Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

Belfast Telegraph - Thursday, 20 April, 1924

Births

HENRY -- March 20, 1924, at 247 Antrim Road, to Dr. and Mrs. Henry -- a daughter.

Deaths

CALDER -- March 19, 1924, at his father's residence, 11 Earl Street, David, son of David and Elizabeth M. Calder. His remains will be removed from his father's residence, to-morrow (Friday) at 2.30 p.m., for interment in Dundonald Cemetery. Jesus called him, he was ready, For that home so bright and fair; Up among the happy angels, He is waiting for us there. Deeply regretted by his Father, Mother and Brothers, DAVID and ELIZABETH M. CALDER.

CHRISTIAN -- March 19, 1924, at her residence, 39 Spencer Street, Annie, relict of the late John Christian. -- R.I.P. Her remains will be removed from above address on to-morrow (Friday), at 1.30 p.m., for interment in the family burying ground, Derriaghy. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Sister, ALICE M'NALLY.

CUNNINGHAM -- March 20, 1924, at her residence 41 Little May Street, Belfast, Eliza, relict of the late James Cunningham (formerly of Ballynahinch) -- R.I.P. Her remains will be removed from St. Malachy's Church, Alfred Street, on Saturday, 22nd inst. (by motor), at 12 noon for interment in Magheradroll Burying-ground, passing through Ballynahinch about 1 p.m. No flowers, please. Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Family.

DODD -- March 20, 1924, at his residence, Woodford, Dromara, County Down, Robert Dodd. Funeral strictly private, by request.

DONALDSON -- March 19, 1924, at her residence, Ballyvalley, Dromore Road, Banbridge, Agnes Donaldson. Funeral on Saturday, 22nd Inst., at 3 p.m., to Ballygowan Presbyterian Burying-ground. Inserted by her loving Daughter and Sons.

FERGUSON -- March 19, 1924, at 48 Church Street, Newtownards, Robert Ferguson. The remains of our beloved father will be removed for interment in Movilla Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday), at 3 p.m. Inserted by his sorrowing Family.

GEMMELL -- March 19, 1924, at her brother's residence, 62 Montrose Street, Jeannie. The remains of our dear sister will be removed on to-morrow (Friday), at 2.30 p.m., to Dundonald Cemetery. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. Inserted by her loving Brother and Sister-in-law, SAMUEL and EDITH GEMMELL.

GRAHAM -- March 19, 1924, at his residence, Church View, Tullyraine, Banbridge, John Graham Funeral to the family burying-ground, Magherally, on Friday, at 2 p.m.

HAGAN -- March 19, 1924, at his parents' residence, 24 Coniston Street, William, the beloved son of Edward and Elizabeth Hagan. His remains will be removed for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, at 2 p.m., to-morrow (Friday). Jesus called him, he was ready, For that home so bright and fair; Up among the happy angels, He is waiting for us there. Deeply regretted by his loving Parents; also his Grandmother and Aunt. 93 Riga Street.

HILL -- March 19, 1924, at her residence, 8 Hope Street, Larne, Rose Hill, The remains of our dearly-beloved mother will be removed on to-morrow (Friday), at 3 p.m., for interment in M'Garel Cemetery. Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Family.

HUTCHINSON -- March 19, 1924, at his residence, The Brae, Union Street, Donaghadee, George Vickers, dearly-loved husband of Isabella Hutchinson. His remains will be removed from above address for interment in Donaghadee Churchyard, at 3 p.m., on Friday, 21st inst. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Wife and two little Children. ISABELLA HUTCHINSON.

HUTCHINSON -- March 19, 1924, at his residence, The Brae Union Street, Donaghadee, George Vickers, dearly-loved son-in-law of Thomas and Isabella Simpson, 11 Shore Street, Donaghadee. His remains will be removed from above address for interment in Donaghadee Churchyard, at 3 p.m., on Friday, 21st inst. Deeply regretted, THOMAS and ISABELLA SIMPSON.

HUTCHINSON -- March 19, 1924, at his residence, The Brae, Donaghadee, George, beloved son of John and Isobel Hutchinson. Deeply regretted, 57 Euston Street, Belfast

BLUE BANNER TOTAL ABSTINENCE L.O.L. No. 781, DONAGHADEE
HUTCHINSON -- Members of above Lodge are requested to attend the funeral of their late Brother, George Vickers Hutchinson, on Friday, 21st inst., at 3 p.m. All Brethren of above Lodge and other Brethren, to assemble at Orange Hall Moat Street, at 2.30 p.m. DAVID TAYLOR, W.M., JOHN COULTER, Secretary,

BLUE BANNER TOTAL ABSTINENCE R.A.P.C., No 781, DONAGHADEE.
HUTCHINSON -- Members of above Chapter are requested to attend the funeral of their late Brother, George Vickers Hutchinson, on Friday, 21st inst., at 3 p.m. All Brethren of above Chapter and other Brethren, to assemble at Orange Hall, Moat Street, at 2.30 p.m., WILLIAM LENNON, W.M., JOHN COULTER, P.M., reg.

BRITISH LEGION, DONAGHADEE BRANCH.
HUTCHINSON -- The members of the above Branch are requested to attend the funeral of their late Member, George Hutchinson. Funeral on Friday, 21st inst., at 3 p.m. R.J. M'WHINNEY, Hon. Sec.

MAZE -- March 19, 1924, at her residence, 273 Shankill Road, Belfast, Rebecca, eldest daughter of the late James Maze, Magheraleave, Lisburn. Funeral to family burying-ground, Derriaghy, on to-morrow (Friday), at 2 p.m. ANDREW MAZE.

MONTGOMERY -- At the residence of her daughter, Welbrook Cottage, Girton, Cambridge, Mary, widow of the late Samuel Montgomery, Belfast and third daughter of the late Robert Greer, Ballynarry, in her 85th year. Interred in Girton Churchyard.

SOMERVILLE -- March 19, 1924, at 11 Pansy Street, Mary, widow of William Somerville. Funeral private. Inserted by her sorrowing Son and Daughter-in-law. WILLIAM and JEANNIE SOMERVILLE. Also her loving daughter. 5 Legunn Street, MAGGIE BROWNLEE.

SOMERVILLE -- March 19, 1924, at 11 Pansy Street, Mary, widow of William Somerville, Funeral private. Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Sister-in-law, and Family. 21 Carlisle Street. LETITIA SOMERS.

STEELE -- March 19, 1924, at her residence, 53 Lepper Street, Jane Gertrude, dearly-beloved wife of Daniel Steele, and the only surviving daughter of Rose and the late Henry Elliott. -- R.I.P. Funeral from St. Patrick's R.C. Church, Donegall Street on to-morrow (Friday) morning, at 11 o'clock for interment in St. Mary's R.C. Churchyard, Ahoghill Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Husband and three little Children (May, Bridget, and Dan). American papers please copy.

STEELE -- March 19, 1924, at her residence, 53 Lepper Street, Jane Gertrude, dearly-beloved daughter of Rose and the late Henry Elliot. Sadly missed by her sorrowing Mother and Brothers. 18 Lepper Street.

WALLACE -- March 19, 1924, at her residence, 39 Jennymount Street, Mary Ann, widow of the late William Wallace. Her remains will be removed from above address on Friday, at 2.30 p.m., for interment in Carnmoney. Deeply regretted by her Daughters, Son, and Son-in-law.

NORTH-EAST TEMPERANCE L.O.L., 1267.
WALLACE -- The officers and Members of above Lodge are requested to attend the funeral of the mother of their esteemed Member, Alex. Wallace. R. MEGARRY, W.M., T.HORNER, P.M., Secretary.

BRANTWOOD F.C.
WALLACE -- The Members of above Club are requested to attend the funeral of the mother of their esteemed Member, Alex. Wallace. J. INGRAM, Chairman, W. GLASSEY, Secretary.

JENNYMOUNT TEMPERANCE FLUTE BAND.
WALLACE -- The Members of the above band are requested to attend the funeral of the mother of their Esteemed Member, A. Wallace. W. M'KNIGHT, Chairman. J. BOOMER, Treasurer.

WILLIAMS -- March 20, 1924, at Larne Harbour, Captain Williams (formerly of Ballymena). Funeral to Ballymena New Cemetery, on Saturday, at 12 noon. FRED WILLIAMS.

YOUNG -- March 19, 1924, at her residence, 54 Townsend Street, Belfast, Mary Jane, relict of the late Leonard Young, and daughter of the late Arthur Ward. Funeral at 2 p.m., to-morrow (Friday), 21st inst., to Drumbeg Churchyard.

continued on page 11

ARMSTRONG -- March 20, 1924, at the District Hospital, Lisburn. Agnes, beloved wife of John Armstrong 18 Sloan Street, Lisburn. Funeral from her late residence, at 3 p.m., on Saturday, to Lisburn Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Husband and Family.

BELL -- March 20, 1924, at the Royal Victoria Hospital. Samuel only son of Andrew and Blanche Bell, Glassdrummond, Ballynahinch, County Down. Interment notice later

ESLOR -- March 19, 1924, at his residence, Ballynure. Thomas, the beloved husband of Eliza Eslor. His remains will be removed from above address on Saturday, at 3 p.m., for interment in Ballyeaston Churchyard. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted by his Wife and two Sons, ELIZA ESLOR.

Thanks

Mr. and Mrs WILLIAM BELL and Family wish to extend their sincere thanks to all those who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement, to those who sent beautiful floral tributes and letters of condolence, and to those who attended the funeral. -- 37 Lawnbrook Avenue.

Mrs. BLAIR and Family desire to return these sincere thanks to the many friends who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement; especially to the Office Staff of Messrs. Nicholson and Morrow, for their beautiful flowers and letters of sympathy. Hoping this will be accepted by all. -- 43 Aberdeen Street.

The Misses DEVENNEY desire to return sincere thanks to the many kind friends who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement; especially to the Labourers of Workman, Clark, North yard; also the Members of North Thomas Street Mission, for their beautiful wreaths. Trusting this will be accepted by all. -- 42 North Thomas Street.

In Memoriam

ERWIN -- In affectionate remembrance of our dearly-beloved sister, Mary Jane Erwin, who departed this life on the 20th March, 1914, and was interred in Carnmoney Cemetery. She has gone, our dear sister, Sorrow never more to know. And we still are sad and lonely, Though she died ten years ago. Weep not for me my sisters dear, I am with God you must not fear; My pain is o'er and I am free, Prepare yourselves to follow me. Ever remembered by her loving Sisters and Brothers-in-law, SARAH and ROBERT CLARKE. ELIZABETH and ROBERT BECKETT. Trenton, New Jersey, U.S.A. Also her loving Mother and Brothers, ELIZABETH, JAMES and JOHN JOHNSTON. Also her Sisters-in-law.

FERGUSON -- In (f)ond and loving memory of our dear father, who departed this life on 20th March, 1921, and was interred in Comber Old Churchyard. In our hearts your memory lingers, Sweetly, tender, fond and true; There is not a day, dear father, That we do not think of you. When the shades of night are falling, And we are sitting all alone, There are times there comes a longing, When we wish you could come home. Ever remembered and sadly missed by his Son and Daughter-in-law: also Grandchildren, ROBERT and AGNES FERGUSON. 32 Ashdale Street.

FERRIS -- In loving memory of my dear husband, Joseph Ferris who departed this life on 20th March, 1911: also my dear daughter Minnie, who died September 24, 1921. Both interred in Carnmoney Burying-ground. Still sadly missed. 6 Rosevale Street. ELIZABETH FERRIS.

LAW -- In loving memory of my dear daughter Norah, who departed this life on 20th March, 1921, and was interred in Killyleagh Churchyard. Every moment I do miss her, Sadly do I feel her loss; Lonely is my home without her, Help me, Lord, to bear the cross. Ever remembered by her loving Mother, Brothers, and Sisters. 9 Moorgate Street. ANNABELL LAW.

LAW -- In affectionate remembrance of Agnes Jane Law, who departed this life on 20th March, 1923, and was interred in Magheragall Churchyard. Holywood Road. JOHN WESLEY KERR

LAW -- In loving memory of Driver Joseph law, Royal Engineers, the dearly-beloved nephew of William Oliver, who died of wounds on 20th March, 1917. Ever remembered by his loving Uncle and Cousins. 3 Malone Place.

M'CLUNE -- In loving memory of my dear daughter, Minnie, who departed this life on the 20th March, 1919, and was interred in the family burying-ground, Moneyrea. In my heart your memory lingers, Sweetly, tender, fond and true; There is not a day, dear Minnie, That I do not think of you. Ever remembered by her loving Mother and Stepfather. MARY and SAMUEL LEATHEM, 16 St. Kilda Street.

M'CRUM -- In fond and loving memory of my dear son, John, who departed this life March 20, 1920, and was interred in Carnmoney Burying-ground. Ever remembered and sadly missed by his sorrowing Mother and Sister. 28 Summer Street. SARAH M'CRUM.

MacGEAGH -- In ever-loving memory of my dear son, Foster A. MacGeagh who died March 20, 1922. GERTRUDE E. MacGEAGH

NEVILLE -- In loving memory of my dear husband, Robert Neville, who departed this life on 20th March, 1921, and was interred in City Cemetery. I think I see his smiling face, Although three years have passed; And in my memory fresh he lives, And will until the last. Ever remembered and sadly missed by his loving Wife. 63 Beersbridge Road. M.J. NEVILLE.

NEVILLE - -- In loving memory of my dear father who departed this life on 20th March, 1921: also my dear brother, Bob, who departed this life on 6th March, 1918. Both were interred in City Cemetery. "Too good in life to be forgotten in death." Ever remembered by his loving daughter and Son-in-law, ANNIE and ROBERT NAPIER, 37 Devonshire Street.

ROBINSON -- In loving memory of our dear son, Private S.G. Robinson, D.C.M., 5th Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers, who died of wounds received in Palestine on 20th March, 1918. "Until the day break, and the shadows flee away." Ever remembered by his loving Father, Mother, Sister and Brothers. Railway Street, Keady, County Armagh.

SPENCE -- In loving memory of my dear father, Robert Spence, who departed this life 20th March, 1923, and was interred in Drumbeg Churchyard. At early morn when all was still, God gave His great command: In silent peace he passed away, Into a better land. Ever remembered by his loving Sons and Daughter-in-law. WILLIAM and SARAH SPENCE, 21 Elm Street. Also his Daughter and Son-in-law. AGNES and ALBERT IRWIN, 62 Spruce Street.

SPENCE -- In loving memory of our dear brother Robert, who departed this life on the 20th March, 1923 also our dear mother, who departed on the 28th November, 1919. Both interred in Drumbeg Churchyard. "Gone, but not forgotten." Inserted by her loving Daughters, Sons and Sons-in-law. M. and WILLIAM OSBORNE, 9 Walnut Street. M. AND J. WALSH, 40 Devonshire Street

SPENCE -- In loving memory of our dear mother, Martha Spence who departed this life on the 20th March, 1922. Always remembered by her loving Daughters, LILLIE, MAUD, and EVA.

WATSON -- In loving memory of my dear mother, Susan Watson, who departed this life 20th March, 1923 also my dear father, brother, and daughter (wee Minnie). All interred in Dundonald Cemetery. Still loved and sadly missed by their loving Daughter, Son-in-law, and Grandchildren. C. and T. OLIVER. Hillmount Houses Jordanstown.

continued on page 11

M'CRUM -- In fond and loving memory of my dear brother, John, who departed this life on the 20th March 1920, and was interred in Carnmoney Burying-ground. "Too good in life to be forgotten in death." Still lovingly remembered by his Sister and Brother-in-law, MINNIE AND DAVID LOGAN.

Clippings

DIESEL ENGINE REPAIRS.

HARLAND & WOLFF'S LONDON WORKS.

A feature of Messrs. Harland & Wolff's London works which shipowners will not be slow to appreciate is (says a London correspondent) the provision which is being made at King George V. Dock plant for dealing with Diesel engines of the Burmeister and Wain-Harland and Wolff type.

A large stock of parts is kept in store, and renewals are consequently made with less loss of time than would otherwise be the case.

The firm's activities are, I gathered during the course of a visit, impressively varied, for the Port of London Authority river craft, buoys, locomotives, cranes, dock gates, and cold storage plant and machinery are being maintained or repaired, and, in addition, elaborate provision has been made, chiefly at the King George V. Dock, for dealing with the largest merchant ships and their machinery.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

TIRED OF HER LIFE.

PLEA OF UNHAPPY BELFAST WOMAN.

At the Belfast Custody Court to-day, before Mr. John Gray, R.M., Martha Brown, a married woman, 36 Eureka Street, was charged on remand with having attempted suicide in the River Lagan on the 12th inst.

The evidence showed that the woman was found standing on the bank of the Lagan about to jump into the water. She had thrown off her hat and gloves, which were lying on the ground. When remonstrated with by James Wales, a labourer, Bilton Place, Belfast, the woman told Wales to go away, as she was going to throw herself into the water, and he would spoil her.

"I am tired of my life," was the woman's excuse when charged by constable Kerr. Her husband promised to look after the prisoner, who was trembling in the dock. She denied that she had attempted to commit suicide, and pleaded not guilty.

The woman was returned for trial, bail being fixed.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

THIS DAY'S SHIPPING.

Arrived at Belfast on the 20th inst. -- The ss Iskra (Sikic), from Bona, with cargo of phosphate, Messrs. Richardsons' Chemical Manure Co., Ltd., consignees (J. Burke & Co., Ltd., agents), The ss Grania (Hagan), from France via Dublin, with general cargo, sundry consignees (J. Burke & Co., Ltd., agents) The ss Amarapoora (Meek), from Rangoon, via Southampton and Liverpool, with general cargo, sundry consignees (Wilson & Reid, agents). The ss Cormorant (Veail), from Ghent, with general cargo, sundry consignees (J.Little & Co., agents). The ss St. Anthony, from Magheramorne, with cement. The ss Cliffsider, ss Carnalea, ss Tynan and ss Eveleen, from Glasgow: the ss Corbet, ss Castlehill, ss Harrier and ss Monaleen, from Garston; the ss Eddie, from Irvine; the ss Sealight, from Donaghadee; the ss Toryisland, from Harrington; and the ss Greenisland, from Ayr -- all with coal.

Sailed from Belfast on 20th inst. -- The ss Glenshesk, ss Monaleen and ss Tynan, for Glasgow; the ss Harrier, ss Ailsa, and ss Carnalea, for Ayr; the ss Toryisland for Preston; the ss Dynamic, for Manchester, via Birkenhead; the ss Holyhead, for Whitehaven; the ss Elwy and ss Greenisland, for Maryport; the ss Slievenamon, for Waterford; the ss Eveleen, for Partington; the ss Edith, for Aberdovey; the ss Glentaise, for Stornoway; the ss Cliffsider, ss Clydebrae, and ss Corbet, for Garston; the ss Florence, for Birkenhead, and the ss Castlehill, for Penmaenmawr.

Arrived -- At Rotterdam on the 20th inst., the ss Orlock Head (Kane), from Amsterdam.

Sailed -- From Barry on the 19th inst., the ss Lord Downshire (Pinkerton), for Las Palmas; from Swansea on the 19th inst., the ss Prima, for Hamburg.

Passed Dunnet Head on the 19th inst., the ss Fair Head (Cole), from Ayr for Rendsburg.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

UNCOMMON SENSE.

PLOTS.

It is the plot that holds a story together.

The writer who began a tale without a fairly definite idea of how it was going to end would meander on unceasingly and uninterestingly.

He would never find a publisher, to say nothing of readers.

It is, of course, quite impossible to know in advance exactly what is going to happen in every chapter.

Characters sometimes take things into their hands -- and, like children, refuse to do what they are expected to do.

Also, when the author gets well into his story new complications occur to him, which sometimes necessitate changes.

To make these changes, he must go back and rewrite some of the early chapters. That is hard work, but if it effects an improvement in the story it is worth while.

You will write, as you go along the story of your life.

You will have a good many collaboraters, and chance will play quite an important part in the narrative.

But you will be the real author, and upon the time and energy and brains which you devote to the manuscript will depend whether, after you have laid down the pen, it will be worth reading by other people.

You will find it profitable to begin with a plot, as good a plot as possible, and to stick to it as far as you can as you go along.

In the course of time you will find that alterations must be made, and that there will be a good deal of rewriting to the back chapters to do.

We cannot always get the right start, and sometimes it is fortunate for us that we cannot, for when we do things over we usually do them better than we did in the first place.

You do not want your life to be rambling and disconnected. Whether you like it or not, the things that you do between twenty and thirty will affect your conduct between thirty and forty.

With a plot, you can direct that early behaviour so that it will benefit your behaviour later on.

You can look ahead, and build on an intelligent plan -- just as necessary in life as in architecture on story-writing.

There is, it is true, a veil between you and the future through which you cannot see.

But you can form a very accurate idea of what is likely to happen from what has happened. Reasoning on that you can form your plot, and make it as ambitious as you choose.

If you do not do that, the chapters you string haphazard on the thread of life are likely to be very disconnected and dull and empty, and neither you nor anyone else will care much about reading them by and by.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

WHEN YOU FEEL LANGUID,
gloomy, without mental or physical energy, disinclined for exertion, and feeling that everything is a trouble. NICHOLL'S HOP TONIC prove wonderfully efficacious. Under its use the appetite is improved, food is better-digested, the liver stimulated, and you quickly become cheerful, energetic, and strong. It is the best remedy for constipation. Being a TRUE TONIC, its effects are permanent. Bottles, 2s and 3s 6d: per post, 2s 6d and 4s 3d. Sold only by I.W. NICHOLL, LTD., Medical Hall, 25 High Street, Belfast.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

BELFAST HARBOUR ACTS.

ELECTION OF COMMISSIONERS, 1924.

IN PURSUANCE of the Provisions of the Belfast Harbour Acts and the Acts incorporated therewith, I, WILLIAM EDWARD WILLIAMES, the Returning Officer, duly authorised in accordance with the provisions of the said Acts, do HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that the several persons hereinafter mentioned, that is to say --

RAYMOND AUGUSTINE BURKE,
THOMAS ROBERT BURNS,
RICHARD BEAMISH FAIR,
SAMUEL GRAY,
ROBERT ERNEST HERDMAN,
SAMUEL KELLY, Knight,
JAMES M'CONNELL,
CRAWFORD M'CULLAGH, Knight, and
ROBERT ARMSTRONG MITCHELL.

were the only persons duly proposed and seconded, and whose Proposal Papers were delivered to the Secretary of the Belfast Harbour Commissioners, as required by the said Acts, and not subsequently withdrawn, are Candidates for election as Harbour Commissioners, and inasmuch as the persons so proposed exceed the number of persons to be elected, I DO HEREBY FURTHER GIVE NOTICE that a Poll will be proceeded with and taken at Nine o'clock in the forenoon of Thursday, the 27th day of March, instant, at the Polling Stations, on the West side of the Clarendon Dock, in the City of Belfast, as prescribed by the said Acts.

The Poll will Close at the Hour of Four o'clock p.m.

WILLIAM E. WILLIAMES,
Returning Officer.

Dated this 20th March, 1924.

 

^ top of page

Belfast Telegraph - Friday, 21 March 1924

Births

THOMPSON -- March 15, 1924, at 26 Lisburn Road, to Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Thompson -- a daughter.

Marriages

EAGLES--RAINEY -- March 17, 1924, at the Cathedral, Lisburn, by the Rev. J.S. Taylor, M.A., Harry, only son of Mr. Harry Eagles and Mrs. Eagles, Broughton, Manchester, to Margaret, youngest daughter of Mr. James Rainey, Lisburn.

M'MURRAY--HUNTER -- March 12, 1924, at Drumbeg Parish Church, by Rev. J.S. Taylor, M.A., assisted by Archdeacon S. Hemphill, D.D.; Rev. Chancellor Benjamin Banks, M.A.; and Rev. W.H.N. Ruddick, M.A., Victor, son of Mr. W.J. M'Murray, J.P., Sylvan Hill, Lisburn, to Violet Edna elder daughter of Mr. Thomas Hunter and Mrs. Hunter, Hillside, Hillhall Road, Lisburn.

Deaths

ARMSTRONG -- March 20, 1924, at the District Hospital, Lisburn, Agnes, beloved wife of John Armstrong 18 Sloan Street, Lisburn. Funeral from her late residence, at 3 p.m., on to-morrow (Saturday), to Lisburn Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Husband and Family.

BEST -- March 21, 1924, at his residence, 198 North Queen Street, John Best. The remains of my beloved father will be removed from above address for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground, on Monday 24th inst., at 2.30 p.m. Jesus called him he was ready, For that home, so bright and fair; Up among the happy angels, He is waiting for us there. Inserted by his loving Daughter, Son-in-law, and Grandson, ANNIE AND WILLIAM MILLAR, 84 Mountcollyer Road.

BEST -- March 21, 1924, at his residence, 198 North Queen Street, John Best. The remains of my beloved father will be removed from above address for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground, on Monday, 24th inst., at 2.30 p.m. Though sad we mark the closing eye, Of those we love in days gone by. Yet sweet in death, their latest song, We'll meet again,'twill not be long. Inserted by his loving Daughter and Son-in-law, and Granddaughter, SARAH AND JOHN WATSON, Also ROBERT WALKER, 84 Mountcollyer Road, Belfast.

ADAM AND EVE R.B.P., No 83
BEST -- The Officers and Members of the above are requested to attend the funeral of their late esteemed Sir Knight and Brother, John Best, P.M., 198 North Queen Street, on Monday, at 2.30 p.m. JAMES M'GILTON, W.M. WILLIAM SLOAN, Registrar.

BOILERMAKERS, IRON AND STEEL SHIPBUILDERS BALLYMACARRETT no. 5 BRANCH.
BELL -- The Members of above Branch are requested to attend the funeral of their late respected Brother, Samuel Bell, on to-morrow (Saturday), at 2 p.m. J.STRANNIX, President. J.CLINTON, Secretary.

BINGHAM -- March 20, 1924, at his grandparents' residence, 9 Crossley Street, Henry (wee Harry), the beloved child of Henry and Jeanie Bingham. His remains will be removed from the above address on to-morrow (Saturday), at 3 p.m. for interment in the family burying-ground, Gilnahirk. Friends will please accept this intimation. It is well with the child; We can say it is well. He has tasted of sickness and death, The gasp and the groan, And the pain it may tell, He never will suffer again. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Parents. HENRY AND JEANIE BINGHAM. Also his Grandparents, WILLIAM AND JANE SCATES, GEORGE AND SARAH JANE BINGHAM.

BUSH -- March 19, 1924, at his residence, 8 Hurst Street, John Henry, the beloved husband of Amelia Bush. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Sister and Brother-in-law, CATHERINE AND WILLIAM FULLERTON. Monkstown

BUSH -- March 20, 1924, at his residence, 8 Hurst Street, John Henry (Jack), the dearly-beloved husband of Amelia Bush. His remains will be removed from the above address on Saturday, 22nd inst., at 2.30 p.m., for interment in the City Cemetery. "Some time, some day, we will understand." Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Wife and Children.

BUSH -- March 20, 1924, at his residence, 8 Hurst Street, John Henry Bush. The remains of our dear father will be removed on to-morrow (Saturday), at 2.30 p.m., for interment in the City Cemetery. Deeply regretted by his loving Daughter and Son-in-law, MARGARET AND WILLIAM CRAWFORD, 1a Donegall Road.

BUSH -- March 20, 1924, at his residence, 8 Hurst Street, John Henry (Jack). The remains of our dear brother will be removed for interment in the City Cemetery, on Saturday, 22nd inst., at 2.30 p.m. Deeply regretted by his loving Sister and Brother-in-law and Family. MARGARET AND JOSEPH REID, 184 Donegall Avenue. Also his Brother and Sister-in-law, BENJAMIN AND ROBINA BUSH, 41 Donnybrook Street.

CAMPBELL -- March 21, 1924, at her sister's residence, Ardmore, Crumlin, Elizabeth. The remains of my beloved sister will be removed for interment in the family burying-ground, Killead, on Sunday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. MARY ANN CAMPBELL.

DODD -- March 20, 1924, at his residence, Woodford, Dromara, County Down, Robert Dodd. Funeral strictly private, by request.

DONALDSON -- March 19, 1924, at her residence, Ballyvalley, Dromore Road, Banbridge, Agnes Donaldson. Funeral on to-morrow (Saturday), 22nd inst., at 3 p.m., to Ballydown Presbyterian Burying-ground. Inserted by her loving Daughter and Sons.

DOWNEY -- March 20, 1924, at Irish Quarter West, Carrickfergus, William H. Downey. -- R.I.P. (late of Falls Road). Funeral private.

EWART -- March 20, 1924, at his residence, 161 Bloomfield Avenue, John Ewart, Flesher, dearly-beloved husband of Elizabeth Ewart. His remains will be removed (by motor) from above address, on Sunday, at 2 p.m., for interment in the family burying-ground, Glebe, Anahilt. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Wife and Family. ELIZABETH EWART.

CITY TEMPERANCE MASONIC LODGE 481.
EWART -- The Officers and Members of above Lodge and other Brethren, are requested to attend the funeral of their late respected Brother, John Ewart. W.F. HOWE, W.M. HUGH M'KINLEY, P.M., Secretary.

JAMISON -- March 20, 1924, at the Hospital, Newtownards, William Jamison. The remains of my beloved husband will be removed from his late residence, 56 Movilla Street, Newtownards, for interment in Movilla Cemetery, on to-morrow (Saturday), at 3 p.m. SARAH JANE JAMISON.

MUNCE -- March 20, 1924, Robert, beloved husband of Jane Munce, 112 Hunter Street, Belfast. Funeral from his late residence, at 2.30 p.m., on Saturday, to Movilla Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. "In the midst of life we are in death." Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Wife and two Sons.

MUNCE -- March 20, 1924, at 112 Hunter Street, Belfast, Robert Munce. The remains of our beloved brother will be removed for interment in Movilla Cemetery, on Saturday, at 2.30 p.m., passing through Newtownards about 4 o'clock. Deeply regretted by his Brother and Sisters, JOSEPH MUNCE, SARAH NEVIN, MINNIE PATTERSON.

CLOCK DART CLUB.
MUNCE -- The Members of above Club are requested to attend the funeral of their highly respected Member. W.J. ARMSTRONG, President. J.NIXON, Chairman.

MURPHY -- March 21, 1924, at her residence, Lisburn Street, Hillsborough, Isabell, dearly-beloved wife of John Murphy. Funeral to Hillsborough Churchyard, on Sunday, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- Deeply regretted.

NEILL -- March 16, 1924, at Chesham, Bucks, John Neill, aged 53 years, Dentist, formerly of Belfast. Interment Chesham Cemetery, to-day (Friday), 21st inst.

FRIENDLY BROTHERS MASONIC LODGE, 609.
NEILL -- The W.M., Officers, and Brethren deeply regret the death of their esteemed Brother, John Neill, Chesham, Bucks, formerly of Belfast. JOHN TATE, W.M. J.M. TEUTON, P.M., Secretary.

REFORD -- On March 5, 1924, at his late residence, 117 Northcote Avenue, Toronto, Lamont Reford, only beloved son of Minnie and the late Joseph Reford aged 20 years. Interred Park Lawn Cemetery, Toronto, Canada.

REID -- March 21, 1924, at the residence of her father, 48 Landscape Terrace, Margaret M., the beloved wife of Joseph Reid, 99 Sandy Row. Funeral (per motor) from 48 Landscape Terrace, on Sunday 23rd inst., to New Cemetery, Cookstown, 2 p.m. sharp, arriving in Cookstown (Gortalowry) about 5 o'clock. No flowers, by request. "Absent from the body, present with the Lord." 2 Cor. 5, 8.

SHANNON -- March 20, 1924, at his residence, 23 Barton Street, Robert, dearly-beloved husband of Annie Shannon. His remains will be removed from above address for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, on Saturday, 22nd inst., at 2.30 p.m. ANNIE SHANNON

SWAIN -- March 21, 1924, at 29 Cyprus Park, Margaret Olive, youngest daughter of Robert Swain. Funeral private.

WILLIAMS -- March 20, 1924, at Larne Harbour, Captain Williams (formerly of Ballymena). Funeral to Ballymena New Cemetery, on to-morrow (Saturday), at 12 noon. FRED WILLIAMS.

WRIGHT -- March 21, 1924, at his residence, 7 Eccles Street. Hugh M'Bride, the dearly-beloved son of Robert and Sarah Wright. Notice of interment later. Deeply regretted by his Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

DONEGORE TRUE BLUES MASONIC LODGE No. 92.
WRIGHT -- The Officers and Brethren of above Lodge are requested to attend the funeral of their late highly-esteemed Brother, Hugh M'Bride Wright, S.D. WILLIAM ACHESON, W.M. JOHN TIMNEY, P.M., Secretary.

SIR CHARLES CAMERON MASONIC LODGE No. 353.
WRIGHT -- The Brethren of above Lodge are requested to attend the funeral of their late respected and esteemed Brother, Hugh M'Bride Wright. R. CLEMENTS LYTTLE, W.M. J.BARRIE, P.M., Secretary.

continued on page 11

LARGYMORE STAR OF THE NORTH R.B.P.
AMSTRONG -- The Officers and Members of above Preceptory are requested to attend the funeral of the wife of their esteemed Sir Knight and Brother, John Armstrong. F. ERVINE, W.M. EDWARD MATEER, Registrar.

BELL -- March 20, 1924, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Samuel Bell, only son of the late Andrew and Blanche Bell, of Glassdrummond, Ballynahinch. Funeral from the residence of his brother-in-law, Hamilton M'Master, Glassdrummond, at 2 p.m., to-morrow (Saturday) for interment in the family burying-ground, Cargycreevy. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.

BEST -- March 21, 1924, at his residence, 192 North Queen Street, John, the dearly-beloved husband of Ellen Best. His remains will be removed from above address on Monday at 2.30 p.m., for interment in Carnmoney. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. He told us he was weary, And fain would be at rest, He was daily, hourly, longing, For a home upon his Saviour's breast. Inserted by his loving Wife and Daughter, and Son, ELLEN BEST. American papers please copy.

HARVEY -- March 21, 1924, at 25 James Street, Newtownards. Hugh, dearly loved son of Hugh and Mary Harvey aged nine years. Funeral to Movilla on Sunday, at 3.30 p.m. No flowers.

KING -- March 21, 1924 (suddenly), at his parents' residence, 20 William Street, Portadown. Rev. William King, Chevington Vicarage, Morpeth, Northumberland. Funeral on Sunday, at 3 p.m., for St. Saviour's (The Dobbin).

M'CALLEN -- March 19, 1924 at her residence, 88 Mountjoy Street, Mary, the beloved wife of James M'Callen. Funeral from above address at 2.30 p.m. for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. Deeply regretted by her Husband and Sons.

M'GRUGAN -- March 20, 1924, at her residence, Parkgate. Martha, relict of the late William John M'Grugan. Her remains will be removed from her late residence, on to-morrow (Saturday) at 12 noon, for interment in Donegore Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Family.

WATT -- March 20, 1924, at his residence, 8 Stanley Street, Samuel Watt. The remains of my beloved husband will be removed for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, on to-morrow (Saturday), at 2 p.m. Deeply regretted, AGNES WATT.

WHITE -- March 21, 1924, at Smiley Cottage Hospital, Larne (the result of a motor accident), James, beloved husband of Sarah White. Funeral from his late residence, North West, Ballycarry, on Sunday, at 3 p.m., to Ballycarry Burying-ground. Deeply regretted. SARAH WHITE.

Thanks

Mr. BELL and Family desire to return their sincere thanks to all who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement, especially to those who sent floral tributes and letters of condolence. Hoping this will be accepted by all. -- 12 Spencer Street.

Mr. THOMAS HEASLEY and Family desire to express their sincere thanks to all those who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement, especially those who sent floral tributes and letters of condolence. Hoping this will be accepted by all. -- 19 Manor Drive.

Mr. JOHN MILLAR and Family desire to express their appreciation of the sympathy shown to them by their friends in their recent heavy loss, and to thank those who sent beautiful floral wreaths and letters of condolence. -- 1 Glenbrook Avenue, Bloomfield, Belfast.

Mr. S. STEWART and Family desire to thank the many kind friends of Charles Street South and others; also to the Officers and Members of L.O.L., 492, and R.B.P. 175 for their kind work and sympathy. Trusting all will accept this grateful acknowledgment. -- 29 Charles Street South.

In Memoriam

CARLISLE -- In sad remembrance of our dear son, Rifleman Robert Carlisle, 1209 16th Pioneers, killed in action March 21, 1918. Somewhere in France he is sleeping, One of the bravest and best; And the stars in the heavens are keeping A watch o'er his lone place of rest. "Greater love hath no man than this, to lay down his life for his friends." Ever remembered by his Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters, 67 Utility Street, Belfast.

CLELAND -- In ever-loving remembrance of my dear son, Thomas Cleland, who was accidentally killed on his 19th birthday, 21st March, 1922. Loved, missed, and remembered by his loving Mother, Sister, and Brothers. MARGARET J. CLELAND, 182 Upper Meadow Street.

COATES -- In loving memory of our dear mother, Annie Coates, who departed this life on 21st March, 1923, and was interred in Holywood cemetery. Within the pearly gates, Beyond the golden shore; The narrow river crossed - For evermore. Oh! happy they who join the other side, And waken in His likeness satisfied. ANNIE AND AGGIE COATES 118 Beersbridge Road.

CORBETT -- In loving remembrance of our dear daughters, Thomasina (dear Ding), who died 21st March, 1921, and Grace (wee Cissy), who died 16th March 1907. "Suffer little children to come unto Me." Lovingly remembered by their Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers. THOMAS H. AND M. A. CORBETT, Ardencliffe, Bangor, County Down, Also Outtrim, Australia.

HARRIS -- In loving memory of our dear son, Rifleman Alfred J.Harris, killed in action at St. Quentin, March 21, 1918. Ever remembered by his loving Father, Mother, and Brother. W.AND D. HARRIS AND W. HARRIS, Jun., 24 Prospect Street, Belfast.

HAUGHEY -- In loving remembrance of my dear son, 12200 Rifleman Henry Haughey, 10th Batt. Royal Irish Rifles, killed in action in France, 21st March 1918. Some day we hope to meet him, Some day, we know not when. To clasp his hand in a better land, Never to part again. Ever remembered by his sorrowing Mother and Sisters. 24 Gaffikin Street. MRS. HAUGHEY.

HYNDMAN -- In loving memory of dear mother, Elizabeth Hyndman, who died 21st March, 1920. Interred in Dundonald Cemetery. While mother lies in peaceful sleep, Her memory I will always keep. Ever remembered by her Daughter and Son-in-law, LIZZIE AND FRANK HANNA, 95 Clementine Street.

JACKSON -- In loving memory of my dear husband, Bandsman J.Jackson, 15th Batt. R.I.R. (missing), reported killed 21st March, 1918. Ever remembered. E. JACKSON, 46 Israel Street.

JOHNSTON -- In loving memory of our dear son, 634 Rifleman William J. (Willie) Johnston, 15th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, killed in action at St. Quentin, March 21, 1918. "For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with Him." He sleepeth in God's keeping, Free from life's care and pain: But the trumpet call will wake him, When Jesus comes again. Ever remembered by his loving Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters. WILLIAM AND MAGGIE JOHNSTON, 77 Lilliput Street, Belfast.

KIRKPATRICK -- In loving memory of John, only and dearly-beloved son of Margaret and the late James Kirkpatrick (late of Magheramorne), who departed this life on 21st March, 1921, and was interred in Inver Churchyard, Larne. MARGARET KIRKPATRICK, 12 Upper Canning Street.

MAGOOKIN -- In loving memory of my dear husband, Second Lieutenant W. D. Magookin, D.C.M., Royal Irish Rifles, killed in action at St. Quentin, March 21, 1918. Ever remembered. DOROTHEA MACGOOKIN, 28 Newport Street, Belfast.

M'CAULEY -- In loving memory of our dear son, Sapper Robert M'Cauley, Royal Engineers, killed in action on the 21st March, 1918. Ever remembered by his Father and Stepmother. ROBERT AND JENNY M'CAULEY, 10 Mill Lane, Ballyclare.

M'CLEMENTS -- In everlasting memory of my dear son, Rifleman W.J. M'Clements, 15th Batt. R.I.R., killed in action on the 21st March, 1918; also my dear husband, William M'Clements, who died on the 31st day of January 1910, and was interred in the family burying-ground, Rocavan. I cannot forget them, no, not for one day. I speak of them often, although passed away. The shock it was hard, no doubt, to bear, But Jesus has promised I shall meet them up there. Still sadly missed. Inserted by his loving Mother, Brothers, and Sisters. MARY M'CLEMENTS, 70 Christopher Street. Also his Uncle, SAM THOMPSON.

M'CLEMENTS -- In cherished remembrance of my dear brother, Rifleman, W. James M'Clements, killed on the 21st March, 1918. Always remembered by his loving Sister. AGGIE

M'CLEMENTS -- In ever-loving memory of my dear brother, Rifleman W.J. M'Clements, 15th Batt. R.I.R., killed in action on the 21st March, 1918. Death cannot sever the bond of my love, Nor steal the fond hope I shall meet him above. Never forgotten by his loving Sister and Brother-in-law. MARTHA AND DAVID HARVEY, 65 Christopher Street. Also his Nieces and Nephews.

M'GIBBEN -- In Lasting remembrance of our dear sons, Driver James M'Gibben, R.F.A., killed in action at the Somme, 25th August, 1916; and Rifleman Samuel M'Gibben, killed in action at St. Quentin, 21st March, 1918. Waiting in a holy stillness, Wrapt in sleep. Still mourned by Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers. 25 Palestine Street.

M'PHERSON -- In loving memory of my dear daughter, Sarah M'Pherson (Teddie), who departed this life 21st March, 1922, and was interred in City Cemetery. HENRY FULTON, 6 Bellevue Terrace, Lisburn Road.

SINGLETON -- In loving memory of our dear son, 57527 Corporal George Singleton, Royal Engineers, who was killed in active service in France, on 21st March, 1918. "Gone, but not forgotten." Inserted by his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sister, Brother, and Brother-in-law. GEORGE AND MARGARET SINGLETON, 4 Fleet Street.

SMART -- In loving memory of my dear father, who departed this life on the 21st March, 1923 "Too good in life to be forgotten in death." Ever remembered by his loving Daughter and Son-in-law. MARGARET AND JOHN LYNN, 113a Rugby Avenue.

SMEETH -- In loving memory of my dear husband, 1105 Rifleman James B. Smeeth, 15th Royal Irish Rifles, killed in action 21st March, 1918. Always remembered by his loving Wife and Family. 7 Malvern Street.

THOMPSON -- In loving memory of my dearly-beloved wife, Agnes Thompson, who departed this life on March 21, 1920, and was interred in Donaghadee Churchyard. Every moment I do miss her, Sadly do I feel her loss. Lonely is my home without her, Help me, Lord, to bear my cross. JOHN THOMPSON. Moat Street, Donaghadee.

WILLIAMSON -- In ever loving memory of our dear son and brother, Archie, missing on 21st March, 1918, No. 19550 12th Royal Irish Rifles. 108 Crumlin Road.

Clippings

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

MEAN KIND OF FRAUD.

BELFAST CLERGYMEN SWINDLED.

"FUNERAL EXPENSES" PLEA.
DEAN OF CONNOR AS WITNESS.

An amazing story of how Belfast clergymen were invited to officiate at a bogus funeral, and to contribute towards the funeral expenses, was related in the Belfast Custody Court to-day. Facing the bench were seated eight clergymen in a row, and they all testified as to how they had been hoaxed.

District-Inspector Spears, who had prosecuted, commented that it was a long time since they had such a fine attendance of the representatives of the Churches.

The accused was a neatly-groomed young man named John Houston, whose address was given as Beechmount Avenue, and he was indicted on eight charges of receiving money by false pretences. He was defended by Mr. John Graham, and ordered six months' imprisonment on each count, the sentences to run concurrently.

The first witness was Rev. John M'Keown, Ashley Avenue. He informed the Court that on the 14th of this month the prisoner came to his door and said his name was Houston, and that he lived in Lisburn Avenue. He said Mr. Rodgers of Ulsterville, could not come to officiate at the funeral of his wife, and he asked witness if he could come. Witness said he would try and attend. Prisoner told witness that his wife had died in Southampton, and that he was bringing her over. He said the charge was five guineas and that he had only 4, and he asked witness if he would give him the 25s to make up the amount required to bring her over. He said if he got the money he would pay witness the money back that evening or the next morning. Witness had only 30s in his pocket at the time, and he gave it to the accused.

"A short time afterwards," said the witness, "it dawned upon me that I had done a stupid thing and the next morning I went to Lisburn Avenue about the funeral and I discovered that there was no person the name of Houston there." Witness then informed the police of what had happened.

Mr. Graham -- Words are insufficient to express what I think about the matter. (Laughter.) You were very charitable to him and believed his story. You will be more careful in future, I take it.

Witness -- I was not very well that day.

Very Rev. W. Dowse, Dean of Connor, was next called, and said that on the 14th inst. The prisoner came to his house and told him that he was in difficulties as his wife and children were across the water and he wanted to bring them home. Mr. Gray, R.M. -- did you never know him before?

The Dean -- No. Proceeding, witness said that after the accused had told his story he gave him 15s, and after he went away witness missed a pair of gloves that were in the hall.

Mr. Graham -- Dean, you were let in also. (Laughter.)

Dean Dowes -- I was.

Mr. Graham -- I am surprised at you. (Laughter.)

The Dean -- I am surprised at myself.

Rev. Walter A. Somers, Avoca, Lisburn Road, said that on the 11th of this month the accused came to his residence and said his name was Houston, and that he lived at 17 Fitzwilliam Street. He told witness that his wife had died at Southampton, and he asked witness for 17s 6d, which witness gave to him. He invited witness to officiate at the funeral at 2.30 on the following day. When witness went to take the service he found that there was no person of the name of Houston at the address given.

Rev. Samuel B. Mitchell, Oakleigh, Osborne Park, stated that the defendant called with him and told him about his "wife" having died across the water, and said that he was bringing the "body" home. He asked witness to arrange for the funeral, and on the representations which the accused had made witness advanced him 5s.

Mr. Graham -- Apparently he asked for too little from you. I observe that in one case he got more than he had asked. (Laughter.) The clergy have been very charitable to this man.

Rev. Charles S. Greaves, The Mount, said the accused came to him on the 10th inst. and asked witness to attend the funeral of his "wife" on the following day. Accused gave witness his address as Ravensdale Street. Witness gave prisoner 15s to help to pay the "funeral expenses." When witness called on the following day at the address given he discovered that no death had taken place.

Mr. Graham -- This is something new for you Mr. Greaves. (Laughter.)

"25 IN THE POST OFFICE."

Rev. Alexander Ashworth, Cyprus Park, deposed to the accused calling him on the 10th March. Prisoner gave witness his address as 201 York Street. He told him that his wife had died at Southampton, and he wanted to bring the "body" over as well as his two children. He said his wife had 25 in the Post Office, and he asked witness for 10s until he would get the money out of the Post Office. Witness gave him the 10s, and the accused signed an I.O.U. for it. (Laughter.) Witness afterwards discovered that the prisoner did not reside at 201 York Street.

Mr. Gray, R.M. -- You did not make any inquiries before you lent him the money? Witness -- Certainly not.

Mr. Graham -- You were more cautious than any of the others, Mr. Ashworth. I am afraid the value of the I.O.U. is no better security than any they have got. (Laughter.)

Rev. William Nesbitt, Ballygomartin Road, told of the accused calling with him on the 13th inst., and telling him a similar story to what he had told the other witnesses. Witness gave the accused 25s.

Rev. David Hill, Cliftonpark Avenue, proved having given 15s to the accused after he had told him a like story.

Mr. Graham, in his address to the Court, said that this case was amusing only from the point of view that clergymen had been "let down" in giving money to this man. He thought it was a tribute to charity and generosity of the clergymen of every denomination in Belfast as to how they acted in cases where genuine charity might be required. Unfortunately in this case the clergy had been imposed upon, and his (Mr. Graham's) old friend, Dean Dowes, had been "let down" along with the rest. While that case was amusing, it also had a tragic side. The accused was a young man of 25 years of age. He had served nine years with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, and he (Mr. Graham) had been instructed that he won the D.C.M. in the war. Apparently he had had an honourable military career, and he was discharged in January, 1923. He had never yet been in prison. He had been out of employment, and he fell to that crime.

The court ruled as stated.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

FOR DUTY -- NOT REWARD.

The hope of success, and not the hope of reward, should be our stimulating and sustaining power. Our object, and not ourselves, should be our inspiring thought. Selfishness is a sin, when temporary, and for time. Spun out to eternity, it does not become celestial prudence. We should toil and die, not for heaven or bliss, but for duty. -- Albert Pike.

"LARCENY BY TRICK."

PREMIUM TO GET WORK.
BELFAST MAN REMANDED.

At the Belfast Custody Court to-day, Mr. John Gray, R.M., presiding. Alfred Edward Yeates, Donegall Pass, was remanded in custody for a week. He was charged with the larceny by means of a trick of £2 in money, the property of Wm. Cobain, 43 Park Avenue, Belfast.

William Cobain, giving evidence, said that on the 6th inst. he saw an advertisement in a newspaper, which read: "Wanted, a young man to learn upholstering, good wages; small capital required." Witness replied to the advertisement, and on the 10th inst. received a card from prisoner at Cromac Street. Witness on going there was asked for a small premium of £10, which the witness could not produce. He had only £2.

Several meetings took place after, at which further arrangements were made to begin business.

On Thursday, 13th inst., at a meeting which took place between the witness and accused the accused asked witness for the remaining £8, which witness said he had not.

Prisoner then said, "There's another day lost. I could have got the £10 down from another chap without any trouble."

Witness was requested to bring money on Friday morning.

Constable David Baird stated that he went to Cromac Street on Friday morning and found prisoner standing in Cromac Street, and he arrested him, and, when cautioned, prisoner said, "I am not guilty."

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

BIG DAY AT ROBSON'S.

CATTLE SHOW AND SALE.
STEADY DEMAND: GOOD TRADE.

The scene at the Victoria Horse Bazaar, Messrs. Robson's Ltd., Chichester Street, Belfast, to-day was one of abounding activity. Once more it was the annual grand show and sale-the forty-ninth-and there was a big entry of pedigree and non-pedigree cattle. These included shorthorn bulls, Aberdeen-Anguses bulls and cows, registered dairy bulls, and British Friesians, and all were characterised by a high standard of merit.

Judging commenced at an early hour in six classes and was finished in excellent time. The judges were Mr. Alexander Cameron, J.P., Cookstown, who had charge of the shorthorn department, and Mr. Martin, of the Belfast Co-operative farm, who looked after the friesians. There was much keeness of competition, making it difficult to award prizes in several cases; but the decisions arrived at gave entire satisfaction.

The duties of chief steward were ably discharged by Mr. John M'Robert, junior, whose father, Mr. John M'Robert, J.P., Rademon, laid aside by illness for some time, performed the same office for quite a long period, with every possible acceptance. Indeed, the figure of that veteran stockowner and agriculturist was very much missed at this enterprise, as also at the great effort of the Royal Ulster Agricultural Society during the past few days, and the hope of his many friends is that he may soon be restored to health and strength again.

The awards were as follows:-

Best Non-Pedigree Shorthorn Bull, calved between 1st January and 31st March, 1923 inclusive -1, Mr. Thomas Linton, Glarryford -- Rose Prince; 2, Mr. Hamilton Holden, Broughshane -- Rover; 3, Messrs. J. and J. Thompson, Dromore, Co. Down -- Star of Ulster; reserve, Mr. John Fleck, Broughshane -- Red Prince; very highly commended, Mr. James Montford, Little Ballymena -- Iris Crown II; highly commended, Mr. John L. Gilpin, Waringstown -- Rex.

Best Non-pedigree Shorthorn Bull, calved between 1st April and 30th June, 1923 inclusive -- 1, Mr. James Montford, Little Ballymena -- Sir William; 2, Mr. Thomas Linton, Glarryford -- Beauty's Pet; 3, Mr. Thomas Linton, Glarryford -- Hero; reserve, Messrs. J. and J. Thompson, Dromore -- Victor; very highly commended, Mr. Dynes Gilpin, Lurgan -- Red Barron; highly commended, Mr. Samuel M'Burney, Broughshane [-- text continued --]

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

THE ONE-DAY STRIKE AGITATION.

BIGGEST MISTAKE POSSIBLE.
NOT PRACTICAL POLITICS.

The policy of a one-day strike in order to call attention to the plight of the unemployed was discussed at a meeting in the Alhambra Theatre yesterday -- Mt. T. M'Donald (Plumbers) being in the chair.

The resolution calling upon trade unions to support the movement was spoken to by Mr. H. Midgley and Alderman Donaldson, who were followed by Councillor Milan. The latter said that according to the terms of the resolution, trade unionists were called upon to enforce a twenty-four hours' strike. With all due reference to the unemployed, organised and unorganised, he thought that was the biggest mistake possible. What did it mean? It might be popular in some directions, and unpopular in others. What it really meant was that the industrial worker would be unemployed for twenty-four hours, and that the whole fabric of their industrial activities would be undermined. It would mean that their shipbuilding, housebuilding, and all other activities would cease. Would it not, he asked, be better to ask the workers who were employed to contribute, at least one hour's wage, in support of the unemployed, apart from any consideration of what they might be entitled to under present legislation in regard to relief? He (Mr. Milan) put that before them on the ground of practical politics: Would it be wise to hold up the whole industrial machinery, as was suggested by the resolution?

The problem of unemployment (proceeded Councillor Milan) was not one of wages entirely, but a question of absorbing the unemployed as far as possible into employment, and he did not think that a strike, as suggested, would be effective. The Labour Government, up to the present, had not solved unemployment, but had found itself up against difficulties. He did not believe the resolution was at all practical politics, and he did not think the majority of trade union officials believed it could be carried out satisfactorily. He himself sympathised deeply with the unemployed [-- text continued --]

 

^ top of page

Belfast Telegraph - Saturday, 22 March 1924

Marriages

RUSSELL--NUTT -- March 19, 1924, at St. Enoch's Presbyterian Church, by the Rev. John Pollock, assisted by the Rev. James Nutt, B.A., brother of the bride, Herbert Alexander Russell, Shankill Road, Belfast, to Mary Barron Nutt, Berlin Street, Belfast.

Deaths

BEST -- March 21, 1924, at his residence, 198 North Queen Street, John, the dearly-beloved husband of Ellen Best. His remains will be removed from above address on Monday at 2.30 p.m., for interment in Carnmoney. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. He told us he was weary, And fain would be at rest. He was daily, hourly, longing, For a home upon his Saviour's breast. Inserted by his loving Wife and Daughters, and Son. ELLEN BEST. American papers please copy.

BEST -- March 21, 1924, at his residence, 198 North Queen Street, John Best. The remains of my beloved father will be removed from above address for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground, on Monday 24th inst., at 2.30 p.m. Jesus called him, he was ready, For that home, so bright and fair; Up among the happy angels, He is waiting for us there. Inserted by his loving Daughter, Son-in-law and Grandson, ANNIE AND WILLIAM MILLAR, 84 Mountcollyer Road.

BEST -- March 21, 1924, at his residence, 198 North Queen Street, John Best. The remains of my beloved father will be removed from above address for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground, on Monday, 24th inst., at 2.30 p.m. Though sad we mark the closing eye, Of those we loved in days gone by. Yet sweet in death, their latest song, We'll meet again, 'twill not be long. Inserted by his loving Daughter and Son-in-law, and Granddaughter. SARAH AND JOHN WATSON, Also ROBERT WALKER, 84 Mountcollyer Road, Belfast

CRUSADERS F.C.
BEST -- Members and Players will please attend funeral of their late respected Member, John Best. T. M'ILVEEN, Chairman, W. TODD, Secretary

CAMPBELL -- March 21, 1924, at her sister's residence, Ardmore, Crumlin, Elizabeth. The remains of my beloved sister will be removed for interment in the family burying-ground, Killead, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at 2 o'clock. MARY ANN CAMPBELL.

CAMPBELL -- March 21, 1924, at her late residence, Ballymuldro, Islandmagee, Mary Jane, formerly of 10 Tramway Street, Belfast. Funeral to-morrow (Sunday), at 3.30 p.m., to Ballyprior Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. SARAH E. CAMPBELL.

CASSELLS -- March 21, 1924, at her residence 2 Main Street, Whiteabbey, Alice, beloved wife of Robert Cassels. Funeral from her late residence, to-morrow (Sunday), at 2.30 p.m., for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Husband and Family.

R.A.O.B. -- ANCHOR LODGE, 4890, WHITEABBEY
CASSELLS -- Officers and Members of above Lodge are requested to attend the funeral of the mother of their esteemed Brother, Isaac Cassels, from her late residence, 2 Main Street, Whiteabbey, on Sunday, at 2.30 p.m. J.BAILEY, W.P., J. ANDERSON, Secretary.

EWART -- March 20, 1924, at his residence, 161 Bloomfield Avenue, John Ewart, Flesher, dearly-beloved husband of Elizabeth Ewart. His remains will be removed (by motor) from above address, on Sunday, at 2 p.m., for interment in the family burying-ground, Glebe, Anahilt. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Wife and Family. ELIZABETH EWART.

CITY TEMPERANCE MASONIC LODGE 481.
EWART -- The Officers and Members of above Lodge and other Brethren are requested to attend the funeral of their late respected Brother, John Ewart. W.F. HOWE, W.M., HUGH M'KINLEY, P.M., Secretary.

HARVEY -- March 21, 1924, at 26 James Street, Newtownards, Hugh, dearly-loved son of Hugh and Mary harvey aged nine years. Funeral to Movilla, on to-morrow (Sunday), at 3.30 p.m. No Flowers.

HORNER -- March 22, 1924, at her son-in-law's residence, 132 Ainsworth Avenue, Maria, the beloved wife of Andrew Horner. Her remains will be removed from above address on Monday, 24th inst., at 1 p.m. for interment in Kilbride Burying-ground, passing through Ballyclare about 2 o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. Deeply regretted by her Husband and Son, ANDREW AND JOHN HORNER, Also her daughter and Son-in-law, ANNIE AND WILLIAM GROVES.

KANE -- March 21, 1924, at her daughter's residence, Hillcrest, Islandmagee, Eliza, widow of the late John Kane, The Heugh, Islandmagee. Her remains will be removed on Sunday, at 3 p.m., for interment in Old Church Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Family.

KING -- March 21, 1924 (suddenly), at his parents' residence, 20 William Street, Portadown, Rev. William King, Chevington Vicarage, Morpeth, Northumberland. Funeral on to-morrow (Sunday) at 3 p.m., for St. Saviour's (The Dobbin).

KING -- March 22, 1924, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, William, the dearly-beloved husband of Helen King. Funeral from his late residence, 65 Nevis Avenue, on Monday, at 2.30 p.m., for interment in Dundonald Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. HELEN KING.

LENNON -- March 22, 1924, at her residence, 45 Brookmount Street, Ann Jane. The remains of our dearly-beloved mother will be removed from the above address for interment in Carnmoney Cemetery, on Monday, March 24, at 2.30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted by her sorrowing daughters. M. AND L. LENNON, 45 Brookmount Street, Belfast.

M'COLLAM -- March 22, 1924, Susan, beloved wife of John M'Collam, Stationmaster, Templepatrick. Her remains will be removed from her late residence, to Templepatrick Churchyard, on Monday, 24th inst., at 2 p.m. Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Husband and Family.

M'GOOKIN -- March 21, 1924, at his parents' residence, Hyde Park, Mallusk, Joseph, the beloved child of Robert and Martha M'Gookin. His remains will be removed from above address on to-morrow (Sunday), at 2 p.m., for interment in Mallusk Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this intimation. "Suffer little children to come unto Me." Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Parents, ROBERT AND MARTHA M'GOOKIN.

M'GOOKIN -- March 21, 1924, at his parents' residence, Hydepark, Mallusk, Joseph. The remains of our dear brother will be removed for interment in Mallusk Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Sunday), at 2 p.m. Deeply regretted by his loving Sister and Brother-in-law, MARY AND SAM JACKSON.

M'MANUS -- March 22, 1924, at her parents' residence, 18 Lisburn Street, Belfast, Mary Teresa M'Manus, the youngest and dearly-beloved daughter of James and Martha M'Manus. Her remains will be removed from above address on Monday, 24th inst., at 2 p.m., for interment in Milltown R.C. Cemetery. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. "Safe in the arms of Jesus." Inserted by her sorrowing Father, Mother, and Grandfather, JAMES, MARTHA, and JOHN M'MANUS.

M'MENAMANY -- March 19, 1924, at 19 Alma Road, Monkstown, Co. Dublin, Patrick M'Menamany, J.P., late of Strabane. -- R.I.P. His remains arrived at Strabane to-day, at 2.30 p.m. Funeral to Burying-ground, at Melmont, on to-morrow (Sunday), 23rd inst., after late Mass.

PURVIS -- March 22, 1924, at his parents' residence, 70 Hopeton Street, James Kelly Purvis, eldest son of Mary and James Purvis. His remains will be removed from the above address on Monday, at 2.30, for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground. "Safe in the arms of Jesus." Deeply regretted by his sorrowing parents, JAMES AND MARY PURVIS.

COL. EAGAR MEMORIAL TEMPERANCE FLUTE BAND.
PURVIS -- The Officers and Members of the above Band are requested to attend the funeral of the son of their esteemed Chairman, James Purvis. J.SIMPSON, Vice-Chairman, S. WARKE, Secretary.

REID -- March 21, 1924, at the residence of her father, 48 Landscape Terrace, Margaret M., the beloved wife of Joseph Reid, 99 Sandy Row. Funeral (per motor) from 48 Landscape Terrace, on to-morrow (Sunday). inst., to New Cemetery, Cookstown, 2 p.m. sharp, arriving in Cookstown (Gortalowry), about 5 o'clock. No flowers, by request. "Absent from the body, present with the Lord." 2 Cor. 5. 8.

SCOTT -- March 22, 1924, at his parents' residence, 118 Grand Street, Low Road, Lisburn, Samuel, youngest and dearly-loved child of David L. and Annie Scott. Funeral on to-morrow (Sunday), at 3.30 p.m., for interment in family burying-ground, Hillhall Presbyterian Churchyard. Friends will please accept this intimation. "Gone to be with Christ, which is far better." Deeply regretted.

WHITE -- March 21, 1924, at Smiley Cottage Hospital, Larne (the result of a motor accident), James, beloved husband of Sarah White. Funeral from his late residence, North West, Ballycarry, on Sunday, at 3 p.m., to Ballycarry Burying-ground. Deeply regretted, SARAH WHITE.

WRIGHT -- March 21, 1924, at his residence, 7 Eccles Street, Hugh M'Bride, the dearly-beloved son of Robert and Sarah Wright. His remains will be removed from above address on to-morrow (Sunday), at 1.30 p.m., for interment in the Old Meeting-house Green, Banbridge. Deeply regretted by his Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters. American papers please copy.

SIR CHARLES CAMERON MASONIC LODGE, No. 353.
WRIGHT -- The Brethren of above Lodge are requested to attend the funeral of their late respected and esteemed Brother, Hugh M'Bride Wright. R. CLEMENTS LYTTLE, W.M., J.BARRIE, P.M. Secretary.

DONEGORE TRUE BLUES MASONIC LODGE, No. 92.
WRIGHT -- The Officers and Brethren of above Lodge are requested to attend the funeral of their late highly-esteemed Brother, Hugh M'Bride Wright, S.D. WILLIAM ACHESON, W.M., JOHN TIMNEY, P.M., Secretary.

YORK L.O.L., 145
WRIGHT -- The Members of above Lodge and other Brethren are requested to attend the funeral of their late highly-esteemed Brother, H.M'B. Wright. EDWARD LEATHEM, W.M., JOHN SAYERS, Secretary.

SIR CHARLES LANYON ROYAL ARCH CHAPTER, No. 64.
WRIGHT -- The Members of above Chapter and other Companions are requested to attend the funeral of their esteemed Companion Hugh M'Bride Wright. HENRY BRANNINGAN, E.K., JAMES WEBSTER, P.K., Reg.

continued on Page 9

GALBRAITH -- March 21, 1924, at her residence 33 Beresford Street, Mary Galbraith, relict of the late George Galbraith. The remains of our beloved mother will be removed from above address for interment to Balmoral Burying-ground, at 2.30 p.m. on Monday. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. Deeply regretted by her Sons, JOSEPH AND THOMAS GALBRAITH.

GUIDERA -- March 22, 1924, at his residence, 50 Scotch Street, John, relict of Rose Ann Guidera, -- R.I.P. Funeral on Monday, at 10.30, to Milltown Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

HANNA -- March 22, 1924, at her residence, Drumaness P.O., Martha, widow of the late R.H. Hanna. Funeral at 1 o'clock p.m. to Clough, on Monday, 24th March. R.J. HANNA

O'LOAN -- March 21, 1924, at the Union Hospital, Henry O'Loan (Harry). Funeral from 64 Cullingtree Road to Milltown Cemetery, on Monday, 24th inst., at 1.30 p.m. -- R.I.P. JAMES O'LOAN.

SMYTH -- March 21, 1924, at the Hospital, Paisley, William Smyth, late of Millbrook, Lisburn. Interred to-day at Johnstone Cemetery, Scotland. GEORGE SMYTH.

STEPHENS -- March 22, 1924, at her residence, 49 Carmel Street, Belfast. Matilda, relict of the late Oliver Stephens, Aughnagegna, Crosserlough, Co. Cavan. Funeral notice later.

Thanks

Mr. and Mrs. CAMPBELL and Family desire to thank the many kind friends who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement, also those who sent wreaths and floral tributes and letters of condolence. Hoping this will be accepted by all. -- 15 Brookmount Street.

Mrs. R. COLLINS desires to return her sincere thanks to the many kind friends who sympathised with her in her recent sad bereavement; also to the Officials and Employees of Messrs. John Harkness and Co., and I.O.R., Conqueror Tent, and to all those who sent floral tributes. Hoping this will be accepted by all. -- 39 Vernon Street, Belfast.

Mrs. CORRIGAN and Family desire to return their sincere thanks to the many friends who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement, especially to Mr. Eveans and Mr. Scott, and Commanding Officers and rank and file of the "B" Special Constabulary; also Sackville Football and Dart Club; also to the Rivetters and workers of Workman and Clark's North Yard, and to the friends and neighbours for their beautiful flowers and wreaths, and to those who attended the funeral. Hoping this will be accepted by all. -- 51 Snugville Street.

Mr. THOMAS CROTHERS, also Mr. and Mrs. MAGOWAN and Family desire to return sincere thanks to all who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement, especially the Reelers of Ewart's, Crumlin Road Mill, and also the neighbours for their beautiful wreaths. Hoping this acknowledgment will be accepted by all. -- 48 Vistula Street.

Mrs. R. J.GAMBLE wishes to return her sincere thanks to all those who sympathised with her in her recent sad bereavement, especially Sisters and Nurses of No. 7 Ward, Royal Victoria Hospital; also Members of Sidon R.A.C. 275, and Sidon Masonic Lodge 275, for their beautiful wreaths; also those who sent letters of condolence. Hoping this will be accepted by all. -- 15 Dublin Road.

Mr. JOHN JACKSON and Family desire to express their sincere thanks to the many kind friends who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement, and to all those who sent beautiful floral tributes and letters of condolence. Trusting this will be accepted by all. -- 24 Agra Street.

Mr. LUTTON and Daughter wish to tender their sincere thanks to all those who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement; especially the Weavers of the New Northern; also Charter's Branch and South Belfast Women's L.O.L., No. 17, and to R.B.P., 902, and L.O.L. 592. To those also who sent beautiful floral tributes and letters of condolence. Trusting all will accept this grateful acknowledgment. -- 11 Forsythe Street.

Mrs. ORR and Family, 37 Church Street, Bangor, desire to thank all those who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement, especially those who sent floral tributes and letters of condolence.

In Memoriam

BERESFORD -- In Loving memory of my dear husband, Andrew Beresford, who died 22nd March 1922, and was interred in Donegore Churchyard. Every moment I do miss him, Sadly do I feel his loss. Ever remembered by his loving Wife and Daughters; also Son-in-law, D. Lennox. ELIZABETH BERESFORD, 269 Upper Newtownards Road.

BERESFORD -- In loving memory of my dear father, who departed this life on 22nd March, 1922, and was interred in Donegore Churchyard. "Thy will be done." Ever remembered by his Son and Daughter-in-law. J. AND E. BERESFORD.

CHERMSIDE -- In sad and loving memory of our dear son, William Chermside, R.U.C., who was killed in May Street, Belfast, while in the execution of his duty on 23rd March, 1922, and was interred in Ballyphilip Churchyard. When the shades of night are falling, And the work of the day is done. I can see through the dark as a mother can, The face of her darling son. Father in heaven we bow to Thy will, But oh! for the sound of the voice that is still. Never forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, and Sister, JOHN, MARGARET AND LILY CHERMSIDE, South Shore, Portaferry.

CHERMSIDE -- In sad and loving memory of our dear brother, William Chermside, R.U. (S.) C., murdered in May Street, Belfast, by rebels whilst in the execution of his duty, 23rd March, 1922. Dear is the spot where our Willie is laid, Sweet is the memory that never shall fade, Sure is the hope that again we shall meet, Kneeling together at Jesus' feet. Inserted by his Sister and Brother-in-law, MAGGIE AND HUGH JOHNSTON, Liberty, Portaferry.

CHERMSIDE -- In sad and loving memory of our dear brother, William Chermside, R.U.(S.)C., murdered in May Street, Belfast, by rebels whilst in the execution of his duty on 23rd March 1922. Our lips cannot speak how we loved him, Our hearts cannot tell what to say; God only knows how we miss him, As we battle along life's rough way. Inserted by his loving Brother and Sister-in-law. JAMES AND LIZZIE CHERMSIDE, Kearney, Portaferry.

CUNNINGHAM -- In loving remembrance of our dearest nephew, Constable Thomas R. Cunningham, who was murdered by rebels in May Street, on 23rd March, 1922, and was laid to rest in Newtownbreda Cemetery. He has gone through the beautiful gate, Away to the city of gold, Which knows no sorrow, sin or pain, He is safe in the heavenly fold. Ever lovingly remembered. R. AND M.HESLIP. 24 Gosford Street.

CUNNINGHAM -- In cherished and everlasting remembrance of our much-loved nephew, Thomas R. Cunningham, R.U.(S.)C., who lost his life in May Street, on 23rd March 1922, aged 23 years. Angels smile to see us weeping, For the one in God's safe keeping. So dearly loved, so sadly missed by his Aunt and Uncle. 22 Gosford Street.

GLENCROSS -- In memory of Lance-Corporal Louis Glencross, R.I.F., 12940, who died March 22, 1923 and was interred in Ballyhalbert. Ever remembered. And those that think of you tonight, Are the ones that loved you best. JOHN AND M. M'CULLOUGH.

LARMOUR -- In fond and loving memory of my dear wife and our dear mother, who departed this life on the 23rd March, 1919, and was interred in City Cemetery. Ever remembered by her loving Husband and Family. 141 Oldpark Road. A.A. LARMOUR

LARMOUR -- In loving memory of my dear mother, who departed this life on the 23rd March, 1919, and was interred in the City Cemetery. Ever remembered by her loving Son. Windsor, Ont., Canada. BERTIE LARMOUR

LARMOUR -- In affectionate remembrance of our dear mother, who departed this life 23rd March, 1919, and was laid to rest in the City Cemetery. Inserted by her Daughter and Son-in-law, SARAH AND MATT M'ALLISTER. Windsor, Ont., Canada.

LARMOUR -- In loving memory of our dear mother, who died March 23, 1919. Ever remembered by her Son and Daughter-in -law, 307 Antrim Road, JIM AND LIZZIE.

LARMOUR -- in fond memory of my dear mother, who died on the 23rd March, 1919, and was interred in City Cemetery. Ever remembered. Germany. (Private) E. LARMOUR.

MOORE -- In loving memory of my dear wife and our dear mother, Margaret Ann Moore, who departed this life on the 22nd March, 1923, and was interred in Dundonald Cemetery. Sadly missed by her sorrowing Husband and Family, Sisters and Brothers. DAVID MOORE, 27 Annette Street.

M'GOWAN -- In loving memory of our dear son, George, who fell asleep in Jesus, 23rd March, 1923, and was interred in St. Patrick's Cemetery, Dundalk. "Until the day break." His loving father and Mother, JAMES AND ELIZABETH M'GOWAN, Mount Hamilton, Dundalk.

M'GOWAN -- In loving memory of our dear brother, Georgie, who fell asleep on March 23, 1923, and was laid to rest in St. Patrick's Cemetery, Dundalk. "Thy way not ours, O Lord." Ever remembered by his loving Sister and Brother-in-law. SARAH AND LESLIE HARKNETT, Mount Hamilton, Dundalk.

M'GOWAN -- In loving memory of our dear brother, George, who departed this life 23rd March 1923, and was interred in St. Patrick's Cemetery. "Gone, but not forgotten." Ever remembered by his loving Brother and Sister-in-law, WILLIE AND JESSIE M'GOWAN, 27 Broughton Street, Dundalk.

continued on Page 9

CLARKE -- In loving memory of our dear mother, Liza Jane Clarke, who passed peacefully away on 22nd March, 1923, and was interred in Carnmoney Cemetery. While mother lies in peaceful sleep, Her memory we will always keep. Sadly missed by her Daughter and Son-in-law, AGNES AND JAMES SOFTLEY. Also her Grandchildren, 33 Killarney Street.

HOLLOWAY -- In fond and loving memory of my dear husband and our dear father, Andrew Holloway, who died on the 22nd March, 1923, and was interred in Dundonald Cemetery. It was very hard for him to part, From his family all so dear; 'Twas hard for them to say "Thy will be done." And stop the falling tear. Farewell, awhile, we'll meet again, Upon the golden shore, Where death-divided loved ones, at last, Shall meet to part no more. Ever remembered by his loving Wife and Family; also his Mother, MINNIE HOLLOWAY, 64 Percy Street, Belfast.

HOLLOWAY -- In affectionate remembrance of my dear son-in-law, Andrew Holloway, who departed this life on 22nd March, 1923. "Too good in life to be forgotten in death." Sadly missed by his Mother-in-law, Father-in-law, Sister-in-law, and Brother-in-law, 1 Cumberland Street.

MATIER -- In loving memory of my dear husband, Richard Matier, who departed this life on the 23rd March, 1920, and was interred in City Cemetery. Ever remembered by his loving Wife and family, MARGARET MATIER, 2 Willow Street.

M'CROSSAN- In loving memory of my dear son, Corporal R.J. M'Crossan, killed in action on 22nd March, 1918, at St. Quentin. I cannot forget him, no not for one day: I speak of him often although passed away, The shock it was hard no doubt to bear, But Jesus has promised I shall meet him up there. Ever remembered by his Father, Sisters, and Brothers, 49 Burnaby Street.

NEILL -- In loving memory of our dear daughter, Maggie, who departed this life on 22nd March 1923, and was interred in Dundonald Cemetery. We cannot forget her, no, not for one day, We speak of her often, although passed away; The shock it was hard, no doubt to bear, But Jesus has promised we shall meet her up there. Ever remembered by her Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers; also Brothers-in-law, Nieces and Nephew, 31 Armitage Street.

Clippings

PORT OF BELFAST.

ULSTER'S GREAT SEAPORT.

BY M.J. WATKINS.
General Manager and Secretary of the Belfast Harbour Commission.

Reprinted from "World Ports," the monthly bulletin of the American Association of Port Authorities, European Harbour and Dock Association, Pacific East Coast Association of Port Authorities.

The Port of Belfast stands in the front rank of British Ports and is the chief seaport of Ireland. It owes its pre-eminence to the great natural advantages of its situation, supplemented by the commercial enterprise of its people and the progressive policy of its Harbour Commissioners who have spared neither effort nor expense in providing an up-to-date and efficient port.

Located at the upper end of Belfast Lough, a natural bay about 12 miles long on the north-east coast of Ireland, it affords a commodious and sheltered harbour, easily accessible for ships of all sizes by means of the deep water approach channel which runs in a direct line to the docks and is excellently buoyed and lighted.

Amongst the natural advantages which Belfast has over most other ports is the smallness of its tidal range which, at its maximum, is only 91/2 feet. This has rendered dock gates unnecessary and vessels can consequently proceed direct to and from their berths at all times, thus obviating the tedious delays which arise at ports where vessels have to wait for high water in order to dock.

The quays, which afford berths for vessels drawing up to 30 feet at low water, have a total extent of nearly 6 miles, and commodious and well lighted sheds have been provided in which goods can be rapidly handled.

A feature of the port is its extensive equipment of quayside cranes, both of electric and steam, ranging in capacity from 2 to 10 tons for ordinary loading and discharging, with special cranes for heavy lifts up to 120 tons.

Over 11 miles of railway lines and sidings have been laid on the quays by means of which direct connection is maintained with the railway systems throughout Ireland, making Belfast an ideal distributing centre for all kinds of goods.

BIRTHPLACE OF LEVIATHANS.

The graving docks rank amongst the finest in the world and have accommodated many of the largest vessels afloat,-Belfast being the birthplace of such leviathans as the "Britannic," "Titanic," and "Olympic," all of which have been accommodated in the Thompson Graving Dock (887 feet long). In addition there are the Alexandra Graving Dock (803 feet long) and several others.

The port has kept well in line with the rapid development of oil for commercial and navigation purposes, the Harbour Commissioners having provided a deep-water wharf where the largest tankers can discharge their bulk cargoes through pipe lines and where oil burning vessels may take supplies of fuel oil. Large installations for storing and supplying oil, petroleum, petrol, etc., have been laid down in the vicinity by the principal companies engaged in the trade, and Belfast now constitutes the largest distributing centre for these commodities in Ireland.

Ample accommodation is available for storing coal, ore, iron, steel, etc., and also timber on land or in ponds, and as a result of the large schemes of reclamation which have been carried out by the Harbour Commissioners hundreds of acres adjacent to waterside and railways, etc., are available for the establishment of additional commercial and industrial works.

The natural advantages of Belfast and the efficiency which has marked its administration throughout its history are reflected in its charges which, for the services rendered, are substantially lower than at other ports, and are being further reduced. The fact that this is appreciated by traders is evidenced by increasing traffic returns, which show that the tonnage of vessels cleared in 1922 exceeded that of the previous year by a quarter of a million tons, whilst the tonnage of imports and exports increased considerably more, and the returns to date clearly indicate that 1923 will far surpass 1922.

The administration of the port is in the hands of the Belfast Harbour Commission, who are appointed under Statute, the Chairman being Mr. W.E. Williames, D.L., J.P.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

Lord Parmoor, who was warmly defended by the Prime Minister in the House of Commons yesterday, when the recent letter published above the signature of the Lord President of the Council was debated. Mr. Ramsay MacDonald declared that the Government stands by Free Trade.

Mr. E. Shinwell, the Secretary for Mines, who is still working hard for peace in the coal dispute. His efforts yesterday resulted in bringing the two sides together again.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

GOLF DANCE AT WHITEHEAD.

The annual dance under the auspices of the Whitehead Golf Club was held on Friday evening in the parochial hall, and attracted a large and representative gathering. The organising committee has made excellent arrangements for the convenience of the guests; the hall was beautifully decorated for the occasion, and the club's hospitality was dispensed in traditional style.

Associated with the lady captain (Mrs Thornbury) and the hon. secretary of the ladies branch (Miss Nethery, Bank House), was an energetic committee, to whom much of the success of the function is due. Supper was served in excellent style in the adjoining hall. The music was supplied by Mr. J. Fearon's orchestra, and Mr. Tom Rew proved an efficient M.C. The programme was an interesting one, and was carried on until the early hours of this morning.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

NATIONAL TEACHERS' ORGANISATION

Sir, -- With regard to the deputation from the I.N.T.O. which waited on Dr. Garrett, senior chief inspector, and which pressed the recommendations that where a teacher is marked "highly efficient" there is no need for the usual annual inspection, allow me to point out that such a recommendation did not emanate from the branches or county associations. Consequently, the members of the deputations spoke only for themselves. Those teachers (and they are the majority) who are marked "efficient" strongly object to such a recommendation. If such proposals are given effect, the one-teacher school and the school of two teachers with 70 -- 80 average of irregular attendance must bear the brunt of the inspection system for the benefit of more favoured colleagues, who, through one cause or another, have managed to annex a "highly efficient" mark. All loyal members of the I.N.T.O. will object to this piece of attempted class legislation, and it is to be hoped that they will take steps to ensure that future deputations act only on the instructions issued to them.

I.N.T.O.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

IRISH TEMPERANCE ALLIANCE

The council of the Irish Alliance met in the Boardroom, 20 Lombard Street, Belfast, on Friday evening, Mr. Hamilton M'Cleery presiding. The secretary reported on the number of meetings which he had attended during the week with a view to establishing Temperance Councils in districts which had not already formed them.

Correspondence was received from Mr. Robert Crawford, M.P., enclosing a reply of the Minister of Finance, Ulster: who gave the number of retail licences in force and the annual licence duty involved, 31st, March, 1923. There were 3,845 licences, with an annual licence duty of £51,038 9s 1d. In addition to the number of the wholesale and retail dealers given, there are also hotels, railway refreshment rooms, restaurants, and clubs where intoxicating liquors are sold.

"I don't know what work torrents of rain interfere with. I only know that it doesn't interfere with mine" -- a constable at Bow County Court.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

LONDONERS' VIOLENT EXERCISE.

WALKING MILES TO WORK.
COURT OF INQUIRY OPENED.

London was tramless and 'busless this morning owing to the strike at midnight of tramway and 'bus workers. This resulted in many exciting scenes at the railway stations and on the road.

Thousands of City workers had to walk miles to get to business, whilst many more beseiged the already packed underground trains.

No official statement was issued at the Electric Railway House this morning, but a Press Association representative was informed by an official there that the stoppage, so far as they were concerned, was complete, no trams or 'buses running on any of the London General Omnibus Company's routes or those of its allied concerns.

"The stoppage is complete," was also the message given out at the head offices in London of the Transport and General Workers' Union this morning by the Strike Committee. The men, said one official, had all shown most perfect loyalty.

The Strike Committee, representing both tramwaymen and 'busmen, had sat throughout the night receiving reports from all parts.

The Court of Inquiry into the tramway dispute was opened at the Law Courts, London, to-day, under the presidency of Sir Arthur Colfax. Many officials of the various interests involved attended, including Lord Ashfield.

Mr. Bevin at once opened the case on behalf of the men.

In no city in the world, said he, had men to work at such high pitch of nervous strain. At the last fall in wages they made an urgent appeal that London should be excepted from the national vote on reduction, but the pleadings were not given the slightest consideration.

PICKETTING AND PIRATES.

The Transport Workers' Union made it known last night that they will not tolerate pirate competition at the expense of the tramwaymen, and ways and means will be taken to stop every pirate 'bus plying for hire. Every garage is to be extensively picketed from midnight, and any busman seen piloting a "pirate" is to be warned of the risks he runs. In the view of the officials of the union very few pirates will do so.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

THE CARMANIA ASHORE AND AFLOAT

ON SANDBANK SOME HOURS.
TAKEN OFF BY FLEET OF TUGS.

Our Liverpool correspondent telegraphs:- The Cunard liner Carmania, on her trial trip after reconditioning at Glasgow, ran aground at the Askew Spit, near Crosby Lightship, at the entrance to the Mersey early this morning. She remained fast on the sandbank for some hours, but the impact was so imperceptible that the passengers on board, save the navigating officers and crew on duty, were unaware of the accident until they rose in the morning.

Wireless messages were sent from the ship and a fleet of tugs were promptly in attendance. With their aid, and the Carminia's own steam, the liner was got off without any difficulty, and she proceeded up the river. There was no damage of any description.

The Press Association's Liverpool correspondent telegraphs:- The Carmania was pulled off the sandbank by six tugs as high tide approached, and was thus refloated. She proceeded up the river to Liverpool.

The Cunard Company announce that the Carmania is now safely in the Huskisson Dock.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

SEAFORTHS' ADVENTURE.

"WE ARE FED UP," SAID ONE.

Two soldiers, Private Wilkins and Bowen, of the 1st Battalion Seaforth Highlanders, were remanded until Tuesday at Belfast Custody Court, to-day, on charges of maliciously breaking a plate-glass showcase at the premises of Samuel Brown, Ann Street, and stealing three trinket cases.

Constable Williams told the Court that on Friday night about 11.30 while in Church Lane he heard a crash in Ann Street, and going there he found that the showcase had been smashed, and a large paving stone was lying near. He went in pursuit of two soldiers in kilts, and met the prisoners. Wilkins said, "It's all right: we will go quietly. We wanted money. We are fed up." Brown said, "It's all right, lead us down." In their possession he found the three trinket boxes.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

CO. ANTRIM BLACKGUARDISM.

An old lady named Margaret M'Cluney, aged about fifty-five to sixty, reported to the police at High Street barracks, Ballymena, this morning, that when in her house at Woodgreen Cross, Galgorm Parks, on Friday night, at about ten o'clock, just as she was retiring for the night, two young men entered her little shop, and one of them asked for a packet of cigarettes.

When she was in the act of getting the cigarettes, the other young man covered her face with a handkerchief or muffler, and started to beat her. She was put down, and of them then beat her most unmercifully.

She created a noise by rattling a tin can, on which she managed to lay hold, and attracted the attention of a neighbour named David Craig, but just as he arrived on the scene, the two young men decamped.

The woman presented a pitiable spectacle, her face being badly blackened and cut.

The police are making investigations into the outrage, and have obtained a description of the culprits from the injured woman, who stated they were not disguised.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

NEWTOWNARDS GUARDIANS.

BANGOR DOCTOR'S RESIGNATION.

Mr. David O'Prey presided at the meeting of Newtownards Board of Guardians to-day, at which a letter was read from Dr. Mitchell, medical officer for the Bangor dispensary district, resigning his position. The doctor explained that he had received warning as to his health for the past two years, and he felt that the circumstances would not permit him to continue. He was sixty-two years of age, and it was with regret he resigned.

The clerk intimated that Dr. Mitchell had been for twenty-three years the medical officer for Bangor.

On the motion of Mr. James M. Thomson, J.P., seconded by Mr. T.R. Lavery, M.P., the resignation was accepted with regret.

The relieving officer reported that £34 0s 2d Had been distributed since last meeting as outdoor relief to 245 persons.

The tender of Messrs. Fred. Storey, Ltd., for the supply of medicines for the union and the seven dispensary districts was accepted, and Messrs, John Clarke & Co., Ltd., Belfast secured the contract for the supply of appliances.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

WHAT ABOUT BELFAST?

A correspondent writes:- At a meeting of Liverpool business men at the Midland Hotel a Liverpool organisation was formed. Its purpose is that of acquainting the world with the marvellous opportunities Liverpool offers for combining business with pleasure. In the influential business circles of Liverpool it is felt that if only the world is informed it will realise that outside London, Liverpool is the finest town in England, from both a pleasure and a business point of view. Its fine panorama along the Mersey, its magnificent Cathedral, and its many theatres, fine shops, golf courses, etc., all help to raise it to this proud position. It is felt, therefore, that the new movement will fill a long-felt want, and make Liverpool the pleasure as well as the business centre of industrial England.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

LORD LONDONDERRY ON BORDER.

The distinguished party later visited Clogher, where they were received by Capt. J.H. King, O.C., 31st Platoon.

Proceeding to the Protestant Hall, they inspected a detachment of Red Cross nurses, under Miss Haire-Forster, and afterwards inspected the A and B forces, the latter in charge of Sub-District Commandants William M'Keown and Alexander M'Comb.

After a short visit to the platoon headquarters at Clogher Park, the party proceeded to Fivemiletown and Colebrooke.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

VICTORY TROPHY GUNS.

ANTRIM PRESENTATION
IMPRESSIVE PROCEEDINGS.
RECEPTION BY COMMISSIONERS.

In the presence of a large assemblage of residents and visitors trophy guns were handed over this afternoon to the keeping of Antrim Town Commissioners. The ceremony, which took place in the open-air, was invested with outstanding interest to many whose relatives had played a heroic part in the Great War. Shops, where convenient, were closed, and flags and bunting were displayed.

Punctual to the time arranged -3 o'clock -- a procession formed up in Castle Street, and was composed of the Massereene Brass and Reed Band, members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary, in command of Captain A.G. Irvine, D.I.; "B" Specials, in command of Captain Robert Thompson, a trophy gun drawn by ex-Servicemen, ex-Servicemen representing the town and district; the Town Commissioners, Dungonnell Flute Band, Boy Scouts, and members of other loyal and patriotic organisations. All marched to Fountain Street, which presented a crowded appearance, and here a meeting was held under the presidency of Mr. C. Burrows, chairman of the Town Commissioners.

In the course of his remarks, the Chairman said their demonstration was unique in the history of the ancient town of Antrim. When they realised that the presence in their midst of two German guns had created all that excitement in many, very many, were puzzled to know the reason why. Therefore, he should like to offer them, very simply, a few thoughts on what the guns were to them, and what they were not. In the very forefront of his observations he should like to say, and to say it emphatically, that those German trophy guns were in no sense of the word, and under no consideration, a war memorial to their soldiers, either the living or the dead.

NO WAR MEMORIAL.

Unfortunately they were in the sad position of being one of the only towns in Ulster who had up to the present erected no war memorial to their incomparable soldiers. True a scheme for a technical institute was largely subscribed to, but for some reason or other it got jammed, and, therefore, miscarried. In that connection, they might allow him to say, surely that important matter would not end there. There must be ways and means formulated to remove that stigma from the duty and the honour which they owed to their soldiers. (Hear, hear.)

Turning to their trophy guns they might as well admit that some people did not like to see them, and the question arose why they were there. He thought there were many reasons for their being there -- reasons noble, reasons patriotic, reasons imperial, and undying reasons for the presence of those guns in their midst. Those guns should portray to every one of them the majesty, the dominion, and the power of the great British Empire, whose sons they were, and whose sons they were going to remain. (Applause.)

Let them consider for a moment how those guns had reached them. After unparalleled fighting they were taken from the Germans and shipped from France, and now they came to Antrim from England's War Minister as representing his gracious Majesty King George V. (Applause.)

Surely, after the wonderful record connected with their transfer to that town they wanted to be careful how they spoke of those mementoes. It was only natural that they should hate their appearance, that they should hate their materialism, and that they should hate their use; but they needed a far deeper vision -- they wanted to see the bull-dog grip of the Briton, wrestling those implements of war from their enemies. They wanted to see the spirits of the victors witnessing that they had fought a good and victorious fight. (Applause.)

"GLORIFIED FUNERAL."

In a few minutes Colonel Pakenham would be committing those guns to their last resting place, and never again would their chambers be charged with the vehicles of death. Therefore he wanted them to look upon that demonstration as a big glorified funeral. (Laughter.) He was glad to inform them they had present there two gallant soldiers, Colonel Pakenham and Major O'Neill, who would give them first hand impressions of their great soldiers in the world's war.

The world's need now, said the chairman in conclusion, was peace, and if those trophy guns were anything to the people of Antrim let them be emblems of peace. If peradventure the dark clouds of war should ever again threaten either the throne or the person of their beloved King let them remember the words of their suppliant National anthem.
   O Lord our God arise,
   Scatter his enemies
   And make them fall
   Confound their politics,
   Frustrate their knavish tricks,
   Our hope on Thee we fix,
   God save the King.
(Loud applause.)

Colonel H.A. Pakenham, C.M.G., D.L., who addressed the assemblage, dealing with the occasion which had brought them all together, formally handed over the guns to the Commissioners.

The trophies referred to -- reminders of a grim and protracted struggle for the freedom of nations -- were accepted by the chairman of the town authorities, who gave the assurance that they would ever be preserved in Antrim in honour of the men of the town and neighbourhood who had served and fallen in the war.

AFFECTING CERMONY.

The Massereene Brass and Reed Band then played "Rule Britannia," and an appropriate address was delivered by the Right Hon. Hugh O'Neill, M.P., Speaker in the Parliament of Northern Ireland.

The solemn and affecting ceremony of placing wreaths on the guns was performed by Mr. S. Hannan, representing the local ex-Servicemen, and Mr. John M'Cabe (vice-chairman), on behalf of the Town Commissioners. Similar tributes were placed by members of the general public.

Bugler -- Instructor Harry Burrowes sounded the Last Post.

On the proposition of Mr. Charles Mackean, J.P., seconded by Mr. Robert J. Kirk, J.P., both of whom paid high tributes to the gallantry of the men of Antrim who had volunteered for King and country, a hearty vote of thanks was raid to Colonel Pakenham and the Right Hon. Hugh O'Neill for the part each had taken in the proceedings.

The compliment was conveyed by the chairman and suitably acknowledged. The Doxology, announced by the Rev. W.A. Adams, B.A. was sung with fervour, and Rev. Canon M.H.F. Collis, B.D., pronounced the Benediction.

The Reveille was then sounded by Bugler-Instructor Harry Burrowes, and the proceedings closed with the singing of the National Anthem.

Colonel Pakenham said he felt greatly honoured at being invited to undertake that ceremony of handing over the gun. He had certain claims on Antrim town, as he had been commander of the South Antrim Regiment, of which the 3rd Batt. was formed in Antrim, and was first commanding officer of the 11th Royal Irish Rifles, in which Antrim was represented by the C Company. He was very pleased to be there on that occasion to pay his tribute to the gallantry of the men of Antrim. Two hundred and fifty-eight of those men joined his Majesty's forces from Antrim town alone, and of that number some forty-two never returned. If they added to the number from Antrim those who came from Mucknamore, Dungonnell and district the total would be 500. Thiepval, Messines, Ypres, and the great German rout of 1918 were some of the battles and victories in which these men took part. The guns he handed over that day as a trophy of the gallantry of the men of Antrim, had done their best to stop them, but had not succeeded, and they would remain there as mute witnesses to the great German defeat and rout. The makers of those guns (Krupp and Co.) little thought when they were casting them that their final abiding place would be the streets of a peaceful town in Northern Ireland. (Applause.)

The guns were then formally handed over by Colonel Pakenham.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

FOR FAR-OFF FIELDS.

BIG CANADIAN CONTINGENT.
LEAVE BY THE S.S. METAGAMA.

About 300 emigrants sailed from Belfast this afternoon on the ss. Metagama for Canada. The bookings for this journey were, with few exceptions, the largest yet from the Ulster port. The C.P.R. liner left the Clyde on Friday afternoon with upwards of 1,000 Scottish emigrants on board, and dropped anchor in the lough at an early hour this morning.

On account of the heavy traffic it was necessary for the harbour tug Musgrave to make two journeys to the ship. At 7 o'clock the tug left with the first contingent and later she returned to Donegall Quay and fetched the remainder of the passengers out to the ship. In addition, Messrs. Cooper and Son's tug Audacious was requisitioned to carry the baggage.

Two-thirds of the Irish emigrants were young men of fine physique from the country districts, and they were going out to the Far West as settlers on the land.

There was also a heavy consignment of mails, and the work of embarking having been speedily effected, the Metagama left at 2 p.m., being only a few hours detained in the lough.

Mr. W.M. M'Calla, the C.P.R. agent, personally superintended all the arrangements, which were carried out without a hitch, and the Rev. S. Cochrane was also aboard the vessel. Mr. Lough, The Canadian Government representative in Belfast, was pesernt, while Dr. Gibson, J.P., medically examined all the passengers. It should be added that every berth of the Metagama was booked in this trip.

The C.P.R. will have regular weekly sailings to and from Canada during the season, and it is expected that a large number of Canadians will land at Belfast on their way to visit the Empire Exhibition at Wembley.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

CHILDREN'S MATINEE.

GIRL GUIDES AT CINEMA.
VISIT OF DUCHESS OF ABERCORN.

A large and representative gathering of Girl Guides and school children attended the Matinee, Royal Avenue Picture House, this morning, on the occasion of the first visit to the Children's Cinema Matinee, of her Grace the Duchess of Abercorn, President of the Ulster Girl Guides. Guide companies present were the 23rd, 11th, 26th, 10th, 47th, 14th, 34th and 28th Belfast, under the charge of Miss Magill, District Commissioner for Duncairn, assisted by Miss. M. Cromie, with a small detachment of Brownies.

Her Grace, who was accompanied by Lieutenant R. Gilliland, was received by the Children's Cinema Committee, a strong detachment of Guides forming a guard of honour, on her arrival. Some members of the Belfast Education Committee attended by special invitation, also Alderman Mrs. M'Mordie, M.P., and the Councillor Miss M'Comb.

A splendid programme of pictures included "Pathe Gazette," "Eyes of the Fleet," " Aesop's Fables," and "Poppies," a beautiful Nature film, and, not least interesting to the blue-uniformed girls was the "Girl Guide Rally of 1923" (on which occasion her Grace inspected the Guides).

The management also presented, this morning, the first episode of that wonderful film, "A Tour Round the World," which is being taken by Miss Violet Domino, a Scottish girl, who is filming and visiting the world's countries. To-day's film, taken by her, was of "Scotland's Banks and Braes," and was delightfully accompanied with Scottish reels and songs by Mrs. Robin M'Mullin's orchestra. The announcement that Miss Domino's next picture was to be the six counties of Ulster, was received with great enthusiasm.

Alderman Duff, who attended to introduce her Grace the Duchess, said he considered this an exceptional honour, and one which might be taken down as a red-letter day for Ulster, because of the presence of the Duchess of Abercorn, who had come to show her interest and approvement in the great work which had been done in connection with the matinee. It was also a red-letter day because it was the initiation of a new step in education in Belfast, as the Belfast Education Committee had given a sum of money to produce a film of the Northern Counties of Ulster, exclusively for themselves. He hoped that the boys and girls in the humblest cottage in the six counties to those in one of its greatest mansions, all realised that the great mission and hope of all was to make their province one of the best in the world. One of his duties was to introduce the Duchess, but this he thought unnecessary, because she had already won the way into all their hearts.

REPLY BY HER GRACE.

It was a picturesque view when her Grace arose to reply, the centre of a guard of honour consisting of detachments from all the companies present. Her Grace said she was delighted to be present, because she was fulfilling a promise made two years ago when she had first heard of these matinees from Mrs. Lowry, and she had always longed to take part. She also took the opportunity of expressing her gratification to the committee for their splendid work, and particular to the manager of the Picture House for the wonderful kindness he had shown in giving them the use of the beautiful Picture House. They had all been particularly interested in the Scottish film shown, but her Grace mentioned that a much more attractive one still would be the film taken in Ulster. It would subsequently be shown probably all over the world, and Ulster men and women in Australia and Canada would have a peep of their own beloved country. In conclusion her Grace hoped they had all enjoyed the matinee as she had, and trusted that more children would take this opportunity of pleasure and education

VOTE OF THANKS ACCORDED.

Mrs John Lowry, the main-spring of the children's matinee effort, in proposing a vote of thanks to her Grace, mentioned that the presence of the Duchess was the greatest help she could have afforded them.

People were only beginning to realise the possibilities of the cinema for children's education. They were not out chiefly to make money, though a sum of £140 had been given to charity from the matinee.

Dr. Deans, of Rosetta Sschool, in seconding the vote of thanks to her Grace, said that the visit of the Duchess had come at an opportune moment. The cinema committee had experienced a very up-hill climb, and had not received recognition due to them, but the visit of her Grace was the harbinger of that recognition. The strength of the nation depended on the education of her children, and so these matinees were being run on an instructional as well as a pleasing way. The committee were fortunate in the happy choice of Mrs. Norwood as secretary, who had spent more time and trouble over the success of the matinee than they would ever realise. The second great factor which had made the matinee feasible was the fact that the manager received all their proposals in such a generous way.

Councillor Barron and Dr. A. Trimble also spoke, and her Grace was delighted with the children's continued acclamation, given at Alderman Duff's suggestion, as a right royal Ulster welcome to her Grace.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

"THE LIGHT THAT FAILED."

BELFAST MINISTER'S SUBJECT.

Rev. A.L. Agnew, B.A., minister of York Street Non-Subscribing Presbyterian Church, will preach at the evening service to-morrow on the subject of "The Light that Failed."

The Rev. Mr. Agnew on Sunday last preached a special sermon on "Priests." His fearless and thoughtful address made a great impression on the large congregation, and added to the reputation which he has so rapidly gained since coming to Belfast.

On the same occasion the service was attended by the Belfast Chapter of the Laymen's League, the lessons being read by the secretary, Mr. F. Robinson, of Holywood.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

CONCERT IN STRANDTOWN.

A concert was held in Strandtown National School last evening. It was promoted and organised by a patient in former years at the Women and Children's Hospital, Templemore Avenue, who was so grateful for the benefits of that institution that he felt he must do something in return. Mr. Dickenson was in the chair, and the artistes included Miss Pepper, Miss K. Call, Miss M. Chambers, Miss M'Sherry, Master D. M'Roberts, Master T. Cull, Master W. Daniels, Mr. Ward, Mr. Hollywood, and party.

A pleasant program was greatly appreciated. The accompanists were Mrs. Bell and Miss Goudy.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

GIRL GUIDE TRAINING.

Sir.- Might I ask for a little space in your widely read paper with reference to an important matter in the lives of the young girls of our city, and how its development is hindered by some of the ministers of various churches. Within the past twelve months I have taken a great interest in the finest organisation for girls, I think, in the world, namely, the Girl Guides, and who are at present training for their competition on the last Saturday of this month.

I have visited many companies at work lately, and I am sorry to say that the ministers hinder instead of promoting the movement. One company in particular I was with this week, when I got to them, I found them allotted the church vestry room from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. and the small schoolroom from 9 p.m. to 10 p.m., with the school forms in position, leaving them an area of about 30 feet by 10 to drill a company of about 24 girls. Now what kind of a chance has a company with this small area to drill in, in the various competitions.

I think that it is the duty of all ministers to allot at least once a week the largest room in the school from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. for the use of the company and to encourage the girls of his parish to join the company. All companies should have their minister or chaplain in attendance at each parade night to open the parade with prayer. The company of which I speak had their colours presented to them in church some time ago by a lady, I think, of the parish. Those colours are as highly treasured as any regiment's colours, and yet they were never properly dedicated.

I hope our church ministers will see after the comfort of their respective companies --
Yours, etc.,
AN EX-ARMY SERGEANT.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

CONCERT AT BALLYCARRY.

The members of Hillhead Amateur Flute Band promoted an interesting concert, which was held on Friday evening in No. 2 National School, Ballycarry. Rev. Thomas Bartley, B.A., minister of Ballycarry Presbyterian Church, presided, and there was a large and enthusiastic audience. In addition to selections by the band, and orchestral items by the Ballycarry String Band, the following took part in the programme:- Miss Mollie Duff (Islandmagee), Miss Dick, Miss M'Allister (Larne), Miss Ferguson (Belfast), Messrs. Joseph Henshaw, Robert H. Mitchell, Samuel Brown (Whitehead), Harry Long, William Hume, John Beggs (Belfast), J. M'Gladdery, Pardo Erskine, J. M'Kenna, and Isaac Macartney (Belfast). A sketch, entitled "The Pottinger Draught," was ably acted by Messrs. M'Gladdery, Erskine, and M'Kenna.

At the conclusion of the programme Dr. Charles Dundee, J.P., moved a vote of thanks to the chairman and artistes.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

PINT TUMBLER AS MISSILE.

At Belfast Custody Court this morning John Hegan, Bow Street, was ordered to find bail or go to jail for a month for having broken a pint measure and a bottle of port in Mooney's public-house, Collingtree Road, on Friday.

The publican said he refused to serve Hegan, who was drunk, whereupon prisoner lifted a pint tumbler and threw it at the publican's brother, smashing the port bottle.

 

^ top of page

Belfast Telegraph - Monday, 24 March 1924

Deaths

ANDERSON -- March 2, 1924, at his residence, 3615 East 59th Street, Kansas City, Mo., U.S.A.. Joseph, eldest son of the late William and Elizabeth Anderson, Ahoghill, Ballymena. Interred in Olathe, Kansas, Tuesday afternoon, 4th March. Mourned by his two Sons (John and William), and his four Daughters (Marian, Annie, Josephine, and Violet). Inserted by his sorrowing Brothers and Sisters. 64 Donegall Pass.

ATKINSON -- March 22, 1924, at Purdysburn Fever Hospital, Sidney, dearly-beloved son of Ralph and Catherine Atkinson. Funeral leaves Hospital at 2 p.m. to-morrow (Tuesday), (passing Atlantic Avenue at 2.30), for interment in Carnmoney. Deeply regretted by his Father, Mother, Sister and Brother. 13 Clanchattan Street

ATKINSON -- March 22, 1924, at Purdysburn Fever Hospital, Sidney, dearly-beloved brother of Sadie and Herbie Barrett. Funeral leaves Hospital at 2 p.m., on to-morrow (Tuesday), (passing Atlantic Avenue at 2.30), for interment in Carnmoney. Deeply regretted by his loving Sister and Brother-in-law. SADIE AND HERBIE BARRETT. 58 Lawther Street.

ATKINSON -- March 22, 1924, at Purdysburn Fever Hospital, Sidney, dearly-beloved brother of Emily and John Hume. His remains will be removed for interment in Carnmoney on to-morrow (Tuesday) leaving Hospital at 2 p.m. (passing Atlantic Avenue at 2.30). Deeply regretted by his loving Sister and Brother-in-law. EMILY AND JOHN HUME. 44 Stratheden Street.

BLACK -- March 23, 1924, at his residence, 67 University Road, David Auld Black, in his 72nd year. Funeral to Balmoral Cemetery to-morrow (Tuesday), 25th inst., at 11 a.m. No flowers.

BROWN -- March 23, 1924, at her parents' residence, 58 Parkmount Street, Sarah, the dearly-beloved wife of Robert Brown. Notice of interment later. ROBERT BROWN.

CUMING -- March 24, 1924, at her residence, Hill Farm, Ballymagarrick, Caroline, youngest daughter of the late Hamilton Cuming. The remains of our beloved sister will be removed for interment in the family burying-ground, Ballylesson, on Wednesday, 26th inst., at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. T.H. AND A. CUMING.

DARRAGH -- March 22, 1924, at his residence, Ballybeg, Ahoghill, Felix Darragh. -- R.I.P. Interred today (Monday), at 11 a.m., in St. Mary's Church, Ahoghill

DITTY -- March 22, 1924, at Purdysburn Hospital, Margaret Ditty. The remains of our dearly-beloved mother will be removed from her late residence, 2 Greenland Street, on Tuesday, at 3 p.m., to City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. "For ever with the Lord." Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Sons and Daughters; also her Sons-in-law and Daughters-in-law. JACK AND MARY ANN MAXWELL 2 Greenland Street.

GORDON -- March 22, 1924, at the Hospital, Lisburn Road, Francis Gordon, the dearly-beloved husband of Elizabeth Gordon. Funeral from his residence, 35 Banbury Street, on to-morrow (Tuesday), for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, at 2.30. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Wife and Family and two Grandchildren. E. GORDON.

GORDON -- March 22, 1924, at his residence, 35 Banbury Street, Francis Gordon. His remains will be removed from the above address on Tuesday, 25th inst., at 2.30 p.m., for interment in Dundonald. "For ever with the Lord." -- Amen. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Brother and Sisters, and Nephews and Nieces. 96 Henry Street. MARIA HARDING.

OLIVE BRANCH R.B.P., 20
GORDON -- The Officers and Members of above Preceptory are requested to attend the funeral of their late highly-esteemed Brother, Sir Knight Francis Gordon. WILLIAM M'GUIGAN, W.M. WILLIAM J. HIGGIN, Registrar.

R.A.O.B. CORINTHIAN LODGE, 2828.
GORDON -- The Officers and Brethren of above Lodge are requested to attend the funeral of their deceased Brother, Francis Gordon, C.P. WILLIAM M'AULEY, W.P. JAMES SMITH, C.P., C. Secretary.

R.A.O.B. KING GEORGE LODGE, 3752.
GORDON -- The Officers and Members of above Lodge are requested to attend the funeral of their late and esteemed Brother, Primo Gordon. D.O. SPENCE, W.P. R.H. EDMONDSON, City Sec.

HOOKE -- March 23, 1924, at Ivyville, Ballymagreehan, Newtownards, Martha, wife of Richard Hooke. Funeral private. No flowers.

JACKSON -- March 22, 1924, at 30 Camden Street, Belfast, Miss Jackson. Funeral private. No flowers.

KELLY -- March 23, 1924, at No. 1 Market Road, Ballymena, James Kelly. Funeral to-morrow (Tuesday), 25th inst., at 12 o'clock noon.

LAVERY -- March 23, 1924, at his residence, Beechwood, Doagh, William, dearly-beloved husband of Mary Jane Lavery. Funeral to Antrim New Cemetery, to-morrow (Tuesday), 25th inst., at 1 p.m.

LAWTHER -- March 23, 1924, at his residence, Freemanstown, Templepatrick, James the beloved husband of Sarah Lawther, aged 82 years, and late Landsteward to the late J.N. Caldwell, Esq., Lismoyne, Dunmurry. Funeral to Donegore Burying-ground to-morrow (Tuesday), at 11 o'clock. SARAH LAWTHER.

LEE -- March 23, 1924, at his residence, 26 Glenalpin Street, Joseph, the dearly-beloved husband of Agnes Lee. His remains will be removed from above address on to-morrow (Tuesday), for interment in City Cemetery, at 2.30 p.m. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Wife. AGNES LEE. Also his Sons and Daughters, Sons-in-law, and Daughters-in-law.

AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF WOODWORKERS. -- BELFAST 4th BRANCH
LEE -- Members of the above Branch will please attend the funeral of their late Brother, Joseph Lee. JOHN DAVISON, President. JOHN HAWTHORNE, Secretary.

R.A.O.B. -- IVY LODGE, No. 4805.
LEE -- The Members of above Lodge are requested to attend the funeral of the father of their respected Brother, John Lee. W. ADAIR, W.P. W. COLLINS, C.P., C.S.

LEE -- March 22, 1924, at her residence, 123 Nelson Street, Agnes Lee. The remains of our dearly-beloved mother will be removed from above address for interment in City Cemetery, at 2.30 p.m., Tuesday, 25th inst. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Sons, Daughter, and Grandchildren. American and Australian papers please copy.

M'BRIDE -- March 23, 1924, at his sister's residence, 37 Thorndale Avenue, Belfast, John, only son of the late John M'Bride, Bankhall, Magheramorne. Funeral to Loughmourne Churchyard, on Wednesday, 26th inst., at 2 p.m. ANNIE W. DUNCAN.

M'WILLIAMS -- March 23, 1924, Jane M'Williams, the dearly-loved mother of Josephine Smyth. Notice of interment later. 64 Beverley Street.

MacENANEY -- March 23, 1924, at 3 Castleview Terrace, Ballyhackamore, Leo Patrick, second eldest and dearly-beloved son of the late Patrick Vincent and Annie MacEnaney. -- R.I.P. Funeral at 10.30 a.m., to-morrow (Tuesday), from St. Columbkille's R.C. Chapel, for interment in Milltown. "God's will be done." Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Mother and Family.

NEILL -- March 22, 1924, at Mentmore, Belfast, James H. Neill, in his 85th year. Funeral private. No flowers by request.

REYNOLDS -- March 23, 1924, at the residence of her son-in-law, ex-Sergeant Wilson, R.I.C., Castle Street, Comber, Jane Ann, widow of the late George Reynolds. Her remains will be removed from above address on to-morrow (Tuesday), 25th inst., at 3 p.m., for interment in Dundonald Cemetery. Deeply regretted by her sorrowing Family.

ROBINSON -- March 23, 1924, at her residence, 199 York Road, Elizabeth, widow of Thomas Robinson. The funeral of our dear mother will take place to the family burying-ground, Ballynure, to-morrow (Tuesday), at 1 p.m. Inserted by her sorrowing Family. Canadian papers please copy.

NORTH-EAST WOMEN'S L.O.L., No. 65
ROBINSON -- The Officers and Sisters of above Lodge deeply regret the death of the mother of their esteemed Sister, Mrs. Lock, and tender their sincere sympathy to the family. J. WILSON, W.M. M. FITZGERALD, Secretary.

SHANNON -- March 23, 1924, at Thompson Memorial Home, Lisburn, Jemima, widow of the late John Shannon, Suffolk, Dunmurry. Funeral to City Cemetery, from above Institute, on to-morrow (Tuesday), at 2.30 p.m. Deeply regretted WILLIAM BLACK

SMYTH -- March 22, 1924, at her residence, Killyleagh Street, Crossgar, Annie, beloved wife of William Smyth. Her remains will be removed from above address for interment in Lissara New Cemetery, on Tuesday, 25th inst., at 3 p.m. WILLIAM SMYTH

WALLACE -- March 22, 1924 (suddenly), at his residence, 22 Malcolm Street, James, the dearly-beloved husband of Annie Wallace. Funeral on to-morrow (Tuesday), at 2.30 p.m., for interment in Comber New Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Wife and Family. Canadian papers please copy.

RAVENHILL ROAD VOLUNTEERS' L.O.L. 580.
WALLACE -- The Officers and Members of above Lodge are requested to attend the funeral of their late respected Brother, James Wallace. WILLIAM KELLY, W.M. WILLIAM MILLAR, Secretary.

CHOSEN FEW R.B.P., No. 230
WALLACE -- The Officers and Members of above Preceptory are requested to attend the funeral of their late Sir Knight and Bro., James Wallace. JAMES COOKE, W.M. WILLIAM GARLAND, Registrar.

WARD -- March 23, 1924, at her residence, 41 City Street, Jane, widow of Thomas Ward. Funeral to-morrow (Tuesday), at 2.30 p.m., for interment in Dundonald Cemetery. "Peace, perfect peace." Inserted by her loving Daughters. MINNIE AND ANNIE. Also her Daughter, Son-in-law, and Grandchildren. AGNES AND JOHN M'GOWAN.

WHITE -- March 23, 1924, at her residence, 54 Melrose Street, Francis Jane, relict of the late Thomas White. Funeral private.

WHITE -- March 22, 1924, at the residence of his sister, Mrs. T.D. Kerr, Granshaw, Ballygrainey, William, eldest son of the late William White, Drumhirk, Newtownards. The remains of my beloved husband will be removed for interment in the family burying-ground, Movilla, to-morrow (Tuesday), at 12 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. Gone to be with Christ, which is far better. ELEANOR WHITE.

WHITESIDE -- March 23, 1924, at her residence, 38 Great George's Street, Maria, the beloved mother of Thomas Whiteside. Funeral at 2.30 to-morrow (Tuesday) from above address for interment in City Cemetery. Deeply regretted.

BELFAST CATHEDRAL C.L.B.
WHITESIDE -- The Members of above are requested to attend the funeral of the mother of Sergeant William Whiteside. LESLIE C. M'WILLIAM, Captain, J. HILTON-SPRATT, Chaplin.

WHITE LION F.C.
WHITESIDE -- The Officers and Members of above Club are requested to attend the funeral of the mother of their respected Chairman, Thomas Whiteside. DAVID MUNN, Treasurer, JACK HULL, Secretary.

Thanks

Mr. and Mrs. CALDER and Family desire to return their sincere thanks to all kind friends and neighbours who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement, and to those who sent floral tributes and letters of condolence. Trusting this acknowledgment will be accepted by all.-11 Earl Street.

W. HUGHES and Family desire to express their sincere thanks to the many kind friends who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement, especially L.O.L., 570; 46th Old Boys' F.B.: and the neighbours and friends who sent floral tributes and letters of sympathy. Trusting this will be accepted by all -- 15 Drew Street.

Mr. and Mrs. WALLACE and Family desire to thank the many kind friends who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement, also those who sent wreaths, floral tributes, and letters of condolence, especially to the Management and Staff of the Northern Publishing Office, 58 and 60 Victoria Street; also the Officers and Staff of the Belfast Fire Brigade. Hoping this will be accepted by all. -- Central Fire Station, Chichester Street.

In Memoriam

ALLEN -- In cherished remembrance of our dear son, William John, who died from gunshot wounds on the 24th March, 1922, and was interred in the City Cemetery. We cannot forget him, no, not for one day, We speak of him often, although passed away; The shock it was hard, no doubt to bear, But Jesus has promised we shall all meet up there. Ever remembered by his loving Father and Mother, Sisters and Brothers. SAMUEL AND SARAH ALLEN. 48 James Street. Also his Brother and Sister-in-law. THOMAS AND AMANDA ALLEN. Also his Sister and Brother-in-law. NELLIE AND HUGH L. WALLACE.

ANSTEE -- In loving memory of my dear father, who departed this life on 24th March, 1923, and was interred in City Cemetery. A loving thought, a silent tear, A beautiful memory ever dear. Ever remembered by his loving Son and Daughter-in-law. EDWARD AND MINNIE ANSTEE. 15 Pine Street.

ARMSTRONG -- In loving memory of our dear father, John Armstrong, who departed this life on the 24th March, 1907, and was interred in Glenan Churchyard, County Monaghan. To clasp his hand in a better land, When the trumpet call will bring us all together. Ever remembered by his loving Children. ALEXANDER, WILLIE, GEORGE, AND ERNEST. 152 Peter's Hill

ARMSTRONG -- In loving memory of my dear father, John Armstrong, Merchant, 152 Peter's Hill, who departed this life on the 24th March, 1907, and was interred in Glenan Churchyard. County Monaghan "Jesus has promised I shall meet him again." Ever remembered by his only Daughter. GERTRUDE. Braemar, Balmoral.

BALL -- In loving memory of my dear wife, Eliza, who departed this life 24th March, 1918, and was interred in the City Cemetery. Days of sadness still come o'er me, Tears of silence often flow; Memory keeps her ever near me, Though she died six years ago. Always remembered by her loving Husband. SAMUEL BALL 7 M'Candless Street.

BROWNLEE -- In loving memory of our dear daughter, wee Minnie, who departed this life 24th March, 1923, and was interred in Drumbeg. Sleep on, sweet babe, thy pain is o'er, Thy little heart shall ache no more; Cold death has nipped thy tender bud, And now thy soul is with thy God. "Suffer little children to come unto Me." Inserted by her loving Father and Mother. WILLIAM AND RACHEL BROWNLEE 35 Boyne Square

BUNTING -- In loving memory of our dear mother, Mary Ann Bunting, who died on 24th March, 1923, and was interred in City Cemetery. When I softened up her pillow, And tried to ease her pain, I think I hear her angel voice, Saying Minnie, once again. Inserted by her loving Son and Daughter, ROBERT AND MINNIE PARKS. Also her Grandchildren. 14 Boyne Square.

BURNS -- In sad and loving memory of my dear husband, James Burns, who departed this life on 24th March, 1921, and was interred in Shankill Burying-ground. Ever remembered by his loving Wife. AGNES BURNS. 49 Berlin Street.

BURNS -- In loving memory of our dear father, James Burns, who departed this life on 24th March, 1921. A loving father, so true and kind, No friend on earth like him we'll find. Ever remembered by his loving Daughters and Son-in-law. HESSIE PATTERSON, and GEORGE PATTERSON 49 Berlin Street. Also MINNIE THOMPSON. Halifax, N.S., Canada.

BURNS -- In Loving memory of my dear father, James Burns, who departed this life on 24th March, 1921. Ever remembered by his loving Son and Daughter-in-law. SAMUEL BURNS and DORCAS BURNS. 32 Fifth Street.

CARDWELL -- In affectionate and loving remembrance of my dear daughter, Sarah, who departed this life on the 24th March, 1923, and was interred in Carnmoney Cemetery. Ever remembered by her loving Father. JOSEPH LOWE 84 Battenberg Street. Also her Brothers and Sisters and Sisters-in-law

CARDWELL -- In cherished remembrance of my loving sister, Sarah, who departed this life on the 24th March, 1923, and was interred in Carnmoney Cemetery. Ever remembered by her loving Sister and Brother-in-law. EMILY AND JAMES CARUTH 56 Mayo Street. Also her little daughter (Wee Sarah).

CARDWELL -- In affectionate remembrance of my loving sister, Sarah, who departed this life on the 24th March, 1923, and was laid to rest in Carnmoney Cemetery. Fondly remembered by her loving Sisters and Brothers-in-law. LIZZIE AND W.J. CURRIE. 34 Mountjoy Street. MARY AND ROBERT NELSON, U.S.A.

CINNAMOND -- In loving memory of our dear son, Joseph M'Grath, who died the 23rd March, 1918, and was interred in Dundonald Cemetery And with the morn those angel faces smile, Which I have loved long since and lost awhile. Ever remembered by his Father, Mother, Sister and Brothers. 40 Calvin Street.

COSGROVE -- In fond and loving memory of my dear mother, Ann Cosgrove, who departed this life on the 24th March, 1920, and was interred in Dundonald Old Churchyard. The blow was hard, the trial severe, To part with mother, whom I loved so dear. My cross was heavy, I'll not complain, But trust in God to meet again. We have laboured here together, We have laboured side by side; Just a little while before me, She has crossed the rolling tide. Ever remembered by her loving daughter (Martha Boyd) and Grandchildren (Willie and Samuel Moore). 68 Townsend Street. Also Catherine and Annie Moore. 2 Broad Street, Newark, N.J., U.S.A.

COULTER -- In loving memory of my dear son, 14350 Corporal Joseph Coulter, 14th R.I.R., missing on the 24th March, 1918, at St. Quentin. One tear sincere. One silent thought, Keeps his memory ever dear. Ever remembered by his Mother and Brothers. 18 Penrith Street.

COULTER -- In loving memory of my dear brother, 14250 Corporal Joseph Coulter, 14th Batt. Royal Irish Rifles (Y.C.V.), who died in German hands 24th March, 1918. His memory liveth. Ever remembered by his loving brother. WILLIAM COULTER. 13 Hopeton Street.

GREEN -- In fond and loving memory of our dear mother, who died on March 23, 1923, and was interred in Dundonald Cemetery Still lovingly remembered and much missed by her sorrowing Family. 88 Donraven Avenue.

GREEN -- In loving memory of Sarah, my dearest and much-loved sister, who died on March 23, 1923, and was interred in Dundonald Cemetery Worthy of everlasting remembrance, and still lovingly thought of by her Sister Annie; Also Sisters Charlotte, Mary, and Agnes. ANNIE ROSS. 54 Dunraven Avenue.

IRWIN -- In fondest remembrance of our dear children, Ethel Louisa, and wee George, who departed this life on the 23rd and 24th March, 1920, and were interred in Dundonald Cemetery. Not a sound disturbs their slumber, Not one pain to mark their brow; They are safe in the arms of Jesus, Both are happy resting now. Ever remembered by Father, Mother, and little Sisters. GEORGE AND ALICE IRWIN. 33 Derwent Street.

LYTTLE -- In fond and loving memory of my dear husband, and our dear father, ????? Lyttle, who died on 23rd March, 1923, and was interred in Anahilt Presbyterian Burying-ground, Hillsborough, Co. Down. Jesus called him, he was ready, For that home so bright and fair; Up among the happy angels, He is waiting for us there. Ever remembered by his loving Wife and family. LETITIA LYTTLE. 10 Solway Street.

MARSHALL -- In loving memory of my ???? son, 17132, Rifleman William Marshall, ?? Batt. Royal Irish Rifles, reported ???? between 21st and 29th March, 1918, afterwards reported killed. He fell at his post, like a soldier ???? He answered his Master's call; He sleeps far away in a hero's grave, For his country's cause he did fall. In the bloom of life death claimed him In the pride of his manhood days; None knew him but to love him, None mentioned his name but with ???? Ever remembered by his sorrowing ????? Sisters and Brother MARY MARSHALL. 60 Braemar Street, Broadway.

MURDOCH -- In loving memory of my ????? Helen, who died at 90 Roseberry Road, ?? March, 1911, and was interred in ???? Cemetery. Cherished memories of one so dear Are oft recalled by a silent tear. Ever remembered by her loving Husband JOHN MURDOCH. 23 Collyer Street, Belfast.

MURRAY -- In everlasting memory of our ??? son, Rifleman David Murray, who was killed in action in France, on March 24, ???? I cannot forget him, no, not for one day, I speak of him often although passed ??? The shock, it was hard no doubt ?????????? But Jesus has promised we shall meet Him up there. Sadly missed by his loving father, Mother, Brother, and Sisters. 25 Ewart's Row

M'VEIGH -- In fond and loving memory ??? dear husband David M'Veigh, who ??? this life on the 24th March, ???? interred in City Cemetery; also ???????? Robert, who died on the 23rd March ????? "For ever with the Lord." Ever remembered by his loving Wife, Sons, and Daughters. SARAH M'VEIGH. Linfield Lodge, Rowland Street.

RENWICK -- in loving memory of ??????????? William Renwick, 14th Batt. R.I.R., killed in action at Ham on 24th March, 1918. Ever remembered by his Mother-in-law, Father-in-law, two Brothers-in-law, and Friend. JOHN and CHARLOTTE ????? THOMAS and WILLIAM ????? LYDIA PORTER. 18 Fife Street, Belfast.

STEWART -- In loving memory of my ???? mother, Agnes Stewart, who departed this life on 24th March, 1920, and was laid ?????? in Movilla Cemetery, Newtownards My thoughts doth often linger Round a grave not far away, Where they laid my darling mother Four years ago to-day. Ever remembered and sadly missed by ??? loving Daughter. PRIMROSE STEWART. 10 Ashdale Street.

 

^ top of page