ireland, and one whose kindly and genial disposition made him hosts of friends in every circle where duty or inclination brought him in the course of a literary career extending over half a century. The late Mr. M'Monagle, the doyen of Ulster journalists, had reached the allotted span, and had scarcely passed that period by a twelvemonth when the sad event of his demise took place on June 29, following a brief illness, from heart trouble. Usually he enjoyed a vigour and strength which made his working career one that was practically uninterrupted by any serious illness to lay him aside for any prolonged period, and it was only a few days previous to his death since he was about and active.

A son of the late My. Wm. M'Monagle, Londonderry, the deceased journalist was born near Derry on the 26th, August, 1848, and received his education at M'Quilkin's Classical School, Londonderry. Mr. M'Monagle became associated with the Derry Journal in 1863. After a brief experience in connection with that journal he obtained a situation in the Petty Sessions Office in Belfast.

About fifty-three years ago he came to Belfast, and joined the staff of the Banner of Ulster in 1866. This paper had the honour of claiming in a journalistic capacity the services for a period of Mr. Dodd -- now the Right Hon. Mr. Justice Dodd. Over forty years ago the newspaper named became merged in The Witness, founded in 1874, and shortly afterwards the Ulster Echo was established as an evening newspaper to give expression to Liberal sentiments in the province. Both papers were run by the Belfast Steam-Printing Company, Ltd., and the joint editorship and managership was entrusted to Mr. M'Monagle. The dual position was held with conspicuous ability by him while the Company continued the publication of these newspapers. During the war it was considered advisable to suspend publication of the Echo, but in the issue of The Witness there has been no interruption.

A fluent and vigourous writer on topics of current interest, Mr. M'Monagle during his association with the Ulster Echo supplemented his contributions to the editorial columns by his series of breezy and humorous articles on "Men and Matters" by "The Man in the Street." These were widely read and much appreciated for the scope they gave for the ready vein of humour of which their author was the happy possessor. A series of sketches of "Trips to Sweden and the Riviera," his "Reminiscences" and "Recollections of Ulster Life" also illustrated the descriptive powers of the late Mr. M'Monagle, his versatility as a writer, and the width and scope of the knowledge which made him an interesting raconteur on any topic with which he chose to deal.

A public speaker who could be counted upon to deliver a graceful speech on the shortest notice replete with the merry sallies which all who knew Mr. M'Monagle expected from him, his services were frequently called upon in this connection on public occasions, and these requests were invariably acceded to with a graciousness which won for him a widespread affection amongst the members of the public. On two occasions was he the recipient of substantial presentations, the gifts of hosts of admiring citizens. On one of these the then Lord Mayor of the city presided when the presentation of the gift was formally made. On the 14th March, 1914, the fortieth anniversary of his connection with the Echo and Witness was signalised in a pleasant manner when the staff of the Belfast Steam-Printing Company presented Mr. M'Monagle with an illuminated. address in album form, Mrs. M'Monagle receiving on the occasion a beautiful amethyst and pearl brooch pendant and a handsome gold necklet. This kindly friendship which was extended to the deceased by the members of the staff of the newspapers named was reflected also in his relations with his colleagues on the other papers in Ulster.

A member for many years of the Institute of Journalists, Mr. M'Monagle took an active interest in the affairs of that organisation. He was a vice-president of the Institute, a member of its Council, and was twice elected by his colleagues to the position of Chairman of the Ulster District. On a number of occasions he attended as a delegate to the Institute conferences. He was a consistent supporter of the C.P.A. in all its work, and rendered splendid service by his advocacy of our claims on the Church in his leaders and articles in The Witness when opportunity offered.

To his widow, her daughters, and the bereaved relatives every sympathy will be extended by our membership in the loss they have sustained.

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MR. JAMES HOLLYWOOD, J.P.

The announcement of the death of Mr. James Hollywood, J.P., of Mountpottinger, Belfast, and Princetown Road, Bangor, which took place on June 20, at Banff, Scotland, will be received with deep regret by a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. Mr. Hollywood, who was about 60 years of age, had suffered a heavy bereavement in the summer of 1916, when two of his sons -- Lieutenant Arthur C. Hollywood, Royal Irish Fusiliers, and Second-Lieutenant James Hollywood, Royal Irish Rifles, were killed in action in the opening stages of the battle of the Somme. This loss left a permanent mark upon him, and he never regained his old buoyancy of spirit. His health gradually failed, particularly during the past six months, and he went to Banff about a fortnight ago in the hope that he would benefit by the treatment there, but this anticipation was not realised.

The late Mr. Hollywood began a rent and estate agency at Mountpottinger in 1885, when he laid the foundations of a prosperous and steadily-increasing business. By his ability, zeal, and conscientiousness he soon acquired an extensive clientele in that rapidly growing district, and gained the high opinion of all with whom he came in contact. For several years he was a Poor-Law Guardian, and subsequently he was elected a member of the Water Board, on which he remained up till the time of his death. He took a keen and practical interest in the work of the Commissioners,and had the honour, of being appointed Chairman of the Trust for two years in succession, while he rendered valuable service for a long period on the Finance Committee. He was a member of the Ulster Reform Club and of the Belfast Chamber of Commerce, and was a Justice of the Pence for the city. His favourite recreation was golf, and he was connected for many years with the Helen's Bay and Bangor Clubs, having been captain of both those organisations. A Presbyterian, he was a devoted member of First Bangor congregation, and was a liberal subscriber to the funds of the Church, whilst he also contributed generously to charitable and philanthropic objects. As a member of the Central Presbyterian Association he took a keen interest in all its activities, and made a generous response to every appeal. He was a member of the Masonic Order and of the Loyal Orange Institution. Mr. Hollywood is survived by his wife and two sons, David and Gerald, to whom heartfelt sympathy will be extended in their bereavement.

 

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