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The Magazine of the Central Presbyterian Association - 1916

CPA Magazine Masthead

CPA Magazine January 1916

IN PERIL ON THE SEA.

C.P.A. MEMBER'S EXCITING EXPERIENCE.

A graphic account of an experience of having been shelled by an enemy submarine in the Mediterranean appeared in the daily papers on 14th ult., from the pen of Mr. W. M. Crawford. Mr. Crawford, who is a son of Sir W. M. Crawford, J.P., was a passenger on board a liner bound for India, whither he was returning to resume duty in the Civil Service. Mr. Crawford writes:-- "On Tuesday, 23rd November, at 10 a.m., there was a "whish" and a splash in the water not six feet from the edge of the ship where we were seated. My first thought was that something had slipped along the boat deck above our heads and dropped into the sea. There was soon a second splash, and then the native crew came running up to their boat stations. Just then it was clear we were being attacked. All the passengers moved to the Saloon entrance and staircase, and it wasn't long before we all had on life-belts and waistcoats. These waistcoats had been sewn up in white muslin covers so as not to be too conspicuous. It is really wonderful, but there was not the least sign of panic amongst the passengers or native crew. Some of the children cried, and many of the ladies had damp eyes, but everyone was very quiet and calm. My little son was inclined to be frightened when I was putting on his waistcoat, but I told him he must be a little Britisher and put on smiling face, and he did it at once. Meanwhile there was a number of shots from the submarine, but gathered where we were under cover it was impossible to get a clear idea of what was going on. Most of the passengers were in the dining saloon and a number (including ourselves) in the lounge at the top of the companion way. There were several clergymen on board, and they at once led in prayer, and, there were a number of hymns in which we all of course joined -- "Jesus, Lover of My Soul" and "0 God, Our Help in Ages Past." After what seemed a long time word was brought down by the captain that he thought we had dropped the submarine behind, and then we all sang the Doxology and "God Save the King," and gave three cheers for the captain and crew. There was all through a wonderful feeling of our utter dependence upon God and extraordinary calmness. From the human point of view it is most extraordinary that no damage was done to the ship or any hurt to any person on the ship. The submarine fired, so far as I can gather, from 8 to 10 shots, and all except the first, which was perhaps half a mile in front of the ship, were within a few feet of the ship or burst above it."

Mr. Crawford pays a high tribute to the calmness and courage of the crew, and particularly of the captain -- Captain Benjamin Dowse, a relative of the Ven Rev. Wm. Dowse, M.A., Dean of Connor. When someone was speaking with admiration of what, he had done, Captain Dowse simply replied that our escape was due to "One above." A testimonial was drawn up for presentation to the captain, and a sum of close on 175 raised among the passengers to give the captain a cheque and substantial rewards to everyone of the ship's crew. Rev. Dr. Steele, one of our members, and Mrs. Steele, who were returning to India to resume missionary work were also passengers on the ship.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

General Notes.

The following lines appear on the greeting card enclosed with each gift parcel sent to our members with the colours:--

"Fight and fight well . . .
. . . you the sole men
we shall prize in the aftertime,
your very armour hallow'd."
               -- Tennyson

We are proud of our Roll of Honour.
     We mourn for those who fall,
          And hushing our own hearts' pleadings,
     Hear only the Country's call,
          For next to our God is our Nation;
     And we cherish the honoured name
          Of the bravest of all brave armies,
     Who fight for that Nation's fame.

The card had also a good photographic reproduction of the Assembly Buildings, and the message "From the Members of the C.P.A. to their Comrades with the Colours."

Books, and a selection of edible matter in tabloid form were despatched to all our members on the Roll of Honour whose addresses we could obtain, and hearty acknowledgments have reached us from a large number of the recipients, many of whom write home "Somewhere in France." The letters reciprocate the good wishes of their fellow-members and refer to the pleasant times spent in the C.P.A.

-- -- --

Mr. S. M'Cay, of the Donegall Place Branch of the Ulster Bank, who was one of the most regular patrons of our Billiard Rooms; has been transferred on promotion to Londonderry. Mr. M'Cay was a most obliging official, and very popular in social circles. We wish him much prosperity in his new sphere.

-- -- --

We tender respectful sympathy to Mr. Henry Scott, of the Mission Cash Office, Church House, in his bereavement by the death of Mrs. Scott, which took place on the 28th November.

-- -- --

All our readers will, we are sure, be deeply interested in the following paragraph, which appeared in the daily papers in the middle of last month regarding the gallantry of our President's son at the front:--

"The 9th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles (West Belfast Volunteers) of the Ulster Division continues to earn the praise of superior officers for good work in France. A smart piece of work, carried out recently by a party under Lieut. J. M. Sinclair, son of Mr. John Sinclair; Harbour Commissioner, College Gardens, has, elicited the following official compliment:--

'The General Officer Commanding has read the account of the patrol work, done by the 9th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles on the night of ...... with interest, and congratulates Lieut. Sinclair on the manner in which the patrol was led and the most useful information obtained.' An officer of the battalion in the course of a letter to a friend in Belfast refers to the incident in the following terms:-- 'Young Sinclair and the men with him did splendidly, and hurled a good many bombs into the Bosche trench -- a present from the Shankill.'"

-- -- --

Mr. Adams, who is a U.F. Church of Scotland chaplain with the forces in France, was commanded to appear before the King on his recent return home on furlough, and His Majesty decorated him with the Military Cross in recognition of his good work at the front. Mr. Adams, who appeared in uniform on the Assembly Hall platform, delivered a most inspiring and moving address. His story of work among the troops, his evident practical sympathy with the men, and his whole-hearted enthusiasm for their temporal and spiritual welfare, mark him out as the type of minister who is the unanswerable argument to all sceptics of the power of Christianity when manifest in a consecrated life. "The Chaplain and the War" is a little book written by Mr. Adams, descriptive of his work with the forces. All our readers should secure a copy.

-- -- --

A suggested New Year resolution for the 800 C.P.A. members whom it concerns -- "I will settle my subscription for the current year Now!

-- -- --

It will interest our readers to know that the commander of our forces in France and Flanders, Sir Douglas Haig, K.C.B., K.C.V.O., is a relative of one of our associate -- Mr. J. M. Haig, of Mertoun, Hawthornden Road, Knock, and 31-33, Bedford Street. Mr. Haig is a popular patron of the C.P.A. Recreation Rooms.

-- -- --

Mr. Ernest Dunwoody, captain of the C.P.A. Rifle Club, and a well-known all-round sportsman, who has been serving in the Black Watch since the declaration of War, has been promoted to a second lieutenancy. Sergeant W. Glass, of the same regiment, another of our members, has also received a commission. Lieut. Andrew Brand, who received his training at Sandhurst, has been allocated to the West African Force. Lieut. W. S. Murphy, a prominent member of the C.P.A. Swimming Club, was wounded in an engagement in France shortly after entering on active service. Mr. J. D. E. Cheyne, only son of our esteemed member, Mr. S. D. Cheyne, has received a Commission in the Royal Garrison Artillery. Mr. H. T. Miller, a son of Mr. J. H. D. Miller, a prominent member of our Literary and Debating Society, has been gazetted to a Commission in the London Irish from the Belfast University O.T.C.

Our Roll of Honour now totals 150.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

A LETTER FRAE HAME.

Be sure ye mind to write to me,
     For aft I think o' hame;
When watchin' in the trench at nicht,
     It a' comes back again.
I see ilk ane aboot the house,
     The folk gaun oot and in,
It's then I weary maist o' a'      For a wee bit screed frae hame.

Ye caana think what joy it gi'es
     To them that's far awa'
Whene'er they see a letter come
     Wi' e'en a line or twa.
It cheers them up, it helps them on,
     It mak's them brave agen.
Ye widna credit what it does,
     A wee bit screed frae hame.

There's maybe no sae much to say,
     But jist it lets me ken
That ye're a' weel, and ilka ane
     Aye gaun aboot at hame.
A sprig o' heather, or a leaf,
     A photo o' the glen,
Jist anything that brings to mind
     The wee auld hoose at hame.

I sometimes weary whaur I am,
     'Mid a' the din o' war,
I think I hear the auld bell ring,
     I see the Hoose o' Prayer.
Sae, tell me whiles aboot the Kirk,
     Aboot the sermon tae,
My heart is hungry for a word:
     Jist tell me what they say.

Sae mind and no forget to write,
     For aft I think o' a',
When watchin' neath the stars at nicht,
     Or in my "dug-oot" braw.
I see ye a' aboot the hoose,
     The folk gaun oot and in,
It's then I weary maist o' a'
     For a wee bit screed frae hame.

               DAVID HONEYMAN.                (In Church of Scotland Guild Life and Work)

 

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CPA Magazine February 1916

General Notes.

Since the publication of our Roll of Honour in last month's Magazine, a further batch of our members have joined the colours. These include Mr. J. M'Henry, a prominent member of our Recreation Rooms, who has received a commission in the 18th R.I.R.; Mr. L. M'Master, who has been appointed to a lieutenancy in the 17th R.I.R.; Mr. S. M'Cay (formerly of the Donegall Place Branch of the Ulster Bank), who has been gazetted to a lieutenancy in the 20th R.I.R. Mr. A. Marshall, is posted as a lieutenant in the K.O.S.B.; Mr. R. M. Magill, has joined the North Irish Horse: and Mr. S. E. Morrow, is a cadet in the 17th R.I.R. Our Roll should also have included the names of Messrs. Francis Campbell, R. J. M'Cullough, R. Lindsay, James Palmer, J. H. M'Farland and Wm. Jamison. These names bring our total membership with the colours close on two hundred.

-- -- --

From the majority of our members in camp and on the battlefield we have had interesting letters, extracts from which we hope to publish from time to time. They one and all evince a keen interest in the welfare of the C.P.A., and look forward to renewing their acquaintance with the old surroundings.

-- -- --

Our respectful sympathy is extended to Rev. Dr. MacDermott, one of the fathers and founders of our Association, in the great sorrow which, has befallen him and his family by the death on the battlefield of Lieutenant Robert W. MacDermott of the 8th R.I.R. The late gallant young officer, who was Mr. MacDermott's second son, was studying for the Bar, and volunteered for the Army at the outbreak of War. In the Army he was as deservedly popular as he was in social circles at home, and he leaves behind him many happy memories and a record of a faithful life and an heroic death. Dr. MacDermott's eldest son is also serving as an officer in the R.A.M.C.

-- -- --

We have also to express sympathy with others or our membership who have sustained bereavement recently -- Mr. W. T. Beattie, by the death of his son: Mr. C. W. S. Drean, by the death of his only son: Mr. Victor M'Aleese, by the death of his mother; Mr. Robert Russell, a member of our Governing Body, whose brother died suddenly in Antrim.

-- -- --

Our hearty congratulations to one of our esteemed Vice-Presidents, the Right Hon. Robert Thompson, D.L., M.P., who was made a member of His Majesty's Irish Privy Council in the honours list issued at the New Year.

-- -- --

Recent despatches from the front give honourable mention to Rev. D. S. Corkey, of Dundrod: Lieut. A. Lloyd Thompson, son of Mr. J. A. Thompson, Prenhyn, Strandtown, and grandson of the Right Hon. Robert Thompson, D.L., M.P.: and Captain W. Tyrrell, son of Alderman Tyrrell.

-- -- --

Mr. H. Paul, a medical student at Queen's, has received a commission as a surgeon probationer in the Naval Volunteer Reserves. Mr. Paul is a nephew of Mr. R. L. Paul, a well-known member of our Governing Body.

-- -- --

Mr. John Corry, a former member of the Governing Body, writes from Vancouver, B.C., acknowledging receipt of the Magazine, which, he says, he reads from month to month with great interest. Mr. Corry notes with regret the passing of some of the veterans, but rejoices that the work is being carried on, and that the breaches in the ranks are being filled up.

-- -- --

A party of fifty wounded and invalided soldiers were entertained in the C.P.A. Gymnasium on January 21st, by Mr. Patterson, Miss Taylor, the other members of the staff, and the pupils of the Gymnasium classes. The spacious room was nicely decorated, and everything possible was done for the comfort and enjoyment of the visitors. Light refreshments, fruit, cigarettes, tea, etc., were dispensed at intervals, and songs were rendered by Miss Agnes Crawford, Mr. E. Page, Messrs. Fawcett and Birrell, and Miss Shaw gave a recitation. The pupils gave exhibitions of drill, etc., and the men heartily entered into shooting competitions and various games. On leaving each soldier was presented with a gift of handkerchiefs.

-- -- --

We regret to learn, when going to press, of the death of Lieutenant Edward Workman, only son of our esteemed Vice-President, Mr. Frank Workman. The gallant young officer was wounded in the head while serving on the Western front. In Viscount French's final despatch Lieutenant Workman was recommended for distinguished service in the field. We extend our sincere and respectful sympathy to the bereaved parents.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

C.P.A. Men with the Forces.

The following extracts from letters of our members with the Colours will prove interesting to our readers. Mr. H. E. Craig, of the North Irish Horse, son of our former popular Hon. Sec., writes from "Somewhere in France:"

"Though belated, I wish to take the opportunity of thanking the members of the C.P.A. for remembering me at the festive season in such a manner. The Bovril lozenges are quite a boon, and I have found them more than useful on more than one occasion. Xmas week with us was ushered in with some very nice samples of poison gas, but fortunately found us in a perfectly prepared condition, with the result that little damage was done. Contrary to the enemy's expectations, we replied with a perfect hurricane of shot and shell, which effectually cancelled their ideas of advance. On the Sunday morning before Christmas I saw one of the best exhibitions of aerial warfare it has yet been my lot to witness since my arrival in France. The German planes were 'up' to see what movements, if any, in the way of reinforcements coming up, &c., and to generally note movements of troops on our side. Ours were likewise, and consequently when both met there were some battles royal. As is usually the case, when a bombardment is on, the high explosive shells directed at the front line trenches demolish the barb wire entanglements, and it falls to our lot to have to repair same. That is what we've been engaged at lately. It is rather a difficult and ticklish job. It must be done under cover of darkness, and when dusk has fallen we quietly climb over the parapet and start to work. As the German trenches are often within 30 yards distance, the order is, "No talking or unnecessary noise." Watch is kept from both sides of 'No Man's Land,' by aid of star shells, and when one goes up each man must 'freeze,' as to move means tempting Providence. We have done quite a lot of this sort of work, and have come out of it very luckily. We can only hope that our good fortune may follow us in the great advance which every one hopes will be made in the spring."

-- -- --

Lieutenant W. English, of the 17th R.I.R., says:-- "I am glad to read of so many members of the Association doing their bit, and hope to hear of many more joining the colours. I assure you we look back with pleasure to the pleasant times spent in the recreation rooms of the C.P.A."

-- -- --

Private Gordon Paisley, of the Black Watch, stationed at Western Barracks, Dundee, writes -- "I wish to thank the members of the C.P.A. for the two very nice books I received yesterday. They come in very handy, as I always on the hunt for something readable in my spare time."

-- -- --

Corporal Alfred Owens, of the 14th R.I.R. writes:-- "Many thanks to the members of the Association for welcome gift. I am already enjoying the adventures of 'Spud Tamson;' it's good! Something worth reading is a welcome change out here. Wishing you all a happy and prosperous New Year, and the Association success."

-- -- --

Corporal R. M'Lean, writing from Le Havre, says:-- "The books are just my style of reading. I appreciate them more seeing that they come from the C.P.A. Good bye and good luck."

-- -- --

Lieutenant F. R. Skillen, of the 12th King's Liverpool Regiment, writes:-- "I received the book alright yesterday, and I wish to thank the members of the C.P.A. for the kind gift, which I fully appreciate. It is gratifying to think that one is not forgotten by one's friends at home. Literature of any sort is welcome out here, as it helps to while away the monotonous hours in the trenches and in billets. I always pass on any books I receive to my men, and you may rest assured that the gift will bring pleasure not to one but to many. With best wishes to the members of the C.P.A."

-- -- --

Lance-Corporal M. Rankin, of the 14th R.I.R., writes from France on New Year's Eve:-- "Many thanks to the members for the two fine books I received from the C.P.A. safely at Xmas. All such parcels help to make Christmas away from home more enjoyable. Our Batt. is having a fairly easy time at present, having been billeted in one place quite a considerable time."

 

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CPA Magazine March 1916

From the Editor's Room.

We of the most deplorable things in connection with the war is the practice of sending drink to the men at the front. Thoughtlessness, to use no stronger expression, could go no further.

How ignorant we poor mortals are! How often what we mean for kindness turns out to be a snare, and a cause of irreparable injury! How painful it is to think of men being sent to prison for being intoxicated in the trenches, with death staring them in the face!

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY ROLL OF HONOUR.

Our Association has so many ties with the University that we feel sure that our members will be greatly interested in its Roll of Honour, which has now reached its third edition, and of which we have been kindly favoured with a copy.

This document, which seems a very complete one, reflects great honour on all connected with the University in any capacity, and is a noble testimony to the spirit of patriotism reigning within its walls.

It contains, alas, a growing list of those who have laid down their lives, so full of promise, in the defence of their Country, and on behalf of truth and righteousness in international dealings.

We were deeply touched, when reading Dr. Leaf's "Homer and History," to find him acknowledging his indebtedness to the work of Mr. T. K. Frost, who, if we remember aright, was the first out of the University Volunteers to make the final sacrifice on the battlefield.

We stand aghast at the seeming waste of so many young lives, cut off in the very beginning of useful careers, but we cannot, and will not, believe that it is all in vain.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

General Notes.

We have to acknowledge with many thanks a parcel of books for the library, from Rev. David Stewart, B.A., Cregagh. Perhaps some of our readers with well-stocked libraries could help us by similar gifts.

-- -- --

Another of our useful junior members have recently responded to the call of King and country. We refer to Mr. Albert J. Magill, who has joined the North Irish Horse. Mr. Magill was a hard-working member of the Gymnasium, was on the Sabbath Morning Bible Class and Guild Class rolls, and was down on our Literary Society's programme for a paper on Juniors' Night.

-- -- --

Our 33rd Annual Report is now being sent to members and associates. Perhaps its arrival would be taken advantage of by recipients as an opportunity for presenting the claims and advantages of the C.P.A. to their friends who have not joined us, but might do so, if properly approached. We are also making the request that in the annual report of each congregation in the Belfast Presbytery space would be found for a note regarding our existence and work. Several congregational reports have helped us in this way in the past, and we would be gratified if every congregation in the Presbytery would render this little service.

-- -- --

The offertory at the Annual Sermon in January was in excess of that received for several years. We are deeply obliged to Mr. W. J. Stewart, Breda Park, one of our Vice-Presidents, who was unable to attend the service, for a donation of 1.

-- -- --

The recently published annual report of the Pennsylvania Scotch-Irish Society has just come to hand, and announces the election of Rev. Wm. Park, M.A., D.D., one of our esteemed Vice-Presidents, as an honorary member. The report has a good photograph of Dr. Park, who is expected to be present at next year's annual meeting of the Society, which will synchronize with his intended visit to America for the Pan-Presbyterian Alliance meeting in Pittsburg. The only other two Irishmen on the Society's honorary roll are Lord Bryce and Sir Edward Carson.

-- -- --

At the February meeting of the Governing Body of our Association votes of condolence were passed in respectful silence to Rev. Dr. MacDermott and Mr. Frank Workman, two of our Vice-Presidents, each of whom has lost a son in the war. Our senior members will recollect that Dr. MacDermott and Mr. Workman rendered good service in the early years of the Association as joint Honorary Secretaries.

-- -- --

This month's issue contains further extracts from letters from our men with the colours. We are always pleased to hear from our members in camp, in the field, or on the high seas, and are delighted when they give the rooms a call when on furlough.

-- -- --

We regret to record the death of Mr. E. C. Reid, of 126, University Street. The late Mr. Reid was for almost twenty years in the employment of Messrs. Lindsay, Thompson & Co., Ltd., and was highly respected by all who knew him. We tender to Mrs. Reid and Miss Reid our sincere sympathy in their bereavement.

-- -- --

Congratulations to Sir William Crawford, J.P., and Lady Crawford, on the occasion of their Golden Wedding, which they celebrated on 22nd ult. Perhaps the notice which appeared in the daily press would interest our readers:--

CRAWFORD--GLASGOW. -- Feb, 22, l866. In Fisherwick Place Church, by the Rev. J. Morgan, D.D., assisted by the father of the bride, William Crawford, youngest son of Rev. Alexander Crawford, First Randalstown, to Annie Coulson, daughter of the Rev. James Glasgow, D.D., late Missionary in India.

-- -- --

Dr. David Taylor of Lisburn, son of Rev. D. A. Taylor, D.D., an esteemed Vice-President of our Association, has volunteered for medical service in the army, and has received a commission in the R.A.M.C.

-- -- --

Our congratulations to Mr. W. G. Kennedy, C.A., who has joined the Benedicts. Mr. Kennedy was united in marriage to Miss Agnes Scott on 28th January, in Rosemary Street Presbyterian Church, by the Rev. Dr. Park. Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy have taken up residence at Woodlands, Cherryvalley Park, Knock.

-- -- --

His many friends in the C.P.A. and other circles will learn with regret of the impending departure of Mr. J. I. Eadie from the city. Mr. Eadie has secured a lucrative appointment as representative of Messrs. Joseph Rank, Ltd., for the North-west of Ireland, which necessitates residence in Enniskillen. Mr. Eadie was a loyal member of our Association, and took a keen interest in the welfare of the Recreation Rooms. While we are sorry at his removal from Belfast, we heartily congratulate him on his promotion, and wish him much success and prosperity in his new sphere.

-- -- --

Mr. David Long, for some time a popular and energetic member of the C.P.A. Governing Body, and a former Editor of the C.P.A. Monthly Magazine, and now resident in Bristol, was united in the bonds of matrimony to Miss Ethel May Challenger, of Bath, on Saturday, February 12. A large congregation assembled at Manners St. Baptist Church, Bath, for the service, which was choral. The officiating clergyman was Rev. W. Linton, pastor of Oldfield Park Baptist Church. Miss Gwen Crossman was the bridesmaid, and the bridegroom was attended by Mr. Wyndham R. B. Challenger, brother of the bride.

A reception was held at the residence of the bride's parents, Erlesdene, Bath, after which the bridal pair left for Bristol by motor. Amongst the numerous presents were gifts from Mr. Long's Belfast friends. Mr. and Mrs. Long have the best wishes of all C.P.A. folk for their future happiness and prosperity.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

From C.P.A. Men with the Forces.

Lieutenant R. B. Thomson, of the 11th Batt. Royal Welsh Fusiliers, son of Mr. David Thomson, of Eglantine Avenue, writing from Salonica, on 21st January, 1916, says: "I received your kind message of remembrance and good wishes from the members of the C.P.A. the other day, and I think it is quite superfluous to say how much it was appreciated. The Battalion to which I belong has been out here since the beginning of November last, and has had the honour of figuring in an "enemy report" in the Times, as having been "definitely beaten" near Lake Dorian. I am glad to say that report was slightly exaggerated, as we haven't been near that delectable spot up to the present. And I think I may say, without boasting, that in the position we hold now we will give an extra good account of ourselves. Our men are in very good spirits, and are keen in the extreme to meet the enemy who has beaten them so "definitely" on paper! Might I add my congratulations to the others I am sure you have received, to the persons or persons, responsible for turning out such an acceptable and interesting gift from the members who are not fortunate enough to be able to serve in the field."

-- -- --

Mr. E. J. Crawford, a medical student at Queen's, who joined the Armoured Car section of the R.N.A.S., writes an interesting letter from a ship in a northern latitude on Christmas Eve: "The ship is frozen everywhere. The port side is a beautiful sight. It is covered with corrugated ice six inches deep, formed into all shapes of fantastic designs. We are now about a mile from land, and frozen land at that, with only a lighthouse in view. We have seen (to us) some new stars. It almost always darkens shortly after one o'clock. It is bitterly cold. Steel and brass can hardly be handled, and we cannot go on deck without gloves and helmet with ear flaps down. However, it is a dry cold, and does not strike one that it is as severe as it really is. Last night we saw a lovely Aurora Borealis. It was a splendid sight -- streaks of white, green, and purple, moving, fading, and being renewed. I have only had a touch of sea sickness. We are not allowed to shave and can hardly get water to wash (except salt water). We have to leave our boots straight at night, so as to be able to get them on in the mornings, as they become frozen quite stiff. On the whole I am enjoying myself. It is a fine experience, and I have a clear conscience."

-- -- --

Lieutenant, Edmund Clokey, of the 14th Batt. R.I.R., in a letter from France shortly before Xmas, says: "I wish too thank the members of the C.P.A. for their great kindness in remembering me as one of their fellow members on service. They could not have sent a more acceptable gift than a book, and although out here there are times when one would give anything for 'a good read,' it is especially so in the trenches, for when in billets for a 'rest' there is not so much spare time."

-- -- --

The following is an extract from a letter of one of our boys to his friends: "I think the book from the C.P.A. pleased me more somehow, than if I had got a large parcel from some of my friends; I don't know why, perhaps just because it came as a surprise. I enclose the card that came with it, and possibly I may send the book too, after reading it, so that you can keep them for me."

-- -- --

Corporal J. L. Kissick, a. despatch rider, sends his photograph on a postcard from "somewhere in France." He says his "Douglas" (on which he was mounted when photographed) has been running every day since he entered France, and he has never had a break-down.

-- -- --

Sergt.-Major Brice Wightman, of the R.A.M.C., writes from France: "Your Xmas gift and card duly received; many thanks for same. The books have helped to pass away many quiet hours. Best wishes for the C.P.A.'s prosperity this year."

-- -- --

Private Willie Alexander, of the N.I.H., with the Expeditionary Force in France, writes: "Please have the C.P.A. Magazine forwarded to me as I would like to read some of the club news -- especially about the Billiard Room, where I practically lived in spare hours when at home. We are very close to the firing line, and we can hear the guns quite distinctly and the buzz of the melons (as the 'boys' call them) through the air."

-- -- --

Sergt. J. C. Kenning, of the Y.C.V.'s, writing from France, says: "Kindly accept my best thanks for the present so kindly sent me. It was very thoughtful of the C.P.A. to remember those of their members on service in such a practical manner. Nothing delights the boys out here more than to know that they are not forgotten by their friends at home."

-- -- --

Lieutenant Jack Hudson, A.S,C., writes from a hospital in France: "Just a few lines to thank the members of the C.P.A. for the book which I received some days ago. I may say, though unexpected, these remembrances are distinctly cheering to us out here, more so to me now than ever, as I am in hospital, where all books help to pass the time. I got back from leave on Saturday morning, and on Sunday evening I was 'gassed' by the old Hun, and my arm got badly sprained and damaged; luckily it was my left, so I am able to write."

 

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CPA Magazine April 1916

Death of Sergeant-Major Martin Brown.

BROwN -- March 22 (suddenly), at Victoria Barracks, C.S.M. Martin Brown, 17th Battalion R.I.R. (late of C.P.A.), the beloved husband of M. A. Brown. Interred in the family burying-ground, Blaris, on Friday, 24th March.

The above newspaper announcement marks the passing of one who, for nine years, was so well known as the popular, genial, and obliging Sergeant Brown, who so faithfully served the C.P.A.

Prior to his appointment in our Association, the Sergeant had served 21 years in the 1st Battalion R.I.R., and retired with Colour-Sergeant's rank.

In September, 1914, shortly after the outbreak of war, the sergeant again donned the King's uniform, and was attached to the 8th (Service) Batt. R.I.R. as Coy.-Sergeant Major. When his battalion left this country for France he was transferred to the 17th (Reserve) Batt. of the same regiment, and was stationed at Newcastle. He subsequently went to Ballykinlar, and his urbane disposition and soldierly qualities always gained for him the good-will and respect of officers and men.

A cold contracted during the discharge of his duties developed into acute bronchitis, and the end came very suddenly in the Hospital, Victoria Barracks, where he had been removed from Ballykinlar.

The funeral took place from deceased's late home, 148, Dunluce Avenue, and the remains were borne from the house, wrapped in the Union Jack, by his brother N.C.O.'s and Captain. A motor hearse conveyed the body and mourners to Blaris Graveyard, and the party was joined at Lisburn by the band and firing party from Ballykinlar.

The Rev. Alex. Gallagher, of Fountainville Presbyterian Church, where the late Sergeant Brown worshipped, conducted a brief service at the residence, and also at his graveside. The Rev. John Pollock Chaplain to the Presbyterian troops at Victoria Barracks, was also present. The attendance at the funeral included a large number of the C.P.A. Committee and members, and the Staffs of C.P.A. and Church House.

The Sergeant cane to the Association shortly after the opening of its present premises in 1905, and he was Mr. English's right-hand man during that General Secretary's term of office, the duties of which were considerably increased and exacting on coming to the new building.

Our entire membership, and especially those of long-standing, will regret very much the passing of one who was so universally liked, and who performed his multifarious duties with tact and geniality.

At the closing Assembly Hall Sabbath Afternoon Service of the season, on the 26th ult., Mr. David Irwin, J.P. (lay Convener), made sympathetic reference to the demise of Sergeant-Major Brown, and paid a high tribute to his popularity and ability, and referred to the work he had done for several years in connection with the Sabbath services.

In acknowledging receipt of a letter of condolence sent by the General Secretary of the Association (Mr. A. T. M'Clelland), Mrs. Brown, referring to our premises, says:-- ". . . he loved stone in the building."

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

General Notes.

What do we live for, if not to make life less difficult for one another. -- George Eliot.

-- -- --

Almost all the members of our Miniature Rifle Club having joined the Colours, the range at the Kinnegar has been practically unused since the autumn of 1914. A few members, however, have expressed the desire to practise, and if any others are anxious to join, they should get into communication with Mr. D. G. Sloan, 15, Corporation Street, who has kindly undertaken to take charge of the range pending the reconstruction of the Club. Any message left at the C.P.A. office for Mr. Sloan will be duly forwarded to him.

-- -- --

The services in the Assembly Hall on Sabbath afternoons were very well attended during the past month. The speakers were Rev. Dr. Lowe, Rev. R. J. Patterson, LL.B., Rev. T. Byers, and Rev. Dr. Montgomery, who gave an impressive address at the closing service on the last Sabbath of the month. On Sabbath, 19th March, the Assembly Hall Choir, under the leadership of its conductor, Mr. F. J. Moffett, rendered the anthem "'If any man will come after Me" -- the composer, Mr. A. M. Gifford, L.R.A.M., F.R.C.O., presiding at the organ. At the closing service a solo was sympathetically rendered by Miss Isobel M'Burney, and the Carlton Male Quartette sang a suitable sacred selection.

-- -- --

Lieutenant Neil Gavin, R.A.M.C., one or our medical missionaries in India, has fallen in the fight for King and country. The late officer, who was 42 years of age, volunteered for the army, with the consent and approval of the Foreign Missionary Committee. Much sympathy is felt for his widow, a daughter of the late Dr. Fleming Stevenson, and her three little children.

-- -- --

Mr. J. Ernest Davey, son of the Rev. Charles Davey, who has been pursuing Divinity studies at Edinburgh, where he won many honours, has now crowned his university career by winning the Fellowship of King's College, Cambridge, where he had studied before going to Edinburgh for a theological course.

-- -- --

We respectfully tender our sincere sympathy to the following members who have suffered bereavement during the past month: Messrs. T. A. Crawford, Hugh Campbell, Rev. J. W. Gibson, M.A., Harry Gibson, M. Luther Wallace, R. W. M'Dowell, S. Skelly, Ross Houston, S. Williamson, T. Graham, and David Adams.

-- -- --

We regret that Mr. E. M'A. Osborne's name was omitted from list of members in our annual report for year ending 31st August, 1915. Mr. Osborne has been a member since October, 19l4.

-- -- --

Yet another C.P.A. man has given his life for his country. Lance Corporal J. B. M'Dowell of the 20th Batt. Royal Fusiliers (3rd Public Schools Batt.), was shot by a sniper on the Western Front on Sabbath, 12th ult. The late young soldier, who was a son of the late Mr. John M'Dowell and Mrs. M'Dowell, Stranmillis Road, and a nephew of Mr. R. W. M'Dowell, a C.P.A. Vice-President, was well and popularly known in and around the Association. He was a member of the Queen's University O.T.C., but did not wait for a commission. Our deepest and heartfelt sympathy is extended to Mrs. M'Dowell and daughter and all the relatives, in the great loss of a brave and promising young man.

-- -- --

Second-Lieutenant J. S. Jackson, 70th Field Coy., Royal Engineers, who has been wounded while serving on the western front, is one of three soldier sons of the late Rev. W. J. Jackson, M.A., Duncairn Presbyterian Church, and of Mrs. Jackson, 9, Lower Crescent, Belfast. Lieut. Jackson, who is suffering from gunshot wounds in the legs and back, is, we are glad to know, improving, and is now in England.

-- -- --

We again publish with this issue a roll of members in different branches of the Service and we are proud that 1t is swelling.

-- -- --

To Lieutenant Edward Workman, son of Mr. Frank Workman, The Moat, Strandtown, who succumbed to wounds received during a hand-to-hand fight with a party of Germans at the latter end of January last, has been conferred the Military Cross: "For conspicuous gallantry under heavy shell fire during an attack. He organised and rallied attacking parties, and, although wounded himself, continued with great coolness to direct operations."

-- -- --

A marriage took place on the 14th ult at Whiteabbey Presbyterian Church, the contracting parties being Rev. W. B. M'Murray, M.A., (Minister of Whiteabbey Church), and Miss Gladys Evelyn Wilson, youngest daughter of the late John Wilson and Mrs. Wilson Faunoran, Greenisland. The nuptial knot was tied by Rev. John Pollock, of St. Enoch's. May the sun of their happiness ne'er be clouded!

-- -- --

It is with regret that we chronicle the demise of Mr. J. K. A. Robb, of Charleville House, Newtownards, which took place on the 23rd ult. Our late esteemed member, although resident outside the city, took a deep interest in our work, and was a generous subscriber to our funds.

-- -- --

With pleasure we notice that Lieut. W. T. Lyons, of the 8th (Service) Batt. King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regt.), second son of Mrs. Lyons, Valere, Rosetta, and brother of one our esteemed members, Mr. F. H. Lyons, has awarded the Military Cross, and promoted to the rank of Captain, for conspicuous gallantry in Flanders. Capt. Lyons has two brothers also serving with the colours.

-- -- --

One of our popular young associates -- Mr. Arthur Asboe -- who has for some time past been pursuing his studies in England, with the view of entering the Moravian mission-field, has been accepted for army Y.M.C.A. work in Egypt.

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CPA Magazine May 1916

General Notes.

Our Roll of Honour continues to swell. During the past month Mr. Joseph Boyce, junior, has joined the Rifle Brigade, stationed at Sheerness; Mr. Geo. Edgar has joined the 4th R.I.F., and Mr. T. B. Stephenson the 19th R.I.R.

-- -- --

We note that Mr. R. B. Thomson has been gazetted to a lieutenancy in the 11th Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and that Mr. Alfred Owens, of the 14th R.I.R. (Y.C.V.'s), has been promoted to the rank of sergeant.

-- -- --

Mr. Maurice Henry, son of Mr. Robert Henry, of 21, South Parade, has successfully passed the army entrance examination for the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, taking a high place. We congratulate Mr. Henry on this achievement on his first attempt, at the early age of eighteen.

-- -- --

Mr. Wm. M'Caughey, of Merlecot, Bawnmore Road, who was successful some months ago in obtaining a cadetship in the army, is now pursuing his studies in the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich.

-- -- --

In a recent casualty list we noticed among the wounded the name of Captain H. D. Mohan, of the King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment). We are pleased to learn that Capt. Mohan, who is a brother of one of our associates -- Mr. George Mohan, jun. -- is making rapid progress towards recovery.

-- -- --

Congratulations to one of our Roll of Honour members, Lieutenant J. Sinclair Jackson, of the Royal Engineers, on being awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in the field. We are gratified to know that Mr. Jackson, who is one of the three soldier sons of the late Rev. W. J. Jackson, of Duncairn, is recovering rapidly in an English hospital from the effect of wounds received in France. He is expected home in Belfast early next month, and is sure to receive an ovation from his many friends.

-- -- --

Death has again been busy among our membership and in their family circles. We deplore the loss of Mr. Samuel M'Bride, of Lennoxvale, a C.P.A. member of long standing, and one of our generous supporters. In addition to the death on the battlefield of Sergt. William Stephenson (referred to elsewhere), we regret the passing of Lieutenant H. W. M'Connell (son of the Rev. James M'Connell, of the Megain Memorial Church, who fell fighting for King and country; Mr. Thomas Clokey, well-known in Christian work in the city, and whose son, Lieutenant E. Clokey, is on our roll of honour; and Rev. A. F. Hamilton, B.A., of Jerretspass, brother-in-law of Mr. John M'Cracken, a member of our Governing Body. We also sympathise with Mr. R. L. Paul on the sudden death of his brother,Mr. John M'Master on the death, at an advanced age, of his mother; Messrs. G. L. Craig and John Craig on the death of their mother.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

Our Noble Dead

Sergeant Wm. Stephenson, 14th R.I.R.Lance-Corporal J. B. M'Dowell The news of the death of Sergeant William Stephenson, one of the three soldier sons of Mr. W. R. Stephenson, of Fitzwilliam Street, was received with great regret by a wide circle of acquaintances.

Sergeant Stephenson was one of our most popular members, took a keen interest in the Swimming Club, and was a good all round sportsman. He was one of the original members of the Y.C.V.'s, joined the army shortly after the declaration of war, and served with D Company of the 14th R.I.R. in France, where he made the supreme sacrifice in the trenches, on April 6th. The bereaved parents have had sympathetic letters from Captain Wills and Rev. J. J. Wright, Chaplain to the Forces.

Captain Willis writes that on the day of his death, during a heavy bombardment, Sergt. Stephenson went about encouraging the sentries of his platoon, and acted with greatest coolness and courage.

Mr. Wright says:-- :Sergt. Stephenson was an encourager, and many of his comrades will not soon forget him. By his death the battalion has lost a brave man, and each of us realises a true friend is gone."

A letter from one of his comrades speaks in the highest terms of the late Sergeant's pluck and popularity.

The Governing Body of the C.P.A. at its meeting on 14th ult. directed a message of condolence to be sent to the bereaved father, who was formerly a member of Committee, and who still takes an active interest in our work.

Two of Sergt. Stephenson's brothers are with the Colours -- Private Andrew Stephenson, with the 14th R.I.R. in France, and Private T. B. Stephenson, with the 19th R.I.R. in Newcastle.

LANCE-CORPORAL J. B. M'DOWELL, 20th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, a notice of whose death, on the Western Front, on 12th March, appeared in our last issue.

 

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CPA Magazine June 1916

General Notes

Amongst our soldier members from the front who called recently was Quarter-Master Sergt. J. C. Kenning, of the 14th R.I.R. (Y.C.V.'s), In common with his many friends, we were very pleased to see him look so fit.

-- -- --

Sincere sympathy is felt by a wide circle of acquaintances with Mr. and Mrs. Miles Curran, of College Gardens, in their bereavement by the death of one of their sons -- Private Herbert Curran, who was killed, by a trench mortar while serving with the Royal Fusiliers in France. The deceased young soldier and an elder brother, who is stationed in a camp in England, left good positions in civil life shortly after the outbreak of war to join His Majesty's forces in the ranks -- not seeking commissions, Bertie had several months active service before making the supreme sacrifice.

-- -- --

Our Roll of Honour, which is re-published in this month's issue, revised up to 20th ult., shows a considerable increase. The number of those who have fallen in the field is slowly but steadily growing. We cannot expect it to be otherwise. Our prayer and hope is that their sacrifice for us may not be in vain, and that we may prove worthy of those who have died for us, and may have more of the spirit of Him "who gave His life a ransom for many."

-- -- --

A casualty list published early last month contained the name of Corporal A. C. Sayers -- son of Mr. G. J. Sayer's, of Lincoln Avenue -- among the wounded. We are pleased to know that Corporal Sayer's, who is well known in athletic circles in North Belfast, is recovering as rapidly as can be expected.

-- -- --

Rifleman Wm. Jamison, a popular C.P.A. man, and an enthusiastic member of our swimming Club, is sustaining in the army his reputation as a good sport. Willie has won the heavy-weight boxing championship of his battalion.

-- -- --

The name of Lieut. M. H. Turnbull, one of our Roll of Honour members, appeared in a recent casualty list. We are glad to know that his injuries were not of a serious character.

-- -- --

The past year has a melancholy record in a long list of deaths among the ministerial members of the Assembly. The most recent passing is that of the Rev. James B. Michael, Kilmacrenan, Co. Donegal, who died on the 22nd ult., at the residence of his brother-in-law, Mr. Charles W. Black, Belfast. To the bereaved relatives we tender our respectful sympathy.

-- -- --

Hearty congratulations to Mr. John Parker, Jun., on having joined the army of Benedicts. Mr. Parker, who is on the editorial staff of the Northern Whig, was joined in holy wedlock to Miss Esther MacBride, in Malone Church, on the 25th ult., the ceremony being performed by the Rev. Dr. George Thompson. The bridegroom was supported by his brother, Mr. A. D. Parker, the bridesmaids being Misses Mary and Essie MacBride.

-- -- --

Private T. G. Sloane Corporal James Kissick, one of our members, who has been on duty in France with the Royal Engineers as a Despatch rider for almost a year, gave us a call the other day when home on a short furlough.

-- -- --

We regret to announce the death of one of our respected senior members, Mr. Wm. Morton, of 99, University Street. Mr. Morton, who had passed life's allotted span, was a loyal son of the Church and took a keen and practical interest in its welfare. He was a member of Session in the Townsend Street congregation, and to the support of many activities of that charge, and of out Association and kindred agencies, he was a generous contributor. With the bereaved family circle there is much sympathy felt.

-- -- --

To the list of our Noble Dead who have fallen at the front, fighting for King and Country, truth and justice, we have to add the name of Private T. G. Sloane. Tom Sloane, though a member of the sister Church of Ireland, was one of the very considerable number of non-Presbyterians connected with the C.P.A. as associates, and in the welfare of our Association he took a hearty interest. He was loyal member of his own Church, and rendered good service as Honorary Secretary to the the Select Vestry of St. Michael's.

An original member of the Y.C.V's., with his brother Herbert -- who is now a Corporal in the 14th R.I.R. -- he joined the Colour's soon after the war cloud burst on the country. Prior to his joining the army Mr. Sloane was employed in the firm of Messrs. Young & Hyde, Bedford Street, where he was very popular, and in the army his high Christian character and gentlemanly bearing exercised a great influence for good.

With the bereaved parents and sisters, who reside at 9, Elswick Street, the utmost sympathy is felt.

 

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CPA Magazine July 1916

General Notes.

During the past few weeks more of our members have joined the army. We would be very much obliged if readers would assist us in correcting the C.P.A. roll of honour to date. The list of our members and associates published in last month's magazine has several omissions as to rank, regiment, etc., and if the necessary data to fill these blanks, and also the names of members which ought to be added, would be forwarded to us, it would assist us in compiling a roll of honour which we hope to embody in a permanent form at no distant date.

-- -- --

One of our gallant members, Lieutenant Jas. Sinclair Jackson, of the Royal Engineers, son of the late Rev. W. J. Jackson, Duncairn Presbyterian Church, and Mrs. Jackson, 9, Lower Crescent, Belfast, attended the recent investiture at Buckingham Palace, and was presented by his Majesty the King with the Military Cross which he was recently awarded for conspicuous devotion to duty when severely wounded, in command of troops consolidating craters. Lieut. Jackson received a warm welcome from his numerous friends on his arriving home in Belfast on leave. We are glad to know he is making satisfactory progress towards recovery.

-- -- --

Another of our roll of honour members, Lieut. Charles M'Master, formerly of the Y.C.V., but who has latterly been serving with a Trench Howitzer Battery, has been promoted to the rank of Captain. Captain M'Master was recently home on leave, and the news of his promotion will be received with pleasure by his many Belfast friends.

-- -- --

Congratulations to a junior member of our Governing Body, Mr. W. A. M'Aloney, whose marriage to Miss E. Graham was celebrated on 21st June, in the College St. R.P. Church, by the Rev. Professor Kennedy, LL.D. The young couple have the best wishes of hosts of friends for much happiness and prosperity.

-- -- --

Mr. W. J. W. Roome, M.R.I.A., one of our members, whose zeal in missionary enterprise is well-known, has accepted a three years' engagement as a Superintendent of the British and Foreign Bible Society's work in Uganda. Mr. Roome left for Africa on the ss. Saxon in the middle of June. His work in the Dark Continent will he watched with prayerful interest by many friends in the home land.

-- -- --

We are pleased to learn that Rev. D. S. Corkey, of Dundrod, one of our chaplains who lost his left arm as the result of a wound received at the front, is making rapid progress towards recovery, and contemplates returning to his post of duty at the earliest possible moment.

-- -- --

We are pleased to notice that two of our junior members have matriculated in the Queen's University of Belfast -- Mr. H. K. Cowan in the faculty of Medicine, and Mr. David M'Call in the faculty of Science.

-- -- --

About 100,000 signatures have been secured to the petition to Parliament for Prohibition during the period of the war. The petition, which is being promoted by the War Time Council on Drink and National Efficiency, will be presented to Parliament at an early date.

-- -- --

Bereavement has come to the homes of several of our members during the past few days. Mrs. Culbert, widow of the late Mr. Robert Culbert, and mother of Mr. J. A. Culbert, a member of our Governing Body, has passed away, having only been pre-deceased by her husband (who was one of our foundation members) by a few months. Mr, Robert Deacon, an old and esteemed member, who visited the Reading Room as long as health permitted him to come down town, has also passed to the great majority. Mr. W. J. Martin, known to our senior members as one of our most ardent supporters and enthusiastic workers of former days, has also gone; and we have to express sympathy with Mr. Thos. Oliver in the great loss he has sustained in the death of his wife, and with Mr. Jack Speers on the death of his father.

-- -- --

Mr. David Elliott, J.P., one of our oldest members, well-known in scholastic circles, has been the recipient from the Protestant National Teachers' Association of a solid silver tea and coffee service, in recognition of assistance given to the organisation, of which he was President for many years.

-- -- --

We regret to learn of the removal from Belfast to Bootie of Mr. Thomas Kingsberry, who contributed very much to the success of our literary society since becoming a member of the C.P.A. We wish Mr. Kingsberry health and happiness in his new sphere.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

Literary Notes.

Within the last few days Harvard Library, at Cambridge, Mass., has come into possession of a remarkable collection of English historical broadsides and proclamations printed between 1626 and 1700. The collection, which includes many from Lord Polwarth's library, has been formed during the past quarter of a century by a well-known collector, and was sold on his behalf to Harvard by Messrs. Dobell, of Charing Cross-road, sons of the late Bertram Dobell. The only collections to rival that of Harvard were those of Colonel F. Grant, Mr. J. E. Hodgkin (both now dispersed), and that in the possession of Lord Crawford.

There are nearly 800 separate pieces. Four relate to Nell Gwynne and the Duchess of Portsmouth; a large and valuable collection concerns the Duke of Monmouth and the rising in the West of England, and an even more wonderful series concerns the Rump Parliament, among which are many of a satirical character.

Another extraordinary series printed in 1659 deals with the affairs leading up to the Restoration of the Monarchy. There are also various ordinances, issued by the Royalists and by the Commonwealth Parliaments, and a large number concerning the doings of Charles I. during the most eventful period of his history. Accounts of fires form another feature of the collection.

 

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CPA Magazine August 1916

General Notes.

Many Happy Returns to our President, Mr. John Sinclair, who celebrates his birthday on 27th inst.

-- -- --

OH, boys who died for the country,
Oh, dear and sainted dead!
What can we say about you
That has not once been said?
Twas the cause of truth and justice
That you fought and perished for,
And we say it, oh! so gently,
"Our boys who died in the war."

-- -- --

During the past month five more of our members -- Mr. John Lecky (Second Lieutenant), R.I.R., Mr. H. Corry Osborne (Second Lieutenant), West Yorks, Sergeant Alfred Owens, Private Willie M'Fadzean, and Private T. G. M'Kinney -- have fallen in the fight for freedom. In the homes of many of our members there has been great anxiety for the welfare of dear ones who are serving in the army, and in a considerable number of cases there has not been any news, or only the word "Missing," which is so pregnant of suspense.

-- -- --

We have also to express sincere sympathy with the following of our members who have been bereaved on the battlefield of brave boys in the recent sad days -- Sir Robt. M'Connell, Bart.; Mr. J. M'Clinton, Mr. J. Hollywood, J.P. (two of whose sons have fallen), Rev. J. R. M'Cleery, and with Rev. W. Witherow, whose nephew has made the supreme sacrifice. Lieutenant Victor Robb (son of the late Mr. Kirker Robb, who was one of our Vice-Presidents) also succumbed to wounds received in action in France.

-- -- --

Captain W. T. Lyons, of the King's Own, killed in action on the 18th July, had been awarded the Military Cross some months ago. He was a son of the late Mr. T. H. Lyons, and Mrs. Lyons, Valere, Rosetta Park, Belfast, and brother of Mr. F. H. Lyons, one of our members.

-- -- --

Up to the time of writing the official casualty list has not been issued. We note the names of several of our members who are unofficially reported as having been wounded, but doubtless there are others who are on the wounded list about which we have not heard. We will thankfully receive particulars of all such, or the names of any of our members with the colours which do not appear on our roll of honour.

The wounded so far as we are aware:-- Captain S. Maynard Sinclair (only son of our President), Second-Lieut. J. Brown, Second-Lieut. W. S. Maitland, Second-Lieut. H. L. Dickson, Second-Lieut. Johnston Jordan, Lance-Corporal W. Gihon, Private Andw. Stephenson.

We also notice that the following relatives of members have been reported wounded -- Second-Lieut. J. S. Elliott (son of Mr. E. J. Elliott) Lieut. A. Wallace (nephew of Mr. J. Wallace), Second-Lieut. G. Y. Henderson (nephew of Mr. Trevor Henderson), Lieut. J. D. Neill (brother-in-law of Mr. R. D. Williams), Second-Lieut. H. R. G. Abernethy (brother-in-law of Mr. Jack Morrow), Second-Lieut. Mr. Jackson (one of the three soldier sons of the late Rev. W. J. Jackson), Lieutenant Jack Hopper (nephew of Mr. Geo. Hopper), Second-Lieut. J. S. Murphy (son of Mr. John Murphy), and Second-Lieut. R. S. Robertson (nephew of Mr. T. M. Robertson), also Lieut. Malcolm C. Davies, one of the most popular artistes at our Saturday evg. entertainments. Lance Corporal Paul Pollock, and a son of Mr. J. King, Cromwell Road, are among the missing.

-- -- --

Congratulations to Rev. D. D. Boyle and Rev. Thomas Byers, two of our clerical members, who have had the degree of M.A. (by examination) conferred all three by the University of Dublin.

-- -- --

Bon voyage to Mr. H. Arthur Bill who is now on his way to Rhodesia to rejoin his parents. Mr. Bill who was in this country for some years at school, and for a short time at business, was one of our popular junior members, and was a regular attender at the Guild Class last winter.

-- -- --

Mr. T. S. H. Hoey, one of our Roll of Honour members, who was wounded in France while serving with the Canadian Contingent, is at present home in Belfast, and has renewed his acquaintance with the C.P.A.

-- -- --

We notice with pleasure that the clever daughters of our esteemed member, Mr. W. C. Boyd, J.P., of Hazelbank Villa, Ravenscroft Avenue, have further distinguished themselves in the educational world. Miss Margaret Boyd, M.A., has been awarded at the Queen's University, the Higher Diploma in Education, and Miss Lily Boyd won from Victoria College the City Scholarship and Entrance Scholarship, each value for 40 for three years.

-- -- --

We note with regret the death of Mrs. James Duncan, of "Lisnaweary," Myrtlefield Park. To the bereaved husband and other relatives we offer our respectful sympathy.

-- -- --

Many of our readers will have noticed in the daily papers the announcement of the marriage of one our Roll of Honour members -- Mr. Alex. Marshall, who is a Second Lieutenant in the 9th K.O.S.B., and attached to the Machine Gun Corps. The gallant bridegroom is the eldest of the three soldier sons of Mr. and Mrs. James Marshall, of Ardenlee, Belfast, and the bride is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Paterson. The wedding took place at Langside, Glasgow. We wish the happy pair many prosperous and happy years.

-- -- --

It will be a great source of satisfaction and comfort to many of our members who have friends serving in France to know that Colonel Sinclair, M.D., F.R.C.S.E. is stationed in the rere of the 4th Army, of which the Ulster Division forms part, and that his skill has been at the service of numerous wounded soldiers from Belfast and surrounding districts.

-- -- --

Best wishes to Mr. John King (of Fountainville N.S.) and his bride, nee Miss Margaret Hamilton M'Creedy, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John M'Creedy, 32, Clifton Crescent. The marriage was solemnized in Ballysillan Church on 19th, Rev. Alex Gallagher, B.A., being the officiating clergyman.

-- -- --

Company Sergeant Major R. Stanley Drean, of the East Belfast Rifles, has been awarded the Military Cross. The gallant young soldier is a son of our respected member, Mr. R. A. Drean, Manager of the Belfast Savings Bank.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

Sergeant Alfred Owens

SERGEANT ALFRED OWENS.

Sergeant Alfred Owens, of the R.I.R., one of our most promising young members, made the supreme sacrifice for King and Country in the great advance on the Western Front in the beginning of July. The commander officer of the Machine Gun Company in which he was serving writes:-- "I always looked on him as one of my best sergeants, and had marked him down for promotion immediately after this push was finished... He was the same cool chap in a fight as he was in ordinary life. Mr. Wedgwood and he were both killed instantaneously whist taking their teams over 'No Man's Land.'"

The deceased young soldier was the younger son of the late Mr. W. J. Owens and Mrs. Owens, of 4, University St., and brother of Mr. Thos. Owens (Secretary of the Belfast Rope Work Co., Ltd.), who is a member of our Governing Body, and nephew of Mr. G. L. Owens, our Honorary Secretary.

Private Wm. F. M'Fadzean He was just a little over 24 years of age, and had been home on a short spell of leave late in May of the present year. He was a member of the original Y.C.V.'s, and volunteered for the army in September, 1914, joining as a private, and after training in the Ri.I.R., was transferred to a Machine Gun Company, reaching sergeant's rank. Prior to joining the colours he had been employed on the technical staff at Messrs. Workman, Clarke & Co.'s, Ltd., where he had splendid prospects. Mr. Owens was greatly interested in the C.P.A., and had contributed to our Literary and Debating Society's programme. He was particularly identified with the Miniature Rifle Club, of which he was one of the best marksmen. He was also a member of the Ulster Cricket Club, and of the Malone Rugby Football Club, playing for the senior fifteen.

To all who mourn his loss we tender our sincere sympathy.

PRIVATE WM. F. M'FADZEAN.

What is generally accepted as the finest individual deed of heroism recorded in connection with the great offensive of last month was that performed by one of our young members, Private Wm. Frederick M'Fadzean, of the R.I.R. (Y.C.V.s), who in a very immediate sense laid down his life for his friends. The story of Willie M'Fadzean's heroic death is tersely yet graphically told in the following extract from a letter written to his bereaved father by Capt. M'Kee: "Our men were in the assembly trenches, and bombs were being distributed. Your son had a box passed to him, and in the passing some bombs dropped out. In falling, the safety pins fell out; and your son, realising the danger to his comrades, flung himself on top of the bombs. He was killed, and two others were slightly wounded. He saved the lives of a number of his comrades by his action, and we are proud of him. His name has been sent forward to higher authority, with recommendation for a decoration."

The late Private M'Fadzean was the eldest son of Mr. Wm. M'Fadzean, Rubicon, Cregagh, and was in his 21st year. He had been employed with Messrs. Spence, Bryson & Co., Ltd., and was very popular with his employers and his fellow employees. He joined the colours in September, 1914, and speedily gained the esteem of his comrades.

Private T. G. M'Kinney The Governing Body of our Association, at its July meeting, directed that a special minute should be recorded regarding Private M'Fadzean's heroism. We are proud to have his name on the C.P.A. Hall of Honour, and we trust that the memory of his noble death will prove a stimulus to his fellow members in devotion to duty and in unselfishness in whatever sphere in life their lot is cast.

To the bereaved parents, brothers and sisters, we respectfully offer our expression of regret at their great loss, and our appreciation of the courage and heroism of their loved one.

PRIVATE T. G. M'KINNEY.

Private Thomas George M'Kinney, only son of Mr. John T. M'Kinney, Sentry Hill, Carnmoney, who was wounded on July 3rd, died in No.7 General Hospital in France, on July 19th, aged 23 years. He was educated at the Royal Academical Institution, 1907-10; and at Ballyhaise Agricultural Station in 1910-11. He afterwards acted as manager of his father's farms, until he joined a Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers formed from the University and Public Schools' Corps in 1914.

The late Mr. M'Kinney was a relative of Mr. E. W. Browne, one of the oldest members of our Governing Body, who introduced him into the membership of our Association three or four years ago. In common with a large circle of acquaintances, we sincerely sympathise with the bereaved father, sister, and other relatives on the passing at so early an age of a very promising young life. Though there were many inducements for Mr. M'Kinney to remain at home, he felt it his duty to join the army in the hour of his country's peril, and his name is now added to the long list of heroes who have made the great sacrifice for Britain's honour.

 

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CPA Magazine September 1916

General Notes.

I WILL.

I will start anew this morning with a higher, fairer creed;
I will cease to stand complaining of my ruthless neighbour's greed;
I will cease to sit repining while my duty's call is clear;
I will waste no moment whining and my heart shall know no fear.

I will look sometimes about me for the things that merit praise;
I will search for hidden beauties that elude the grumbler's gaze;
I will try to find contentment in the paths that I must tread;
I will cease to have resentment when another moves ahead.

I will not be swayed by envy when my rival's strength is shown;
I will not deny his merit, but I'll strive to prove my own;
I will try to see the beauty spread before me, rain or shine --
I will cease to preach your duty and be more concerned with mine.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

Our Roll of Honour is still growing; and we are proud of it, though we regret that so many of our brave boys have been called upon to make the supreme sacrifice. In this month's issue will be found brief biographical sketches of three young sub-lieutenants who have fallen fighting for King and Country.

-- -- --

Another of our clerical members, Rev. Robert Kelso, of Boardmills, has been appointed a Military Chaplain and has taken up duty in France. Mr. Kelso had volunteered for duty in a ministerial unit for ordinary service, if such had been formed. We are sure Mr. Kelso will bring to his duties those qualities which will tell for good on the lives of the brave men with whom he is associated.

-- -- --

Lance Corporal James Palmer, or the Y.C.Vs., who was wounded on June 29th, is in hospital in Portsmouth.

-- -- --

We regret to note the death of Mr. Robert Smyth, of Newmills, Tyrone, father of the Rev. T. A. Smyth, M.A., of Great Victoria Street Church. The deceased gentleman was a loyal son of the Church, and rendered very valuable service to the congregation with which he was connected.

-- -- --

Among the veterans who have recently passed to the other side is Mr. Jonathan Tate, of Adela Place, Antrim Road, who was for many years one of our members, and two of whose sons are of our roll. The late Mr. Tate was an ardent temperance worker, and was for a long time connected with the Irish Temperance League. Mr. Tate during his period of service saw many changes in the work to which he was devoted, and though progress has been made, the cause can ill afford to lose so enthusiastic a worker. We desire to convey our sincere sympathy to his bereaved widow and family.

-- -- --

We regret to notice the death of Mr. Robert Gibson, J.P., 3, Devonshire Villas, North Parade, a well-known gentleman in the public life of the city. Mr. Gibson's son George, who has been serving as Army Accountant in France for past year, is one of our Roll of Honour members.

-- -- --

Among our recent visitors was Mr. Jack Guiler, who has came home with the Canadian contingent for active service with the forces. Mr. Guiler is a son of Mr. J. R. Guiler, one of our oldest and most respected members. We were also pleased to have a call from Lance-Corporal Eric Taylor of the Canadians, who has been in khaki for over 20 months, and who has been invalided from France suffering from an attack of fever.

-- -- --

We are proud to learn of the award of the Military Cross to Coy.-Sergt.-Major Richard S. Drean, son of one of our esteemed members, Mr. H. A. Drean, Actuary of the Belfast Savings Bank. This military distinction was awarded "for conspicuous gallantry during a heavy bombardment covering an enemy raid. He showed splendid courage and devotion to duty." C.-S.-M. Drean was one of the party of recruiters from the Ulster Division who were in Belfast recently.

-- -- --

In recent lists of wounded appeared the names of several gallant officers connected with the C.P.A. Lieut. Thos. D. Kingan (R.I.R., County Down Volunteers), who was wounded on the 8th ult. Capt. E. S. B. Hamilton, M.B., R.A.M.C., is suffering from gas poisoning. Capt. Hamilton, who is a son of Rev. H. W. Hamilton, M.A., of Lisburn, was captured at Mons, August, 1914. He was exchanged in August, 1915, and resumed duty.

-- -- --

Sec.-Lieut. T. C. H. Dickson, Royal Dublins, son-in-law of our esteemed President, Mr. John Sinclair, was wounded on the 15th ult. We are glad to know that Lieut. Dickson's wound is not serious.

-- -- --

Sec.-Lieut. H. V. S. Kennedy, of the Y.C.V's., 18 suffering from severe gun-shot wounds in the back, received in action recently, and is at present in the 14th General Hospital at Wimereux. He was a member of the Wandsworth Football Club and captain of the Ballynafeigh Cricket Club. He obtained his commission on 4th October, 1915, in the 17th (Reserve) Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, and went to the front in June last.

-- -- --

We are pleased to learn that one of our Roll of Honour members, Sec.-Lieut. J. Brown, son of Mr. S. S. Brown, Assistant Postmaster of Belfast, who is also a member, has been awarded the Military Cross. Sec.-Lieut. Brown who is in the East Belfast Batt. of the R.I.R. was wounded in the shoulder on the 1st July, and is now home on sick leave.

-- -- --

Lieut. F. P. Montgomery, of the R.A.M.C., son of Rev. Dr. Montgomery, has also been decorated with the Military Cross. Lieut. Montgomery is a graduate of Q.U.B., and on receiving his medical degree last summer immediately took a commission in the R.A.M.C., and was posted to a Field Ambulance of the Ulster Division.

-- -- --

A familiar figure will be missed from Shaftesbury Square by the removal by death of Mr. Robert Hollywood, the well-known news-vendor. Mr. Hollywood, who resided at Combermere St., was one of our oldest members, having joined in the early May Street days of the Association. He was a most intelligent man, an expert shorthand writer, and took a keen interest in everything concerning the "winged art." He was passionately fond of animals, and a dog and cat were his only companions since the death of his brother some years ago. Contrary to what appearances would have indicated, he had amassed a considerable fortune, the greater portion of which he bequeathed to religious and philanthropic objects. To the C.P.A. he left a quantity of books.

-- -- --

Mr. Henry Craig, of Dublin, our former highly esteemed Honorary Secretary, in remitting his, and his son's (Corpl. Henry. Craig) annual subscriptions hopes that all is going well with the C.P.A., and desires to be remembered to all his old friends.

-- -- --

We deeply regret the announce the death, on the 25th ult. of Mr. Hugh R. Moffett, father of the popular Assembly Hall organist, Mr. Fred Moffett. The deceased gentleman, who was for many years a member of this Association, and who was connected with the firm of John Fulton & Co., Ltd., warehouseman, was held in high esteem both in business and private life. Our sincere sympathy is extended to Mr. and Mrs. Fred Moffett and relatives in their bereavement.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

Our Noble Dead.

Second-Lieutenant H. H. Dunwoody SECOND-LIEUTENANT H. H. DUNWOODY.

Second-Lieut. H. H. Dunwoody, of the Royal Irish Fusiliers, who was killed in action on 31st July, was the youngest son of Mr. Robert Dunwoody, of Connsbrook Terrace, Holywood Road. He was educated at Campbell College, and entered Queen's University as a student of Civil Engineering, in which he had almost completed his Course. For two years he was assistant master in Larne Grammar School. He joined the Cadet Corps in Queen's University, from which he received his commission in the Royal Irish Fusiliers (Ulster Division).

In less than four months he was sent to the front. He was in the great push of the 1st July, and came out of it unscathed. After being engaged on patrol duty, he was killed by a rifle bullet at a listening post in the front trench on the 31st July. His father received a letter of sympathy from his Commanding Officer, in which he says, "Your son had only joined the battalion a short time. He was showing great keenness in his work; and had already been out on patrol under instructions, and had done well, and he gave promise of becoming a good officer. My sympathy goes out to you in your sorrow. We laid him to rest in the little cemetery here, and his grave will be marked with a plain cross, with name and date, and "killed in action."

The deceased young soldier, who was about 26 years of age was a popular member of our Association, and took a great interest in the Recreation Rooms. He was the runner-up in the first competition for the silver challenge cup presented to the Billiard Rooms by our President, Mr. John Sinclair. His father is one of our oldest members, and his elder brother, Lieutenant J. E. Dunwoody, of the Black Watch, is also on our Roll of Honour. We sincerely sympathise with the bereaved parents and all who mourn his loss.

Second-Lieut. H. Corry Osborne SECOND-LIEUT. H. CORRY OSBORNE.

Corry Osborne, who obtained a commission in the Prince of Wales' Own (West Yorks) about a year ago was killed in action when leading his platoon on 24th July. He had been in France only two months, and was just 20 years of age. After leaving the Royal Academical Institution he was employed in the firm of Messrs. Osborne, Cooke & Co., chartered accountants, of which his father, Mr. Joseph Osborne, C.A., is a member, and gave much promise of a successful career in his profession. He was of a very loveable disposition, and was a great favourite with all who knew him.

He was intimately connected with our Association, not only as a member, but on account of his father's position as one of our honorary auditors. In common with a large circle of friends, we deeply deplore his passing, and tender to his sorrowing father and mother and all the mourners our respectful sympathy.

SECOND-LIEUTENANT JOHN LECKY

Second-Lieut. John Lecky, of the R.I.R., who fell in France on 26th July, was the only child of the Rev. Alex G. Lecky, of Ballylennon, Raphoe. The late young officer, who had not reached his 24th birthday when he made the supreme sacrifice, was educated at Raphoe Royal School and Coleraine Academical Institution. He served his time to engineering in the Fairfield Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow. At the expiration of his apprenticeship he came to the Belfast Technical School to improve himself in some branches of his profession by attending classes, and when in the city became a member of our Association. He enlisted in the beginning of February, 1915, in the Cadet Corps of the 16th Battalion R.I.R., and after being in training in Lurgan till October was sent to France, where he served till January, 1916. Upon receiving a commission he came home and was in training at Clandeboye till he went out again. Our sympathy goes out to the bereaved parents in their great loss.

 

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CPA Magazine October 1916

General Notes

Congratulations to Mr. W. J. Hopper, of the Gresham Insurance Co., on his marriage. Mr. Hopper has brought over a Scotch lady to the Emerald Isle. Another of our members, Mr. John Wylie, B.A., has also joined the Benedicts, the bride being a daughter of Mr. Wm. Boyd, of Mountpottinger. We wish the happy couples many years of united bliss.

-- -- --

We are proud that the V.C. has been conferred on one of our members, though we deeply deplore his death. The honoured hero is Private William F. M'Fadzean, whose photo we reproduce on another page. Our readers will remember that on the fateful 1st of July our gallant young member threw himself on bombs which had fallen in the trench, and at the sacrifice of his own life saved the lives of many or his comrades. For this noble deed the highest recognition which the army can confer has been bestowed on him. While sympathising with our esteemed fellow-member, Mr. Wm. M'Fadzean, The Rubicon, Cregagh, in the loss of a dear son -- a loss which the loved ones will feel for many a year -- we share with them the pride they must feel in the memory of so brave a boy, so noble a deed, and on receiving a grateful country's highest honour.

-- -- --

Two of our members -- promising young licentiates for the ministry, sailed for the West last month -- Messrs. A. C. D. M'Ilroy, M.A., and J. E. B. M'Ilroy, M.A. They purpose taking a special divinity course at Princeton, but we hope they will thereafter return to this country and that their services will be secured for the Church of their fathers.

-- -- --

Our condolence is tendered to Mr. H. T. Barrie, M.P., on the death of his mother, to Mr. Adam Harbison, J.P., on the death of his sister, to Mr. A. A. Campbell, solicitor, on the death of his mother, and to Mr. John M. Andrews on the death of his father, the Rt. Hon. Thos. Andrews, P.C., D.L.

-- -- --

Among the recipients of military honours recently conferred is Sergeant Jas. Fitzsimons, who received the Military Medal. Two of the Sergeant's brothers are on our membership roll. One of the latter, 2nd Lieut. S. E. S. Fitzsimons, is serving with the Y.C.V.'s in France, while another brother, Corpl. Jack Fitzsimons, has been missing since the big push of 1st July.

-- -- --

Two more of our Roll of Honour members, Cadets Alfred Lowe (son of Rev. Dr. Lowe) and Edwin Ledlie (son of Dr. Ledlie), have been gazetted as receiving commissions in the army.

-- -- --

The casualty lists continue to have a mournful interest for our membership. 2nd Lieut. W. Kearns Adrain, brother of Mr. John Adrain and nephew of Mr. W. Kearns, is officially reported killed in action. Corporal Robert Wood Stuart (Armagh), brother of Mr. A. J. Stuart, has made the supreme sacrifice while serving with the R.A.M.C. in France. 2nd Lieut. Jas. Marshall, one of the three soldier sons of Mr. J. Marshall, of Ardenlee House, Ravenhill Road and 43, Queen Street, is suffering from a second attack of gas poisoning. His first attack was in June and he recovered sufficiently to take part in the July advance, but has become again a victim to Hun vapour. 2nd Lieut. R. B. Quinn, Hampshire Regiment, reported wounded, another of our members, is a son of Mr. W. I. Quinn, 4, Crescent Gardens, accountant to the Belfast City and District Water Commissioners. Capt. Elliott Johnston (son of Mr. S. Johnston, of Ardenza, Knock), who has been awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous bravery, is reported missing.

-- -- --

We notice with pleasure that Lieut. A. E. M'Connell, a son of our worthy Vice-President, Mr. James M'Connell, J.P., Stranmillis House, has been promoted to a captaincy in the R.I.R.

-- -- --

Lieut. W. J. Hogg, youngest son of Mr. J. Hogg, York Street, and brother of Mr. S. Hogg, Shankill Road, has been given a captaincy in the R.A.M.C.

-- -- --

Private W. J. Campbell M'Quitty, Machine Gun Corps, who has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field, is a former member of the C.P.A. He is a son of Mr. Robert M'Quitty, Deputy Clerk of the Crown and Peace, one of our members of long standing. Private M'Quitty was wounded early in July, commended for bravery at a later date, and for gallant conduct in recent operation has got the Military Medal.

-- -- --

We wish a safe voyage and a prosperous future to one of our young members, Mr. Fred Bowden, who sailed in September fro Australia. Mr. Bowden was employed in the office of Mr. R. T. Martin, solicitor, for four years, and was most popular with a large circle of friends.

-- -- --

Last December, owing to the generosity of a few of our members, we were able to send a greeting and a gift to each of our brave boys with the Colours whose addresses we could obtain. The letters which were received from both officers and men thanking the Association for its remembrance made very interesting reading, and showed that the presents were most acceptable. This year we propose to do something similar, if the funds are forthcoming; and we shall be pleased to acknowledge any subscriptions received for this object in the Magazine. As our Roll of Honour now contains almost 200 names, a considerable sum will be required, though of course we do not mean to attempt anything very elaborate. In this connection, and also to make our Roll of Honour complete, we would be glad of the particulars of the rank, regiment, etc., in all instances where not published, and also the addresses in every case. We are sure our readers will help us in this way, and if the information is given at the office it will be gratefully received.

-- -- --

Many of our readers will have noticed that Mr. Wm. Moorehead, one of the most energetic and popular members of our Governing Body, has been appointed Accountant to the Belfast and Co. Down Railway Company. Mr. Moorehead, who has been in the service of the Company all his business life, occupied a responsible position in the Secretary's department for a number of years past, and we heartily congratulate him on his well-merited promotion.

-- -- --

We were glad to have a call the other day from Mr. J. M. English, a former General Secretary of our Association. Mr. English, who is now an Inspector under the National Health Insurance Scheme in Co. Kerry, was spending a holiday in the North, and looked up many of his old friends in the city, and did not forget the C.P.A., in which he was, and is, so much interested.

-- -- --

Another of our soldier members has been awarded the Military Cross. The latest recipient is Second-Lieut. W. S. Maitland, who displayed great gallantry in the field. Second-Lieut. Maitland, who was wounded in France, has sufficiently recovered to resume duty at home, and is stationed at Holywood, our Roll of Honour members now includes a V.C. and four M.C.'s.

-- -- --

By the way, one of our gallant Roll of Honour members, 2nd-Lieut. J. Brown, M.C., did a plucky act a few weeks ago, in rescuing a boy who was in danger of being drowned in the Lagan. When crossing the Albert Bridge in a tram car, Mr. Brown, who noticed the boy struggling in the river, rushed to the parapet jumped into the river, and brought the boy to safety. Just what one would expect of so distinguished a soldier.

-- -- --

We regret to chronicle the death of Mr. John M. Martin, one of our young members, who passed away at Bangor on 22nd ult. Deceased who was the youngest son of Mr. T. S. Martin, of 126, University Street, Belfast, was deeply interested in our Association. He was a hearty supporter of the Football Club, acted as a steward at the Entertainments, and was latterly Honorary Secretary of the Chess Club, the success of which he was most anxious to promote. He was very popular in our Rooms, and in social and business circles was a great favourite. He frequently contributed chess notes to the Magazine under the nom de plume of "Nitram." We deplore his early death, and deeply sympathise with the sorrowing parents.

-- -- --

Just as we go to press we have received a letter from Captain Charles M'Master on the recruiting question, which we hope to publish next month.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

The Late Private Wm. F. M'Fadzean, V.C.

Our V.C.

The late Private M'Fadzean was a son of Mr. Wm. M'Fadzean, Rubicon, Cregagh (of Messrs. Johnston, Allen's), and was born at Lurgan on 9th October, 1895. He came to Belfast in infancy, and was educated at Mountpottinger National School, and the Trade Preparatory School of the Municipal Technical Institute, and entered the services of Messrs. Spence, Bryson & Co., Ltd., linen manufacturers, Great Victoria Street, and became a member of our Association on commencing business, his father being for many years an enthusiastic and loyal C.P.A. member. Willie joined the Army in September, 1914. He had been a member of the 1st Batt. East Belfast Regiment Ulster Volunteer Force, and passed from it into one of the battalion of the Royal Irish Rifles raised in response to the call to the Volunteers to join a division. Rugby football was one of his favourite recreations, Collegians being his club.

He was a member of Newtownbreda Presbyterian Church (Rev. Dr. Workman's). His heroic death was the subject of eulogistic letters from his officers, as reported in our August number. One tells the story in following graphic manner:-- "The platoon was in the assembly trenches at about midnight the night before the attack took place, and bombs were being distributed to the men. There was a box of bombs on the parapet, and M'Fadzean lifted it in order to open it. It was tied round with cord, and in cutting this with his jack-knife the box fell into the trench spilling the bombs. He evidently heard a click, and knew that some of the safety-pins had been knocked out. He threw himself on the bombs, and two of the bombs exploded, killing him and wounding two of his comrades, Lance-Corpl. Halliday and Pte. Gillespie. He was lifted out of the trench and placed on a stretcher, when it was seen that he was past hope, as death had been instantaneous. I can only add that he was a splendid soldier, and the life and soul of the platoon, either in billets or on the march. He was in the best of spirits at the time it occurred."

Rev. Dr. Workman, at Newtownbreda Presbyterian Church, preaching from the words:-- "Greater love hath no man than this that a man lay down his life for his friends," said, Willie M'Fadzean was a distinguished soldier of the splendid Ulster Division. "And we have," he added, "the comfort and joy of knowing that he was also a good soldier of Jesus Christ. He was a lad endowed with great natural ability, and of a most genial and lovable disposition. God placed him in a home where he was brought up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. Before leaving that home he professed his faith in Christ, and sat down with his people at the Lord's table. His mother had given him a soldier's Testament, which he kept always in his tunic, and from which he and his like-minded chum regularly read a portion nightly.

     "Soldier of God, well done,
          Rest from thy loved employ;
     The battle's fought, the victor won --
          Enter thy Master's joy."

As was previously stated in our Magazine, a special record was made by our Governing Body of our young hero's noble deed and gallant death, and we hope to perpetuate his name and fame in a more tangible way at no distant date.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

CORPORAL FRED J. IRWIN

Corporal Fred. J. Irwin, of the R.I.R., who was killed in action on 21st August, was the third son of the late Mr. James Irwin and Mrs. Irwin, Skerrymore, Castleblayney, and a nephew of the Rev. Dr. John Irwin, of Windsor.

He was educated at the Newry Intermediate Schools. Fred joined the C.P.A. when he came to the city, about three years ago, to serve his apprenticeship in the manufacturing firm of Messrs. M'Bride & Williams, Ltd., Ormeau Avenue. He joined the Rifles on the formation of the Ulster Division two years ago, and in the autumn of last year went to the front. He was wounded in the big advance in July, but had so far recovered as to be able to resume duty a short time before he heard the last summons. Fred was a lovable lad, and a large circle of friends deeply sympathise with his widowed mother and other relatives.

It may he added that a younger brother of the deceased young soldier is in one of the training camps preparing for active service.

 

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CPA Magazine November 1916

General Notes

We regret to chronicle the death, after a protracted illness, of Mr. Archie Getty, 38, Fitzroy Avenue. Mr. Getty, who was a very estimable youth, was for several years one of our associates.

-- -- --

We also deplore the death, in action, of Sergeant John Falconer, of the Canadian Infantry. Sergt. Falconer was a son of Mr. Wm. Falconer, of "Alt-Min," Cregagh, and brother of Mr. Henry Falconer, one of our members.

-- -- --

We have to express sympathy with several of our members who have been bereaved recently. The obituary list includes Mr. Saml. Diamond, father of Mr. Robert Diamond; Mr. John M'Caw and Mr. Thos. M'Caw, brothers of Mr. Robert M'Caw and uncles of Mr. James M'Caw, Mrs. Wm. Mitchell (Ashgrove Park), Mrs. Patterson (mother-in-law of the Rev. T. A. Smyth, M.A.), and Mrs. Frazer (mother-in-law of the Rev. W. G. Smyth).

-- -- --

Second Lieutenant Harold K. May has been wounded the second time. Mr. May, who is in the Royal Berks., has two brothers under arms. He is a son of Mr. Geo. May, Scottish Provident Buildings), a C.P.A. associate for many years.

-- -- --

We are sorry to learn that 2nd Lieut. S. M'Cay, who was one of our members when on the staff of the Ulster Bank in Donegall Place, has been wounded in action, "somewhere in France."

-- -- --

The name of 2nd Lieut. H. W. Brown, of the West Yorks, one of the three soldier sons of Mr. Wm. Brown, assistant secretary of the Presbyterian Orphan Society, appeared in the recent casualty list among the wounded. We are glad to know that his injuries are not serious.

-- -- --

Many of our members will have read with interest in the daily papers of the discovery by army doctors at the front in France of the causes and cure of trench fever. One of the doctors who took a prominent part in the research was Dr. John M'Cloy, assistant tuberculosis officer of the Belfast Corporation. Dr. M'Cloy is one of our Roll of Honour members.

-- -- --

We congratulate two of our junior members on the distinguished places taken by them at the Intermediate Examinations. Mr. Jonathan Tate, Adela Park, took a double first, winning a 30 exhibition and medals in the classical group in the senior grade, and Mr. H. C. Black, of Landscape Terrace, was awarded 15 exhibition and a 2 prize in the middle grade Mathematical and Science groups. Both are Inst. boys.

-- -- --

The marriages of two of our members were announced last month -- Mr. J. C. Bodel and Mr. J. S. Munce. We wish much happiness and prosperity to both couples.

-- -- --

One of our former members, Mr. Stewart Hoey, who volunteered for the Army from Canada, where he had a good position in a Banking concern, was recently discharged from active service owing to severe wounds received in action in France. Mr. Hoey sailed for Canada the other day to resume his position in the Bank.

-- -- --

We were pleased to have a call from 2nd Lieutenant J. A. Campbell, of the Machine Gun Corps, who is home on leave recuperating after wounds received in action. We are glad to know that Mr. Campbell is making a good recovery, and hopes to soon return to duty.

-- -- --

2nd Lieutenant Francis Campbell, of the King's Liverpool Regiment, was severely wounded on 9th ult. Mr. Campbell, who has over a year's service to his credit, is a partner in the firm of Messrs. Campbell Bros., stained glass artists.

-- -- --

Congratulations to Lieutenant A. Norman M'Clinton, son of our esteemed member, Mr. John M'Clinton, J.P., Rosaville, Windsor Park, on having won the Military Cross. This gallant young officer is another of our young men who returned from Canada at the call of King and country.

-- -- --

At the Assembly meeting the Memorial Window to the late Mr. Joseph Cuthbert was unveiled by his son Mr. Wm. Cuthbert, of South Africa. Rev. Alex. Cuthbert, M.A., another son of the deceased, in a short but touching speech made over the window to the Trustees of the Assembly Hall and Church House, and the gift was accepted in their name by the Moderator. The Sinclair window and the Cuthbert window, on either side of the platform, help to further beautify the very handsome large hall.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

NOT HIS JOB.

By EDGAR A. GUEST in Detroit Free Press.

"I'm not supposed to do that," said he
When an extra task he chanced to see;
"That's not my job, and it's not my care,
So I'll pass it by and leave it there."
And the boss who gave him his weekly pay
Lost more than his wages on him that day.

"I'm not supposed to do that," he said,
"That duty belongs to Jim or Fred."
So a little task that was in his way
That he could have handled without delay
Was left unfinished; the way was paved
For a heavy loss he could have saved.

And time went on and he kept his place
But he never altered his easy pace,
And folks remarked on how well he knew
The line of the tasks he was hired to do;
For never once was he known to turn
His hand to things not of his concern.

But there in his foolish rut he stayed
And for all he did he was fairly paid,
But he never was worth a dollar more
Than he got for his toil when the week was o'er;
For he knew too well when his work was through,
And he'd done all he was hired to do.

If you want to grow in this world, young man,
You must do every day all the work you can;
If you find a task, though it's not your bit,
And it should be done, take care of it;
And you'll never conquer or rise if you
Do only the things you're supposed to do.

 

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CPA Magazine December 1916

General Notes.

FOR THESE DARK DAYS.

I will not doubt though all my ships at sea
Come drifting home with broken masts and sails;
I will believe the Hand which never fails,
From seeming evil, worketh good for me;
And though I weep because those sails are scattered,
Still will I cry, while my best hopes are shattered,
"I trust in Thee!"

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

Recent additions to our Roll of Honour comprise the names of Mr. J. M'Cleery, son of Mr. J. O. M'Cleery, who has joined the Royal Naval Air Service. Mr. J. A. Fenton (2nd. Lieut.) has been ordered to Salonica. Corporal Gerald Cole, of the R.A.M.C., is also under orders for the East, and Mr. Jack Tetherington, another of our young members, has joined the colours on attaining military age.

-- -- --

In the House of Commons recently Mr. Coote, M.P. for South Tyrone, presented a petition from the Bangor and District War Time Council Unit praying the Government to prohibit the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors during the period of the war and for six months after its termination.

-- -- --

In the rescue of the crew of a stranded coal steamer off the Newcastle coast our esteemed member, Cadet Tom Stephenson, took a prominent part, which has received deserved recognition in the Press and elsewhere. Mr. Stephenson's conduct is characteristic of the pluck and unselfishness which has been proved by the fact that three of four brothers joined the colours since the outbreak of war, and one has made the supreme sacrifice.

-- -- --

One of our Roll of Honour members, Second Lieut. J. Brown, M.C., son of our esteemed member, Mr. S. S. Brown, Assistant Postmaster of Belfast, has been awarded the Royal Humane Society's bronze medal for having rescued a lad from drowning in the Lagan. Reference was made in it previous issue of the Magazine to our gallant member's plucky conduct in connection with the incident.

-- -- --

The list of Ulster soldiers who have recently been awarded the Military Medal includes three names of C.P.A. interest. Pte. Wm. M'Cormick is a member of the C.P.A. Swimming Club, and holder of the Royal Life-Saving Society's bronze medallion; Second-Lieut. Thos. Sinclair Haslett, son of Rev. T. Haslett, M.A., Ballymena, is a nephew of our President, and also a nephew and namesake of Col. Thomas Sinclair, M.D., one of our Vice-Presidents; Second-Lieut. Jas. Nesbit M'Granahan is the youngest son of Rev. Dr. M'Granahan (formerly of Townsend Street Church, now of Derry), who has promised to preach at our next Annual Service.

-- -- --

At the recent investiture of Military Honours by the King in Buckingham Palace, Rev. Dr. Montgomery, one of our Vice-Presidents, had the honour of being present and witnessing the presentation by His Majesty of the Military Cross to his gallant son, Lieut. F. P. Montgomery, of the R.A.M.C.

-- -- --

We are glad to know that the wounds received in action by Second-Lieut G. S. Sinclair (son of the late Mr. S. Sinclair, and nephew of our respected President) were not of a serious nature, and that both he and Captain J. M. Sinclair -- our President's only son, who was severely wounded some months ago -- are making satisfactory progress.

-- -- --

Pleased to note that Mr. C. E. White, one of our esteemed associates , has been promoted to the position of managing director of the firm of Messrs. Robert Hogg & Co., Ltd., Donegall Square West, and High Street. Mr. White was for ten years manager of this prosperous concern, and all who know him congratulate him on his well-merited promotion.

-- -- --

One of our young members, Cadet Maurice Henry, son of Mr. R. Henry, of South Parade, has been gazetted from the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, to a commission in the Indian Army (unattached list). Lieutenant Henry sailed for the East the other day, and we join with his many friends in wishing him a safe voyage, a pleasant term of duty in India, and a prosperous career in the army. Mr. Henry's other son, Corporal Ernest Henry, is serving with the Rifles in France.

-- -- --

We extend respectful sympathy to a member of our Governing Body, Rev. Charles Davey, on the death on the battlefield of his son William. We also offer our condolence with those of our members who have suffered bereavement during the past few weeks, whether the call has come to their loved ones at home or abroad.

-- -- --

We were delighted to have calls from and chats with quite a number of our soldier members recently. These include Lt. R. B. Thomson and Second-Lt. J. H. Scott, both on furlough from the Eastern theatre of war; Sergt. H. W. Verner, who has recovered from wounds received in France; Corporal Robert M'Lean, of the R.A.M.C., who was on a short leave; Mr. Arthur Asboe, a theological student, ineligible for active service, but who has been doing good work among the troops in France, and Sergeant-Major B. Whightman, of the R.A.M.C., also home on furlough.

-- -- --

Welcome home to. Mr. J. I. Ellison from his trip to Canada and the States. Mr. Ellison, who was accompanied by Mrs. Ellison, visited the members of their family settled in the New World, including his son-in-law, Rev. Wesley Megaw, who is assistant to the Rev. Dr. Patterson (late of May Street) in Toronto. Mr. Ellison, who is a member of the Irish Temperance League Executive, had the unique experience of witnessing the closing of the last public-house in Toronto, as a result of the recent Prohibition legislation for Ontario.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

THE COMRADE.

Chill above the battlefield the winds of night were flying,
     No star lit the clouded sky;
Lonely, in the darkness, a soldier lay a-dying,
     When One he knew not stood nigh.

"Who art Thou, O Comrade, with the eyes of tender pleading,
     Head bowed in the sorrow of the years?
Hast Thou also fought in battle, for Thy hands and feet are bleeding,
     Thy side bears the wound of spears?"

"Yea, I have fought in battle, to the bitter conflict's ending,
     To the very yielding-up of breath,
And I have trod the pathway, whereto thy feet are tending,
     The strait, sad way of Death.

"I have known the darkness of the shadow that is o'er thee,
     The last keen pang have known.
Thou need'st not fear to travel where thy Comrade went before thee,
     Thou goest not alone !"

C. D. E.

 

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