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The Magazine of the Central Presbyterian Association - 1917

CPA Magazine Masthead

CPA Magazine January 1917

General Notes.

Two more of our members have fallen in the fight for the worlds liberty -- Second-Lt. James M'Neill M'Kinstry, and Corporal J. Gordon, a fuller reference to these heroic youths will be found elsewhere in this issue, and we tender to the mourners, especially the bereaved mothers, both widows, heartfelt condolence.

Sec.-Lieut. Jack M'Kinstry, a brother of the late Mr. M'Kinstry, has also been since wounded, but we hope he will soon be restored.

-- -- --

Reference is also made in this month's Magazine to the passing of one of our veteran members, Mr. J. B. Macrory, whose wife only survived him a few hours. Mr. Macrory filled a place in our Association it will be hard to fill, but "he being dead yet speaketh," for his memory will long remain fresh and fragrant in the many lives influenced for God and goodness.

-- -- --

We have also to mourn the removal by death from the ranks of our membership of Mr. J. E. Ross, of Highbury, Cadogan Park, and Mr. D. W. Elliot, M.P.S.I., and to sympathise with Mr. S. Johnson, J.P., whose gallant son, Captain Elliot Johnston, M.C., has been killed in action; with Mr. W. Kirk, who has recently been called upon to sustain a double bereavement in his family circle; with Mr. Wm. Sweeney, and the death at Salonika of his brother, Staff Sergt.-Major R. E. Sweeney, of the A.S.C.; and with Mrs. M'Mordie, of South Parade, in her anxiety regarding her son, Sec.-Lieut. J. W. Mordie, officially reported missing.

-- -- --

Many of our readers will have noted with regret the obituary announcement of one of our former members in Canada -- Mr. E. B. Connor.

-- -- --

Congratulations to Sergt. Matt. Rankin on being promoted to commission and the Rifles; to Company Sergt.-Major R. Stanley Drean, M.C., on having attained the rank of Sec.-Lieut. in Inniskillings; to Second Lieut. J. Brown on being decorated by His Majesty with the Military Cross, and on being awarded the Royal Humane Society's Medal for life-saving at Albert Bridge; to Capt. R. Gerald M'Elney, M.B., R.A.M.C. (son of the Rev. R. M'Elney, M.A., Downpatrick), on being awarded the M.C.; to Capt. E. H. Marshall, of the Black Watch, on his marriage; and to Rev. T. A. Smyth, M.A., and having scored another success of the Trinity College, Dublin, exams, entitling him to the LL.B. degree.

-- -- --

Mr. Lawrence Crawford Brown, eldest son of Mr. Robert Brown, Donaghmore, and grandson of Sir Wm. Crawford, has been gazetted as Second Lieutenant in the Inniskillings. Lieut. Brown, who was in business in the States, came home and volunteered and the R.A.M.C. attached to the Ulster Division. Both he and his brother Oliver, who was recently wounded, have seen much active service abroad.

-- -- --

An excellently enlarged photograph of our V.C. member, the late Private Wm. Frederick M'Fadzean, has also been hung in the Reading Rooms. A suitable inscription, briefly narrating our hero's brave deed, has been appended. The photo, is by Howard, Donegall Place, and the enlargement was entrusted to Mr. A. R. Hogg, Trinity Street, who has executed the work most satisfactorily. The young hero's father has received a letter of sympathy from His Majesty the King, who expresses his appreciation of Private M'Fadzean's bravery, accompanied by an indication from the War office to the effect that of Mr. M'Fadzean is so desirous, His Majesty will be graciously pleased to present to him the medal so worth won one by his brave boy.

-- -- --

Our Fallen Heroes.

Sec.-Lieut. James M'Neill M'Kinstry Sec.-Lieut. JAMES M'NEILL M'KINSTRY.

Second Lieutenant James M'Neill M'Kinstry, whose portrait is reproduced below, was the seventh son of the late Robert M'Kinstry, of Bessbrook, and of Mrs. M'Kinstry, 16, Rugby Road, Belfast. He was gazetted to the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, on the 15th November, at 1915, from the O.T.C., Queen's University, and left for France in June of this year. He took part in many attacks on the Somme; from the 6th September to 19th October was Acting Captain whilst in his Company. He was severely wounded in action on November 23rd, and died in hospital in France on December 2nd, being 21 years of age. He was educated at the Intermediate School, Newry, and the Royal Academical Institution, Belfast. Before the war he was in the employment of Messrs. Miller & Martin, yarn and flax merchants, Bedford Street. At school, in business, in Association, in social circles, and in the army, he was very popular, greatly admired and respected for his unselfishness, his genial manner, and his great thoughtfulness for others. He was a member of the C.P.A. for many years. Two of his brothers are at present on service, one a surgeon on the navy, and the other 2nd Lieut. in the Royal Irish Rifles. We deeply sympathise with his bereaved widowed mother, and the other mourners in their loss and sorrow.

The following is an extract from a letter from the late young officers Commanding Officer to his mother: -- "it may be a comfort to you to know how much we thought of him, no braver or cheerier little fellow ever lived. Although I had not been associated with him for long, we had been through some bad times together, and his bravery and unselfishness were things to marvel at, he always thought of everybody else and never of himself. I have been hoping that he would pull through, as he was attended to very promptly; he was hit while helping a wounded man. I will not write any more, as I feel any form of consolation must seem an impertinence to you in your great grief, only I wanted to tell you how cheery and brave and utterly unselfish he was. I do not think I shall ever find so good a comrade again."

 

 

-- -- --

CORPORAL J. GORDON.

John Gordon, 21, Shandon Street, was proposed for membership, in our Association in October, 1915, but before the meeting at which he was elected was held he had responded to his country's call. He was therefore not very well known by the bulk of our membership, though many of our junior members had the pleasure of his acquaintance in connection with Duncairn congregation, and in business and social life. He attained speedy promotion in the army, and was doing special duty in a machine corps when he made the supreme sacrifice. We had looked forward to welcoming him into our membership with many others, "when the boys come home," but God has willed it otherwise. We tender to his sorrowing relatives, especially to his widowed mother, our deepest sympathy.

-- -- --

The late Mr. James Boyd Macrory.

Died 7th December, 1916.

Mr. James Boyd Macrory We have lost a very old and very faithful member and supporter of the C.P.A. by the death of our friend, Mr. J. B. Macrory, who was for so many years a member of our Committee, and after incorporation of the Association, of our Governing Body. Our minds go back to the old days, before we had a General Secretary, when the Committee, or some members of it, met in our Rooms in the old premises, 12, May Street, to do the necessary organising an office work. This labour was heartily engaged in and enjoyed by all, as while the work was proceeding conversation was general, and many an anecdote and sally caused hearty laughter. News from all the churches was to be had there, and, were so many different congregations were represented, there was little going on in the religious world of Belfast that we were not made up on. Mr. Macrory was always one of the cheeriest workers, and could tell a story and enjoy a joke with the best, but he never had an unkind word to say of another, and if he could not speak a kind one, he held his peace.

He was a convincing speaker, and took a special interest in the evangelistic side of work, often taking part in religious meetings, delivering addresses, and preaching in pulpits when invited. He had a special gift in prayer, and those who heard him petitioning the Almighty could not but be impressed with the reverence, the dignity, the fervency of his utterances.

He had a very courteous and warm mode of greeting a friend, as on meeting one, his face lighted up, his words were cordial, and his hand grasp was hearty. For several years he acted as secretary to the Ramblers' Club, and we had some most enjoyable outings, under his direction. As an instructor of the young he had extensive experience in six or seven different parts of the country, completing his service at Castlereagh, where his body now lies interred.

Of later years he represented Messrs. Brown & Nolan, National school suppliers, and had his place of business, in Berry St, were he did an extensive trade with the National school teachers in the city and province. Holding very strong views on temperance, he heartily co-operated in that work, and some years ago was one of the leading spirits in the "forward temperance" movement in Belfast. Latterly he worshipped in Fitzroy Avenue Church, and served on the Congregational committee.

For several years he suffered from chest trouble, but in spite of this, and of the consequential curtailment of his outdoor activities, who was ever the same bright personality.

On our Governing Body we shall miss his familiar presence and wise counsel, but his memory will remain with those who had the pleasure of being associated with him in our work. We mourn his loss, yet "by their fruits ye shall know them," so we doubt not but that with him it is well. He was "an Israelite indeed in whom there was no guile."

Our sympathy goes out to the bereaved son and daughter, whose sorrow is accentuated by the fact that ere the remains of their father were removed for interment, their beloved mother passed away after a brief illness. As the Rev. Wm. Colquhoun, B.A., so fittingly said at Mr. Macrory's funeral service, "They were lovely and pleasant in their lives and in their deaths they were not divided."

Our Governing Body at its meeting on 8th ult. adopted a resolution regretting Mr. Macrory's demise, and recording its high appreciation of his many and varied services. The members present subscribed for a wreath to be sent as a tribute to the memory of the deceased, and at the funerals of both Mr. and Mrs. Macrory our membership was well represented.

At the united service on Sabbath afternoon, 10th ult., Mr. David Irwin, J.P., who presided, made a touching reference to the double bereavement sustained by Miss Macrory, who is a member of the Assembly Hall Choir. Mr. Irwin also spoke of Mr. Macrory's interest in the C.P.A., and every organisation for the betterment of the community, and of the consistent Christian character manifested by Mr. and Mrs. Macrory during their lengthened period of happy United life. Mr. Moffett and the members of the Choir, it should be mentioned, forwarded a beautiful floral tribute to be placed on Mrs. Macrory's coffin, as a mark of sympathy with Miss Macrory.

G.L.O.

 

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CPA Magazine February 1917

General Notes.

The Roll Call of C.P.A. members who have made the supreme sacrifice for King and Country, which are President read at the Annual Service, comprised the following eighteen names:-- Coy. Sergeant-Major Martin Brine, 17th R.I.R.; Private W. H. Chittick, Honourable Artillery Company; 2nd Lieut. Francis Curley, Royal Engineers; Private Thomas C. Dodds, Rand Rifles; 2nd Lieut. H. H. Dunwoody, R.I.F. (Ulster Division); Corporal Fred J. Irwin, R.I.R.; Corporal J. Gordon, Machine Gun Corps; 2nd Lieut. John Lecky, R.I.R.; Lance-Corporal J. B. M'Dowell, 20th Batt. Royal Fusiliers; Private William F. M'Fadzean, V.C., 14th Battalion R.I.R.; 2nd Lieut. J. M'N. M'Kinstry, 12th Inniskillings; Private T. G. M'Kinney (Public Schools' Battalion), Royal Fusiliers; 2nd Lieut. J. W. M'Mordie, 2nd K.O.Y.L.I.; 2nd Lieut. H. Corry Osborne, West Yorks.; Sergeant Alfred Owens, 109th Brigade Machine Gun Company; Private Thomas G. Sloan, 14th Battalion R.I.R.; Sergeant W. Stephenson, 14th Battalion R.I.R.; 2nd Lieut. Jas. Watson, 2nd R.I.R.

-- -- --

It is our sad duty to chronicle the death in action of another of our promising young members -- 2nd Lieut. J. W. M'Mordie, and the eighteenth of our Roll of Honour members to make the supreme sacrifice. His photograph and an obituary notice from the pen of his friend and pastor, Rev. Dr Macmillan, of Cooke Centenary Church, appears on this issue.

-- -- --

Many of our readers will have heard with deep regret of the death of Lieut.-Commander Ralph Ireland, R.N., H.M.S. Southampton, who was drowned on the 19th ult. whilst on active service. He was the second surviving son of Mr. Adam L. Ireland, Tilecote, Malone Park, Belfast, a member of the well-known firm of Ireland Bros., Ltd., then the manufacturers. He was washed overboard in heavy seas. Deceased, who was 28 years of age, had a distinguished and in many respects a notable career. In 1904 he passed out from the Britannia King's Medallist. He became a lieutenant in 1909 and a lieutenant-commander in July, 1916. At the beginning of the war he was serving on H.M.S. Birmingham, which sunk the first German submarine on the 9th August, 1914. He was also in the action at Heligoland Bight on the 28th August, 1914, and in the Dogger Bank battle on the 24th January, 1915. He was transferred to the Southampton, and took part in the Battle of Jutland on the 31st May, 1916. Sympathetic reference to the death of Lieutenant-Commander Ireland was made by Rev. Dr. Purves in Elmwood Presbyterian Church. We deeply sympathise with Mr. and Mrs. Ireland and the other mourners in their great loss.

-- -- --

Recent Army Honours Lists include several C.P.A. members' names. One of our respected Vice-Presidents, Colonel Thomas Sinclair (better known as Professor Sinclair), brother of our esteemed President, has had the honour of being made Companion of the Order of the Bath. Captain Charles M'Master (whom we congratulate on his marriage), has been awarded the Military Cross, as have also Lieutenant Robert Watts, and Lieutenant Hugh Young (of the Ulster Bank), son of the Rev. W. J. Young, of Milford, Co Donegal. Lieutenant W. R. Perry, who has been promoted on the field to a Captaincy, and mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig's despatch, paid our rooms a visit when here on sick leave. Lieutenant T. J. A. Thompson, formerly of Messrs. John Robb & Co., Ltd.) has been promoted Captain; Sergeant P. H. Patterson, son of our popular Gymnasium Director, has received a 2nd Lieutenant's commission on the field; and Captain A. E. M'Connell, son of Mr. James M'Connell, J.P., Stranmillis House, has been mentioned for distinguished service in Dublin during the rebellion.

-- -- --

We extend our sympathy to the following members, who have suffered bereavement during the past few weeks -- Messrs. Samuel Watson, John Edgar, Henry Murphy, E. Dempster, John Campbell, Samuel M'Guffin, and Mr. R. M. Young, J.P., on the death of his father, the Rt. Hon. Robert Young, J.P., at the advanced age of 94.

-- -- --

We noticed that Mr. Gerald Hollywood, fourth son of Mr. J. Hollywood, J.P., has been gazetted for a commission in the Army. Two of Mr. Hollywood's sons made the supreme sacrifice and the great July advance. Certainly some families in our city are bearing their share of the duties of empire.

-- -- --

Petty Officer E. J. Crawford, one of our members who was a medical student at Queen's, has been wounded while serving with the Russian Armoured-Car Forces. He is a nephew of Mr. Roger Crawford, a member of our Governing Body.

-- -- --

Our Recreation Room members will be specially interested to learn that Bandsman Charles Pavis, formerly marker in our Billiard Rooms, is still making music with the boys in France. He acknowledges with profuse thanks a parcel sent to him from the C.P.A. at Xmas, and sends greetings to all and sundry.

-- -- --

Letters to hand from Salonica and other distant battle fronts acknowledge with evident appreciation the gifts we sent at Christmas to our members with the Colours. That the presents were appreciated by our brave boys is, we are sure, sufficient thanks to all who participated in Christmas Gift Fund.

-- -- --

Glad to note that 2nd Lieut. W. S. Maitland, M.C., has been presented with gold watch from Messrs. Lever Bros., Ltd. (in whose employment he was prior to the war), in recognition of the military distinction he has gained.

-- -- --

Mr. S. Donald Cheyne, one of our respected members, has received the Commission of the Peace. We are sure in Mr. Cheyne's hands the office will be worthily filled and the duties faithfully discharged.

-- -- --

Congratulations to our fellow-member, Alderman James Johnston, J.P., on his election as Lord Mayor, and all honour to him for his decision to banish intoxicants from the Civic board.

-- -- --

Just when going to press we learn with regret of the death of one of our oldest members, Mr. Robert Duncan, of Queen's Square, Belfast, and Highland's, Holywood. A sister of Mr. Duncan's had only predeceased him a few days, and last year his brother, Mr. D. A. Duncan, also one of our members, passed away. We deeply sympathise with Miss Duncan, the surviving sister, in her bereavement.

-- -- --

The many friends of Mr. David Long, a former editor of the C.P.A. Magazine, who is now resident in Bristol, will be sorry to hear that he has been seriously ill, and will also sympathise with him in his bereavement by the sudden death of his sister, which took place the other week.

-- -- --

Our Fallen Heroes.

Second-Lieutenant J. W. M'Mordie SECOND-LIEUTENANT J. W. M'MORDIE.

James Wilson M'Mordie, youngest son of the late Mr. Francis M'Mordie, of Crossgar, Co. Down, and of Mrs. M'Mordie, South Parade, Belfast, was born on 20th January, 1897; so that when he finished his course on 18th November last he had not seen his twentieth birthday. However, "being made perfect in a little while, he fulfilled long years." He was a candid, courageous, conscientious youth, gifted with high ideals, and with a strong and winning personality. He received his higher education at the Methodist College, and he was regarded by his masters as a lad of parts and capable of much achievement. The home circle planned for him the course of medical study in the University, but active spirit chose a business career; and he entered the service of a linen manufacturing company in the city, were he soon gave promise of great capacity, and made a place himself in the thoughts and esteem of his employers. He became a member of the C.P.A.; he was frequently to be found in the Library and Reading-rooms, and he continued to be a central figure among his former school-fellows and acquaintances, his influence always being on the side of truth and honour. As was written about him after his fall in action, "No one could be a friend of his without being the better on that account." It is no surprise that he heard the call this country, and in July, 1915, he joined the local Officers' Training Corps, receiving in the following month his commission in the Shropshire Light Infantry. During his course of training here, and of further preparation across the Channel, he flung himself with characteristic ardour into his work, and felt the joy of growth, of expanding powers, and of the prospect of occupying a place among the Allied forces fighting for his freedom of the world. To use his own phrases, shaped on the anvil of his juvenile and jubilant nature, he was was "alive and kicking;" "fit as a fiddle;" and he "could not be better." At the same time he was fully aware of the serious possibilities involved in the step he had taken; but these he set aside in view of the more serious call to which he could not be disobedient. His conclusion was worthy of the man who kept the bridge in the brave days of old; "I know no better death and to die on behalf of King and country." The thought of sorrow and anxiety at home weighed more heavily upon him than concern about himself, and he felt a special responsibility for the welfare and safety and those whom he led, and who were devoted to him in no ordinary way. "We are all band of brothers," he was accustomed to say; and in hymns and psalms they often together sang long hours of the night away. He was in several attacks on the Somme, with the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, to which in France he was attached; and he had several narrow escapes, of which he never made any mention. On 18th November he was reported missing, and from that day until the first week of the New Year
     "Our very hopes belied our fears,
     Our fears our hopes belied."

And then it was announced that he had not been taken prisoner, but that in the grey dawn he was seen to fall as he fearlessly led his men across the German lines; and old friends declared -- "We knew that Jim was not the man to allow himself to be captured." The tributes paid by the Commanding Officer, by the Brigadier, by the Chaplain, and by his comrades were most appreciative and gratifying. They described him as "a very gallant officer," as "one of our very best," who "brought credit to the battalion," and one whose loss was "deeply felt."

On Lord's Day evening, 7th ult., the memorial service was held in the Cooke Centenary Church, to which he belonged, and in which his mother and her sisters have been for many years among the most highly respected and most useful members; and to them our most sincere sympathy is extended. Mr. Frank M'Mordie, an elder brother of deceased, is serving with the Royal Engineers, and is at present in the East.

J. M.

 

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CPA Magazine March 1917

THE KINGDOM OF MOURNE.

By SKEAN DHU.

-- -- --

PART I -- THE LAND.

"Thou art, oh God, the Life and Light
     Of all this wondrous world we see;
Its glow by day, its smile by night,
     Are but reflexions caught from Thee."
-- Moore.

-- -- --

"Thou great First Cause, least understood,
     Who all my sense confined
To know but this, that Thou art good,
     And that myself am blind;
Yet gave me in this dark estate
     To see the good from ill;
And, binding Nature fast in fate,
     Left freed the human will."
-- Pope.

In the south part of Co. Down, which is the most beautiful district of Ulster, tourists discover the ancient "kingdom" of Mourne or Boirche. I have gone through it on foot more than once, and have been carried at other times like a parcel! I have also read the history of its people. One bleak January day, a few years ago, the Great Northern Railway train brought me to the small but thriving town of Banbridge. In such places the linen trade seems to succeed better, while a small wages go further there than in Belfast. Passing along the broad coach road to Rathfrilan', which at that time was covered with two inches of frozen snow, I entered a bare and hilly country, given up to mixed farming, including a few pigs and poultry. After passing a night with friends at Monteith, I proceeded on my way, noticing the low Dehemet mountains eastward, and the rounded mass of Cnoc westward. Having made a pilgrimage to Bronte Glen on a former walking tour, and failed to see the famous apparition of a headless horseman on account of youth, I pressed on southward, reaching the steep streets of Rathfrilan' about midday. This historic old town, which has a romantic site, is a little decayed now. It is a "finished town," to use a local phrase. As a health resort, it has the best air in Ireland; but the lodgings are too few. There are four Presbyterian sanctuaries (including the Covenanting), although two would suffice in this sphere of usefulness and influence!

It has some time had a good market for flax, although not so large a one at present as an in "days of old." There are a few good shops, not including some public-houses and spirit-groceries. "Have you any industries here?" I asked the man in the Western town one day. "Begorra, there isn't any, but sellin' porter," he replied. "That is a poor industry!" I exclaimed. All wise persons are moderate ascetics, abstaining daily from some things which injure, praying or aspiring with body and mind.

I have stood upon the breezy Castle Hill four times in spring, summer, autumn, and winter. The third visit inspired the following lines:

The O'Neill Castle (Iveagh) At Seafin

"Ruined Iveagh Castle
Crown's Rathfrilan' hilltop,
Giving to the curious
A varied panorama.
Relic of the old time,
How it brings before me
A vision of the past!
I seem to see, tho' dimly,
Saffron-kilted chieftains,
With their fierce retainers,
Defending the old stronghold
Against attacks of strangers,
Till the natives fell down,
Unwillingly submitting
To foreign confiscation...
The course of time brings vengeance.

My dim day-dream is ended
By bloodthirsty Prussians
Slaying English children,
By hot, hasty Fenians
Seeking independence...
Autumn's lights and shadows
O'er God's plains and mountains
Beautify six counties
Circling Iveagh Castle.
Autumn's mellow breezes
Fan my heated forehead,
Sweeping o'er the cornfields
Ripe with golden splendour,
Breathing sweet perfumes
From the verdant meadows,
Exhaling ozone tonic
From the western ocean...
Slowly I descend the
Steep slope of this hilltop,
Leaving with reluctance
The Castle of McGuiness."

The village of Hilltown has a comfortable and reasonable hotel, and is charmingly placed under the Mourne Mountains. The air in this part of the world is pure and sweet, redolent of heather. Nearby is the old ruin of Clonduff Abbey in an ancient graveyard -- another link with the past. It connects one with early Celtic Christianity, and the O'Neills.

The next morning I was climbing the picturesque road to Kilkeel, which winds up to the "Deer's Meadow" -- a bleak moorland tableland, were antlers were once seen. The following poem is one result of my wanderings in this highland region. It may induce some others to explore these beauty spots of Ireland.

"The River Shimna floweth ever
     In windings to the Irish Sea,
Past Clanbrasils mountains bold,
     Far famed for beauteous scenery.

In the high Deer's Meadow moorland,
     Fringed by gloomy heathery hills,
Is the source of peaty Shimna,
     Silvery bann, and other rills.

There the winds are pure and clear,
     Passing o'er the purple heather.
There the lights and shadows fleet
     In the early autumn weather.

There the mists of Mourne dissolve
     Into spates and floods of rain,
There the thunder cannonading
     Echoes loud across the plain.

Thro; deep pools and o'er grey ledges
     The River Shimna onward passes.
Tollymore's demesne it graces,
     Laving it's tall trees and grasses.

Under bridges, pass marsh meadows,
     From gloomy mountain to raging sea,
This restless river seeks an outlet,
     A wider sphere of activity.

Tho' its waters for a distance
     From the tide apart may keep,
Slowly, surely, they are mingled
     In the wide and mighty deep.

The picturesque road between the Deer's Meadow and Kilkeel winds downward between two ridges of granite mountains, partly clothed with pine trees. Pretty glimpses of Carlingford Lough are seen on the right, while on the left a mountain path runs up to Loch Shannagh -- a lonely tarn, surrounded by bleak mountains and quaking bogs. I know it well. Belfast's Water Board has included this tarn in its great waterworks system, together with that wild scenery of the Silent Valley and Blue Lake, admired by pedestrians.

A fertile and loamy plain extends from romantic Rostrevor to Annalong, surrounding the quaint old town of Kilkeel, which is dominated on the north by Slieve Bingian. It suits primroses, blackberries, flax, oats, and grass. Air and scenery are both notably good here. That famous view from the modern fishing village of Annalong looking landward is indeed fine, while the air is bracing and pure. Some modern labourers' cottages have been built; but more lodging-houses are needed.

The following acrostic on Slieve Bingian does not mention a small crater near its top, nor Blue Lake above Annalong; but it is an attempt to sum up an experience on a homeward journey:

"Steep, extinct volcano,
Looking o'er Mournes plain,
Inviting the bold climber
Ever on and upward,
Veiled at times in cloud-wreaths,
Early mist, and snowflakes;
Before recorded history,
Individual and social,
Nature's Bible page here
Gave to man a lesson
In the laws of God.
Appearances are great
Necessity's time-garment."

-- -- --

For the use of the blocks illustrating this article we are indebted to the kindness of F. J. Bigger, Esq., M.R.I.A., and Messrs. R. Carswell & Son, Ltd.

-- -- -- -- -- --

General Notes.

During the month one of our oldest members, Mr. John Frame, has been called to his rest and reward. One by one our older members are passing away, and it is for those who remain to prosecute the work they had so much at heart with redoubled energy and enthusiasm. We tender our respectful sympathy to the bereaved family.

-- -- --

We have also to convey our expressions of condolence to Mr. R. M. Martin, a member of our Governing Body, whose father died at an advanced age during the month. Mr. D. J. Hogg, another member of our Governing Body, Mr. A. Hogg, and Mr. George Rodgers (Convener of our Evangelistic and Temperance Committee), have been bereaved by the death of Mr. David Hogg. Mr. Hogg, who was well over the three-score years and ten, was father-in-law of Mr. Rodgers, at whose residence he passed away. Mr. Joseph Osborne, C.A., one of our Honorary Auditors, has also been bereaved by death of his father, who also attained a good old age. Mr. R. W. M'Dowell, one of our Vice-Presidents, and Mr. W. M'Mullan, each mourns the loss of a sister. Mr. W. Brown and Mr. George Robinson have recently lost the partners of their lives, and Mr. Geo. Hopper has lost a brother.

-- -- --

Colonel Thos. Sinclair, C.B., who was home on leave recently has been decorated by His Majesty the King with the insignia of the Companionship of the Bath.

-- -- --

Captain and Adjutant Ge. Thompson, one of our Divinity Students, who volunteered for combative service early in the war, has been promoted to the rank of temporary Major.

-- -- --

We were pleased to have a call the other day from Mr. A. E. Gillespie, a former member, who has for years been resident in the United States. Mr. Gillespie has "made good" and now occupies a fine position on an American Railway. He was staying with friends at Knock during his sojourn in this country, and we wish him a safe voyage back to the land of his adoption.

-- -- --

Congratulations to Mr. N. C. Stewart, one of our young members, who has passed the intermediate examination of the Irish Charted Accountants' Institute; and to Mr. Benjamin Bogle, who took a high place in the recent Great Northern Railway Examination.

-- -- --

Among our boys from the front recently home on leave who called to renew their acquaintance with our Rooms were Campbell Ross and Jim Mann, both of whom have been doing their bit for long over a year on stretch "somewhere in France."

-- -- --

We are glad to know that Petty Officer E. J. Crawford, who was wounded when on duty in the Armoured Car service in the East, has recovered, and has been awarded the Medal of St. George.

-- -- --

We congratulate Alderman Wm. Tougher, J.P., one of our most faithful and generous members, on being appointed High Sheriff of the County of the City of Belfast. The High Sheriff has kindly consented to preside at our Elocutionary Competitions in the Minor Hall on 29th inst.

 

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CPA Magazine April 1917

THE CASTLE OF THE TAFFES. -- This fine Castle was erected by the old family of Taafe, Earls of Carlingford. It was used as a trading centre as well as a stronghold, and assisted in building up the commerce and prosperity of the town.

THE KINGDOM OF MOURNE.

BY SKEAN DHU.

PART II -- THE PEOPLE.

"O Lord, my God, Thou art very great;
Thou art clothed with honour and majesty;
Who coverest Thyself with light as a garment;
Who maketh winds His messengers,
His ministers a flaming fire...
Great is the Lord, and highly to be praised,
And His greatness is unsearchable...
Thy kingdom is an everlasting kingdom...
With Thee is the fountain of life...
Great is our Lord, and mighty in power;
His understanding is infinite.
The Lord upholdeth the meek.
He bringeth the wicked down to the ground.
He hath made a decree which shall not pass away,
Praise the Lord from earth...
My soul waiteth only upon God;
From Him cometh my salvation." -- Psalms.

Newcastle, Annalong, Kilkeel, Rostrevor, Warrenpoint, Rathfriland, and Castlewellan, are beauty spots, which deserve to be famous all over the world. I sometimes quote Kingsley's beautiful lines.

"The moor-tracks wind into the pathless night
Till they are lost at last upon the height;
But in the west there lingers all the light
To see me home.

The Love that led me all that golden way,
Nor left me when my feet had gone astray,
Will hold me still at dying of the day,
And bring me home."

THE CASTLE OF CARLINGFORD. -- The first portion of this great Castle was erected about 1210, to defend the harbour of a place of much importance for trade and intercourse. The town was subsequently walled in and markets and fairs held by the people. The Castle changed hands many times. The O'Neills werethere in 1596 and again in 1642. O'Brien, of Inchiquin, was there in 1649

It is now time to say something about the people of South Down. The majority are Irish members of the Roman Church; but a minority are Protestants of differing sects. The Romish majority seems to be increasing in the that part of Ireland. Farmers, labourers, fishermen, and lodging-house keepers make up the bulk of its people, and but few have gone to the great world-war, which has extended Prussian Kultur by desolating large tracts of Europe and desecrating artistic Romish sanctuaries! Some men die for their country; other men live for it, and I admit that a sane patriotism includes digging in the garden no less than warfare against injustice.

The people in South Down are waking up out of a "long sleep of sorrow." Some external improvements have been made, with a little spiritual betterment added. In picturesque Newcastle they have public light, sewage, school, promenade, and pier; but they need public water and a slaughter-house. There are some good hotels and lodging-houses; the Presbyterian and Romanist sanctuaries have been rebuilt with much advantage; yet something remains to be done. If the strong-drink shops were all closed by military order, or otherwise, it would be a real improvement. King Alcohol is not so much in evidence about Annalong and Kilkeel. In the second town they have public piers, water, lighting, sewage, and technical school; but a municipal slaughter-house is needed. Fishing is the main industry in Mourne, small farming being next in importance. Most of the herring-boats are rented; a few only are owned in partnership. As for the small farmers, they co-operate to some extent; but employ little labour, and their children spend some school-days working on the farms. There is not much chance education in such places, and Wakes take place still.

CARLINGFORD PRIORY. -- This fine castellated Priory was founded about 1305 by the Dominicans who long flourished there. So late as 1670 in the time of the Venerable Oliver Plunkett, the best preacher in the country, Fr. Eugene O'Coigly was Prior and there were five other Friars. By English statute the Abbey was confiscated and the Friars driven out and their Church left a ruin.

The path along the Kilkeel shore gives one a wide, beautiful view of sea and mountains. It leads to a ruined castle at the north end of Carlingford Lough. This structure was built some time in the 11th century, and fortified by the De Burghs or Burkes, Earls of Ulster, during the next century. The native Irish destroyed it in 1343 A.D.; but soon afterwards it was repaired and more strongly fortified. It was then placed, together with the Castle of Carlingford, under Constable, to secure communication between the eastern Pale and English settlements in Lecale or East Down.

Irish is not spoken in County Down; but the accent of South Down is a mixture of Ulster and Leinster intonations. In Greenore, only a mile across the Lough, the Leinster accent is heard. The Danes made raids on the Irish coasts from the 7th to the 10th centuries, and raths, round towers, &c., were then made for defensive purposes. One large rath is seen in the grounds of Kilmorey Park, near Kilkeel. A very few Danish names remain in Ireland; but most of the Protestants have English, Welsh, Scotch, and French names. A few in Mourne bear Highland Scotch names, and are not ashamed of the same.

Quarrying of granite is one of the Mourne industries which might be extended with advantage. The Mourne granite is not surpassed for toughness and lastingness, while its texture is so close that it can take on a beautiful polish. It contains mica crystals, topaz, small red garnets, olivine, and beryls. These beryls, which cut glass, are equal in lustre to those of Siberia. The topazes are mostly pale; but both these gems occur in the same matrix as that of Siberia -- a course and much decomposed granite rock. Quarrying is a healthy open-air work; it suits strong men well enough, if the wages are sufficient. A good use for Mourne granite is found in building handsome and suitable schools. It is related that a South Down Presbyterian farmer went once with a friend to an Episcopalian service in a stone-built sanctuary. Turning over the leaves of a prayer-book, he noticed that word, "Collect," at the top of short and general prayers, and then gathered up his hat, stick, &c, in a hurry. "Where are you going?" asked his friend. "A'm away home," he replied. "There's too much collectin' here!"
     "Wise steering is ever needed
     By Churches, Empires, vessels;"
but no person, place, or system can please every one, and a few persons are never satisfied.

THE CARVED CASTLE OF CARLINGFORD

In kindly Mourne the Protestants and Roman Catholics do not bite or devour each other because of their religious-political differences, nor are they so out-of-date as in the past. Some notions reach them from the outside world by various means. Progress, if slow, is sure. The stream of tendency, although not rapid, flows ever onward. Passing and permanent elements are found in man, no less than in nature. They are also in human societies. Concrete ideas or sensations of the external world, whether Divine or human, change; they are real only for a time. So it is also with emotions. Temporal truth, however, implies eternal reality.

"The Lord by wisdom founded the earth; by understanding He established the heavens." God is the permanent reality in a universe of change and decay, who is above all human criticism whatever, whose Will or Governing Principle energises and evolves everywhere, leaving to our human wills a limited freedom and responsibility. Heredity and circumstance do not entirely destroy that human free-will, which in daily life is so much needed. Mere puppets have no moral responsibility, and are neither good nor evil. They are non-moral. Therefore we can aspire with our Irish poet, Moore, in his beautiful poem on the dove.

Mourne, with its people, must pass away. Its ancient kingdom is no more. So passes the glory of this word. Even
     "The stars shall fade away, the sun himself
     Grow dim with age, and nature sink in years."

The Eternal transcends all temporal truth. The Infinite dwarfs and surrounds all finite affairs. Divine wisdom is the principal thing, and shall conquer evil.

-- --

For the use of the blocks illustrating this article we are indebted to the kindness of F. J. Bigger, Esq., M.R.I.A., and Messrs. R. Carswell & Son, Ltd.

-- -- -- -- -- --

General Notes.

Our esteemed fellow member, Mr. Wm. M'Fadzean, of the Rubicon, Cregagh, attended recently at Buckingham Palace, and received from His Majesty the King the Victoria Cross awarded to his late gallant son, Private Wm. F. M'Fadzean, one of our young heroes, whose portrait occupies a place of honour in our rooms.

-- -- --

Lieutenant J. Cromie, of the Norfolk Regiment, one of our Roll of Honour members, who was recently wounded, has been awarded the Military Cross.

--- -- --

The Distinguished Conduct Medal has been awarded Sergt. J. A. Verner, another of our C.P.A. members. The presentation was made at Ballykinlar by Brigadier General G. W. Hackett Pain, C.B.

-- -- --

Captain Wm. Tyrrell, M.C., M.B.E., R.A.M.C. Special Reserve, son of one of our Vice-President, Alderman John Tyrrell, J.P., has been promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. Lieutenant-Colonel Tyrrell has filled the responsible position of Deputy-Assistant Director of the Medical Service for some time past.

-- -- --

Mr. Henry Musgrave, D.L., one of our esteemed Vice-Presidents, has been added to the list of Freemen of the City, an honour well-merited by Mr. Musgrave's generosity and services to every good cause connected with Belfast and its welfare.

-- -- --

A recent obituary list contained the death of Private R. J. McCarton, of the Canadian Expeditionary Force. The deceased, who contracted a cold while serving in France, was a nephew of Mr. Robert Johnston, a member of Governing Body. We extend to the mourners our sincere sympathy.

-- -- -- --

We are pleased to see that Mr. T. B. Stephenson, who was serving in a Cadet Company, has been gazetted to a Commission in the 19th R.I.R.. Mr. Stephenson was one of the moving spirits in all athletic clubs, especially in the Swimming Club, in the days of peace, and since joining the army has promoted cross-country running and other sport. We are sure he will make a good officer, popular with his men, while efficient, faithful, and every inch a soldier.

-- -- --

Congratulations to one of our very faithful members and a former energetic member of Committee -- Mr. James M'Caw -- who has entered into the bonds of matrimony. We wish our good friend Mr. M'Caw and his bride many years of united happiness.

-- -- --

We extend our sincere sympathy to your fellow-members -- Quarter-Master-Sergt. Brice Wightman, Messrs. Geo. F. and Harold J. Whiteman in their bereavement by the death of their mother.

-- -- --

The deep sympathy of our membership goes out to Mr. J. S. Mitchell, whose beloved daughter passed away recently.

-- -- --

Mr. W. A. M'Aloney, a popular member of the Committee mourns the loss of an uncle, who met with a fatal accident whilst superintending the felling of trees on his land.

-- -- --

Two of our popular members, Mr. Herby M'Master and Mr. Victor Maneely, have been laid aside by serious illness. We are very pleased that Mr. M'Master is now convalescent, and Mr. Maneely has quite recovered his normal good health and is back to business.

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CPA Magazine May 1917

General Notes.

The hand of death has touched several of our homes since our last issue of the magazine. In addition to the four Roll of Honour members, to whose loss we refer in another column, we desire to express sympathy with Mr. T. Porter, a member of our Governing Body, on the death of his brother, Mr. Samuel Porter, who for many years was on the roll of our Association. To Mr. J. M. O'Brien, Larne, to Mr. J. Whiteside, B.A., on the death of a sister, and to Mr. H. S. Perry, on the death of his father, we respectfully tender our sincere condolence. We also deplore the deaths of Mr. W. F. Munce and Mr. John Mackenzie, C.E., J.P., two of our members.

-- -- --

Our young men are joining the Colours in a steady stream. Quite a number of C.P.A. lads have recently volunteered on attaining military age. Among these is Norman Irwin, elder son of our respected Vice-President, Mr. David Irwin, J.P. Norman has been for a number of years a member in full communion of Duncairn Church, acted as honorary organist in Mr. T. O. Millar's Bible Class on Sabbath mornings, and taught a class in Fortwilliam Evening Sabbath School, in which he also was honorary librarian. Mr. Irwin and his like-minded chum, Mr. G. G. Stewart, have joined the Royal Garrison Artillery, to which another of our young members, Mr. J. Duffield, has also gone. Mr. W. R. Boyd and Mr. Hugh Craig have left business for the Officers' Training Corps at Queen's in preparation for Army service, and Mr. L. E. Curran has joined the Royal Flying Corps. Next month we hope to publish our Roll of Honour revised up to date, and we would be deeply obliged if our readers would inform us of any of our members who may have joined the services recently, and the rank and regiment of all who may have been promoted since the list was last published in our Annual Report and magazine.

-- -- --

A recently casualty list announces among the wounded one of our members, Second Lieutenant J. B. Glass. Mr. Glass before he entered the army was a partner in the firm of Messrs. M'Coull & Glass, tea agents, Victoria Street.

-- -- --

Second Lieut. S. M'Kay, formerly of the Ulster Bank, who was wounded some time ago, is now convalescent, and paid a visit to Belfast recently.

-- -- --

Second Lieut. R. Leonard Thompson, a grandson of the Rt. Hon. Robert Thompson, M.P., one of our esteemed Vice-Presidents, has been awarded the Military Cross. Another grandson of the Rt. Hon. gentleman, Captain R. Lloyd Thompson, was the winner of the Military Cross last year.

-- -- --

Rev. Professor Paul, M.A., B.D., of M'Crea Magee College, Londonderry, son of Mr. R. L. Paul, one of our prominent members, is taking up work in France among the troops in connection with the Y.M.C.A.

-- -- --

Congratulations to Mr. D. G. Sloan on his marriage. We wish him and his bride many happy, prosperous years.

-- -- --

In an Association with so large a membership as ours changes are inevitable, and while it is our privilege to constantly welcome new members., from time to time it falls to our lot to bid goodbye to old friends. Our latest loss n this respect is the removal of Mr. Archibald M'Diarmid and family to Dumbarton. Mr. M'Dairmid was a loyal member of our Association for many years, took his full share of work on the Governing Body and various sub-committees, and was a leading spirit in the C.P.A. Rifle Club. His youngest son -- the only boy resident in Belfast -- at the outbreak of war joined the Colours, and is one of our Roll of Honour members. We wish Mr. and Mrs. M'Dairmid and their daughter much happiness during their residence in their native Scotland.

-- -- -- -- -- --

IN MEMORIAM.

JAMES K. PIRRET, Sec.-Lieut. King's Royal Rifle Corps. Fell 4th April, 1917.

Call him not dead -- he has only "Gone West,"
What better way can we speak of his rest.
Gone from the conflict, its terror and gloom --
To the beauty and brightness of God's "inner room."
Valiant and brave -- he can never grow old,
Never know weariness, sorrow, or cold.
Always remembered, and loved as the day,
Bravely he marched for his country away.
Clear was the call, -- he was ready to go,
Leading, he fell, with his face to the foe.
One more young hero has stood the great test;
Call him not dead -- he has only "Gone West."
Mary Allen.

-- -- -- -- -- --

In Memoriam.

OUR FALLEN HEROES.

Remember what they were, with thankful heart,
     The bright, the brave, the tender, and the true.
Remember where they are -- from sin apart,
     Present with God -- yet not estranged from you.

But never doubt that love, and love alone,
     Removed our loved ones from this trial scene:
Nor idly dream, since they to God have gone,
     Of what, had they been left, they might have been.

-- -- --

Rifleman J. M'Culloch Four more of our Roll of Honour members have fallen within the last few weeks. To the bereaved parents and friends our tenderest sympathy is extended. Twenty-two of our 200 odd members with the Colours have made the supreme sacrifice. And while we pray for the preservation of those who are in the battle line, we are bound to loyally and lovingly say, "Thy will be done." Almost coincident with the news of the death of our four friends a number of C.P.A. youths on attaining military age joined, and in the cause of Empire and Liberty have become baptized for the dead. Appended are the photos and a few facts about our brave boys who have answered the last roll-call.

RIFLEMAN J. M'CULLOCH,
was the only son of Mr. J. M'Culloch, B.E., J.P., Granshaw, Comber, one of our oldest members. Young Mr. M'Culloch was educated at the Institution, and after leaving school had the privilege of a trip to Canada. On his return he elected to take up the study of motor engineering in Belfast, and on coming to the city joined our Association. In 1915, though much under military age, he joined the 17th R.I.R., and was subsequently drafted to the 8th Battalion. He was trained in Ballykinlar and Newcastle, and had seen a few months' active service in France before the fateful 1st July, after which he was reported missing. The official announcement of his death came to hand a few weeks ago.

Private David Gordon Paisley

PRIVATE DAVID GORDON PAISLEY
(aged 22 years),
of the Black Watch (Lewis Gun Section) elder son of Mrs. Paisley, 30 Madison Avenue, Belfast, was killed by a shell in France on the 1st April. The late Private Paisley was employed in Messrs. Lindsay Brothers, Donegall Place, where he served his apprenticeship, and before the war broke out was an active member of the North Belfast U.V.F. He enlisted in the Black Watch in December, 1914, and went to the front in July, 1916. He was wounded in November last at Beaumont Hamel, and after recovery rejoined his regiment. His only brother, Private James Edgar Paisley, is also serving in the Black Watch.

Gordon was a loyal C.P.A. member, and was a regular visitor to our rooms. He was one of three boys who were the originators of the Bangor Boy Scouts, and was keenly interested in outdoor life. He was a most gentlemanly and lovable youth, and very popular with all who knew him.

Second Lieutenant James K. Pirret

SECOND LIEUTENANT JAMES K. PIRRET,
Kings Royal Rifles, aged 23, second son of Mr. James Pirret, 43, Ardenlee Avenue, Belfast, was killed in action in France on 4th April. Second Lieut. Pirret was described by the Captain of his Company and the Lt.-Col. of his battalion as a capable, hard working and keen officer, who was loved by his men for his absolute straightness and sincerity. He fell in the operation of taking the village of Metz-en-Couture. The order to attack was given on the 4th April. They had captured the front line German trench and were pressing on to capture the village that lay beyond. They had got to the outskirts when they came under machine gun fire from a large house in the corner of the village. Mr. Pirret, who was leading at the time, was the first to fall; he was shot through the head, his death being instantaneous. He was of a decidedly spirited nature, and some years ago came under the influence of the Torrey-Alexander Mission. While training at Ballykinlar he was one of a small band of Christians who attended and took part in religious meetings at the Soldiers' Home there. He was a young man of great promise, and his loss is deeply mourned by all who knew him. His fellow officers write of his devotion to duty in the highest terms, and it was worthy of notice that when the Captain was on leave he was in command of the Company, and gave great satisfaction.

Corporal Robert M'lean

Mr. Pirret, who was 23 years of age, served his apprenticeship to the timber trade with Messrs. M'Cue, Dick, & Co., and enlisted in the Royal Irish Rifles whilst employed in the timber department of Messrs. Harland & Wolff, Ltd. His two brothers are in the Army -- Sergeant J. L. Pirret, Army Service Corps, Egypt, and Private Wm. Pirret, Canadian Railroad Construction Company.

CORPORAL ROBERT M'LEAN,
Army Service Corps, who was killed in action on the 7th April, was the eldest son of Mr. Robert M'Lean, of Riddels, Ltd., Donegall Place. On the outbreak of the war he was serving his apprenticeship with Messrs. Wm. Ewart & Sons. He was a most active member of the C.P.A., acted as a steward at the Saturday Evening Entertainments, and was a member of the Sabbath Morning Bible Class. Prior to the outbreak of the war he was a member of the Ulster Volunteer Force, South Belfast Regiment. After serving nearly two years in France with the A.S.C., Ulster Division, which he joined in May, 1915, he was posted to the Artist Rifles, and subsequently to the Royal West Kents, with a view to receiving his Commission, but unfortunately during his period of training with the latter Regiment he received his death wound at the early age of 21 years. The news of the death of Bobby M'Lean, as he was familiarly known among our junior members, was received with genuine regret. He was a most lovable lad, every inch a gentleman, ever ready to help in any good cause, and most unselfish. During his period of training, on his week-end leaves home, he attended our Sabbath Morning Bible Class, and his soldierly bearing was most striking. His Commanding Officer writes to his parents of his keenness as a soldier and his popularity with his comrades.

 

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CPA Magazine June 1917

General Notes.

CONGRATULATIONS.

2nd Lt. R. L. Thompson, grandson of the Rt. Hon. Robert Thompson, D.L., M.P., on receiving the Military Cross.

Second-Lt. W. R. Graham, one of our Roll of Honour members, on his marriage, on April 23rd, to Miss Kathleen M. Prentiss.

Mr. Thomas H. Graham, who recently entered into the happy state of matrimony in U.S.A., where he and his bride are resident for the present.

Lt. J. S. Elliott, son of Mr. E. J. Elliott, on his recovery from wounds received on the Somme, and his appointment to a position in the War Office.

Second-Lt. John Brown, M.C. (son of Mr. S. S. Brown, Assistant Postmaster of Belfast), one of our Honour Roll members, in having received a bar to his Military Cross decoration.

Mr. S. Johnston, J.P., Ardenza, Knock, on being presented by Brigadier-General Hackett Pain with the Military Cross awarded to his gallant son, the late Capt. Elliott Johnston, who made the supreme sacrifice for King and Country.

2nd Lt. S. M'Cay, formerly of the Ulster Bank, on having so far recovered from wounds received in action as to act as transport officer at the G.N.R., Belfast.

Captain W. A. Anderson, M.B., R.A.M.C. (nephew of Sir Robert Anderson), mentioned in despatches.

Second-Lt. E. W. Logan (late Ulster Bank staff, son of Rev. Dr. Logan, Sandholes), on receiving his Commission in the 20th R.I.R.

Dr. S. T. Irwin, University Square, on receiving a Commission (Captain's rank) in the R.A.M.C.

Lance Corporal W. A. Greer, 14th R.I.R. (Y.C.V.s) on being presented with a Certificate for Conspicuous Gallantry on 1st July, in carrying a wounded sergeant from the German line to the British Front lines under heavy fire.

Major W. J. Somerville, Royal Engineers, nephew of Mr. R. T. Martin, B.A., mentioned in despatches by Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig.

Captain T. J. C. C. Thompson, R.I.F., mentioned in despatches.

-- -- -- --

SYMPATHY

We proffer our sympathy to the following of our gallant young soldiers reported wounded or missing in recent casualty lists:

Second Lt. A. M. Turnbull, Royal Flying Corps, eldest son of Mr. M. M. Turnbull, LL.B. (Missing).

Capt. J. S. Lyons, King's Own Royal Lancaster Regt, brother of Mr. F. H. Lyons, Valerie, Rosetta Park (Wounded).

Second Lt. W. A. Malone, of the Cheshire Regt., son of Mr. John Malone, "Entroya," Fortwilliam Park (Wounded and a Prisoner).

Second Lt. W. B. Baillie, Royal Irish Regt., son of Mr. W. T. Baillie, Royal Irish Regt., son of Mr. W. T. Baillie, "Marathon," Green Road, Knock (Wounded).

Rifleman Joseph Boyce, Rifle Brigade (Wounded).

2nd Lt. J. A. Acheson, The King's (Liverpool Regt.), son of the late Mr. John Acheson, J.P., Portadown (Wounded).

Second Lt. E. R. Ledlie, Royal Irish Rifles, son of Dr. A. Ledlie, Strangemore Terrace (Wounded).

We also sympathise with the following of our members at home who are laid aside by illness, and wish for them a speedy recovery:-- Rev. T. A. Smyth, M.A., LL.B.; Rev. C. M. Young, B.A.; Rev. R. J. Porter, B.A.; Mr. W. W. Henry, Landscape Terrace; Mr. John Skinner, Chadwick Street, and Mr. Joseph Rea, Cliftonpark Avenue.

-- -- -- --

CONDOLENCE.

Condolence to our members and friends who have been bereaved recently by the deaths of

Mr. W. F. M'Kinney, Sentry Hill.

Mr. Andrew Kinkead, Ballysillan.

2nd Lieut. John Dobson, R.I.F.

2nd Lieut. Wm Glass, Black Watch.

Lieut. W. Carruthers (son of Mr. F. Carruthers, of Dublin, who while resident in Belfast was one of our most active members).

Lieut. S. J. Todd Martin, son of the late Rev. Dr. Todd Martin and Mrs. Todd Martin.

Sergt. W. G. M'CAw, R.I.R., son of our esteemed member, Mr. Geo. M'Caw, 27, Atlantic Avenue.

Lieut. Fred Williamson, of the Indian Army Reserve of Officers, son of Mr. John Williamson, one of our most respected members, and a member of May St. Kirk Session.

Mr. David Adams, St. Jude's Avenue.

Master James M'Connell, son of Rev. J. M'Connell, B.A.

Miss A. Bennett, 10, Ormeau Road.

2nd Lt. G. S. Sinclair (nephew of our President), the twenty-fifth of our members to make the supreme sacrifice.

To Mr. W. D. M'Bride, "North Gretton," Malone, in his bereavement by the sudden death of his wife.

-- -- -- -- -- --

In Memoriam

OUR FALLEN HEROES.

Second-Lieutenant J. DobsonSecond-Lieutenant Wm. Glass

Second-Lieutenant J. Dobson, Royal Irish Fusiliers, who died on 4th May, of wounds received two days earlier, was a son-in-law of Mr. George Hopper, Oaklands, Chichester Park, Belfast, local manager of the Gresham Insurance Society, and a member of our Governing Body. Mr. Dobson received his commission in November, 1915, and has been at the front since December, 1916. Prior to joining the colours, he was the principal buyer in the firm of Messrs. Pratt & Montgomery, Belfast. He was one of our C.P.A. members, and a member of the Cliftonville Golf Club. His wife received the sad news from the War Office just a few days before the first anniversary of their wedding. The late young officer has two brothers with the Colours -- Driver Alex. Dobson, R.E., who is in the Royal Engineers. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved young widow and all the mourners in their great loss.

A large circle of friends and acquaintances heard with deep regret of the death in action in France of Second-Lieutenant Wm. Glass, of the Black Watch. The deceased officer was one of a family prominently identified for many years with the Fitzroy Avenue congregation and our Central Presbyterian Association. Prior to the outbreak of war Mr. Glass was the Belfast representative of Messrs. Barker & Dobson. He had considerable military experience in peace time, having been one of the old Scotch Volunteers, and was with several other of our members instrumental in forming groups of Volunteers, and was with several other of our members instrumental in forming groups of Volunteers for the 6th Battalion Black Watch Territorial Force, in which he served as a private an non-commissioned officer. He was thus mobilised immediately war broke out in August, 1914, and was stationed in the East of Scotland, and last year on receiving his commission proceeded to France. The late Mr. Glass took a keen interest in welfare of boys, and was actively identified with the Boys' Brigade, serving with M'Clure St. Sabbath School of Fitzroy Avenue Church. He also organized a Company of the B.B. at Balmoral Industrial School, which, under his capable captaincy, developed into one of the best companies in the Belfast Battalion. Mr. Glass was one of the original Y.C.V. members, and on the formation of the U.V.F. threw his energy and enthusiasm into that movement, acting as honorary drill instructor for several city companies. In a letter which has been received from his colonel it is stated that he fell while leading his men into action. Two of his brothers are in the army -- Captain G. S. Glass, Royal Army Medical Corps, attached to a battalion of the Hampshire Regiment, and Second-Lieutenant J. B. Glass, Northumberland Fusiliers, another of our honour roll members, who was recently wounded. Another brother is Mr. H. M. Glass, of Eversley, Whitehead. The deceased officer is survived by his wife and four sons, who are at present residing in the Isle of Man, which was the home of Mrs. Glass prior to her marriage.

-- -- -- -- -- --

C.P.A. MAN IN THE AIR SERVICE.

Flight-Sub-Lieutenant J. M. M'Cleery

Above is photo of one of our young Roll of Honour members, Flight-Sub-Lieutenant J. M. M'Cleery, eldest son of Mr. J. O. M'Cleery, Ava House, Old Cavehill Road, who some months ago joined the Royal Naval Air Service. Young Mr. M'Cleery in the picture is seen in his machine.

 

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CPA Magazine July 1917

General Notes.

CONDOLENCE

We extend our expressions of condolence to our members and friends who have been bereaved by the deaths of --

Mrs. Roome, Ben Vunue, Greenisland, widow of the late Rev. Wm. Boden Roome, and mother of Mr. W. J. W. Roome, M.R.I.A., one of our members, now doing missionary work in Africa.

Mr. W. Claw, Charleville, Dunmurry.

Second-Lieut. Brian Boyd, son of Mr. W. A. Boyd (manager of Messrs. Manfield, Ltd. Belfast).

Mr. R. Dods, B.A., J.P., Newcastle, one of our oldest members.

Mr. W. Taggart, of Cavan, brother-in-law of Mr. Robert Russell, of the Ulster Bank, a member of our Governing Body.

Capt. Arthur K. M'Bride, Hydepark, killed in action.

Rifleman R. Campbell Ross, son of Mr. R. J. Ross, Cameron Street, who is the 26th of our Roll of Honour members to make the supreme sacrifice in the great war.

-- -- --

SYMPATHY.

Sympathy is extended to --

Mr. H. T. Barrie, M./P., and Mrs. Barrie in their anxiety regarding their son, Flight Sub-Lieut. Frank Barrie, of the Royal Flying Corps, who is reported missing.

Pte. Arthur Blair, of the New Zealand Force, one of our Roll of Honour members, and son Mr. Alex. Blair, director of Messrs. S. Sinclair & Co., reported wounded.

Corporal Ernest Henry, of the R.I.R., son of Mr. R. Henry, 21, South Parade, wounded.

Captain S. Yeates, R.I.R., Coniston, Derryvolgie AVe., reported wounded.

Second Lieut. Samuel Mercer, of the R.I.R., one of our Roll of Honour boys, and a member of Nelson Memorial Church and Choir, wounded.

Second Lieut. Norman M'Neill, suffering from shell-shock.

-- -- --

CONGRATULATIONS.

Mr. Wm. Moore, B.A., Mr. James Craig, B.A., and Mr. C. F. M'Caughey, M.A., on being licensed for the ministry.

Mr. Matthew Majury, B.A., B.D>, on being called to First Garvagh and Second Limavady Congregations. We understand Mr. Majury has elected to go to Garvagh.

Second Lieut. Edwin Ledlie, youngest son of Dr. Ledlie, of Strangmore Terrace, on being awarded the Military Cross.

Messrs. A. D. C. and J. E. M'Ilroy, two of our over-seas members, who have obtained the B.D. degree in Princeton.

Mr. John Ross, jun., Eia St., on his success at the recent King's Scholarship Examination.

Mr. James Graham, Cliftonville Circus, pupil teacher in Belfast Model School, on taking 10th place in Ireland at the King's Scholarship Examination.

Sergt.-Major Brice-Wightman, of the R.A.M.C., on being awarded a special certificate for meritorious service in the Ulster Division.

Messrs. J. P. Henderson, Noble M'Kibbin, and Wm. M'Coach, who have successfully passed the Summer Matriculation Examination of the Queen's University.

Mr. John E. M'Kee, Finaghy, on his marriage to Miss Margaret Young, of Ballymoney.

Mr. Archibald Duglad, B.A., on wining the Dufferin Medal for oratory in the Literary and Scientific Society of Q.U.B.

-- -- -- -- -- --

FACTS FROM FRANCE.

Rev. Professor F. J. Paul, M.A., M'Crea Magee College, Londonderry, who is spending his summer vacation with the troops in France, writing to his father, Mr. R. L. Paul, a member of our Governing Body, about the middle of last month, says:--

Dr. Macauly and I are for the present giving addresses in the various huts. The questions discussed include: "If God is good, why is there so much suffering?" "Why should the innocent suffer with the guilty?" "Can any good come out of the war?" "Is death the end of all?" The soldiers are very much interested. They listen to these matters being discussed, and they ask questions about them in a way that no body of men at home would do... I have met a good many soldiers (officers and man) from the North of Ireland since coming out here, and they are all very glad to meet with one from the old country. The weather here has been quite variable, so far as my experience has gone yet -- quite as variable as in Ireland!

-- -- -- -- -- --

In Memoriam

OUR FALLEN HEROES.

Second-Lieutenant George S. Sinclair, R.I.R.Rifleman R. Campbell Ross

The deceased young officer, who recently made the supreme sacrifice on the Western Front, was the second son of the late Mr. Samuel Sinclair and Mrs. Sinclair, Inglewood, Adelaide Park, Belfast, and a nephew of our President, Mr. John Sinclair, and Colonel Thos. Sinclair, C.B., of the Army Medical Service, one of our Vice-Presidents. He was educated at the Royal Belfast Academical Institution, and had just entered Queen's University with the view of adopting the medical profession, when he volunteered and obtained his Commission. Mr. Sinclair was a very popular with his fellow students and comrades in the army, and had every prospect of a prosperous career. His elder brother, Second Lieutenant H. D. Sinclair, is also serving in the Royal Irish Rifles, and both were members of our Association, and belonged to the large number of young officers to join the Colours from Elmwood congregation, with which their family is connected. Much sympathy is felt with Mrs. Sinclair and the other bereaved relatives.

Campbell Ross was the third son of our esteemed member, Mr. R. J. Ross, an elder in Gt. Victoria Street Church, a worthy member of the teaching profession, and a prominent Rechabite. Campbell, who was only 17 years of age when he "joined up," was a member of the Y.C.V.s. He received his fatal wounds when acting as a stretcher-bearer and assisting to bring in wounded after a sharp engagement early last month. A comrade and one of our chaplains have forwarded particulars and very sympathetic letters to the bereaved parents. He belonged to the old Boys' Hall in connection with Fitzroy Avenue Church, having been a member of that Company of the Boys' Brigade. He was one of our C.P.A. members and was identified with several of the activities of Gt. Victoria St. Congregation, and was much interested in the Band of Hope Choir. He spent a brief holiday at home about three months ago, and was in good health and spirits. The fact that Campbell's death is the first break in the family circle, consisting of the parents and twelve children, makes the sad occurrence peculiarly trying, and has evoked the deepest sympathy of the community.

A letter from the late young soldier's officer tells how he was tending the wounded when struck, and how he and lads like him are specially selected for this trying task. The letter expresses great sympathy with the mourners.

 

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CPA Magazine August 1917

General Notes.

CONDOLENCE.

We offer sincere condolence to Mr. Clifford Coulter on the death of his mother, the relatives of the late Sergt. J. J. M'Coubray (killed in action), the relatives of the late Rev. Professor S. Law Wilson of Assembly's College, Mr. Robert Brown, Dundonald, on the death of his daughter in Dublin; Mr. Wm. M. Clow, J.P., on the death of his son, Malcolm M. Clow, conducteur French Red Cross, who died of dysentery in Macedonia, and to Mr. J. E. Henry and Mr. W. W. Henry on the death of their father.

-- -- --

SYMPATHY

We sympathise with Rev. Dr. Workman, Mr. John Workman, Mr. Frank Workman, and the other relatives in their anxiety about Lieut. Charles Workman, M.C., of the Royal Flying Corps, who is reported missing.

-- -- --

CONGRATULATIONS

Congratulations to --

Major Horace H. Haslett, son of the late Sir James H. Haslett, and brother of our esteemed member, Mr. J. Horner Haslett, on having been awarded the French decoration -- Croix de Chevalier.

Major G. Thompson, of Ollaraba, Larne, one of our Honour Roll members, and a distinguished divinity student, on receiving from the President of the French Republic the Croix de Guerre.

2nd Lieut. R. V. Lyons, of Valere, Rosetta Park, one of a family who has played a noble part in this war, and brother of our worthy member, Mr. Fred Lyons, on receiving his Commission in the Rifles.

Mr. Jack M'Alery, second prize winner in Senior Grade, Technical Institute, in the Sir Charles Lanyon and Fitzpatrick Prize Scheme, for a set of efficiently executed architectural drawings.

Mr. P. O. Diamond on his success at the recent examination of the Society of Incorporated Accountants and Auditors.

Mr. C. S. Bennington on having matriculated at Queen's University, and volunteered for Mission Work in the Qua Iboe.

Mr. J. H. M'Ilveen on his part in winning the Downing Cup in the steady pair-oar race promoted by the Commercial Boating Club.

Acting Company Quartermaster Sergeant R. K. Guiler, on being promoted to a lieutenancy. Lieutenant Guiler is a brother of our old member, Mr. J. Guiler, M.P.S.I.

Capt. J. R. M. Mackenzie, son of the late Dr. M. Mackenzie, Belfast, on being awarded the Military Cross.

Sergt. Major Brice Wightman, one of a family closely identified with our Association, and one of four brothers who have done their bit in this war, on receiving the French decoration of the Croix de Guerre.

Lieut. G. Y. Henderson, fourth son of the late Sir James Henderson, and brother of our esteemed member Mr. H. Trevor Henderson, on being awarded the Military Cross.

-- -- -- -- -- --

THE MEMORABLE 1st JULY, 1916.

PRESBYTERIAN COMMEMORATION SERVICE.

At the special commemoration and "In Memoriam" service held on the afternoon of 1st July in the Assembly Hall, the preacher was the Moderator of the General Assembly (Right Rev. Dr. John Irwin, M.A.), who was assisted in the conduct of the service by the Revs. Dr. MacDermott, Dr. Montgomery, and J. H. Morton, B.A. The music, which was specially selected, was led by the Assembly Hall Choir; and Mr. F. J. Moffett presided at the organ. In the course of the service an offertory was taken up on behalf of the U.V.F. Patriotic Fund. In the course of an eloquent sermon the Moderator said, never had there been a greater test of personal valour than that of the boys' whom they were gathered that day to honour and to commemorate, exploits that could never be forgotten while the history of their country and province was being written. They were proud to think that the boys and girls who were coming up behind them were of the same heroic mould. The dead they could not help. They were in God's care, but in a few months hundreds of men -- wounded men -- would be coming back to their shores. They, too, were in God's care and in theirs and his. The Government would do all that was possible. The Government could not do what was not possible, and their loving gratitude and his must come in to make up that which was behind. The singing of the National Anthem and the benediction, pronounced by the Moderator, brought the proceedings to a close.

-- -- --

In Memory of Our V.C.

An impressive service was held in Newtownbreda Presbyterian Church on the afternoon of the first Sabbath in July, when a tablet erected to the memory of the late Private William Frederick M;Fadzean, V.C., 14th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles (Young Citizen Volunteers), by his fellow members of the 1st Battalion, East Belfast Regiment, U.V.F., and Ballynafeigh and Newtownbreda Unionist Club was unveiled by Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel C. W. Barlow, D.S.O., General Staff Officer, Northern District, Irish Command. The seating accommodation of the spacious church was fully occupied, many had to be content with standing room, and hundreds were unable to gain admission. Rev. Robert Workman, D.D., minister of Newtownbreda congregation, was the preacher, and the other clergymen taking part in the service were -- Rev. Canon W. P. Carmody, B.A., of Knockbreda Parish Church; Rev. John Macmillan, D.D., of Cooke Centenary Presbyterian Church; Rev. Randall C. Phillips, of Newtownards Road Methodist Church; Rev. Dr. Rose; a minister of the Presbyterian Church; Rev. R. N. Ruttle, B.A., of St. Jude's Parish Church; and Rev. J. S. Rutherford, M.A., assistant to Rev. Dr. Workman. There was a distinguished company of officers and influential citizens present.

Mr. William M'Fadzean, Rubicon, Cregagh, father of Private M'Fadzean, who was accompanied by Mr. R. P. Bowden and other relatives, was accommodated in a front seat. The string band of the 3rd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, under Bandmaster Millett, and the choir, under Mr. R. W. Roulston, organist, led the praise portion of the service. The congregation included a detachment of the Young Citizen Volunteers from Newcastle and a contingent of wounded soldiers from the U.V.F. Hospital, among whom was Private George Gillespie, who was standing beside Private M'Fadzean when the young hero won the Victoria Cross. After the choir had given a devotional rendering of the anthem "Crossing the Bar" to Woodward's setting, Lt. Colonel Barlow, before unveiling the tablet, delivered an appropriate address, and Rev. Dr. Workman preached an eloquent sermon in which he paid a tribute to our fallen hero, who was a member of his congregation. The reverend gentleman concluded by reading the following telegram from Captain J. A. Mulholland, adjutant of the Young Citizen Volunteers -- "Y.C.V.'s salute the memory of their fallen hero, Willie M'Fadzean."

The offertory was in aid of the Limbless Branch of the U.V.F. Hospital, and a liberal response was made. The Dead March in "Saul" having been played, the congregation standing, "The Last Post" was sounded, and the solemn proceedings concluded with the pronouncement of the benediction by Dr. Workman, and the singing of the National Anthem.

 

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CPA Magazine October 1917

General Notes.

"It is not tale of years that tells the whole of man's success or failure, but the soul he brings to them, the songs he sings to them. The steadfast gaze he fixes on the goal"

-- -- --

Best wishes for their future happiness and prosperity to Mr. and Mrs. Sam. Maxwell, who were married on August 22, at College Square Presbyterian Church, by Rev. Dr. Megaw, assisted by Rev. S. H. Blair, B.A. The happy pair have a wide circle of friends.

-- -- --

Mr. F. J. Moffett, the popular Organist and Choirmaster of Assembly Hall and Fitzroy Avenue Church, has resumed work after the summer vacation, and he would like a few additional voices, ladies and gentlemen, for the afternoon choir in Assembly Hall during the winter session -- Oct to March. Those who would like to assist us in these services should apply to Mr. Moffett, at 37, Cromwell Road, or previous to the commencement of the service on any Sabbath afternoon, or to Mr. Richard Lowry, the Hon. Sec. of the choir, at 39, Pretoria Street.

-- -- --

We are in receipt of a card from Mr. Wesley Camlin from Romsey, Hants, to say that he has joined the Royal Engineers, and is training at Woodley Camp. Best wishes to Sapper Camlin.

-- -- --

Death has removed from our midst a well-known figure in the Reading Room and Chess Room, Mr. V. H. Rylski, well-known for many years in Belfast business circles. The deceased was born on the 11th August, 1830, at Kocow, not far from Lemberg, the capital of Galicia, which, at the time of the first partition of Poland, became Austria's prey. He joined as a volunteer the Polish Legion which was formed in Hungary during the war in 1848-49. To the relatives we express our heartfelt sympathy in their bereavement.

-- -- --

We offer our sincere condolence to Rev. James Pyper, B.A., on the death of his revered father, Mr. James Pyper, M.A., Principal and Founder Mercantile College; to Mr. W. J. Crossley, on the death of his beloved mother; to Mr. Acheson Ferguson, on the sudden death of his wife; and to Mr. John Woods, on the death in action of his second son, Lt. Norman Hill Woods, M.C.

-- -- --

We are gratified to learn that Corporal R. Lindsay, R.I.R., son or Mr. Wm. Lindsay, a member of our General Committee, and who was wounded on 8th August, and is in an Edinburgh Hospital, is progressing rapidly, and we wish him a complete recovery to health and strength.

-- -- --

Mr. J. J. Eccles was united in the holy bonds of matrimony with Miss Florence Wilson, of Rugby Road, by Rev. Wm. Colquhoun, B.A., at Fitzroy Avenue Church, on 7th ult. Hearty good wishes for their future happiness.

-- -- --

As on previous occasions, we desire to send a greeting and gift in December to our brave boys with the Colours, and as our Roll of Honour now contains upwards of 200 names we should be pleased to receive small subscriptions towards this object. The letters which were received last year from the recipients of gifts made very interesting reading, and showed that our remembrance of our lads in the Services was much appreciated.

-- -- --

Lieutenant Norman Hill Woods, M.C., Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who has been killed in action on 16th August, was a son of Mr. John Woods, Churchfield, Holywood, an old and valued member of the C.P.A. In November, 1914, he enlisted in the 6th (Territorial) Black Watch, and served in that battalion until May, 1915, when he obtained his commission. He was awarded the Military Cross in March last for conspicuous gallantry in action, the official announcement stating that he carried out a successful raid with marked ability and captured two unwounded prisoners. Although heavily engaged during the retirement from the enemy's trench he brought his party back with no casualties. The deceased officer was 24 years of age.

-- -- --

Deep sympathy is felt for Mr. John Stewart, a newly-elected member, in the death of his wife.

-- -- --

Congratulations to Mr. Robert Drysdale, the popular and energetic Secretary of the Charity Organisation Society for many years, on his appointment to the Secretaryship of the War Pensions Committee, Belfast.

-- -- --

We regret to learn that 2nd Lieut. Victor H. Morgan's name appears in the casualty list as "Missing, believed killed." 2nd Lieut. Morgan is a brother of Mr. H. S. Morgan, an associate of this Association.

-- -- --

A marriage was solemnised at Oldpark Presbyterian Church, on September 19, between Mr. Gilbert L. Craig, of the Tramways Office, and son of the late Mr. John Craig, formerly of Bellarena, and Miss J. B. Wallace, daughter of the late Wm. Wallace, of Crossreagh, Portrush. The officiating minister was Rev. Dr. R. T. Megaw, of whose congregation (College Square, Belfast) Mr. Craig and his brother are arduous workers. Mr. Craig is well and popularly known in the C.P.A., and was a former secretary of the Ramblers' Club. Our heartiest good wishes for the future happiness and prosperity of the newly-married pair.

-- -- --

Mr. R. J. Dalzell, for many years a member of the C.P.A., and well-known in the Recreation Rooms, has removed to Dublin. We regret his departure from our midst, and he has our best wishes for his prosperity in the metropolis.

-- -- -- -- -- --

Our Noble Dead.

L/Cpl. JOHN H. DIXON, Lewis Gun Section, R.I.R.

"His was the proudest part,
He died with the glory of faith in his eyes,
And the glory of Love in his heart."

Lance-Corporal Dixon fell in action on the 16th August, when in charge of a Lewis Gun Section in the attack, and he fought his gun gallantly until he was killed.

The youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Dixon, of 51, Ormeau Road, Belfast, he was a member of the C.P.A. for some time prior to his volunteering for service in 1914, and had been serving with the Y.C.V.s in France since September, 1915.

L/Cpl. Dixon was an original member of the Y.C.V.s., and was attached to the Company which was identified with the C.P.A. in pre-war days. He took part in the Somme attack on the memorable July 1st, 1916 and Messines, June 7th, of this year.

Capt. the Rev. John Knowles, Presbyterian Chaplain, in a letter to Mr. Dixon says: "We are all deeply grieved for the loss of your son. He was a good soldier, faithful in his duty, and has been faithful unto death."

To the family circle we extend our profound sympathy in the loss in a noble cause of a dear son and a gallant brother.

-- -- -- -- -- --

WHERE ARE OUR DEAD?

Oh! can it be our loved ones
Simply lie
Asleep? Those dear, proud boys gone forth,
Gone forth to die,
Careless of death, with life just
"Under way" --
Deep in the grave, inanimate
As clay,
Waiting for some far distant
Judgment day.

Or do they, clothed in white,
With harp in hand --
We say it reverently -- a vague
Mysterious band,
Praise God unceasingly
While hearts o'erflow
With joy? Alas, alas! would that it
Might be so!
But can we think it, knowing
As we know?

Knowing that each dear, brave,
Courageous soul,
Was scarce attuned to such
A lofty role,
We may not reach the Highest
With one bound,
First we must learn to tread
The lower ground;
And still the "silent army" grows and grows,
And tears abound.

Oh! mourning hearts, be still,
Forget to weep,
Your loved ones are not dead,
Not e'en asleep;
Beside you, as of yore, they come,
They stand,
And touch your hair, and lips,
And press your hand,
The same dear personalities;--
No change has bann'd.

Communion, soul with soul;
God's gracious will
Permits them yet to love us,
Minister, and still
The aching void, and dry
The eyelids red.
Listen, perchance thou'lt hear
Their gentle tread,
Their whispered words -- "Be comforted,
We are not dead."

ANNIE M. MARCH,
In The Young Man and Woman.

-- -- -- -- -- --

The late Captain Charles M'Master, M.C.

AN APPRECIATION.

Of the many sons whom Erin in general, and Ulster in particular, have to mourn, no one is more worthy of a place of honour than the late Captain Charles M'Master, M.C. An ardent patriot, the need of King and Country at the outbreak of the War in 1914 came to him as the call of God. No one who has gone fourth to make the supreme sacrifice ever counted the cost more fully than he did. He was a born Crusader, and every worthy cause, local or imperial, commanded his best energies. He thought deeply, felt keenly, and laboured unceasingly in behalf of every cause which commended itself to his judgment. He had in him all the instincts and the intense social passion of a reformer. Opposition did not daunt him, and comradeship was his daily breath. He made fast friendships, and was true as steel to his friends, and no sacrifice was too great to serve their need.

The key to his character lay in the fact that he was an earnest Christian. To him Christianity was essentially a life. He had a high ideal of duty. In fact he was a Puritan. God and Duty were the two poles of his thought and life. This was the inevitable fruit of the evangelical atmosphere of his home. An ardent Boys' Brigade man, he had the power of gripping and holding young men. He not only captained for years a Company in the Boy's' Brigade, but also taught his own Bible Class in connection with it. He kept in constant touch with all its members, taking a personal interest in their private life, labours, and pastimes. His personal sacrifices in safeguarding youth from the temptations of the city, his many charitable acts and timely aid in the day of adversity, would need a chapter to themselves.

And yet, with all this, he never let his left hand know what his right hand had done. Unostentatious in the highest degree, he hated advertisement. He had a deep scorn for meanness, hypocrisy, insincerity, and cant. He had all the spiritual passion of an Old Testament prophet. He was a practical mystic, and had all the force of such a personality.

Another phase of his character was revealed in the eagerness with which he took up his duties as a soldier. Among the bravest of the brave, as his Military Cross indicates, he combined firmness with gentleness in a remarkable degree.

He treasured his men, knew each one of them, considered their temperaments, and their personal well-being was his first care. They were his children, and they loved him deeply in return. With him they would go anywhere and do anything. He inspired them with confidence. He was all ideal Christian officer. Drill, discipline, duty, and daring were the four points of his military compass. Need we wonder that men wept over his loss as children mourn a father that has fallen. Death, the great recruiting sergeant, has summoned no nobler soul to the higher service of the King of kings, It may be truly said of him: "Whatever record leaps to light, He shall not be ashamed."

This tribute is placed as a wreath upon his memory by one who enjoyed the rare privilege of his fast and deathless friendship.

 

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CPA Magazine November 1917

General Notes.

Life is given us for one great purpose -- growth of character. It matters little what may be our duties our pleasures, our cares, so only we grow by them. We live well not by doing lofty things, but by doing little things in a lofty spirit.

-- -- --

Mr. W. H. Smith, of Malone Avenue, has signalised his election by presenting to the Library three splendidly bound volumes of Oliver Wendell Holmes' Breakfast Table series. Mr. H. G. Murray, of Princess Gardens, has made a second contribution of 8 volumes of boys' books. Mr. A. A. Campbell, solicitor, Waring St., has made a gift of several bound volumes of the "Young Man." To these gentlemen we are deeply indebted for their generosity.

-- -- --

Mr. Thos. Moore is offering to the 18th Coy. Boys' Brigade (Fortwilliam) four prizes of one year's membership of the C.P.A.; the test is to be four essays on subjects to be chosen dealing with their organisation. Now then, Sabbath school and Bible Class teachers, here is an idea for you! Who's next?

-- -- --

Corporal Samuel John Johnston, R.I.R. (Y,C.V.), a former member of our Association, son of Mr. Robert Johnston, of the Governing Body, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery. Over two years ago he took service as a despatch rider in France, afterwards volunteering to the Scouts. In the face of enemy fire he was instrumental in rescuing wounded officers and men and having them conveyed to a place of safety.

-- -- --

CONGRATULATIONS TO

Mr. Edward Frame, of Alfred Street and University Street, son of the late Mr. John Frame, on his marriage to Miss Lillian M. Todd of Ingledene, Bloomfield.

Mr. R. C. Ferguson, M.A., LL.B., on his appointment as Lecturer in Commerce in the Municipal Technical Institute.

Mr. W. Bailie Russell, B.A., on being appointed to the Secretaryship of the Presbyterian Orphan Society.

Mr. J. R. Guiler on his marriage, which took place recently in England.

Mr. R. Leslie Dodds on being commissioned as Surgeon-Probationer on H.M.S. "Mameluke."

Mr. J. M. Legate on being appointed as choirmaster of Carnmoney Presbyterian Church. Mr. Legate was for 18 years choirmaster of Ballyclare Church, where his father, Rev. E. M. Legate, is senior minister.

-- -- --

The death took place from pneumonia, in Chicago, on the 3rd ult., of Mr. W. C. Quinn, son of Mr. W. C. Quinn, of Crescent Gardens, and for some years an associate of the C.P.A. To the father and mother and brothers, two of whom hold commissioned rank in the Army, we extend our sincere sympathy in their great loss.

-- -- --

We offer our deepest sympathy to Mr. S. E Thompson and Rev. S. W. Thompson, B.A. on the death of their respected father.

And to Mr. J. S. Munce, B.E., A.M.I.C.E., on the death of his father, Mr. Munce, late Asst. City Surveyor of Belfast.

-- -- --

The Church at home and abroad have lost a valuable worker and supporter through the death early last month of Mr. Robert Gray of Brookhill Avenue. The late Mr. Gray was a member of this Association for a long number of years, and was a member of the Shankill Road Mission congregation, and was one of the original members of the committee of the Jungle Tribes Mission, and had all along been a liberal supporter of its funds. He provided a well for the Mission Station at Rampur, and supported a native worker.

-- -- --

The marriage took place on the 19th ult. at Fitzroy Avenue Presbyterian Church of one our Roll of Honour members, Captain W. Martyn Downing, of the R.I.R., the bride being Miss Irene A. Gowdy, of Eglantine Avenue. The officiating ministers were Rev. Wm. Colquhoun, B.A., and Rev. Dr. Montgomery (uncle of the bride). The newly-married pair have our best wishes for their future prosperity and happiness.

-- -- --

Mr. Robert Cobain, a highly respected member of long standing, died suddenly at his residence, Evelyn Gardens, on the 22nd ult. We offer our condolences to the bereaved relatives and friends.

-- -- --

Mr. William Brown, Secretary of the Presbyterian Orphan Society, has retired after 35½ years faithful and efficient service in this noble department of the Church's work, and he carries with him into his well-earned leisure the heartiest wishes of all for his future happiness and good health.

 

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