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Belfast Telegraph - 24 April, 1919

Marriages

BALL--CAMPBELL -- April 23, 1919, at Fitzroy Avenue Presbyterian Church, by Rev. Wm. Colquhoun, B.A., assisted by Rev. Samuel Thompson, M.A., and Rev. George Thompson, D.D., James Edgar Ball, Albert View, University Street, to Helen Whiteside, daughter of the late James Campbell, Omagh, Co. Tyrone.

MILLAR--IRVINE -- April 16, 1919 at the Parish Church, Glenoe, by the Rev. C.H. Buchanan, Edward A., second son of the late James Millar, Ballycarry, to Mary Jane, eldest daughter of James and Sarah Irvine, Glenoe.

MOORE--PATTON -- April 19, 1919, at Fisherwick Presbyterian Church, by Rev. W.A. Hill, B.A., of Bangor, William, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H.B. Moore, Mount Edgcumbe, Stranmillis Road, Belfast, to Esther, second daughter of the late Thomas Patton and Mrs. Patton, Ward Avenue, Bangor.

M'CRACKEN--CAMPBELL -- April 18, 1919, at St. Patrick's Church, Jordanstown, by the Rev. R.N. Ruttle, B.A., Robert, youngest son of the late Wm. and Mary M'Cracken, Belfast, to Sarah, eldest and only daughter of James and Martha Campbell, Monkstown.

Deaths

BALMER -- April 23, 1919, at her residence, 16 Glenwherry Street, Mary Jane, widow of the late John Balmer. The remains of our be- loved mother will be removed on to-morrow (Friday), at 2 p.m. for interment in Hillsborough Churchyard. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted by her loving Son and Daughters.

BAXTER -- April 23, 1919 at her residence, 45 Howard Street South, Jane, the eldest daughter of the late Samuel and Elizabeth Baxter. The remains of my dear aunt will be removed on to-morrow (Friday), at 2.30 p.m. for interment in Dundonald Cemetery. Inserted by her Nephew, WILLIAM H. BAXTER.

BAXTER -- April 23, 1919 at her residence, 45 Howard Street South, Jane, the eldest daughter of the late Samuel and Elizabeth Baxter. Her remains will be removed from above address on to-morrow (Friday), at 2.30 p.m., for interment in Dundonald Cemetery. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. THOMAS JAMISON.

BEATTIE -- April 23, 1919, at Royal Victoria Hospital. Sarah, dearly-beloved daughter of Robert and the late Elizabeth Beattie. Her remains will be removed from her father's residence, 54 Northumberland Street, on to-morrow (Friday), at 2.30 p.m., for interment in Dundonald Cemetery. Deeply regretted by her Father, Sisters and Nephew. ROBERT BEATTIE.

BONNAR -- April 23, 1919, at 25 Linden Gardens, Belfast. James Ambrose, dearly-beloved son of John and Sarah Bonnar. -- R.I.P. His remains will be removed for interment in Milltown Cemetery on to-morrow (Friday), at 2 p.m. Our Lady of Lourdes, pray for him.

BRIGGS -- April 23, 1919, at his residence, 118 Canmore Street, Alexander Alphonso (Frank) Briggs, dearly-beloved husband of Sarah Ann Briggs. His remains will be removed from his late residence, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday) at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. SARAH ANN BRIGGS.

BURNS -- April 23, 1919, at her husband's residence, 165 Albert Street, Ellen, the dearly-loved wife of John Burns. -- R.I.P. Her remains will be removed for interment in Millton Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday) at 2 p.m. On her soul, sweet Jesus, have mercy.

DAVEY -- April 23, 1919, at his residence, 59 Paris Street, John, dearly-beloved husband of the late Margaret Davey. The remains of my dearly-loved father will be removed from the above address on to-morrow (Friday), at 2.30 p.m., for interment in Dundonald Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. At rest. Inserted by his sorrowing Daughter and Son- in-law. MAGGIE AND JAMES EATON. Also his two Grandchildren, Agnes and Jim, 49 Carlow Street.

DAVEY -- April 23, 1919 at his late residence, 59 Paris Street, John, the dearly-beloved father of Rosanne Townsend, and husband of the late Margaret Davey. His remains will be laid to rest in Dundonald Cemetery on to- morrow (Friday), at 2.30 p.m. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. Some time, some day, My eyes shall see, The face I loved so well; Some day I'll clasp his loving hand, And never say farewell. Deeply regretted by his loving Daughter and Son-in-Law, ROSANNE and JOHN TOWNSEND Also his two Sons, Martin and John.

JOHNSTON -- April 23, 1919, at the residence of her son-in-law, 3 Charlemont Square North, Bessbrook, Sarah Jane Johnston. Funeral from above address on to-morrow (Friday), at 2.30 p.m. sharp, for interment in Presbyterian Cemetery, Bessbrook. Inserted by her Son and Daughter-in-law, ALEXANDER AND MAGGIE JOHNSTON.

JOHNSTON -- April 23, 1919, at the residence of her son-in-law, 3 Charlemont Square North, Bessbrook, Sarah Jane Johnston. Funeral from above address on to-morrow (Friday) at 2.30 p.m. sharp for interment in Presbyterian Cemetery, Bessbrook. Inserted by her Son-in-law JAMES M'CULLOUGH.

KERNS -- April 23, 1919 at his mother's residence, Kern Villa, Cliftonville Circus (of pneumonia), Joseph, dearly-beloved son of Sarah and the late Joseph Kerns. Funeral from above address, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, at 2.30 p.m., on to-morrow (Friday). SARAH KERNS.

MORRISON -- April 23, 1919, at his residence, 7 Court Street, Newtownards. Samuel Morrison. The remains of our dearly-loved father will be removed from above address, for interment in Whitechurch Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday), at 11 a.m. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. Inserted by his sorrowing Sons and Daughters.

MURRAY -- April 24, 1919, at the residence of his Son-in-law, 7 Charlemont Square North, Bessbrook. Robert Murray, fourth son of the late Alexander Murray, Ravara, Ballygowan, Co. Down. Funeral from above address on to-morrow (Friday) at six o'clock, for interment in Presbyterian Cemetery, Bessbrook. ALEXANDER SEATON.

M'DADE -- April 23, 1919, at 57 Witham Street, Herbert, fourth and dearly-beloved son of Thomas and Edith M'Dade. Funeral on to- morrow (FRIDAY), at 2.30 p.m., for interment in the fmily burying-ground, Movilla, Newtownards.

M'KENNA -- April 24, 1919, at her residence, 22 Windsor Street, Belfast. Louisa, the beloved wife of John Henry M'Kenna. Funeral on Saturday, 26, inst., at 2 p.m., for interment in the City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. JOHN HENRY M'KENNA.

M'KINNEY -- April 24, 1919, at North-East Division, Carrickfergus. Jeannie Mackey, wife of David Legg M'Kinney. Funeral to St. Nicholas' Churchyard on to-morrow (Friday) at 4 p.m.

M'KITTERICK -- April 23, 1919, at Ballyrea, Newtownards, Jane M'Kitterick. The remains of my beloved wife will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Movilla, on to-morrow (Friday), at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. ROBERT M'KITTERICK.

PARKHILL -- April 23, 1919, at his residence. The Crescent, Holywood. James Parkhill (formerly of Carrickfergus). The remains of my beloved husband will be removed, for interment in St. Nicholas' Churchyard, Carrickfergus on to-morrow (Friday), at 2.30 p.m. (by motor) No flowers. CATHERINE L. PARKHILL.

TAIT -- April 24, 1919, at her parents' residence, Cromwell's Highway, Lisburn. Elizabeth (Lily) Tait. The remains of our beloved daughter will be removed for interment in Lisburn Cemetery, on Saturday afternoon, at 2.30 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. JOHN and EDITH TAIT.

THOMPSON -- April 23, 1919, Mary Elizabeth (Minnie), daughter of the late Cornelius and Elizabeth Thompson. -- R.I.P. Funeral from her late residence, Ballinderry Road, Knock- more, Lisburn, for interment in Holy Trinity Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday), at 1:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. On whose soul, sweet Jesus, have mercy. Deeply regretted by her Sister, Brothers, and Brother-in-law.

Thanks

Mrs. BAMFORD desires to return sincere thanks to the many kind friends who sympathised with her recent sad bereavement; also to the officers and staff of the Municipal Sanatorium for their floral tribute. Hoping this will be accepted by all. Cloughfern, Whiteabbey.

In Memoriam

BEATTIE -- In memory of my dear father Thomas Beattie (late of 19 Newtownards Road), who departed this life on 24th of April 1915, and was interred in Dundonald Cemetery Gone and forgotten by some you may be, But dear to my memory for ever you'll be; If the grave were to open what changes you would see, But eternal rest is far better for thee. Inserted by his Daughter and Son-in-law LIZZIE and JAMES BENNETT, 108 Newtownards Road,

BILLINGHURST -- In affectionate remembrance of my darling sister, Edith Alexandra (Edie), who died on the 24th April, 1918, and was interred in the City Cemetery. The voice we loved is still Ever remembered by her sorrowing Sister MINNIE.

BILLINGHURST -- In fond and loving remembrance of my darling sister, Edith Alexandra (Edie), who departed this life on 24th April, 1918, and was interred in City Cemetery. Ten years, sweet child, of love and mirth To thee from God were given; A little angel when on earth, An angel now in heaven. Deeply regretted by her loving Sister, Brother- in-law, and little Niece. M. and W.T. FULTON.

BILLINGHURST -- In fond and loving remembrance of my darling sister, Edith Alexandra (Edie), who departed this life on 24th April 1918, and was interred in City Cemetery. Father, in Thy gracious keeping Leave we now our loved one sleeping. Ever remembered by her loving sister and Brother-in-law. J. and E. PRICE.

FERGUSON -- In memory of my beloved daughter, Agnes Ferguson, who fell asleep on 24th April, 1916, and was interred in Downpatrick Cathedral Cemetery. JAMES FERGUSON Manor Terrace, Cregagh Road.

IRWIN -- In loving memory of my dear brother, Cassie Walker, died on April 24, 1918; also my son Jack, died on April 18, 1917; also my daughter Lizzie, died on April 19, 1906, and my dear wife, died on 2nd October, 1906. All were interred in Dundonald Cemetery. Sadly missed by Father and Sisters, 41 Newport Street.

IRWIN -- In loving memory of my dear brother, John Charles, who died on April 18, 1917; also My dear sister Cassie Walker, who died on April 24, 1918. Both interred in Dundonald. Sadly missed Annie and Harry and their two little Nieces, Lily and Ella, 24 Newport Street

MORRISON -- In loving memory of our dear mother, Jane Morrison, who fell asleep in Jesus on 24th April 1917, and was interred in City Cemetery. Absent, but not forgotten by her loving Son and Daughter-in-law THOMAS and ELLEN MORRISON (the former serving abroad). 38 Euston Street.

MORRISON -- In loving memory of our dear mother, Jane Morrison, who fell asleep in Jesus on the 24th April 1917, and was interred in the City Cemetery. Peace, perfect peace. Ever remembered by her loving Son and Daughter. ALLAN and MARTHA MORRISON, 50 Channing Street.

O'BRIEN -- In loving remembrance of my dear husband, Henry O'Brien, who departed this life on the 24th April, 1917, and was interred in the family burying-ground, Bryansford. For ever with the Lord. Sadly missed by his loving Wife and Children. EDITH O'BRIEN, 1Cherryville Street.

Our Heroes -- In Memoriam

CURRY -- In loving remembrance of Private R. J. Curry, Canadian Infantry, 44th Batt., who was killed in action, April 24, 1917, at Vimy Ridge. He sleeps in a military cemetery at Villers-au-Bois, France. He died that those he loved might live. Ever remembered by his loving Father and Mother, Sisters and Brothers. 248 Crumlin Road.

CURRY -- In loving memory of our dear brother, 829402 Private R.J. Curry, Canadian Infantry, killed in action on April 24, 1917 Not gone from memory nor from love, But to our Father's house above. Ever remembered by his loving Brother and Sister-in-law. WILLIAM AND NELLIE CURRY, 125 Bray Street.

GRAHAM -- In loving memory of my beloved husband, First-class Petty Officer Joseph Graham, killed in action on 24th April, 1917 and was interred in Roumania. To memory ever dear. Ever remembered by his loving Wife, ANNIE GRAHAM, Antrim.

STEELE -- in fond and loving memory of Private James Steele (75932), 2/2 London Regiment, killed in action on 24th April, 1918, son of Mr. and Mrs. W.S. Steele, The Crescent, Holywood.

Clippings

TERMS OF LONDON TREATY

The secret Treaty of London, signed on April 25, 1915, by Britain, France, Italy, and Russia, promised that Italy should receive by the future Treaty of Peace the following: -- The Trentino; the whole of the Southern Tyrol as far as the Brenner; Triest and its surroundings; the county of Gorizia and Gradisca; all Istria as far as the Quarnero, including Volocca and the Istrian Islands; the Province of Dalmatia and all the islands north and west of the Dalmatian coast; Valona; the island of Saseno and territory between the river Volussa and the district of Chimara; the right to conduct the foreign relations of Albania; full possession of all the islands of the Dodecanese then occupied by her; and a zone in Asia Minor in the Adalia region. The Treaty, however (says the "Daily News"), did not promise Italy Fiume, but expressly provided that it should remain in the territory of Crotia, Servia, and Montenegro.

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AWARDS FOR BRAVERY

NINE MEDALS PRESENTED
CEREMONY AT VICTORIA BARRACKS

Brigadier-General G.W. Hacket Pain, C.B., presented a number of decorations for bravery in the field at a parade of the troops in Victoria Barracks, Belfast, today. The Brigadier was accompanied by Major N.H.C. Russell, D.S.O., General Staff Officer and Major W.H. Stanley Jones, D.A.A. and Q.M.G., and the battalion on parade was the 3 rd Norfolk Regiment, in command of Lieut-Col. C.M. Jickling, O.B.E. The following were the decorations conferred: --

D.C.M.
Sergt. J. Kennedy, Labour Corps, 7 Beit Street, Belfast.
Lance-Corpl. R. Herdman, Royal Irish Rifles, 90 Oldpark Road, Belfast.

MILITARY MEDAL.
Gunner T. Chambers, 34 (Antrim) Fire Command, Carrickfergus.
Bdr. T.V. Smith, 34 (Antrim) Fire Command, Carrickfergus.
Private B. Bower, 4th K.O.Y.L.I. Ballykinlar.
Private W.J. Lyness, Royal Scots, 14 Oakley Street, Ballysillan, Belfast.
Cpl. H. Tannahill, Royal Irish Rifles, Trinity Place, Dunmurry, Co. Antrim.

MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL.
R.S.M. H. Glasspool, 4th Batt. Hampshire Regt., Clandeboye

BELGIAN CROIX DE GUERRE.
Sdr. S.-Sergt. A. Hawkins, R.A.S.C., Victoria Barracks, Belfast

The Brigadier congratulated each of the recipients on being awarded the decorations which he had presented to them.

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NORTH BELFAST REGIMENT

COL. GORDON VACATES COMMAND

Lieut.-Col. F.L. Gordon, D.S.O. who has been identified with the 15th Batt Royal Irish rifles ( North Belfast Volunteers) since its formation, has vacated the command of that battalion after 4 1/2 years' service. The 15th is one of the few battalions of the Ulster Division which survived the reorganisation of 1918, and it is still overseas, though reduced to a cadre. Lieut.-Col. Gordon before the war was the officer commanding the Special Services Section of the North Belfast U.V.F., and when the Ulster Division was got up he was immediately posted to it. With the exception of a period when he commanded the Leicestershire Yeomany, Lieut.-Col. Gordon served with the Ulsters. He holds the D.S.O. for his services during the war.

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BELFAST TENANCY DISPUTES

In the course of the hearing of an ejectment writ at the Belfast Recorder's Court to-day the evidence showed that the tenant in possession had come from England to take up work, and succeeded in the tenancy of a house in Moyola Street. Plaintiff's case was that the original Tenant had given up possession, and that there was no agreement entered into between the landlord and the succeeding tenant, i.e. the defendant. This was contested by the defendant, but his Honour, in entering judgement for the plaintiff, said he was not there to procure houses for anybody. He realized the scarcity there was of houses, and if he could give everybody a house he would be only too happy to do so. His duty was to decide whether the party in possession was entitled to it or not. In another case, which had reference to No. 49 Fitzroy Avenue counsel for the plaintiffs who are mineral water manufacturers said the house was originally built and intended for use as a residence for the manager of the works. The premises for the past few years had been let, and it was now desired to retain possession. His Honour -- Why are you turning these people out? Counsel -- We want it ourselves. It is essential the manager or some responsible employee should reside there to have supervision over the works. His Honour- Your clients did not think that when it was let to the present occupier. For the plaintiffs it was stated another house in Rugby Avenue was available for the defendant, who however, expressed her inability to remove there owing to the extent of her furniture and the inadequate accommodation the house provided. His Honour adjourned the case, intimating there was the offer of alternative accommodation which defendant could avail herself of, and its acceptance or otherwise would direct him in his ultimate decision.

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SENTRIES AT KYNOCH'S WAYLAID

GAGGED AND RIFLES STOLEN
ONE MENACED WITH REVOLVER.

Arklow (Co. Wicklow) was the scene of a daring attack on two private soldiers on Wednesday evening. The men were not only beaten, but gagged and relieved of their rifles and bayonets.

The soldiers had been doing sentry duty at Kynoch's factory. Returning to the barrack they were set upon by a number of men.

Considerable violence was used, and in the free fight the trench helmets worn by the sentries were somewhat battered.

Their resistance was unavailing, and the assailants, after gagging them, decamped with their rifles and equipment.

Later one of the soldiers managed to free himself, and brought the news of the attack to the military barracks.

A rescue party which was sent out discovered the second sentry lying in an unconscious condition. He was removed to barracks on a stretcher, but had happily sustained no serious injury.

One of the victims declares that during the attack he cried out to attract attention, but one of the party produced a revolver and forced him to desist.

A military force has been stationed in Arklow since the first year of the war.

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BLUEBEARD'S HOBBY

"GATHERING DEAD LEAVES"
STORY OF ANOTHER VICTIM

The London "Daily Express" correspondent at Paris writes: -- Another victim of Bluebeard has been identified. This time it is a penniless woman, a Madame Jaume, who met Landru after her husband had been compelled to leave the country owing to a disastrous business enterprise, which made him unable to meet his financial liabilities.

Landru promised her marriage and took her to his bungalow. She told a friend that Landru seemed insane because he spent the whole day gathering dead leaves and storing them in a shed. The woman's husband started divorce proceedings but when the legal papers were to be served she had disappeared.

Landru brought a box of chocolates to her most intimate friend, saying that it was a parting gift from Madame Jaume on the eve of her departure for America.

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LIVED IN A BYRE

REMARKABLE INQUEST STORY
CO. DERRY MAN'S MISERABLE END.

An extraordinary story was related at an inquest at Bogagh, County Derry, on Wednesday evening, on John James Crawford, a labourer, of about 60, who was found by the police dead in a byre, his body encircled by a rope, the end of which was fastened to the byre door.

W.J. Barr, Bogagh, who said Crawford, was his mother's half-brother, gave evidence of identification, and described deceased as foolish. On Tuesday morning witness got a message from Andy Boyle to come and help him to get deceased out of the graipe (a manure trench behind the cows). Witness went to the byre and found deceased lying on his back in the graipe, with his head against the wall. He was in a very filthy state. Witness and Boyle pulled deceased out of the graipe, and put him on some straw near the byre door, where he had been in the habit of lying. Witness then went to work, telling his (witness's) employer.

In reply to Sergeant Bennett, who represented the Crown, witness said deceased "did not speak, but gave a groan."

The Coroner (Dr. M'Laughlin) -- Did you not judge from that that there was something wrong?

Witness -- I did surely.

The Coroner -- Yet you did nothing but go on to your work? -- I told my employer, and he sent word to the sergeant.

What was your object in doing nothing for the man? -- I don't know. I didn't bother my head about him. I hadn't anything to bother my head about him.

The Sergeant -- You didn't even give him a drink of water?

Witness -- Miss Wilson was there and knew more about it. I don't know about a sick man. What could I do?

The Coroner -- I consider you acted in an extremely callous way, to say the least.

Andrew Boyd, a farm labourer, said in consequence of what Nellie Olford (Mr. Watson's servant) told him he went to George Watson's byre and found deceased lying as stated by Barr. Crawford was in a helpless, weak state.

Nellie Olford said since coming to Watson's a year ago she had known deceased, who lived in the byre, where she saw him regularly. He was working last Saturday. On Sunday he complained to her of having a sore throat, and she made him some tea. On Monday, when lying in the byre he again spoke of his throat and asked for a drink. Witness gave him some milk and later gave him tea. Towards evening he asked for a drink of water, and witness brought him a quart of cold water, which he drank. Later witness saw him taking a drink of water at the spout. An hour later, when witness was milking, deceased was lying on the straw in the byre. Witness went that night to a dance in Bready. On the following morning about seven o'clock she saw Crawford lying in the graipe. Witness told her mistress, and she sent for Boyd. Deceased was lying in the graipe and when removed to the straw always fell back again. "Miss Watson and I," added witness, "tied a rope around him, and fastened it to the door to keep him from falling down. He was so heavy, and there was nobody about to pick him out. At eight o'clock when witness went back to the byre deceased was dying.

Dr. Malseed attributed death to heart failure brought on by illness and exposure. He said the condition of the body and the surroundings were simply too awful to imagine in a civilized community.

The Coroner commented on what he regarded as the callous behaviour of the first witness, who was a relative of the deceased. Boyd seemed to have done his best for the poor man; so did the girl Olford. Deceased seemed to have been treated without humanity. He might have been removed to the workhouse.

The jury returned a verdict of death from Illness and exposure. The foreman said the jury were going to add a rider censuring the relatives for the life the man was allowed to lead, as well as his death, but they knew the man and knew the difficulty in dealing with him.

Mr. Rowan, a juror, said deceased was a strong-willed man, and it would have taken three or four policemen to take him to the workhouse against his will.

Mr. Parkhill, another juror, said deceased was so unclean that nobody could take him into their house.

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THIRTEEN YEARS ORGANIST

LISBURN TRIBUTE TO MR. J. MAGEE.

For over thirteen years Mr. Joseph Magee, a Belfastman, had, as organist and choirmaster of First Lisburn Presbyterian Church, sole charge of the praise portion of the services of this old-established congregation. During his leadership the choir grew considerably and there was also a marked improvement in the music. It was thus only to be expected that the churchpeople, with whom he had been so intimately connected, should mark in a tangible form the close of his service in the church.

At a social reunion he was the recipient of a well filled purse of Treasury notes. There was a very large gathering of members of the congregation, the choir, and friends of Mr. Magee at the presentation, which was made in the Assembly Rooms, Lisburn.

Rev. J.J.C. Breakey, minister of the church, who presided, said Mr. Magee had conducted the praise service in a most efficient and praiseworthy manner, and now, owing to business pressure he was obliged to sever his connection with them. Mr. Magee had constantly inconvenienced himself to perform duties which were not part of his regular routine-especially in the Sabbath-school-and he was beloved by all with whom he came in contact. (Applause.) In Belfast Mr. Magee would have wider scope for his undoubtedly fine music talents, and some other congregation would gain by First Lisburns' loss. (Applause.)

Mrs. J.D. Martin made the presentation, amidst applause.

Mr. Magee, in reply, assured those present that his work in the church had been a labour of love. It was not the first occasion on which the congregation had shown their generosity. They had always treated him in a kind manner, and out of all proportion to what he had done to bring the choir up to its present standing. His task had been an easy one, thanks to the kind and hearty cooperation of the members of the choir, and, indeed, the whole congregation in general. The pleasant recollections he had of his Lisburn friends would live in his memory, and First Lisburn would never take second place. Unfortunately, owing to business and family reasons, he was reluctantly compelled to sever his connections with that church, but he might say that in spirit he would always be with them. (Applause.)

Games and dancing were commenced, and at the close of the proceedings Mr. Magee was given a most enthusiastic send-off. Mr. Magee is well-known in cricket circles in Belfast, having assisted Woodvale and Lisburn clubs.

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TRAMWAY ACCIDENT SEQUEL.

In the Belfast Summons Court, to-day, District-Inspector Gerity mentioned a case in which Denis Killen, 95 Leeson Street, was charged with having driven a tramcar in a manner dangerous to the public on the 21st November, 1918, and stated that a civil action arising out of the occurance had now been decided, and he thought the charge might now be withdrawn.

Mr. T. Cairns said there had been an accident on the occasion, for which the Corporation had now paid.

The case was marked withdrawn.

 

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Belfast Telegraph - 25 April 1919

Births

EVANS -- April 22, 1919, at 1 Lydford Road, Westcliff-on-Sea, to Mr. and Mrs. J.S. Evans -- twin sons.

HAMILL -- April 21,1919, at 50 Trevelyan Terrace, Duncairn Gardens, to Mr. and Mrs. J. Hamill -- a daughter.

Marriages

M'CLURE--AGNEW -- April 23, 1919, at Helen's Bay Presbyterian Church, by the Rev. Samuel Walker, M.A., First Donaghadee, assisted by the Rev. Aston Robinson, B.A., Carland (cousin of the bride). John M'Clure, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. John M'Clure, Ballyhaskin, Millisle to Louise Bradley, youngest daughter of Mrs. Agnew and the late Archibald Agnew, Thorndale, Ballyfotherly.

M'NINCH--SMYTH -- April 16, 1919, at Comber Non-Subscribing Presbyterian Church by Rev. D.J. Williams, Killinchy, James Watt, youngest son of Mrs. M'Ninch and the late James Watt M'Ninch, Newtownards, to Agnes, daughter of Mrs. Smyth and the late John Smyth, Ringcreevy, Comber.

Deaths

BURKE -- At his late residence, Gilnahirk. John Burke, passed away on the 27th April 1919, and was interred in Gilnahirk Presbyterian Church Graveyard. Inserted by his Friends Mrs. JAS. GELSTON AND JOHN GAMBLE.

COOKE -- April 25, 1919, at his father's residence, 186 Donegall Road, James, the eldest and dearly-beloved son of William and Mary Cooke. His remains will be removed from above address, for interment in City Cemetery, on Sunday. 27th inst. at 2.30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted. Inserted by his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers. WILLIAM AND MARY COOKE.

FERRIS -- April 24, 1919, at Ferris' Bay, Larne Harbour (of acute pneumonia). W.J. Ferris, Glenone, Earlswood Road, Belfast. Funeral private.

FLEMING -- April 24, 1919, at his residence, Massereene, Antrim. Samuel, the youngest son of John Fleming. The remains of our dearly-beloved brother will be removed from above address, for interment in New Cemetery, on to-morrow (Saturday), at 11 a.m. Friends please accept this (the only) intimation. Gone to be with Christ, which is far better. Deeply regretted by his Brother and Sisters, also Niece.

GREER -- April 25, 1919, at his residence, 10 Empress Street, Thomas, the beloved husband of Sarah Greer. -- R.I.P. Notice of interment later. Inserted by his sorrowing Wife and little Daughter.

KEENAN -- April 23, 1919, at Royal Victoria Hospital, Rachel, the third and dearly-beloved daughter of William and Florence Keenan. Her remains will be removed from her residence, 69 Kyle Street, Sydenham, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery on Sunday, at 2.30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. Suffer little children to come unto Me. WILLIAM AND FLORENCE KEENAN. English papers please copy.

KEENAN -- April 23, 1919, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Rachel, the third and dearly beloved daughter of William and Florence Keenan. Her remains will be removed from her residence, 69 Kyle Street, Sydenham, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery on Sunday, at 2.30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. Though few my years while here below, The longer is my rest; God called me hence in early life, Because He thought it best. Inserted by her Neighbours in Sydenham, also her loving Companions.

LONG -- April 24, 1919, at Gransha, Islandmagee, William Long. His remains will be removed for interment in the family burying-ground New Church, Islandmagee, on to-morrow (Saturday), at 1 p.m.

MACARTNEY -- April 23, 1919, at his residence, 35 Rossmore Avenue, James, the dearly-loved husband of Robina Macartney. Funeral on to-morrow (Saturday), at 2.30 p.m., to Newtownbreda Churchyard.

MARTIN -- April 24, 1919, at 24 Skegoniel Avenue, David, son of Joseph Martin. His remains will be removed, at 2.30 p.m., on to-morrow (Saturday), for interment in Carnmoney. Friends will please accept this intimation.

M'DOWELL -- April 25, 1919, at 23 Greenville Terrace, Bloomfield, Annie, relic of the late George M'Dowell, and daughter of the late John Cowser, Millicent, Co. Kildare. Funeral at 2.30 p.m. on Sunday to Dundonald Cemetery. Deeply regretted by her Sons and Daughters, also by her Sons and Daughters-in-law.

M'KENNA -- April 24, 1919 at her residence, 22 Windsor Street, Belfast, Louisa, the beloved wife of John Henry M'Kenna. Funeral on to-morrow (Saturday), at 2 p.m., for interment in the City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. JOHN HENRY M'KENNA.

M'NEILLY -- April 25, 1919, at his residence, Albert Road, Carrickfergus, John the beloved husband of Agnes M'Neilly. Interment notice later.

RAINEY -- April 24, 1919, at 71 Theodore Street. Robert, dearly-beloved husband of Elizabeth Rainey. Funeral on to-morrow (Saturday) at 2.30 p.m., to City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

RODGERS -- April 24, 1919, at his grandparents residence, 2 Lackagh Street, Thomas N. Rodgers (wee Tommy), youngest and dearly-beloved son of William and Elizabeth Rodgers, aged 2 years and 4 months. His remains will be removed from above address on to-morrow (Saturday), at 2.30 p.m. for interment in Dundonald Cemetery. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. Thy will be done. WILLIAM AND ELIZABETH RODGERS. Also his grandfather and grandmother, THOMAS AND MARY JANE NEWELL, 2 Lackagh Street.

ROWAN -- April 23, 1919, at Royal Victoria Hospital, Letitia, eldest and dearly-loved daughter of Thomas and Mary Harper. Her remains will be removed from her parents' residence, 25 Paxton Street, on to-morrow (Saturday), at 2.30 p.m., for interment in City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted by her father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters, THOMAS AND MARY HARPER.

ROWAN -- April 23, 1919, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Letitia, beloved wife of John Rowan, junior. Her remains will be removed from her father's residence, 25 Paxton Street, on to-morrow (Saturday), at 2.30 p.m., for interment in the City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. JOHN ROWAN, Junior.

TAIT -- April 24, 1919, at her parents' residence, Cromwell's Highway, Lisburn. Elizabeth (Lily) Tait. The remains of our beloved daughter will be removed for interment in Lisburn Cemetery, on to-morrow (Saturday) at 2.30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. JOHN AND EDITH TAIT.

TAIT -- April 24, 1919, at her parents' residence, Cromwell's Highway, Lisburn. Elizabeth (Lily), eldest and dearly-beloved daughter of John and Edith Tait and granddaughter of Letitia and the late John Dornan, Dublin Road, Lisburn. Funeral to Lisburn Cemetery on to-morrow (Saturday), at 2.30 p.m. Deeply regretted. LETTITA DORNAN.

Thanks

The Daughters of the late Mrs. Jamison desire to return sincere thanks to the many kind friends and neighbours who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement, especially the friends of Beechfield House for the beautiful wreath. Hoping this will be accepted by all. -- 34 Eversleigh Street.

Mr. and Mrs. KIRKWOOD and Family wish to thank those who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement. Hoping this will be accepted by all. York Villa, Cable Road, Whitehead.

Mr. and Mrs. M'CORMICK and Family desire to return sincere thanks to the many kind friends who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement; also to the foremen carpenters and fellow-workmen of Workman, Clark, Ltd. (North Yard), for their floral tribute. Hoping this will be accepted by all. 93 Broom Street, Belfast.

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. TOWNSEND desire to return their sincere thanks to the many kind friends who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement: also to all who sent floral tributes, especially Alexandra National School, People's Hall Sunday School, and companions of Glencollyer Street. Hoping this will be accepted by all. 23 Glencollyer Street.

The Brothers and Sisters of the late Mrs. Wilson wish to return thanks to the many kind friends who sympathised with them in their recent sad bereavement: also to the workers of Lindsay Thompson's Thread Department for their beautiful wreath. Hoping this will be accepted by all. MAGGIE FERGUSON, 7 Tramway Street. L. GREER, Whitewell.

In Memoriam

ALLCOCK -- In loving remembrance of our dear mother, Fanny Allcock, who departed this life on 25th April, 1918, and was interred in the Victoria Cemetery, Carrickfergus. Ever remembered by her Daughter and Son-in-law, LILY AND WILLIAM TIMMINS.

BILLINGHURST -- In affectionate remembrance of my darling daughter, Edith Alexander (Edie), who died on the 24th April, 1918 and was interred in the City Cemetery. At rest. Ever remembered by her loving Father and Sisters. A.T. BILLINGHURST, 24 Hillview Street.

BOAL -- In loving memory of my dear daughter, Margaret Boal, (wee Peggy), who fell asleep in Jesus on 25th April, 1918, and was interred in the City Cemetery. An angel took my flower away, Yet I will not repine, For Jesus in His bosom wears, The flower that once was mine. Sadly missed by her sorrowing Mother and Sister. ANNIE AND ISABEL BOAL, 72 Leopold Street.

CARRUTHERS -- In loving memory of my dear wife Tillie, who departed this life on April 25, 1916, and was interred in City Cemetery. Ever remembered by her sorrowing Husband and Children. DAVID CARRUTHERS, 3 Skegoniel Avenue.

FINLAY -- In remembrance of my dear son, who departed this life on 25th April, 1918, and was interred in Hillhall Burying-ground. Friends will forget you, but your mother will never; You will dwell in my heart till life's journey is done. Lord, teach me Thy way that when my days are ended, I'll be met at the gates by my own dear son. Ever remembered by his Mother, Sisters and Brothers. 52 Low Road, Lisburn.

JOLLEY -- In sad and loving memory of our beloved daughter, Grace Louise, who entered into rest on the 25th April, 1918, and was interred in City Cemetery. Sweetly thy soul doth rest. JUSTENIAN AND MARGARET JOLLEY, 6 Brassey Street.

MURRAY -- in fond and loving memory of our dear child Willie, who died on the 25th April, 1918, and was interred in Milltown cemetery. For of such is the Kingdom of Heaven. Ever remembered by his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters. JOHN AND LUCY MURRAY, 14 Donore Street.

M'FARLANE -- In loving memory of my dear husband, Albert Dougal M'Farlane, Chief Petty Officer, H.M.S. --------- (late of Ruth Street), drowned at sea on 25th April, 1918. Inserted by his sorrowing Wife and two little Children. KATHLEEN M'FARLANE, Landscape Terrace.

PROCTOR -- In sad and loving memory of my dear husband, Thomas Proctor, who departed this life on 25th April, 1918, and was interred in Carnmoney Burying-ground. Gone from among us, oh, how we miss him, Loved him so dearly his memory we'll keep; Never while life lasts will we forget him; Dear to our hearts is the place where he sleeps. Deeply regretted by his loving Wife and Step-Children. -- 33 Jennymount Terrace.

PROCTOR -- In loving memory of my dear father, Thomas Proctor, who died on the 25th April, 1918, and was interred in Carnmoney Churchyard. We saw him fading like a flower, We could not make him stay, But nursed him with the tenderest care, Till God called him away. Ever remembered by his Daughter and Son-in-law and two Grandchildren. JANE AND ALEXANDER BRANAGH, 29 Jennymount Street.

PROCTOR -- In loving memory of my dear father, who departed this life on the 25th April, 1918, and was interred in Carnmoney Burying-ground. Could I, his son, have clasped the hand, Of the father I loved so well. To kiss his brow when death was near, And whispered. "Dad, farewell." Gone, but not forgotten by his only Son and Daughter-in-law, THOMAS AND SARAH PROCTOR (the former serving in H.M. Navy). 16 Barbour Street, Greencastle.

RICE -- In loving memory of my dear wife, Elizabeth Rice, who passed away on 25th April, 1918, and was interred in Dundonald Cemetery. Cherished memories of one so dear, Are oft recalled with many a tear. Sadly missed by her loving Husband and Daughter. HUGH RICE AND AGNES JOHNSTON, 30 Clermont Lane.

SIMMS -- In fond and loving memory of my dear husband, Joseph Simms, who departed this life on 25th April, 1917, and was interred in Dundonald Cemetery. Sadly missed by his sorrowing Wife and Children. ISABELLA SIMMS, 81 Tower Street.

SMITH -- In fond memory of my dear father, James Smith, M.D. (late Shankill Road, Belfast) who departed this life on April 25th, 1900, and was interred in Balmoral Cemetery. Gone, but not forgotten. H.C. SMITH (with Colonial Force abroad).

STEWART -- In fond and loving memory of my beloved daughter, Sarah Jane (Jeanie), who departed this life April, 1917, and was interred in Dromore Churchyard. Gone and forgotten by some you may be, But dear in our memory for ever you'll be: If the grave were to open what changes you'd see, But eternal rest is better for thee. Inserted by her loving Mother and Brother and Sister. -- 9 Gotha Street.

Our Heroes -- In Memoriam

BELL -- In loving memory of my dear husband, 8255 L.-Corpl. Charles Bell, 1st Batt. R.I. Fusiliers, killed in action at Ypres on April 25, 1915. A day of remembrance sad to recall. Ever remembered by his loving Wife and two little Sons. 11 Upton Cottages, Glen Road.

BELL -- In loving memory of our dear son, L.-Corpl. Charles Bell, R.I.F., killed in action on the 25th April, 1915, at Ypres. Ever remembered by his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers. 19 Upton Cottages, Glen Road.

CALDERWOOD -- In loving memory of my son, Pte. William Calderwood, 11th Batt. Australian Imperial Force, killed in action at Gallipoli, on 23rd April, 1915, grandson of James Calderwood (deceased), formerly of Sandy Row and Body's Row, Belfast. JAMES CALDERWOOD, 32 Beverley Street. Philadelphia and Pittsburg papers please copy.

CARMICHAEL -- In loving memory of Private Andrew Carmichael, 1st Batt. Royal Irish Fusiliers, killed in action near Ypres on 25th April, 1915, eldest and beloved son of John Carmichael, Craig View Place, Ballyclare.

CHEYNE -- In sad and loving memory of our dear son, Eddie Emerson Cheyne, 1st Batt. Royal Irish Fusiliers, killed in action at St. Julien, near Ypres, 25th April, 1915. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters. GEORGE AND SUSAN CHEYNE, 102 M'Clure Street, Belfast.

KEIR -- In loving memory of our dear son, Private Edmund Keir, 1st Batt. 1st Brigade, Canadians, who died from wounds received at the Battle of Langemarke, 25th April, 1915, and was interred in Military Cemetery, Boulogne, France. Though he sleeps not in his native land, But 'neath a foreign sky: Far from those who loved him dear, In a hero's grave he lies. Sadly missed by Father, Mother, Sisters, and Brother. Also in memory of all the Ulster men who fell. DAVID AND MINNIE KEIR, Toronto.

Clippings

BELFAST ORANGEISM.

SHANKILL'S MEMBER JOINS THE ORDER.
AN INTERESTING GATHERING.
IMPORTANT UNIONIST SPEECHES.

An enjoyable social gathering was held in West Belfast Orange Hall on Thursday night, when a large number of the brethren and friends of the Order were guests of the Worshipful Master and the officers of Coronation Total Abstinence L.O.L. 786, on the occasion of the initiation of Br. Samuel M'Guffin, M.P., as a member of the lodge. Br. Hugh Murphy, D.M. No. 9 District, presided, and among those present were Br. A.P. Dalzell, Deputy Grand Master of Belfast; Br. S. M'Guffin, M.P.; Mr. T. Moles, M.P.; Brs. R.J. Lynn, M.P.; R.M. Gaffikin, J.P.; W.J. Twaddell, J.P.; R.B. Andrews, F. Leathem, Thos. Mitchell, A. Hodges, Joshua MacBride. H. M'Laurin, A.Shaw, secretary No. 9 District; Also the following officers of Coronation Lodge:- Brs. James Humphrey. W.M.; Thomas Patterson, D.M.: Andrew M'Mullen, secretary: Samuel M'Clure, treasurer: and Joseph M'Mullen, James Noble, Robert Boyd, J. Sedgwick, and William Trimble, members of committee.

Br. H. Murphy (after an enjoyable tea), proposed "The King." Commenting on the fact that that was their first festive night since the conclusion of peace.

The toast was loyally honoured.

The Chairman read a letter of apology from Br. Colonel R.H. Wallace, C.B. Grand Master of Belfast, expressing his great pleasure at the introduction of Br. M'Guffin into the Order, and enclosing a cheque for 10 towards the hall renovation fund. (Applause).

Br. R. M'Gaffikin, J.P., proposed "Prosperity to the Loyal Orange Institution" There were, he said some people who thought the wiles of their ancient enemy had been squashed, but those who studied present-day signs saw that was not so. It behoved every Protestant to join the Order and sail under his own true colours. The Institution had obtained a very valuable acquisition in the person of Br. M'Guffin. (Hear, hear). He was a man not afraid to express his opinion anywhere. He (the speaker) had actually heard him tell the members of the Scottish Association that Robert Burns was not the greatest poet on earth, but Shakespeare. That was true courage. (Laughter and applause).

Br. A.P. Dalzell, who responded, congratulated the District Master of No. 9. Br. Murphy upon the good work he had done in connection with the renovation of the hall and the liquidation of the dept. He joined with the ex-High Sheriff in welcoming his dear friend, Br. M'Guffin, upon his admission into the Orange Institution (Applause). He was of the right stamp, and a good many of his forbears had been worthy members. They knew that in this, as in everything he did, Br. M'Guffin had acted from a thorough conviction of duty. It was changed times when they had at a gathering in West Belfast Orange Hall no less than three Belfast Members of Parliament. (A voice: "Three live members" and applause). Had the circumstances been suitable they would have had five more there. Having briefly reviewed the work of the Institution during the war, Br. Dalzell referred to the political situation. He said that with three-quarters of Ireland in a state of seething discontent and rebellion, it almost looked as though the desire of the Government in introducing the Proportional Representation Bill was to bring the other fourth into a similar condition. They had also the fact that the Home Rule Act of 1914 remained on the Statute Book. They, as Orangemen, denied the right of any legislative assembly to dictate to them as to what King they should serve or as to what flag they were to live under. (Applause). They were as determined as ever to resist to the full the inroads of Home Rule, and they looked to the members present to help them to maintain the principles of the Orange Institution -- civil and religious liberty (Applause).

Br. Thomas Mitchell in proposing "Our Newly-initiated Brother." Said they had brought into their institution that night a man worthy of all esteem and favour they could bestow upon him. (Hear, hear.) Those who had known Br. M'Guffin for a long time knew him to be a real man, honest in his convictions and one who formed his conclusions according to his conscience. He had joined the Orange Institution from a conviction that in principle it was right. The brethren of West Belfast would be delighted to have amongst them the member for Shankill Division, who would maintain their principles against all corners -- even against the great Joe Devlin. (Laughter and applause.) BR. S. M'GUFFUN, M.P., who was received with musical honours, said that if he had not been a member of the Orange Institution previously it was not because he did not consider it a worthy institution, but perhaps from a feeling that it was not an altogether necessary institution. He had, however, absolutely modified his conviction in that respect. He claimed, further, to have family associations with the Order. An uncle of his had had the distinction of being the W.M. of No. 1 L.O.L. in the parish of Killyman, Co. Tyrone, and he sacrificed his life for the cause. He was warned time and again that his life was not safe going to and from his lodge, and one night he was brutally assaulted, his tongue cut out of his head, his fingers cut from his hands, and his body was thrown over a hedge -- brutally assassinated by the enemies of the Orange Institution. He felt proud to be descended from men of that class, and hoped to prove himself a worthy member. (Applause.) He had always felt that the Order was more a religious than a political one; and the Home Rule question, as he had said in the election, was in reality a sectarian one. The policy of the Papacy was the overthrow of Protestantism; and he felt it was the duty of every true man to connect himself with the one institution which stood between them and the absolute sway of the Catholic hierarchy. (Hear, hear.)

He had recently been attending a series of addresses at Kingsway Hall on the reunion of the Churches, and had with surprise heard Dr. Orchard say that reunion would be impossible until the Church of Rome joined, too. They knew that that Church would never consent to an alliance with the Protestant Churches upon any terms of equality. (Hear, hear.) The hon. member proceeded to say that the strength of the Orange Institution was due to its being founded on the principles of the Bible. It was brought into being in defence of civil and religious liberty, and against the dominance of the Church of Rome, and it was the duty of all Protestants to be associated with it (Hear, hear.) The Nationalists, he pointed out, took their instructions from the direction of the hierarchy. They had been good enough to express their confidence in the Unionist members for the city, and it was with great pride that he found himself associated with such gentlemen as Br. Lynn, Mr. Moles, and his other colleagues. He had had the pleasure of listening to the speech of Mr. Moles, which Sir Edward Carson characterised as the best maiden speech he had ever heard. Mr. Moles had the facts and data of nearly every question that could possibly affect them, and these he was always ready to place at their disposal. The member for Woodvale, Br. Lynn, promised to be one of the most active members, who ever represented the city. All the other members also discharged their duties with regularity and faithfulness. Having emphasised the importance of the work done in Grand Committee, and the necessity of close attendance upon it, the speaker concluded by heartily congratulating the chairman, (Br. Murphy), upon the success of his efforts to have the dept upon the West Belfast Hall extinguished (Applause). The Chairman proposed " The Visiting Brethren." Which toast was cordially received.

THE MEMBER FOR ORMEAU.

Mr. T. Moles, M.P., opened his reply by saying he would address them as brethren in an anticipatory sense, as he was in a similar position to Br. M'Guffin regarding his attitude to the Orange Institution. The position of a member in the present Parliament (he proceeded) was a very responsible one, and the coming months would be as severe a testing time as could possibly be imagined. Four or five Grand Committees were sitting simultaneously and no member of any of these who had the interests of his city and the community at heart could neglect to give the work his constant attendance and attention without violation of conscience and gross dereliction of duty. Without any egotism, he could assure them there were not any harder working men in the House than the 23 they had sent from Ulster. (Hear, hear.)

The Home Rule Act of 1914, he reminded them, was on the Statute Book -- placed upon it by means as contemptible and despicable as ever time-serving politicians had resorted to; as gross a breach of a public pledge given by a responsible Minister as had ever been known. (Hear, hear.) They knew what politicians were, but there were politicians and politicians, and he hoped that they from Ulster belonged to a better breed. This they could say, they were led by a man who had never stooped to a single mean act. (Applause.) Sir Edward Carson had given up the highest office to which any man could aspire in the service of his country -- all that could appeal to a man of commanding genius -- he had given his time and energy, even his health, and he only asked of those he served was to be united and loyal. (Applause) They as Orangemen had loyalty as the root principle of their Order -- loyalty to their faith, to their country, and to their leaders. They had maintained their principles in face of much misunderstanding, but their fidelity had never been shaken; they had gone on steadfastly in the path of duty, realising that sooner or later men must think seriously whether, after all, they might not be right. Br. M'Guffin had explained to them his position in regard to the Order, and he (Mr. Moles) was in precisely the same boat. While they lived they learned. That was not the first time he had been speaking in an Orange Lodge, but he believed it was the last time he would speak as one who was not a member of the Order, (Applause.) Their young men and the older men, too, should do their utmost to extend the membership of the Institution, for they enshrined in it all the great fundamentals, all the verities, all the noble ideals that made men good citizens. (Hear, hear.) Their latest member (Br. M'Guffin) had already done useful service in the House, and he believed in him and Br. Lynn the electors of Shankill and Woodvale had as good men as were ever likely in the history of the city to represent them. (Applause) Belfast had been accused of doing some foolish things sometimes, but the residents did a wise thing when they discovered his two honoured friends and colleagues. (Applause.) In conclusion, he reminded them that it was a dramatic coincidence that the initiation of Br. M'Guffin had taken place on the anniversary of the gun running at Larne. (Applause)

Br. R.J. Lynn, M.P. (who, the chairman stated, had been about twenty-four years an Orangeman, and was going to become a member of L.O.L. 786), said that the Ulster Unionist party were absolutely united. They were all out to play the game for Ulster, and were led by one of the greatest men in the Empire, who stood head and shoulders above every other member in the House. (Applause.) They had shown they were not afraid to tackle the greatest of their opponents, but the latter had only got a few whiffs of the powder they would get before the session ended. (Laughter and applause.) Some people in their simplicity imagined the danger was past, but very serious problems lay ahead. The price they had to pay for liberty was eternal vigilance, and it was because the Institution had always been vigilant that he had always loved it. If the Vatican wanted, it could put an end to Sinn Fein to-morrow, but they did not want to do it. It was the duty of Orangemen to see that all such efforts were frustrated (Applause.)

Speeches in reply to the toast were also delivered by Br. Joseph MacBride, Councillor W. J. Twaddell, and Samuel M'Clure.

Brs. Joseph M'Mullan and A. Shaw contributed songs at intervals.

The Past-Master of L.O.L. 786, having been made the recipient of a collar and certificate in recognition of his services during his period of office, the proceedings were closed with the singing of the National Anthem.

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ART OF GIVING EVIDENCE

PRAISE FOR BOY WITNESS.

An eleven-year-old boy named Richard Lesham Weir, residing with his parents at Gadbroke Grove, London, was complimented by Mr. Biron, the magistrate at the Marylebone Police Court, on his very distinct and plain speech when giving evidence against a young carman named Alex. James, charged with stealing and receiving his bicycle.

The constable who followed the boy in the witness-box provided a striking contrast, and the magistrate asked him several times to repeat his statements "People don't seem to be taught to speak at all," he said. "I can scarcely understand a word you say, but that little boy, whose head could only just be seen above the witness-box, you could hear every single word he said."

The prisoner was said to be the associate of evale thieves, and was sentenced to three months hard labour. Mr. Biron directed the police to "let that very intelligent boy" have his bicycle back.

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TROUBLE AT A FUNERAL.

UNSYMPATHETIC SYMPATHISERS.

On the 10th April there was a funeral at New Lodge Road of a married relative of Annie Mary Connellan, who lives at Lancastrian Street off that thoroughfare. Amongst the mourners were Eliza O'Hanlon, 110 New Lodge Road, her married daughter, Mary Lynch, and the latter's baby. Their sympathy did not turn out happily, for each of the parties had the other summoned for assault at the Belfast Summons Court to-day.

Mr. B. Campbell was for O'Hanlon and Lynch, and Mr. N. Tughan for Connellan.

O'Hanlon and Lynch alleged that while they were watching the funeral going past in the customary solemn fashion, Mrs. Connellan (who, they said, had been "celebrating" the event) turned up suddenly and "scratched the face off" Mrs. O'Hanlon, by making a "glam" at her. Mrs Lynch, her daughter, as in duty bound, went to the rescue, and was struck in the chest, her baby being also "glammed" and scratched. This caused Mrs. Lynch to faint.

The case made by Mrs. Connellan was that the other two women came to laugh at the obsequies , and asked her when they saw her crying, were onions cheap that day. They then assaulted her.

Eventually the parties severally agreed to have peace between them, and the cases were struck out.

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BOXING.

HOLBORN STADIUM CONTESTS.

A full programme was negotiated at Holborn Stadium.

The meeting between Arthur Townley, of Birkenhead, and Henry Curzon, in a fifteen-rounds contest, was the principle attraction. Townley was much taller than his antagonist, and had the advantage accordingly. After a mediocre beginning, the form of the men improved, and hard knocks were exchanged. In the thirteenth round Townley staggered Curzon with two or three terrific punches, and just as round fourteen came on, the towel was thrown into the ring. Townley being declared the winner.

Next followed a twenty-round match between the well-known bantam weights, Tal Jones of South Wales, and Dick Heasman, of London. It was a very plucky fight right to the finish. Jones took a decisive lead from the eight round, and was declared the winner on points.

DISAPPOINTING DISPLAY IN DUBLIN.

A boxing tournament at the Theatre Royal, Dublin, on Thursday night, was a disappointing affair, the star attraction -- a twenty-round contest between Eddie M'Goorty and Tom Gummer -- being a fiasco.

The fight opened tamely. Hardly a blow was struck in the first round. Early in the next Gummer went down for a count of eight and a few seconds later was counted out, the result of a straight left to the body. M'Goorty had accordingly an easy victory.

Only one of the minor events went the full distance. Sergeant Gibbans eventually losing to Kid Doyle.

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THE DONEGALL QUAY BUFFET

The description given in a recent issue by "The Man in the Street" in connection with the work carried on by Mrs. Picken was most interesting reading (writes "J.") I hope it will be noted as one item in connection with the work done by Belfast ladies during the war. I visited the quay once or twice, and was delighted with what I saw, and if "The Man" would pursue the matter a little further, and let us readers know how many breakfasts have been supplied, it would be very valuable information, and likely cause more people to be interested in the work: I understand close upon 200,000 breakfasts were supplied "free gratis and for nothing" and when one tries to imagine what this has entailed on Mrs. Picken and her helpers it makes us ashamed that we did not take more interest in, and subscribe more generously to, the good work. Not many of us would care to be at the quay every morning, wet or dry, at five o'clock, as Mrs. Picken has been, to make men coming off the boats, perhaps after a rough, cold passage from the other side, welcome to a warm hearty breakfast. By the way in this connection, an interesting incident occurred on one of the dark, miserable, wet mornings when Mrs. Pickens extended the right-hand of welcome to a khaki-clad figure descending the gangway, she received the answer , "Yes, mother, I certainly will be glad of a cup of tea." To her surprise, she had invited one of her soldier sons, a doctor in the R.A.M.C., who was coming home on short leave. Her other son, a B.L., discarded his gown, and became a motor driver in France. Very few families can boast of having a medical son and a barrister in our Army, and doing good work for our King and Country. I understand the Belfast Branch of the Irish Women's Temperance Association are getting up a private testimonial to Mrs. Picken for her work at the Donegall Quay Buffet. I would suggest it should take the form of a public one. I am quite sure many would like to subscribe to a public testimonial if they only knew about it.

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Mrs. HELEN BARTON

who is now visiting Belfast and other Ulster towns in connection with the Victory Campaign Week organized by the Ulster Temperance Council. Mrs. Barton is a native of Glasgow, and was a member of the Glasgow Parish Council for nine years, and has taken a prominent part in social reform work, being a member of the Central Board of Control, which deals with problems arising out of the war. She has just completed a three and half years' tour of New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and the United States.

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1,000 HILLSIDE WHISKY STILL

A Toronto telegram in the " Times" says -- Provincial officials have located and destroyed a whisky still in Northern Ontario after an arduous bush journey. For many hours they were lost in country thick with underbrush and deep in snow. The still, which was built into the side of a hill and approached by an underground entrance, was deserted when the inspectors arrived, and it is supposed that they had been seen coming by watchers. The still and its contents were valued at 1,000

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

For sending matches through the post to her husband, a soldiers wife was fined 10s and costs at Altrincham, Cheshire.

Mr. Justice Macleod, Puisne Judge of the High Court, Bombay, is appointed Chief Justice of the Court in succession to Sir Basil Scott, who is retiring.

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WORK ON THE PLOTS.

SOME POINTS FOR HOLDERS.
MAKING CROPS WEATHER PROOF.

(By the Editor of the "Smallholder.")

If you have never grown salsify you should certainly make a small sowing this year. It is easy to grow, and makes a nice change in the winter. It is called the vegetable oyster.

If you have a small patch left on the ground set apart for roots, sow a few rows at once in shallow drills an inch deep and a foot apart. Do not sow on manured ground nor on poor soil. Like other root crops, salsify likes a soil which was well manured for the last crop.

Scorzonera is a similar crop, but most people prefer salsify. Just remember when the time comes for thinning this crop that the plants need only be left at about 4 inches apart, as large roots are not wanted.

It is not wise to sow long beet before May, but I am getting in a little if the turnip-rooted beet or globe beet. I choose a good variety, such as Sutton's Globe. I don't buy what is called Egyptian, which in my opinion, is not worth growing when compared with the beautiful types set out by good seedsmen. Globe beet is hardier than the long, and matures much more quickly.

It may be sown frequently from the beginning of March till the end of July, and by using this through the summer we can keep all our long beet for storing.

I don't thin too heavily, for if left at a few inches apart the roots are large enough for use when pulled out. This is a tip worth remembering. Remember, also, that beet must be protected from birds in the early stages.

Globe beet may be used as a catch-crop if you don't let the roots get too large.

The only disadvantage about globe beet is that it has not so good a colour as blood-red long beet.

RICH SOIL THE BEST

Those onions, Brussels sprouts, lettuces, cauliflowers, broad beans, and peas which I grew in the frame so as to be able to defy the weather are now quite large enough to plant out. But we often get some very cold weather in the treacherous months of April and May, and so I am careful to harden off my plants well, or I should lose the advantage I have gained.

I already have the pots and boxes in a cold frame, and have been removing the lights every day, and leaving them propped up at the back at nights. Now I am going to remove the lights entirely, and in a few days I shall either take away the frame or move the boxes, etc., out of it. This will make the plants really hardy and ready for planting out before the end of the month.

Of course, if we are likely to get a very sharp frost or hail or snow I shall drive a few stakes in, connect these up with poles, and throw some mats over this supporting frame-work.

By gradually exposing the crops to outside conditions we get the foliage well hardened, and in a manner of speaking give the plant a first-class chance to withstand the weather.

Meanwhile, if owing to the cold weather we have had, the ground for them is not yet prepared, it must be done at once. I always like to get this done at least a few weeks before planting, so that there will be time for it to settle down. Don't make the mistake of thinking that these plants require a less rich soil than those grown entirely outside. That idea is all wrong. If there is to be any difference the soil should be better, so that we may improve on the advantage we have gained.

Even on quite a small plot it is possible to grow fruit. This without taking up very much room, provided you follow our plan.

I plant the bushes along the edge as near as two feet from the path, and even then I have room for an edging of herbs. But I always make sure to leave sufficient room to get the wheelbarrow along. With a fence of raspberries or loganberries I plant only a foot from the path, so that I can attend to one side of the row from the pathway. I don't believe in using the main part of the plot for fruit, except strawberries.

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TOWN OF NEWRY.
VALUABLE LEASEHOLD.

LICENSED PREMISES

FOR SALE.

To be sold by Public AUCTION, on the PREMISES on MONDAY, 28th April, 1919, at TWELVE o'clock noon (new time) on the instructions of the Proprietor, Mr. JAMES WARNOCK.

ALL THAT VALUABLE LICENSED SHOP, DWELLING-HOUSE, YARD, AND PREMISES, situate at No. 10 WILLIAM STREET, NEWRY, and held by Mr. WARNOCK under Indenture of Lease for the unexpired term of 99 years, from the 1st May, 1854, subject to the nominal rent of 15 per annum.

The attention of investors is specially directed to this valuable Property, which is situate in one of the very best positions in that part of the important Town of Newry, which immediately adjoins the Docks and the Dublin Bridge and Greenore Railway Stations. An extensive business has been carried on for many years in the Premises, and the Vendor's rights to Supples of Liquor will be Sold with the Premises.

For further particulars as to Title and Conditions of Sale apply to COLLINS & COLLINS, Solicitors Having carriage of Sale, Newry, and Kilkeel. HUGH KING, Auctioneer, Grinan Lodge, Newry, and Whitecross.

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ARVA HOUSE.
CAVEHILL ROAD.

LETTING OF LANDS

I have received instructions from Mr. George Houston to Let by AUCTION, on the PREMISES, on THURSDAY, 1st May, 1919, at TWELVE o'clock.

About 6 ACRES FOR GRAZING AND CUTTING for the Season, in Lots to suit Purchasers.

Terms -- Credit to 1st November 1919, on Approved Security, with Auction Commission.
W.S. HARVEY, F.A.I.,
Auctioneer, 24 Arthur Street,
Belfast, and Lisburn.

 

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