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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Wednesdy, 24 March 1909

Deaths

CUNNINGHAM -- March 24, at her parent's residence, Denmark Street, WEE RACHEL, youngest and dearly beloved daughter of Robert and Jane Cunningham. -- Notice of interment in to-morrow's paper. Robert & Jane Cunningham.

LEWIS -- March 23, at her father's residence, 12 Beechmount Avenue, MARY J., eldest and dearly-beloved daughter of James and Mary E. Lewis. -- R.I.P. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in the family burying-ground, Hannahstown, on Friday afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

MEHAFFEY -- March 23, at 12 Edward Street, Newry, HUGH MEHAFFEY, Merchant. Funeral to St. Patrick's Churchyard, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, 25th inst., at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Clippings

OLD-AGE PENSIONS.

FALLS WARD COMMITTEE.

A meeting of the above committee was held on Tuesday night, under the presidency of Alderman James MacMahon, when the pension clerk (Mr. John O'Herlihy) submitted all the adjourned claims, which were disposed of in accordance with the statutory qualifications. The new claims were allowed with one exception, the claim being adjourned for proof of age.

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SUDDEN DEATH IN BELFAST.

HOW IDENTIFICATION WAS ESTABLISHED.

CORONER AND THE "EVENING TELEGRAPH."

In the Recorder's Court, Townhall Street, Belfast, to-day, the City Coroner (Dr. James Graham) held an inquest relative to the death of Catherine Scott (27), a domestic servant, which occurred at her lodgings, 23 Bloomdale Street, on the 22nd. Sergeant Bridgham conducted the examination of witnesses.

Jane Scott, 65 Denmark Street, sister of deceased, gave evidence of identification. Witness last saw her alive on the 20th inst. She was then in good health, although she was never very strong. Deceased belonged to Ballymoney.

The Coroner -- I suppose you knew nothing about it until you saw the photograph and paragraph in yesterday's "Evening Telegraph"?

Witness -- Yes, when the sergeant came.

Mrs. Martha Hawthorn, 23 Bloomdale Street, stated that deceased came to lodge with her on the 11th inst. On Monday morning, 22nd inst., about 8 o'clock, deceased came downstairs, threw her arms round witness, and commenced to laugh. She then fell to one side, and commenced to work in convulsions, and died in about ten minutes. Witness sent for the police and Dr. Watson.

Dr. Watson, Beersbridge Road, attributed death to heart failure.

The Coroner said he supposed the jury would return a verdict in accordance with Dr. Watson's evidence. The police had great difficulty in getting the body identified. The proprietor's of the "Belfast Evening Telegraph" kindly assisted the police, and inserted a photograph which was found amongst deceased's belongings, and a paragraph. He was sure the jury would appreciate the kindly action of the "Telegraph".

The jury returned a verdict as suggested by the Coroner.

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BELFAST SCHOOL ATTENDANCE CASES.

In Belfast Summons Court, before Messrs. A. Newton Brady, R.M., and Walter E. Archibald, J.P., the following were prosecuted for neglecting to cause their children to attend regularly at school, and fined in sums varying from 2s to 5s:-

John Donnelly, 95 Unity Street; William Edwards, 27 Hanover Street; William Johnston, 58 Leadbetter Street; William Dickson, 7 Alexander Street; Stephen Cromie, North Queen Place; Mary Ballantine, 47 Shannon Street; James White, 35 Prospect Street; Archibald Skates, 69 Bentham Street; William Rea, 20 Lake Street; John Dowds, 51 Lagan Street; Daniel Russell, 62 Joy Street; Robert George, 10 Stanfield Court; William Addison, 46 Lecumpher Street; James M'Kitterick, 60 Dundela Street; David Hamilton, 32 Dundela Street; Matthew M'Cullough, 13 Dundela Street; Ellen Munroe, 1 Laburnum Street; Eliza Greer, 22 Bread Street East; John Mullan, 18 Union Place; George Lane, 19 Malvern Place; William Harmon, 64 Christopher Street; Charles Dicker, 19 Oldpark Place; John Foster, 42 Avoca Street; Thomas Conn, 24 Sancroft Street; Samuel M'Aloney, 43 Brown Street; Francis Porter, 7 Melbourne Street; Hamilton Shaw, 7 Wigton Street; Andrew Sangster, 3 Tobergill Street; William Cairns, 44 Moscow Street; James M'Dowell, 31 Lawnbrook Square; John Ormsby, 124 Cupar Street; Charles Kildea, 15 Elgin Street; James Crozier, 53 Balfour Avenue; Harry Patterson, 29 Agra Street; William Nesbitt, 34 Jameson Street; Thomas Martin, 34 Wesley Street; Robert Moore, 8 Kenmare Street; Bruce Cairns, 74 Clementine Street; Ellen M'Aulay, 23 Linfield Road; James M'Kee, 68 Armoy Street; Samuel Brown, 53 City Street; William Bell, 7 Cussick Street; Samuel Robinson, 33 Methuen Street; Teresa Ryan, 60 Chemical Street. Henry Yates, confectioner, 10 Berlin Street, was fined 4s for employing a child under fourteen years who had not obtained a certificate of proficiency.

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DONAGHADEE NOTES.

In connection with the Shore Street Presbyterian Church, Donaghadee (of which the Rev. Robert Andrews is the esteemed minister), a very meritorious and well executed operetta and musical entertainment, organised by Mrs. Andrews (wife of Rev. Robert Andrews), was given in the schoolroom adjoining the church on Tuesday night. Mr. James A. Brown, U.D.C., presided over a very large and representative attendance, large numbers of people being unable to gain admission. The operetta portion was entitled "The Enchanted Glen", and the children, in suitable costume, performed the parts of the various characters represented. The vocal and musical items of the programme were also rendered in the most praiseworthy manner. At the conclusion, on the motion of Dr. Gibson, J.P., a vote of thanks was heartily accorded by acclamation to the chairman, to Mrs. Andrews, and to all who had kindly contributed to the programme. The various accompaniments were efficiently rendered by Miss May Henry, A.L.C.M. A most enjoyable evening was brought to a successful close by the singing of the National Anthem.

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BELFAST POLICE COURTS.

CUSTODY
Before Messrs. G. Nagle, R.M., and E. Emerson.

THREE RINGS.

James Lee, a boy, was charged with stealing three rings, value 3 10s, the property of Meta M'Cartney, within the past six months. Constable Kenny said when he arrested the boy he said he pawned one of the rings and got 5s for it. He had told the lad's parents, but they were at work, and would not come to the court. Lee was remanded.

Mr. A.J. Lewis prosecuted in the police cases.

"THAT'S A SURPRISE."

Henry Baird appeared in the dock charged with wife assault. When arrested prisoner remarked, "That's a surprise." Mr. Baird, 18 Molyneaux Street, represented that prisoner was an idle man, who was never sober when he could get a drink. He frequently threatened her life, and once drew the razor across her throat. Prisoner was ordered a month in jail in default of finding bail.

ASSIZE DEFAULTERS ARRESTED.

Maggie Cooke and William Ferris, who had previously been returned for trial on bail to the present assizes, appeared in the dock again, having been arrested on foot of a Bench warrant that had been issued because they had not been forthcoming before the judge. The charge against accused is that they stole 1 15s 2d from William J. Williams. The male prisoner said he was informed he would get notice when to go to the assizes, but did not get it. The accused were returned for trial to the next jail delivery (Recorder's Court) in custody.

SCENE AT TRADE'S HOTEL.

Bernard and William Ferran were charged with smashing six panes in the Trade's Hotel, Frederick Street, and assaulting Mr. Carson, the proprietor, and Francis Dixon a lodger. It was deposed that the prisoners were ejected from the hotel for fighting with two other persons, and they flung stones through the windows. Bernard Ferran was sent to jail for three months, and William for two months.

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BELFAST CHAUFFEUR SUMMONED.

In Belfast Summons Court, before Mr. Garrett Nagle, R.M., and Dr. N.J. M'Donnell, J.P., Constable Robb summoned Thomas Murphy, Malone Park, for, as alleged, driving a motor car recklessly in Lower Chichester Street on the 11th inst. Mr. D.F. Spiller prosecuted and Mr. Joseph Donnelly defended. Defendant is a driver in the employment of Mr. James Gallagher.

The constable stated that at about five o'clock on the evening of the date mentioned he was on point duty at the junction of Chichester Street, Great Edward Street, and Victoria Street. He saw the defendant Murphy driving a motor car along Lower Chichester Street from the direction of Oxford Street. The car was travelling at about 20 or 30 miles an hour. At the same time witness saw a tramcar approaching him from Great Edward Street. The motor was about 26 yards away, and the tramcar about 11 yards away. Witness signalled to the defendant to stop, and after he applied his brakes his vehicle skidded for 21 yards. When the tram driver saw the defendant approaching he applied the brakes and stopped his tram. Had he not done so there would have been a collision. As it was, defendant's car just skimmed the tram by about three inches.

Tram-driver Lamont was also examined.

Mr. Donnelly pointed out that the constable said he saw the motor when it was 26 yards away, and that after the driver had applied his brake the car skidded for 21 yards. Therefore the constable had only five yards in which to estimate the speed of the motor.

Mr. Frank Kerr, solicitor, one of the passengers in the motor car, said they had come from Downpatrick that day, and the car travelled so slowly that every other car on the road passed them. (Laughter.) They proceeded down Lower Chichester Street at about six miles an hour, and when the constable signalled the motor car was brought to a dead-stop within its own length. Witness, Mr. Robert Lindsay, and Mr. Gallagher were sitting in the rear of the car, and the chauffer occupied the front seat. There was never any danger of a collision.

Councillor Robert Lindsay and Mr. Gallagher having been examined, the magistrates dismissed the case.

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BELFAST LADY'S WILL.

Before the Master of the Rolls on Tuesday, in the case of Dunscombe, deceased, Ruddock v. Walker, which was brought to administer the trusts of the will of Lucy Jane Dunscombe, late of Belfast, who left considerable real and personal property, including houses in Kimberley Street, Mr. Whittaker, K.C. (instructed by Mr. Hugh Hayes) applied on behalf of the plaintiff, Robert Ruddock, who resides near Lurgan, that Mr. James Chambers, of Newtownards Road, Belfast, the receiver over the house property, should be discharged from his receivership on passing his final account, and that Mr. John Bowman, of Rossmore Avenue, Belfast, be appointed in his stead. It appeared that Mr. Chambers had been appointed to administer a large estate near Gilford, Co. Down. The application was granted.

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ACCIDENTS IN BELFAST.

ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

The following cases were received to-day:--

Margaret M'Laughlin (36), 27 M'Millan's Place, contused side; Patrick M'Glone (10), 37 Roumania Street, contused head; Robert Anderson (16), 18 Trafalgar Street, lacerated fingers; Robert Copeland (68), 30 Raby Street, burns to hand; Alexander Hamilton (15), 28 Ottawa Street, lacerated wound to arm; John M'Donald (37), 13 Elizabeth Street, injuries to ribs.

MATER INFIRMORIUM HOSPITAL.

The following accident cases were treated at the above institution to-day:--

James Owens (21), 103 Millfield, sprain to wrist; Bella Ferris (26), 4 Malvern Street, incised scalp wound; Michael M'Keown (23), 27 Millfield, lacerated wound to eyebrow.

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MOVEMENTS OF ULSTER LINERS.

HEAD LINE.

Rathlin Head, at New Orleans 23rd inst. to load for Belfast; Torr Head, at Barry loading for Rio De Janeiro; Howth Head, passed Key West 23rd inst. for Galveston and Belfast; Ramore Head, at Cardiff loading for Rio de Janeiro; Carrigan Head, at Belfast from Galveston; Glenarm Head, at New Orleans loading for Dublin; Malin Head, on passage from Barry for Rio de Janeiro; Bray Head, passed Key West 20th inst. for Vera Cruz; Innishowen Head at Dublin from Riga; Bengore Head, at Dublin from St. John, N.B., for Belfast; Dunmore Head, at Belfast from Windau; Teelin Head, at Belfast loading cotton for Reval; Glen Head, due Larne 26th inst. from Windau for Belfast; Black Head, at Windau from Reval for Belfast; White Head, on passage Belfast to Reval with cotton; Fair Head, at Ardrossan loading for Riga via Belfast.

LORD LINE.

Lord Antrim, from Rio 13th inst. for Philadelphia; Lord Charlemont, from Cardiff 20th inst. for Tenerife; Lord Downshire, at Alexandria 19th inst.; Lord Dufferin, from Newport 13th inst. for Hamburg and Rotterdam; Lord Erne, at Alexandria 6th inst.; Lord Iveagh, from St. Michaels 16th inst. for Baltimore; Lord Lansdowne, from Baltimore, 17th inst. for Belfast; Lord Londonderry, at Belfast; Lord Ormonde, at Barry 22nd inst.; Lord Roberts, at Ancona 22nd inst.; Bangor, from Huelva 1st inst. for New York; Belfast, at Tampa 21st inst.

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Thursday, 25 March 1909

Deaths

AGNEW -- March 24, at her late residence, 58 Eglinton Street, SARAH AGNEW. The remains of my beloved wife will be removed, for interment in Annahilt Glebe churchyard, on to-morrow (Friday) morning, at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. THOMAS AGNEW.

BRANAGH -- March 24, at 27 Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn, MARGARET BRANAGH. The remains of my beloved sister will be removed, for interment in Lisburn Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. ISABELLA BRANAGH.

BROWN -- March 24, at his residence, 3 Hastings Street, THOMAS, the beloved husband of Margaret Brown. His remains will be removed from the above address, for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground, on Saturday afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. MARGARET BROWN.

COOPER -- March 24, at 67 Antrim Road, Belfast, WILLIAM, the dearly-beloved husband of Sara Cooper, aged 51 years. His remains will be removed, for interment in Balmoral Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday) morning, at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- Deeply regretted.

CUNNINGHAM -- March 24, at her parent's residence, 7 Denmark Street, WEE RACHEL, aged 4 years 7 months, youngest and dearly-beloved daughter of Robert and Jane Cunningham. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at here o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- "Sadly missed by those who loved her most." -- ROBERT & JANE CUNNINGHAM.
American papers please copy.

HARRISON -- March 25, 1909, at his residence, 43 Jameson Street, Belfast, ALEXANDER, the dearly-beloved husband of Eleanor Harrison. Funeral from the above address, on Saturday morning, 27th inst., at eleven o'clock, for interment in the family burying-ground, Bangor Churchyard, passing through Newtownards about one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. ELEANOR HARRISON.

HERON -- March 24, at 17 Wesley Street, SARAH JANE HERON, aged 78 years. Interment in City Cemetery on to-morrow (Friday) morning, leaving her late residence at half-past nine o'clock.

HUGHES -- March 24, 1909, at her residence, 3 Iverna Street, Belfast, DEBORAH, relict of the late William Hughes, formerly of Castlecaulfield. Funeral from the above address on to-morrow (Friday) morning, at half-past ten o'clock, for Great Northern Railway, train 11.20, arriving in Dungannon 12.40, for interment in the family burying-ground, Castlecaulfield. Friends will please accept this intimation. LENA HUGHES.

LAVERY -- March 25, at his father's residence, 5 Westbourne Street, HENRY, the dearly-beloved son of William and Margaret Lavery. His remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at half-past to o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.

LEWIS -- March 23, at her father's residence, 12 Beechmount Avenue, MARY J., eldest and dearly-beloved daughter of James and Mary E. Lewis. -- R.I.P. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in the family burying-ground, Hannahstown, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

MISKELLY -- March 24, at Castle Street, Bangor, ELIZA JANE, relict of the late Thomas Miskelly. The remains of my beloved mother will be removed from her late residence, for interment in Bangor Churchyard, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at four o'clock. JOHN MISKELLY.

MONAGHAN -- March 24, at her residence, 16 Waterford Street, UPHEMIA MARY MONAGHAN. -- R.I.P. The remains of our dearly-beloved mother will be removed, for interment in Milltown Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. PATRICK & JOHN MONAGHAN.

M'CLEAN -- Wednesday, 23rd, at her sister's residence, 52 Upper Library Street, Belfast, ROSE M'CLEAN. Her remains will be removed for interment in the family burying-ground, Cargin, on to-morrow (Friday) morning, at eight o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. MARY M'CLEAN.
American papers please copy.

M'QUILLAN -- March 25, at his father's residence, High Street, Antrim, JOHN GEORGE M'QUILLAN. -- R.I.P. Interment in St. Comgall's Cemetery, Antrim, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at three o'clock. BERNARD M'QUILLAN.

ROSS -- March 24, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, MAGGIE, the dearly-beloved wife of James Ross. Her remains will be removed from her late residence, Sydenham Avenue, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. JAMES ROSS.

SPROUT -- March 24, at her father's residence, 10 Grace Avenue, Bloomfield, MARTHA, the eldest and dearly-beloved daughter of John and Kate Sprout. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, on Saturday afternoon at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.- Deeply regretted. JOHN & KATE SPROUT.

WATSON -- March 24, at her residence, 6 Kilmond Street, MATILDA, the beloved wife of William John Watson. -- R.I.P. Funeral on Saturday afternoon, at half-past one o'clock, for Milltown Cemetery. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. William John Watson.
American papers please copy.

In Memoriam

GRAY -- In loving memory of my dear father, ROBERT GRAY, who departed this life on the 25th March, 1908, and was interred in Shankill Burying-ground. -- "Gone but not forgotten."
ROBERT GRAY. 85 Mayo Street.

KNOX -- In affectionate remembrance of my dear brother, JOSEPH, who departed this life on 25th March, 1907, and was interred in the Ballynure Burying-ground.
     A light is from our household gone,
          A voice we loved is still,
     A place is vacant on our hearth,
          Which never can be filled.
Inserted by his sisters and brothers.

M'ILVEEN -- In sad and loving memory of my beloved wife, MARY ANN M'ILVEEN, who died March 25, 1908, and was interred in Carnmoney Burying-ground.
Weep not for me, I'm free from pain,
     My earthly sufferings o'er,
          I hope to meet you all again,
     On Heaven's peaceful, happy shore.
          Till then, dear loved one, fare thee well,
     No murm'ring word shall e'er be spoken,
          How dear thy memory none can tell,
     Thou'rt in the circle never broken.
Inserted by her loving husband and family.
JOHN M'ILVEEN. 66 Westland Street.

THOMPSON -- In memory of my dear wife, SARAH, who died at 95 Roden Street, Belfast, March 25, 1906, and was interred in Moira Churchyard. George Thompson.

Clippings

BELFAST GAS-POISONING CASE.

A woman named Mary M'Shane, aged about 50 years, and residing at 9 Chapel Lane, was admitted to the Mater Infirmorum Hospital on Wednesday in an unconscious condition, suffering from gas poisoning. Inquiries at the hospital late this afternoon elicited the information that the woman has not yet regained consciousness, but she is expected to recover.

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THE REVOLVER IN TYRONE.

BLACKSMITH'S SAD DEATH.

INQUEST AT COOKSTOWN.

Mr. John Malone, coroner for the division, held an inquest in the boardroom of the Cookstown Workhouse on Wednesday evening, into the cause of the death of a black smith named Robert M'Mullan, of Corrycoar, who it is alleged, had been shot by John Harte, of the same place, and who is at present on remand.

Sergeant Waterman, R.I.C., deposed to the identification of the deceased. He was employed by John Moore, blacksmith, of Gortavoy. He saw deceased about 5-30 p.m. on the 22nd in Moore's house. Deceased was in bed. He told witness he got the wound from a revolver shot on the previous night. He said he was in company with a man on Sunday night, and suddenly a shot went off at his side, his right side, and he felt something like a bullet striking him. He said to him (the other man) -- "Fire away," and the other man fired some shots -- he could not say how many. He gave witness the name of the man, but he was reluctant to tell anything about it. He said there was no quarrel. From what witness heard he went to the house of Terence Harte, father of the man Harte who is accused, and there found a REVOLVER IN THE POCKET OF A COAT, which was supposed to belong to John Harte. He took possession of the coat. Witness afterwards went to the townland of Lurgyneel and saw John Harte there, and arrested him on the charge of inflicting grievous bodily harm on Robert M'Mullan by firing a revolver shot at him the previous night. Witness gave him the usual caution, and he said, "Yes." Witness then took him to his employer's (Mr. James Hughes's) house, and the accused said to Hughes, "You take the horse; I suppose I'll have to go with these boys; and Hughes said, "What about?" and Harte answered, "About this shooting business of M'Mullan; it's not much." Witness then brought him to M'Mullan's house. He had a cloth tied round Harte's hand. Witness brought him into the room in which M'Mullan was in bed. There were five or six other men there also, and the deceased at once

POINTED TO HART

and said, "That is him." His deposition was then taken before Mr. Henry, J.P. Later on deceased was removed to Cookstown Infirmary, accompanied by Dr. Mann and Constable Kerr. After arrest, on his way to Derry, Harte said -- "A body never knows what's before them. I did not think there was anything in her. I thought she was empty long ago."

In reply to Mr. Mullan, witness said he had made inquiries, and had found that deceased and accused were always good friends, and had been in the habit of drinking together. They were in each other's company on the evening of the occurrence.

To Mr. Monson -- M'Mullan said he knew Harte by seeing him in the forge.

Mr. Monson then read the deposition of deceased, which stated that on Sunday, the 21st inst., deponent's brother, Thomas M'Mullan, of Donaghmore, came out to see him. He arrived about 10 o'clock in the morning. He had half a pint of gin with him, which he divided between John Moore, Sam Moore, himself, and deponent. Some time after that they went to Galbally, and had some drink there. Deponent's brother left Galbally before him. On the way back he stopped at James M'Ivor's. When

DEPONENT GOT BACK HOME

his brother was away. He got something to eat, and then went to Trimble's to get a shirt, and then went to Ned Loy's, of Tortavale. After that deponent went to Wm. Steenson's, Kirby, and then left Steenson's to come home. It might be about nine o'clock. On his way home he fell in with John Harte again. They came along the road towards Gortavoy. He commenced to discharge some shots. The first shot he fired deponent felt something striking him on the side. He then fired over his head, and deponent told him to fire away. He felt a pain in his side at the time. He did not see any firearms with Harte, but he saw the flashes.

Dr. F. Mann, Pomeroy, gave evidence as to being called in to see the deceased. He found a wound on the right side, which M'Mullan said he received from a pistol. The wound was a small round red wound, about an inch and a half above the right hip bone. Witness performed a post-mortem examination in conjunction with Dr. Graves, and found the bowel perforated in six places. The cause of death was haemorrhage of the bowels. Witness saw Harte's hand, and saw it slightly wounded. Harte said it was the bullet that struck M'Mullan that grazed his hand.

The jury, after lengthy consultation, found that deceased died at Cookstown from shock and haemorrhage, the result of a bullet wound inflicted by John Harte, of Corrycoar, and were of opinion that the indiscriminate sale and use of revolvers is a public danger, and should be remedied by law.

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DISCUSSING FOOTBALL MATCH.

BELFAST CLUB SECRETARY SUMMONED.

In the Belfast Summons Court to-day -- before Mr. A. Newton Brady, R.M., and Mr. S.P. Kerr, J.P. -- a young man named Samuel Stevenson, residing at 15 Oregon Street, was prosecuted at the instance of Constable Michael Furlong for indecent behaviour on March 14. Mr. William Tughan (for Mr. D.F. Spiller) prosecuted, and Mr. John Graham defended.

The constable stated that his attention was attracted to the defendant, who said he could kick the head off Furlong any time, and subsequently when spoken to gave a wrong name and address.

Mr. Graham said his client had never been before the Court on any previous occasion. He worked in Brookfield Mill, and was secretary of the football club in connection with the firm. On the 13th inst. the Brookfield team met Hydepark, and a player named Furlonger was the fastest runner in the latter club. Defendant was discussing the match with companions, and he said rather loudly he could "run" Furlonger any day. These words were not intended to apply to the constable, whose name was Furlong, but the complainant came forward, evidently thinking they were uttered for his benefit, and spoke in a nasty way to Stevenson, who in return answered in a similar way.

Evidence having been given in support of Mr. Graham's statement as to the football discussion.

The Resident Magistrate remarked -- We have travelled far enough in this case. We have had two Furlongs. (Laughter.) We dismiss the case.

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MILITARY NOTES.

The experimental system of administration of barrack duties, which has been under trial in the Irish Command since 15th May last, is to be dropped at the end of this month, and the former system under which the local administrative officers, Army Service Corps, at Dublin, Curragh, Belfast, and Cork, were responsible for barrack service, as well as supply and transport services in their respective areas, will come into force again from 1st prox.

The quarterly royal engineer inspection of the barracks in the Belfast Division will take place as follows:- Belfast, quarters 2nd Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment, 1st and 2nd April; 62nd Company Army Service Corps, 7th; staff and departments, 15th and 19th; Holywood, 1st Battalion Rifle Brigade, and military hospital, 5th and 6th prox.; Ballykinlar Camp, 7th prox.

Fifty-one years ago to-day the Royal North Down Rifles were disembodied after service in England during the Indian Mutiny.

It will not be necessary for quartermasters of Royal Garrison Artillery Militia converted into Royal Field Reserve Artillery to effect any change of uniform, but in cases where expense has been incurred, in alteration of uniform, a refund up to a maximum of 15 may be authorised.

The names of Royal Engineer officers in Ireland recommended for the following appointments are required at the Royal Hospital, Dublin, next week:- Chief Instructor in Experimental Science at the Royal Military Academy (Majors and Senior Captains only); Company Officer, Class B, at the Royal Military Academy (Captains or Subalterns); tour of service at Sierra Leone (Subalterns trained in defence electric light work).

The appointment of Captain Slater, of the Royal Sussex Regiment, Belfast, as Adjutant of a Territorial Infantry Battalion, is announced.

Mr. Haldane, replying in the Parliamentary papers to Viscount Castlereagh, says:-- Army requirements are advertised in those papers which from their general circulation of a professional or class character appear to be suited to give the required publicity. All political considerations are rigidly excluded in making the selection.

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In fining a Dublin milk vendor named Fagan 10 on Wednesday for selling milk adulterated with 21 per cent of added water, the magistrate, Mr. Drury, warned defendant, who had been previously convicted of the same offence, that a third conviction would render him liable to a fine of 100, or imprisonment.

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MONAGHAN MAN KILLED.

INQUEST AT CASTLEBLAYNEY.

On Wednesday morning, in the schoolroom of the Castleblayney Workhouse, an inquest was held on the body of James M'Elearney by Mr. Thomas Dignam, J.P., the South Monaghan Coroner. Dr. Wilson was called, and said that he was medical officer of the union hospital. He had known the deceased for a considerable time, and was called to see him about nine o'clock on the 25th ult. at Mr. John Wiley's, Blayney. He found him suffering from a large contused lacerated wound on the side of the head, two inches long. He did not consider the wound dangerous. Deceased seemed to be suffering from concussion, as during the time witness was dressing the wound he vomited and seemed to have lost a considerable quantity of blood. He went home on Saturday, and promised to come into hospital if he wasn't doing well. Witness again saw him on the 21st inst., again at Mr. Wiley's. The wound was then completely healed. Witness ordered him to come to hospital, as he had some symptoms of compression of brain with severe headache. He remained in the hospital until his death on the 23rd inst. After depositions had been made by John M'Elearney and Thomas Markey, the jury returned a verdict that death was due to abscess on the brain, as a result of the injuries received on the 25th February.

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DEATH OF MR. WILLIAM COOPER.

A well-known and respected business man in Belfast has passed away in the person of Mr. William Cooper, whose death took place yesterday at his residence, 67 Antrim Road. Mr. Cooper's illness was of brief duration, and under the skill and care of Dr. Austin he at first showed distinct signs of recovery. A sudden and severe relapse, however, followed, and Sir William Whitla was called in for consultation. Medical skill was, however, unavailing in the case, and he sank slowly and passed away on Wednesday. The deceased gentleman was a native of Ballyclare. Over 25 years he commenced business on his own account, and rapidly built up a large trade as grocer and provision merchant in the Antrim Road district. A pathetic fact connected with his death is that it took place just about the period when the funeral service of the late Rev. W.J. Jackson was being held. The deceased was an elder in Mr. Jackson's congregation, so that Duncairn Church has lost not only its pastor but one of its most responsible and honoured office-bearers in the same week. Sincere sympathy is felt for Mr. Cooper's relatives at his comparatively early death. He had only reached the age of 51 years.

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Friday, 26 March 1909

Births

M'KAY -- March 22, at 20 Church Street, Antrim, the wife of Archibald M'Kay, of a daughter.

Marriages

PARKES--M'GIBNEY -- March 23, at St. James' Church, Belfast, by the Rev. F.W.W. Warren, B.A., rector of St. Silas' Church, Belfast, JOSEPH, youngest son of Joseph Parkes, Oldpark Road, Belfast, to ESTHER WALKER (NESSIE), youngest daughter of Fras. M'Gibney, Harcourt Street, Cliftonville, Belfast.

Deaths

BROWN -- March 24, at his residence, 3 Hastings Street, THOMAS, the beloved husband of Margaret Brown. His remains will be removed from the above address, for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. MARGARET BROWN.

COOKE -- March 25, at the Throne Hospital, EDWARD, youngest son of the late Thomas Cooke, Belfast. Funeral from above institution on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. WILLIAM COOKE, T.R. COOKE.

GREEN -- March 25, THOMAS GREEN. The remains of my brother will be removed from 41 Albion Street, for interment in the Cemetery of the First Presbyterian Church, Lurgan, on to-morrow (Saturday) morning, at nine o'clock. WILLIAM GREEN.

GREER -- March 25, at 46 Smithfield, SARAH ANNE, the dearly-beloved wife of Dick Greer. Her remains will be interred in Shankill Burying-ground on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- "We miss her most that loved her best." -- Gone, but not forgotten. DICK.

GREER -- March 25, at her residence, 46 Smithfield, SARAH ANNE GREER. The remains of our beloved sister-in-law will be removed, for interment in Shankill Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at three o'clock. -- Inserted by her brother-in-law and sisters-in-law, ROBERT GREER, AGNES BULLICK, and MAGGIE REA.

HARRISON -- March 25, 1909, at his residence, 43 Jameson Street, Belfast, ALEXANDER, the dearly-beloved husband of Eleanor Harrison. Funeral from the above address, on to-morrow (Saturday) morning, at eleven o'clock, for interment in the family burying-ground, Bangor Churchyard, passing through Newtownards about one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. ELEANOR HARRISON.

HENRY -- March 25, 1909, ELIZABETH, the dearly-beloved wife of David Henry. Her remains will be removed from her late residence, 7 Austin Street, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in Comber Churchyard. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. -- Deeply regretted. DAVID HENRY.

KENDALL -- March 25, 1909, at his residence, Loughnamore House, Co. Louth, JOHN W. KENDALL, aged 84 years. Funeral will leave for Ballymiscanlon on to-morrow (Saturday), at 1.30 o'clock.

LINDSAY -- March 25, at his sister's residence, 8 Mountjoy Street, ROBERT, the dearly-beloved husband of Fanny Lindsay. His remains will be removed, for interment in Dromore family burying-ground, on to-morrow (Saturday) morning, at half-past nine o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. FANNY LINDSAY.

LOWRY -- March 25, at Catherine Street, Killyleagh, the residence of his father, ISAAC PATTERSON LOWRY, only son of James Lowry. His remains will be removed, for interment in Killyleagh Meeting-house Green, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. JAMES LOWRY.

MOORE -- March 25, at 274 Cupar Street, Belfast, MARGARET, the dearly-beloved wife of Andrew Moore. The remains of my beloved wife will be removed from above address, for interment in Shankill Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- Deeply regretted. ANDREW MOORE.
American papers please copy.

MOORE -- March 25, at 274 Cupar Street, Belfast, MARGARET, the dearly-beloved wife of Andrew Moore, and third daughter of Thomas Kinkaid. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in Shankill Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at 3 o'clock. -- Deeply regretted. Inserted by her Father, Sisters, and Brother.
American papers please copy.

MOORE -- March 25, at 274 Cupar Street, MARGARET, the dearly-beloved wife of Andrew Moore. The remains of our beloved sister-in-law will be removed from the above address, for interment in the Shankill Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at three o'clock.
     "Until the day breaks and the shadows flee away."
MAGGIE & HANNAH MOORE.

MORTON -- March 25, at his residence, Cloughogue, NATHANIEL MORTON, aged 75 years. Funeral to family burying-ground, Old Churchyard, Ballymena, on to-morrow (Saturday) morning, at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.

MORTON -- March 25, at his residence, Cloughogue, Ballymena, NATHANIEL MORTON. The remains of our dearly-beloved father will be removed for interment in Ballymena Old Churchyard, on to-morrow (Saturday) morning, at ten o'clock. -- Deeply regretted. AGNES TAYLOR & ELEANOR MORTON.

M'BRIDE -- March 24, 1909, at his residence, 12 Glandore Avenue, Antrim Road, DAVID A. M'BRIDE. The remains of my dearly-beloved husband will be removed for interment in Old Bangor Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Saturday) morning, at nine o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. MARGARET M'BRIDE.

M'CALL -- March 25, at High Street, Holywood, MICHAEL M'CALL. -- R.I.P. Interment on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. PETER M'CALL.

M'GRATH -- March 25, at his residence, 60 Mill Street, Belfast, JOHN M'GRATH, Hairdresser. The remains of my dearly-beloved husband will be removed from above address, on Sunday, 28th inst., for interment in Milltown Cemetery, at 1.30. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- On his soul, sweet Jesus, have mercy. MARY M'GRATH & FAMILY.

BELFAST HAIRDRESSERS' TRADE UNION.
Members of the above Trade Union are respectfully requested to attend the funeral of our late Brother, JOHN M'GRATH.
WILLIAM DAVIS, President. PATRICK LOUGHRAN, Secretary.

M'LAUGHLIN -- March 25. The remains of my beloved mother, ANNE JANE M'LAUGHLIN, will be removed from 51 Short Strand, for interment in Milltown, on Sunday afternoon, 1.30. Friends will please accept this intimation. ELIZABETH DEMPSEY.

NEILL -- March 25, at 195 Conway Street (late of Aberdeen Street, Belfast), MARGARET NEILL, widow of James Neill (Street Inspector). The remains of my dearly-beloved mother will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. -- New Zealand papers please copy. J. ALEX. NEILL.

NEILL -- At his residence, 44 Glantane Street, Belfast, on 25th inst., JOHN NEILL, aged 89 years. Funeral private.

SMITH -- March 25, 1909, at 9 Darling Street, Enniskillen, JAMES DOUGLAS (DODO), youngest son of William and Alice Smith, aged 3½ years. Funeral on to-morrow (Saturday) morning, at eleven o'clock, for New Cemetery, Enniskillen. -- "Jesus called a little child unto Him."

SPEERS -- March 25, at the Abbey Sanatorium, ARTHUR, the dearly-beloved brother of Robert and James Speers. His remains will be removed from his brother's residence, 25 Lendrick Street, on Sunday afternoon, at half-past two o'clock, for interment in the City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. ROBERT & JAMES SPEERS.

SPROUL -- March 24, at her father's residence, 10 Grace Avenue, Bloomfield, MARTHA, the eldest and dearly-beloved daughter of John and Kate Sproul. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- Deeply regretted. JOHN & KATE SPROUL.

STEWART -- March 26, at her residence, 71 Brookmount Street, MARY, the wife of Robert Stewart. Her remains will be removed, for interment in Soldierstown Churchyard, on Sunday morning, 28th inst., at eleven o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. ROBERT STEWART.

VILLIERS -- March 26, 1909, at her sister's residence, Carnmoney, MARY ELIZABETH VILLIERS. The remains of my beloved sister will be removed from above address, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at half-past three o'clock, for interment in Carnmoney Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. MARY VILLIERS.

WARRINGTON -- March 25, at his residence, 210 Blythe Street, HENRY, the beloved husband of Jane Warrington. His remains will be removed from above address, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at 2.30 o'clock, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. JANE WARRINGTON.

L.O.L. 242 -- ULSTER CONVENTION.
Members and other Brethren are requested to attend the funeral of our late Brother, HENRY WARRINGTON.
J.S. BRIGGS, W.M.; J. STEWART, Secretary.

WATSON -- March 24, at her residence, 6 Kilmood Street, MATILDA, the beloved wife of William John Watson. -- R.I.P. Funeral on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at half-past one o'clock, for Milltown Cemetery. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. WILLIAM JOHN WATSON.
American papers please copy.

Deaths too late for classification

CLEGG -- March 26, at his residence, 39 Rowland Street, JAMES, second son of the late George and Eliza Clegg. His remains will be removed, for interment in Balmoral Cemetery, on Sunday afternoon, at 2.30 o'clock. Inserted by his loving sister, MARY J. M'CRACKEN.

LOWRY -- At his parent's residence, Catherine Street, Killyleagh, ISAAC PATTERSON LOWRY. His remains will be removed, for interment in Meeting-house Green, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Very deeply mourned by his sister and brother-in-law, MARTHA & SAMUEL CALVERT. The Cross, Killyleagh.

TEMPLETON -- March 26, at his residence, Working Boys' Home, May Street, CAPTAIN WM. TEMPLETON (late Assistant Superintendent of Balmoral Industrial School). -- Notice of interment in to-morrow's papers.

WYLIE -- March 25, at her residence, 14 Hart Street, ELIZA JANE, the dearly-beloved wife of John Wylie. Her remains will be removed from above address, on Sunday afternoon, at half-past one o'clock, for interment in Lisburn Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. JOHN WYLIE.

In Memoriam

ARMSTRONG -- In sad and loving memory of my beloved husband, JOHN ARMSTRONG, who departed this life on the 26th March, 1906, and was interred in Glenan Churchyard, Co. Monaghan. -- In Christ united still we are.
ANNIE ARMSTRONG. 152 Peter's Hill.

M'KINSTRY -- In fond and loving memory of my dear husband, THOMAS M'KINSTRY, who died 26th March, 1908, and was interred in Dundonald Burying-ground. -- Until the day breaks and the shadows flee away.
Sadly missed by his sorrowing Wife, MARGARET M'KINSTRY. 26 North Ann Street.

M'KINSTRY -- In fond and loving memory of my dear father, THOMAS M'KINSTRY, who died 26th March, 1908, and was interred in Dundonald Burying-ground.
     A face once loved now sadly missed,
          a smile that was so bright;
     from worldly care and earthly pain,
          his soul has winged its flight.
Sadly missed by his sorrowing Daughter, MINNIE M'KINSTRY. 26 North Ann Street.

Clippings

LEGAL NOTICE.

In the goods of MARIA JANE CUMMING, late of 32 Carmel Street, Belfast, Widow, deceased.

ALL PERSONS CLAIMING TO BE CREDITORS of the above Deceased, who died on the 17th February, 1909, are requested to send, on or before the 20th April, 1909, particulars of their claims to the undersigned Solicitor for the Administrator, as after that date the Assets will be distributed.

Dated this 9th day of March, 1909.

JOSEPH ALLEN, Solicitor,
16 Bow Street, Lisburn.

=====================

BELFAST ASSIZES

RECORD COURT.
(Before Mr. Justice Madden.)

BARKLEY v. GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY.

On Thursday an action was brought by James Morgan Barkley and William John Thompson, trading as William Barkley & Son, coal merchants, Belfast, against the Great Northern Railway Company to recover 218 10s 9d due on foot of an indemnity contained in section 6 of the Workmen's Compensation Act.

In the statement of claim it was set forth that a man named William John M'Coubrie had been in the employment of the plaintiff company, and while working for them was fatally injured by an engine and waggons of the defendants, owing to alleged negligence of the latter's servants. The plaintiffs were compelled to pay under the Workmen's Compensation Act to the widow the sum of 218 10s 9d, including costs, and they now claimed to be indemnified by the Railway Company.

In the defence it was denied that the Railway Company was guilty of negligence in driving the engine and waggons, and it was stated that the injuries to M'Coubrie were not caused by their negligence, but by his own negligence, he being guilty of contributory negligence.

Messrs. W.M. M'Grath, K.C.; D.M. Wilson, K.C.; and John M. Whitaker, B.L. (instructed by Mr. C.G. Jefferson) appeared for the plaintiffs, and Messrs. James Chambers, K.C.; and Henry Hanna, B.L. (instructed by Messrs. Crawford & Lockhart) for the defendants.

THE DEFENCE.

Mr. Chambers, in opening for the defence, said that the value of the man's life had been assessed, and it was only a question of which two great corporations should pay. The bylaws of the Harbour Commissioners had been read, and the regulations of the railway company, and it was sought to show that they had been broken or violated by the defendants, because, as contended, neither their signalman nor their shunter were attending their duties. He would, however, prove the contrary was the case, and that it was after the waggons were coupled up and the signal given that the deceased rushed into the gap, and before anybody could prevent it he was caught between the buffers. The negligence was all on deceased's side.

Edward Wilson said he was a shunter in the employment of the Great Northern Railway, and he had been engaged at Queen's Quay for the past nine years. He remembered the morning of the accident. There were seven or eight waggons not attached. There was a flagman named Patrick Smith there, whose duty it was to go in front of witness and see if the way was clear. Witness was about ten waggon lengths in front of the engine and Smith was in front of him. Witness first saw M'Coubrie when coming out from coupling two waggons. M'Coubrie made a rush for the space between the waggons and got caught. Witness could not have done anything to prevent the accident. The waggons were moving along slowly at the time of the accident, and the flagman was about three waggons further along, and could not see M'Coubrie. Deceased was caught between the stationary and moving waggons.

Patrick Smith, flagman, said it was his duty to go in front of the train. He did not see the accident.

Thomas Martin and James Mawhirt having been examined.

The jury retired at 4.20 p.m., and after an absence of twenty-five minutes returned to court and announced that they found for plaintiff.

His Lordship entered judgement against the railway company for 218 10s 9d accordingly.

=====================

PINK UN'S PROGRAMME.

TO-MORROW'S FIXTURES.

ASSOCIATION FOOTBALL.

COUNTY ANTIRM SHIELD. -- FINAL TIE

CLIFTONVILLE v. GLENTORAN 2nd.
GREAT MATCH AT CELTIC PARK.

The final tie of the above competition takes place to-morrow at Celtic Park, and the circumstances connected with same have created an interest which seldom occurs in the final of any senior competition. The all- conquering junior team of Glentoran 2nd, by virtue of winning the Steel & Sons Cup, earned the right of competing for the senior trophy, and, as is well-known, have supplemented their victory by defeating Belfast Celtic and their own senior eleven. The eyes of all footballers will be on them to-morrow to see if they can create a record by winning the double event. Cliftonville are, however determined to vindicate the seniors and win the Shield, which the club has not accomplished since 1897 -- 98. The kick-off is at 3.30 sharp, and the prices of admission 6d and 1s. Mr. J.B. Stark, who next Saturday referees the great International between Scotland and England, will have charge of the teams which will be as follows:- Cliftonville -- F. M'Kee, J. Seymour, T. Neely, J. Wright (captain), D. Martin, S. Palmer, S. M'Comb, J. Robertson, W. Houghton, G. Bull, and F. Thompson. Glentoran 2nd -- J. Harrison, S. Bennett, R. Bennett, A. Waddell, P.B. Jamison, T. Lewis, R. Lyner, G. Lillie, James M'Knight, S. Ritchie, and John M'Knight.

IRISH SENIOR LEAGUE.

BELFAST CELTIC v. BOHEMIANS.
This match will take place in Dublin on Saturday. Both teams will be at full strength.

IRISH JUNIOR LEAGUE.

DISTILLERY 2nd XI. V. LINFIELD SWIFTS.
This match will take place at Windsor Park to-morrow, and a keen contest should be the result, as the great rivalry existing between the Whites and Blues is shared by the juniors. The fixture promises to be a local "Derby." The Swifts' team will be selected from the following:- Mehaffy, Johnston, Beattie, Lowry, Brown, Turner, Jackson, Milne, Rice, Donald, M'Knight, Roy, and Maginnis; whilst the Whites will field their strongest eleven. Kick-off at 3.30.

FORTH RIVER v. MOUNTPOTTINGER.
This important League match will take place at College Park at 3.30. It will be remembered that these elevens met in the Steel & Sons' Cup, and, after a draw, the Mounts were beaten in the re-play, at Edenderry. Seeing that this is the first match in the League between the teams, the homesters will make a great effort to gain the two points, and thereby obtain the leading position on the table. Both teams will be at full strength.

ARDS v. DUNDELA.
These teams will meet at Strandtown -- and not at Ards as reported -- at 3.30. In the previous League engagement, at Ards, the game ended in a draw, so in to-morrow's match the elevens will make great efforts to secure a win. The Dundela team will be -- Pawson, M'Michael, Watters, Dempster, Hamilton, Wilton, Boyce, MacFarlane, Gray, Matier, and Neeson.

CELTIC 2nd v. CLIFTONVILLE OLYMPIC.
These old-time rivals meet at Solitude to-morrow, at 3.30, in the Junior League. The teams will be at full strength, and a well-contested game should be the result. At the conclusion of the match Cliftonville Strollers and Barn will meet in the Irish Junior Alliance.

IRISH JUNIOR ALLIANCE.

LARNE v. ULSTER RANGERS.
GREAT FIGHT FOR POINTS.

As this will be their first meeting in the Alliance this season, and judging from their position on the table, there is sure to be a big struggle at Rosetta Park for the lead. The Rangers have held the championship for two seasons, and intend to create a record in holding it for the third season in succession, and as both teams are displaying excellent form, and feel confident of the result, a most exciting game should be witnessed. Kick-off 3.30.

QUEEN'S PARK v. DISTILLERY WEST END.
JUNIOR CUP FINALISTS AT GROSVENOR PARK.

The above should prove a very interesting match, as the local team are doing finely at present, and intend to win the remaining matches in the competition. Distillery Linwood and Willowbank will meet and play for four points in the Shaftesbury League. This should also make a rare struggle.

At Oldpark -- Corinthians v. Queen's Island.
At Ballymena -- Summerfield v. Owen O' Cork.

SECOND DIVISION.

At Ardenlee Avenue -- Telephone v. Lurgan Celtic (at 3-0).
At Ardenlee -- Willowfield v. Ollardale.
At Cregagh Road -- City Hall v. Zebras.
At Balmoral -- B.I.S. v. Celtic Strollers.
At Flax Street -- Highfield v. Commercials.

JUNIOR SHIELD.

At Ballyclare -- Milltown v. Hillmount.

=====================

THIS DAY'S SHIPPING.

Wind -- N.W.

Arrived at Belfast on 26th inst. -- The ss Bengore Head (Finlay), from St. John, N.B., via Dublin; sundry consignees; G. Heyn and Sons agents. The ss Ferrum (M'Allister), from Manchester, with a general cargo; the ss Mallard (Galbraith), from Irvine, with explosives; the ss Balmarino, from Ardrossan; the ss Eveleen, from Ayr; the ss Gael, from Campbelltown; the ss Helen, from Cardiff; the ss Balniel, ss Kathleen, and ss Ailsa Craig, from Garston; the ss Druid and ss Olderfleet, from Glasgow; and the ss Helen Craig, from Whitehaven -- all with coal.

Sailed from Belfast on 26th inst. -- The ss City of Malaga and ss City of Stockholm, for Dublin; the ss William Balls, for Barry; the ss Parkmore, for Troon; the ss W.M. Barkley and ss Lagan, for Whitehaven; the ss Puffin and ss Zillah, for Penmaenmaur; the ss Woodburn, for Newry; the ss Clint, for Portavogie; the ss Melissa, for Maryport; the ss Wheatsheaf, for Liverpool; the ss Flour, for Barrow; the ss Balmarino, for Ayr; the Twin Sisters, for Drummore; and the Sparkling Wave, for Strangford.

Arrived -- At Buenos Aires, on 13th inst., the ss Tynedale (Yeates), from Cadiz; at Rouen, on 22nd inst., the ss Gransha (Roberts), from Swansea; at St. John, N.B., on 23rd inst., the ss Montreal (M'Neill), from Antwerp; at Natal, on 23rd inst., the ss Beechley (Williams), from Melbourne; at Colombo, on 23rd inst., the ss Belle of Spain (Minister), from Natal; at Kustendje, on 23rd inst., the ss Blairmore (Austen), from Varna; at Reval, on 25th inst., the ss White Head (Suffern), from Belfast.

Sailed -- From Penarth, on 22nd inst., the ss Glynn (M'Kinty), for Sables d'Olonne; from Rouen, on 22nd inst., the ss Moyle (Mulholland), for Havre; from Swansea, on 22nd inst., the ss Argus (Patterson), for St. Malo; from Swansea, on 23rd inst., the ss Inver (Brown), for Rouen; from Newport, on 23rd inst., the ss Rochefort (Mulholland), for Havre.

=====================

MR. JESSE COLLINGS.

Mr. Jesse Collings has had a fair night. He has, however, suffered a good deal of pain from his leg, the attacks being very sharp on two occasions. He has lost strength during the past few days.

=====================

NEWTOWNARDS NOTES.

On Thursday evening a very successful gathering took place in connection with the local parish church, in the Londonderry Schools. There was a very large attendance, and after tea the chair was occupied by the rector, the Rev. W.L.T. Whatham, B.A. A very interesting programme was gone through, speeches being made by the chairman, Mr. T.R. Lavery, J.P., Mr. M.H. Walker, and Rev. H. Swanzy, all heartily welcoming the new curate, the Rev. C.P. Fisher, B.A., to the parish. Mr. Fisher suitably replied. The musical programme was a capital one, the following taking part -- Mrs. Whatham, Miss Stevenson, Miss M'Neilly, Miss Morgan, Miss Kelso, Miss Harrison, Miss Savage, Miss Croke, Miss Spence, Misses A. and J. M'Neilly, Mr. Harris, Mr. Mercer, and the band of the Church Lads Brigade.

=====================

BURGLARY NEAR BELFAST.

SURPRISE FOR AN INTRUDER.

A special court of petty sessions was held in Cregagh police barracks yesterday, when a man named Montgomery was charged with burglariously entering the house of Mr. Cuthbert H. Bell, Lisnasharragh, early that morning. Evidence was given by Sergeant Cosgrove to the effect that on the previous night he concealed himself, with Constable Henry, in Mr. Bell's smokeroom. About 4.15 a.m. prisoner climbed on to the window sill, and, pulling down the upper portion of the window, entered the room, where he found the police awaiting him. He was barefooted, and his boots were found afterwards on the ground beside the window. Prisoner was taken to the barracks and searched, and a pipe, knife, and pouch found in his possession were identified by Mr. Bell as his property.

Prisoner was remanded to Belfast Jail till next Tuesday.

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Saturday, 27 March 1909

ACCIDENTS IN BELFAST.

ROYAL VICTORIA HOSPITAL.

The following cases were admitted to-day:--
John Brown (40), Andersonstown, contused fingers; David Anderson (39), 20 Lower Mount Street, fractured leg; Arthur Neill (22), 8 Rathmore Street, scalp wound; Patrick O'Neill (26), 15 Wall Street, lacerated fingers; Violet Binghan (4), Bentham Street, contused forehead; Edward Connelly (30), 6 Grosvenor Place, scalp wound.

MATER HOSPITAL.

The following cases were admitted to-day:--
John Burton (20, 4 Sherbrook Street, fractured arm; William Matthews (7), 6 Wimbledon Street, lacerated wound to foot; Robert Stewart (50), 144 Nelson Street, incised wound to leg; George Hanna (50), Glentilt Place, dislocated shoulder.

=====================

NEWTOWNARDS BOARD OF GUARDIANS.

The Chairman, Mr. Wm. Gowan, presided at the weekly meeting of this Board held to-day. The thanks of the Board were accorded to General Montgomery for a gift of pictorial periodicals for the use of the inmates. The contract for the supply of tea to the house at 1s 6d a lb. was, on the advice of the tea-tester, given to Messrs. Job Brothers, Newtownards. Dr. Harriett Neill, Bangor, wrote accepting nomination on the Ladies' Boarding-out Committee.

=====================

LOCAL BREVITIES.

Mr. Justice Gibson is still indisposed, and unable to preside in the Crown Court at the City Assizes.

844,544 passengers were carried on the Belfast tramways for the week ended yesterday, the receipts being 3,637 2s 5½d, as against 799,914, and 3,351 10s 1½ d for the corresponding week last year.

-- -- -- --

No man who's doing his work well is too small for a friendly word and a pat on the back; and no fellow who's doing his work poorly is too big for a jolt that will knock the nonsense out of him. -- G. H. Lorimer.

=====================

BELFAST BURNING FATALITY.

The Belfast Coroner (Dr James Graham) held an inquest in the Royal Victoria Hospital, to-day, concerning the death of Elizabeth M'Guiggan, 18 Mary Street, who died on Friday. The evidence was to the effect that on the 18th inst. deceased was lighting a lamp when her clothes became ignited. She was severely burned before the flames could be extinguished, and had to be taken to the Royal Victoria Hospital, where she died from shock following the injuries. The jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

=====================

REPORTED DISASTER.

TO TWO AMERICAN BATTLESHIPS.

Blown up off Cuba.

(Central News Telegram.)

NEW YORK, Saturday. -- It is rumoured here that two United States battleships have blown up off Guantenamo (Cuba).

The Navy Department at Washington is so far without any confirmation, but has requested the great news organisations to investigate the report.

=====================

BELFAST ASSIZES.

SPECIAL JURY RECORD.

BANGOR BOATBUILDER'S ACTION.

The Right Hon. Mr. Justice Madden sat this morning in the Record Chamber of the County Courthouse, Crumlin Road, and took up the hearing of the last special jury record on the list.

LENAGHAN v. IRVING.

James Lenaghan, boatbuilder, Southwell Road, Bangor, sued Lester Irving, builder and contractor, Bingham Street, Bangor, to recover 500 damages for alleged negligence and breach of contract in writing, dated November 13, 1907, made between the plaintiff and the defendant.

Mr. A. H. Bates, K.C.; Mr. W. M. M'Grath, K.C.; and Mr. John M. Whitaker (instructed by Mr. H. H. Massen) appeared for the plaintiff; and Mr. James Chambers, K.C.; Mr. D. M. Wilson, K.C.; and Mr. H. C. Stronge (instructed by Messrs. Moorhead & Wood) represented the defendant.

The statement of claim set forth that the defendant contracted with the plaintiff to do all the work and supply all the material required in the erection of three houses at Southwell Road, Bangor, and that the defendant, in breach of contract, failed to do the work in a workmanlike manner and to the entire satisfaction of the plaintiff, or in accord with the plans and specifications.

The defendant denied that he was guilty of breach of contract and said that in so far as the houses were not built according to plans and specifications they were altered by the order of the plaintiff. He counter-claimed for 83 17s 1d for work done and materials provided, and 16 for repairs executed. To that the plaintiff joined issue, and said the work was not done, and of it was done it was included in the contract.

=====================

BANGOR NOTES.

The annual children's carnival of song, music drill, club drill, &c., by the pupils of Ward National and Commercial Schools -- of which Mr. and Mrs. Wm. MacDonnagh are principals -- was held in the large Dufferin Hall on Friday evening. There was a large gathering, and the object, the augmentation of the school prize fund, should be fully realised. In the various items the children showed intelligence and precision. The programme was contributed to by Master W. Irwin, as Miss Prim. A most enjoyable evening was spent, Miss Stewart and Miss Barrett played the accompaniments.

Under the auspices of Bangor Young People's Society of Christian Endeavour (Interdenominational), of which Rev. L. H. Cullen is president, a social meeting, which proved thoroughly enjoyable, was held in the Good Templar Hall on Friday evening. Assisted by a number of helpers, Miss Dwyer and Miss Baird dispensed tea, the lady members having provided the eatables. After tea, games were indulged in.

Under the auspices of Bangor Purple Star L.O.L. 677 -- of which Br. Thomas Rowley is W.M. -- a soiree and dance was held in the Lodge Hall on Friday evening when there was a large attendance. After tea, the chair was taken by Br. John Watson, District Master, who introduced the programme, which included songs by Brs. James M'Caw, James Sherlock, A. M'Caw, Alexander Jamison, Miss Cassie Rowley, and Miss Jennie M'Clure; recitations, Miss M. Rowley. Dancing was afterwards indulged in.

=====================

MILITARY NOTES.

In future when the date of an officer's embarkation to take up a staff or other extra-regimental appointment abroad is reported, the port at which the officer actually embarked is also to be stated.

Captain W. F. Parsons, Adjutant, 36th Royal Field Artillery Brigade, Dundalk, has been posted to F Battery, Royal Horse Artillery, at Woolwich.

A trial is to be made with one regiment in each cavalry brigade of a proposed scheme for the provision of 50 horses over the ordinary peace establishment in each regiment, which, when trained, are to be distributed among suitable persons residing in the neighbourhood of the barracks where the regiment is quartered, who will be free to use them for riding, light draught, etc., returning them every year to the regiment for three weeks or a month's training.

=====================

BELFAST BANKRUPTCY LIST.

The list of business for Monday's sitting of the Belfast Bankruptcy Court contains three arrangement matters. The other business will be as follows:- Bankruptcy matters -- In re John N. Simms, audit and dividend; Mr. S. Ross. In re Robert Finnie, audit and dividend; Mr. S. Ross. In re William Sprott, adjourned first and second public sittings; Mr. M'Gonigal. In re Allen Burns, first public sitting; Mr. S. Ross. In re James Cunningham, audit and dividend; Mr. P. J. Magee. In re John Ogle, adjourned hearing charge and discharge; Mr. J. Alexander. In re David S. Wright, adjourned audit after composition lodged; Mr. J. Alexander. In re Sarah Rainey, adjourned audit after composition lodged; Mr. J. Alexander. In re Maurice Reuben, adjourned examination of witnesses; Mr. J. Alexander. In re Crawford Brothers, examination of witnesses; Mr. S. Ross. In re Miriam Myers, adjourned application to set aside adjudication; Mr. M'Gonigal. In re James Boyd, adjourned application to show cause against adjudication; Mr. James Alexander.

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Monday, 29 March 1909

Births

YOUNG -- March 27, at Ballykeel, Holywood, to Mr. and Mrs. John S. Young -- a son.

Deaths

BAINS -- March 28, 1909, at 88 Agnes Street, ROBERT, eldest son of the late John Bains. His remains will be removed from his brother-in-law's residence, Kinegar, Holywood, on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at ten o'clock, for interment in the City Cemetery. Funeral private. JOHN COOKE.

BARCLAY -- March 28, 1909, at her residence, 7 Wensley Street, ELIZA BARCLAY. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in Mallusk Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- "Absent from the body, present with the Lord." LUCY BARCLAY.

BELL -- March 28 (suddenly), at her residence, 5 Alma Terrace, Agincourt Avenue, AGNES, dearly-beloved wife of Thomas Bell. Funeral to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at 10-30, to City Cemetery. THOMAS BELL.

CAUGHEY -- March 28 (suddenly), at his residence, 40 Brookmount Street, WILLIAM CAUGHEY. The remains of my beloved husband will be removed, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. -- Deeply regretted. ANNIE CAUGHEY.

CREIGHTON -- March 28, at her residence, Plantation, Lisburn, JANE CREIGHTON. The remains of my beloved wife will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Kilrush, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. ISAAC CREIGHTON.

DOHERTY -- March 29, at her grandfather's residence, 34 Princetown Road, Bangor, SUSAN EVELYN (EVA), only daughter of the late Henry Doherty, of Belfast, and granddaughter of William Doherty, Bangor. Interment in New Cemetery, Bangor, on Wednesday afternoon, at three o'clock.

DUNLOP -- March 28, at his residence, 58 Ravenhill Road, WILLIAM, the beloved husband of Sarah Dunlop. His remains will be removed from above address, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- Deeply regretted. SARAH DUNLOP.

ERWIN -- March 28, at his residence, 101 Louisa Street, JAMES, the dearly-beloved husband of Martha Erwin. The remains of my dear husband will be removed, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon at half-past two o'clock, for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- Deeply regretted. MARTHA ERWIN.

FORSYTHE -- March 28, at her residence, 19 Broom Street, ANNIE, second and dearly-beloved daughter of Adam and Elizabeth Forsythe. Her remains will be removed from above address, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at one o'clock, for interment in Derriaghy Churchyard. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. -- Deeply regretted. ADAM & ELIZABETH FORSYTHE.

GARDINER -- March 28, SAMUEL (WEE SAM), aged 2 years, son of William and Bella Gardiner. His remains will be removed from Royal Victoria Hospital, for interment in Shankill Graveyard, on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at half-past ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. WM. GARDINER, 83 Utility Street.

GOURLEY -- March 28, 1909, at his residence, Green Road, Ballyclare, ROBERT GOURLEY. The remains of my beloved husband will be removed from the above address, for interment in the New Cemetery, Ballyclare, on to-morrow (Tuesday), at twelve o'clock noon. Friends will please accept this intimation.
     Affliction sore long time he bore,
          Physicians were in vain,
     Till God gave ease when He did please,
          And freed him of his pain.
MARY GOURLEY.
American papers please copy.

GREER -- March 27, at 25 Wardlow Street, SARAH ANN GREER, the beloved daughter of the late Robert Hemphill, Portstewart. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
     Weep not for me, my children dear
     I am with Christ, you need not fear;
     But pray your sins may be forgiven,
     That you may meet with me in Heaven.
Inserted by her loving daughters and son, JAMES GREER.
Coleraine papers please copy.

HUMPHREYS -- March 28, at the residence of his son-in-law (Rev. James Smyth, Donaghadee), SAMUEL BEATTY HUMPHREYS, J.P. Funeral from his residence, Fort Lodge, Enniskillen, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon 30th inst., at two o'clock. -- "He was not, for God took him."

IEVERS -- March 27, at the residence of her sister, Rhoda Lodge, Hillsborough, ANNIE G. E. IEVERS, daughter of the late Rev. Colin Ievers, Rector of Rasharkin, County Antrim. Funeral private.

IRWIN -- March 29 (suddenly) at the Infirmary, Lisburn Road, DAVID IRWIN. The remains of my dearly-beloved son will (D.V.) be removed from his late residence, 65 Glenwood Street, for interment in Shankill Burying-ground, on Wednesday afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
"For the Lord Himself shall descend from Heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God; and the dead in Christ shall rise first; wherefore comfort one another with these words." -- I. Thess. iv., 16-18. JAMES IRWIN.

MARTIN -- March 29, at Royal Victoria Hospital, JANE (JINNIE) MARTIN, the eldest daughter of Henry and Emma Martin. Funeral from hospital to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at ten o'clock, for interment in the family burying-ground, Aghalee.

MILLAR -- March 28, at her father's residence, 54 London Street, ANNIE D. R. MILLAR, dearly-beloved daughter of Gawn and Mary Millar. Her remains will be removed, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. GAWN & MARY MILLAR.

MONTGOMERY -- March 28, at 11 East Lynn, Castleton Street, ELIZA MONTGOMERY, relict of the late George Montgomery, late of Drumanockan, Hillsborough. Her remains will be removed from the above address, on Wednesday morning, at ten o'clock, for interment in the family burying-ground, Drumlough. Funeral strictly private, by her own request. -- No flowers.
Inserted by her sorrowing family.

MOUTRAY -- March 27, at his residence, 3 Beatrice Road, Bangor, WILLIAM MOUTRAY, formerly of Ballygawley, Co. Tyrone. His remains will be removed, for interment in Bangor New Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at four o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. ELIZABETH MOUTRAY.

M'CONKEY -- March 27, at her residence, 84 Chief Street, AGNES, relict of the late Samuel M'Conkey, aged 86 years. Funeral private.

M'GAHEY -- March 29, at Belvedere, Drumbo, STANLEY M'GAHEY, aged 9 years. Interment in Carnmoney, on Wednesday morning, 31st inst., at half-past ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. ALEXANDER M'GAHEY.

M'ILROY -- March 28, at his residence, 223 Tennent Street, JAMES, the beloved husband of Jane M'Ilroy, late Company Sergeant-Major R.G. Artillery, Swansea. Funeral will take place to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- Swansea papers please copy.
Inserted by his sorrowing wife and children.

M'ILROY -- March 28, at his residence, 223 Tennent Street, JAMES, the beloved son of Mary M'Ilroy.
Inserted by his mother and sister.

M'KENNA -- March 28, at her residence, 6 Ava Avenue (Ladies' School), Belfast, MISS M. A. M'KENNA. -- R.I.P. Funeral to Milltown Cemetery on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at half-past one o'clock.

M'QUILLAN -- March 27, at his residence, Dunluce House, Larne, DAVID, dearly-beloved husband of Grace M'Quillan. Funeral from above address, on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, 30th inst., at half-past eleven o'clock for interment in the family burying-ground, Inver Churchyard. -- No flowers, by request. GRACE M'QUILLAN.

NESBITT -- March 27, 1909, at her residence, 18 Mileriver Street, SARAH, widow of the late Matthew Nesbitt. Interment to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at ten o'clock to Antrim Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. MARGARET MADDEN.

SHERLOCK -- March 28, at her residence, 41 M'Clure Street, ANNIE SHERLOCK. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at ten o'clock.

SMITH -- March 28 (of pneumonia), at his residence, 12 Belgrave Street, HUGH, the beloved husband of Agnes Smith. His remains will be removed from the above address, for interment in Dundonald Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. AGNES SMITH.

NATIONAL AMALGAMATED UNION OF LABOUR 117th BRANCH.
Members of the above Branch are requested to attend the funeral of our late Brother, HUGH SMITH.
G. BISHOP, President. D. CAMPBELL, Secretary.

SMYTH -- March 28, at her son-in-law's residence, 88 Joy Street, CATHERINE SMYTH, relict of the late James Smyth, Cooper. -- On whose soul sweet Jesus have mercy. Her remains will be removed from above address, on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at nine o'clock, for interment in the family burying-ground, Lisbane. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- American and African papers please copy.
By her sorrowing children.

Deaths too late for classification.

THOMPSON -- March 29, at his residence, 23 North Ann Street, ROBERT THOMPSON. His remains will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Carnmoney, on Wednesday afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- Deeply regretted. ROBERT JAMES & CHARLOTTE THOMPSON.

In Memoriam

ANGUS -- In fond and loving memory of our beloved daughter, JANE ALLEN, who fell asleep in Jesus on March 28, 1906, and was interred in the City Cemetery. -- "Gone to be with Jesus, which is very far better."
Inserted by her loving father, brothers, and sister. 24 Calvin Street.

COOK -- In fond and loving memory of my dear husband, and our beloved father, GEORGE COOK, who departed this life 29th March, 1908, and was interred in Carnmoney Cemetery.
     He was a patient sufferer,
          Who long desired relief,
     And now within the silent grave,
          At last he rests in peace.
Inserted by his loving wife and family. 21 Ivan Street.

FINN -- In sad and loving memory of my dearly-beloved husband, PATRICK FINN, who departed this life on the 28th March, 1908, and was interred in Milltown Cemetery. -- "On whose soul sweet Jesus have mercy."
Inserted by his loving wife and children. 128 Library Street.

MORROW -- In loving memory of my dear son, WILLIAM JAMES MORROW, who died March 29, 1907, and was interred in Hillsborough Churchyard. -- "Gone, but not forgotten."
THOS. & BELLA MORROW. 25 Marlborough Avenue.

SMYTH -- In loving memory of our departed mother, MARGARET HEGAN SMYTH, who departed this life March 29, 1901, at 10 Hurst Street, Sandy Row, Belfast.
     Christ shall clasp the broken chain,
     Closer when we meet again.
Inserted by her sons, JOSEPH & WALTER. 23 Madeline Street.

SMYTH -- In memory of my dear mother, MARGARET HEGAN SMYTH, late 10 Hurst Street, who died March 29, 1901.
     A light is from our household gone,
          A voice we loved is still;
     A place is vacant in our home,
          Which we can never fill.
BY HER SON.

WALLACE -- In loving memory of HENDERSON MERVYN (WEE HENDIE), who died 29th March, 1904.
Inserted by his loving mother. 9 Fountainville Avenue.

Clippings

SUDDEN DEATH AT BANGOR.

On Saturday evening Dr. R. C. Parke, J.P., coroner for the Northern Division of Down, held an inquest at The Tower, Clifton Road, Bangor, respecting the death of a cook named Dora Maginn, aged about 58 years, who had died suddenly the previous evening. Mr. Wm. White, J.P., employer of the deceased, stated that the woman had performed her usual work on the morning of the 26th. She had taken her dinner at about 1.30 p.m., when she displayed no signs of illness. In accordance with her custom, she lay down for a rest after the meal in her own bedroom, which adjoined the kitchen. At three o'clock she was found dead, having evidently expired about half an hour before that time. Maggie M'Cready, 48 Dufferin Avenue, Bangor, stated that she had known the deceased for nine or ten years, and had been in service with her. She was a woman of temperate habits, and had been subject some time ago to attacks of bronchitis, for which she had been treated by a Belfast physician. Recently this had not incapacitated her from performing her duties. The deceased was a native of Dublin, and, so far as witness knew, had no friends in Ireland. She was unmarried. Dr. R.L. Moore proved to having made a superficial examination of the body on the evening of the 26th inst. There were no marks of violence. From his observations witness came to the conclusion that the deceased had suffered from heart disease, and that death had resulted from cardiac failure. The jury, of which Captain William Johnston was foreman, found a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony. Sergeant S.W. Dixon watched the proceedings on behalf of the police.

===================

RECENT FIRE AT DERRYGONNELLY.

THE CHARGE AGAINST MR. PHILIP M'CUSKER.

At the Derrygonnelly Petty Sessions, on Friday, before Messrs. J. Gray, R.M. (presiding); Jeremiah Jordan, M.P.; John A. Irwin, James C. Mason, and J. Timoney, justices, the hearing was resumed of the case against Mr. Philip M'Cusker, R.D.C., licensed publican and hotel proprietor, Derrygonnelly, who is charged by District-Inspector Armstrong, Enniskillen, with having on the 24th February, 1909, "unlawfully and maliciously set fire to his dwelling-house with intent to defraud." Mr. A.C. Cooney, solicitor, represented the defendant. Sergeant Smith and Mary Timoney having been examined. Thomas Reid, Belfast, manager of the General Accident and Life Assurance Company, gave evidence as to the defendant having his hotel premises and shop insured with his company for 3,000. The accused, when sending in his proposal, made a written statement to the effect that no mineral oils or other hazardous goods were kept upon his premises. Witness visited the premises after the fire, but found them in a very confused state, and at once realised that he could not deal with the claim and that it was a case where an assessor would have to be employed. The defendant had put in a claim for 173 11s 3d damages alleged to have been done by the fire. That claim had not yet been paid. Robert M. Gray, auctioneer and assessor, Belfast, stated that on behalf of the insurance company he visited the premises and assessed the damage done. He found that a fire had taken place under the counter immediately opposite the window, and that the panel of the counter had been charred and partly burned through. He also found that the fixtures opposite had been surrounded by fire, and his inference was that there had been two fires. Mr. Cooney objected to witness giving his opinion on this matter, but District-Inspector Armstrong said witness was an expert in such matters; and after somewhat heated interchanges the question and answer were allowed, and witness repeated that he believed there had been two distinct fires, one under the counter and the other round the shelves on the left-side entering from the street. He assessed the total damage done by the fire at 26 17s 6d. He estimated the loss of wines and spirits at 6, but the accused had put in a claim for 79 9s 3d for wines and spirits. The loss of groceries he estimated at 12, whereas the accused claimed 60 for injury to his grocery stock. The furniture had not been touched by the fire or injured in any way. The furniture had been insured for 400, but witness assessed the value of all the furniture in the house at 50.

Mr. Cooney -- This man is brought down here to bolster up the whole case.

District-Inspector Armstrong -- There is no bolstering at all, and the witness's evidence shows the whole motive in this case.

After further evidence the accused was again remanded for a further period of eight days, bail being fixed at 200 -- himself in 100 and two sureties of 50 each.

===================

OPERA HOUSE BLOWN UP.

The Boston correspondent of the "Daily Chronicle," telegraphing on Sunday, says that the new Boston Opera House which was under construction was last night blown up with dynamite, and immense damage was done. It is believed that the outrage was the outcome of a labour strike that is progressing in Boston, but the details of the occurrence are still wrapped in mystery.

===================

BANGOR BOATBUILDER'S ACTION.

Hearing at Belfast Assizes.

At Belfast Assizes to-day, before the Right Hon. Justice Madden, the hearing was continued of the special jury record, in which James Lenaghan, boatbuilder, Southwell Road, Bangor, sued Lester Irving, builder and contractor, Bingham Street, Bangor, to recover 500 damages for alleged negligence and breach of contract, in writing, dated November 13, 1907, made between the plaintiff and the defendant.

Mr. A. H. Bates, K.C.; Mr. W. M. M'Grath, K.C.; and Mr. John M. Whitaker (instructed by Mr. H. H. Mussen) appeared for the plaintiff; and Mr. James Chambers, K.C.; Mr. D. M. Wilson, K.C.; and Mr. H. C. Stronge (instructed by Messrs. Moorhead & Wood) represented the defendant.

The statement of claim set forth that the defendant contracted with the plaintiff to do all the work and supply all the material required in the erection of three houses at Southwell Road, Bangor, and that the defendant in breach of contract, failed to do the work in a workmanlike manner and to the entire satisfaction of the plaintiff, or in accord with the plans and specifications.

The defendant denied that he was guilty of breach of contract, and said that in so far as the houses were not built according to plans and specifications they were altered by the order of the plaintiff. He counterclaimed for 83 17s 1d for work done and materials provided, and 16 for repairs executed. To that the plaintiff joined issue, and said the work was not done, and if it was done it was included in the contract.

===================

MILITARY NOTES.

A report by the Army Council on the "Solano" targets and appliances for miniature cartridge practise expresses the opinion that the apparatus provides as complete a musketry education as possible for those who cannot, for any reason, undergo a full course of musketry with service ammunition.

Superintending Inspectors and Inspectors of Work Staff for Royal Engineer services are in future to be granted travelling expenses for themselves and for their families on change of station.

Separation allowance, it has been decided, cannot be granted in respect of the families of non-commissioned officers undergoing preliminary training on transfer to the Royal Field Reserve Artillery.

Under the equipment regulations for the Special Reserve, the arms and equipments at present held by infantry regimental depots are to be transferred to the 3rd Reserve Battalions, except those held for issue to Army Reservists on mobilisation.

On Sunday night Sir Neville Lyttleton left for London to attend a meeting of the Army Selection Board.

Brigadier-General F. C. Heath, Inspector of Royal Engineers, will carry out inspections on 22nd prox. of Dunree and Lenon Batteries and the manning of electric lights in Lough Swilly district.

The annual regimental sinner in connection with the Legion of Frontiersmen, Headquarters Irish Command, will be held on Empire Day at Dublin, as elsewhere announced. Applications for tickets should be made as early as possible to the local organising officer, G. G. Simpson, Adjutant. Mr. J. A. Montgomery, organising officer, Belfast, gives notice that the weekly meeting of the Northern Squadron will be held, as usual, in Ye Olde Castle.

===================

Thirty years ago to-day there was enacted at Kambula, Zululand, one of those thrilling incidents which make Britons the world over feel proud of their name and race. On the 29th March, 1879, at Kambula a force of 1,600 English soldiers was surrounded by a picked force of twenty thousand Zulu warriors, and for seven hours this British force sustained an attack delivered again and again with savage ferocity. Not only were these attacks repulsed, but finally the British inflicted upon the horde of Zulus one of the most severe and crushing defeats experienced throughout that campaign. A few of the Belfast and North of Ireland men who took part in the battle, the story of which at the time created a profound sensation, still survive, though a large number perished in the recent South African war. Those who are alive will no doubt to-day go back in memory thirty years, and recall scenes enacted at Kambula and the victory they helped to achieve.

===================

CHURCH BELL DEDICATED AT TULLYLISH.

On Saturday afternoon a fine bell, erected at Tullylish Parish Church in memory of Revs. John M'Niece and R. R. Kane, LL.D., former incumbents of the parish, was dedicated by the Bishop of Down and Connor and Dromore. The service was conducted by Rev. E. A. Myles, M.A., and the lesson was read by Rev. Canon Lett. There was a large number of Orangemen present in regalia, and the local clergy were well represented. At the conclusion of an appropriate address, the Lord Bishop made allusion to the faithful services of Rev. John M'Niece and Rev. Dr. Kane. The congregation was very large. After the service the bell was rung the first time, its sound being audible for a long distance round.

===================

The musketry course for the trained non-commissioned officers and men of the Belfast Squadron North Irish Horse will be held on the Kinnegar range on the 17th, 18th, and 19th May, and the recruits' course will be fired the three following days.

===================

BELFAST POLICE COURTS.

CUSTODY.
(Before Mr. A. Newton Brady, R.M.)

ALLEGED THEFT OF CLOTH.

Constable Stewart charged Mary Beattie, Andrew Beattie, Andrew Lowry, and Isaac M'Kinley with stealing a quantity of cloth, the property of Hugh M'Dowell, 147 Albertbridge Road, within the past four months. It was stated that the stolen property was valued at 20. Accused, who were tailors, in the employment of Mr. M'Dowell, and who were defended by Mr. John Graham, were remanded for a week.

ALLEGED ASSAULT WITH KNIFE.

Patrick Slavin was charged by Constable Reilly with assaulting Nellie Warnock, a young woman residing at 18 Mitchell Street. It was alleged that on Sunday night accused entered woman's house, and struck her on the chin with a knife. She had to go to hospital to get the wound dressed. A remand until Friday was granted.

PIES AND PIGS' FEET.

Patrick Quinn, a young man, was charged with stealing four pigs' feet and four pies, by means of a trick. It was stated that prisoner went into the restaurant of Mr. Watts, 67 North Street, on Saturday night, and stated that Miss Baker, the pianist at the Star Music Hall, had sent him for the goods. On this representation he was given the articles. Miss Baker said she did not send the prisoner.

Mr. Lewis -- The serious part of it is attributing such a horribly ravenous appetite to Miss Baker. (Laughter.)

Prisoner had never been in trouble before, and he was put on a term of probation.

THREATENED TO HAVE HIS LIFE.

Thomas Halliday was charged with threatening to commit suicide, and also with threatening his wife. Prisoner's wife stated that her husband had been drinking heavily for some time past, and on Saturday he threatened to kill her and to take his own life. Some neighbours had to take a couple of razors off him. Accused was remanded for a week. Mr. N. Tughan prosecuted.

THE GAMING ACTS.

Jacob Dunseith, Alexander Dunseith, John Edwards, and Joseph Martin were charged at the instance of Detective-Sergeant Baird with using and keeping the place known as "the yard," at the corner of Durham Street and Grosvenor Road, as a gaming concern. Mr. A. J. Lewis prosecuted, and Messrs. John Graham and Robert H. Leighton defended. Mr. Lewis read the Act of Parliament under which the prosecution was brought. Sergeant Baird stated that on Saturday evening he entered the place, which is enclosed by hoardings, and found swing-boats and a "helter-skelter" railway. The Dunseiths and Edwards were at the roulette table and Martin at another table with tin and dice. There were about thirty people round the roulette table. In reply to Mr. Graham, witness said that there was also a shooting gallery and wild beast show. Constable Slacke gave corroborative evidence. Mr. Leighton said that as regarded Edwards he was in the unfortunate position of only giving a hand at taking in and paying money at the end of the table, while as to Martin there was no evidence that he had taken any money. Alexander Dunseith and Joseph Martin were fined 5, and Jacob Dunseith and John Edwards 3. In the case of the two last-named the fines were subsequently reduced to 1, on the application of Mr. Graham.

SUMMONS.
(Before Mr. Garrett Nagle, R.M.)

TRADE UNION CASE.

A summons was brought by Richard Davies, general secretary of the Municipal Employees Association of Great Britain and Ireland, against Alexander Crothers, 73 Britannic Street for that he, "being the collecting stewart of Belfast No. 3 Branch of the association, did, within the past six months, at Belfast, wilfully withhold the sum of 3 1s 9d collected by him as such stewart for and on behalf of the said association." Mr. N. Tughan appeared for the complainant, and Mr. John Graham represented the defendant. The case was adjourned by mutual consent till Thursday without the facts being gone into.

===================

PROVINCIAL NEWS.

(Summarised from our Early Editions of to-day.)

A pillar letter-box in Ballybay was found to be on fire on Saturday morning, and several important letters were destroyed. It is thought that the fire was caused by the accidental dropping of a match through the opening.

Mr. Wm. Watson, landstewart to Mr. E. M. Archdale, Ballinamallard, was crossing the Ballycassidy River in a boat on Friday, when it capsized, throwing him into about 12 feet of water, but he was speedily rescued by some workmen who were close at hand.

At Raphoe Petty Sessions on Saturday, Mary Farrell summoned Philip Lynch, farmer, for assaulting her and her infant child Fanny Farrell. It appeared that defendant was chasing several children, who, he alleged, had been throwing stones at him when driving. Plaintiff tried to prevent his following them, when he struck her with a whip stick. He also accidentally struck a child in her arms, and it was afterwards found to have two ribs broken. Defendant was fined 21s and costs.

Mr. Robert Haire, C.E., held a Court of Arbitration in the Workhouse, Lisnaskea, on Wednesday, to decide the amount of compensation to be awarded to the owners and occupiers of the plots of land required by Lisnaskea District Council for the erection of labourers' cottages.

Robert Watson, a sawyer, sustained a severe wound in the hand through an accident in the sawmills of Mr. John West, near Ballinamallard, on Thursday.

===================

Thomas Wright, a carter of Donisthorpe Lane, Moira, died at Ashby-de-la Zouch from injuries sustained on Saturday through being thrown out of a trap after collision with a lamppost. His brother Joseph was killed on the spot.

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BELFAST BURNING ACCIDENT.

On Sunday a woman named Hannah Doherty, aged 34 years, of Mary Street, was removed in the ambulance to the Royal Victoria Hospital suffering from severe burns on the body, as a result of her clothing catching fire. When admitted her condition was regarded as serious, and on inquiries being made at noon no improvement had been made.

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DEATH OF MR. S. B. HUMPHREYS J.P., ENNISKILLEN,

MANAGER OF SLIGO, LEITRIM, AND N.C.'S RAILWAY.

We deeply regret to announce the death of Mr. S. B. Humphreys, J.P., Fort Lea, Enniskillen, the genial and popular general manager of the Sligo, Leitrim, and Northern Counties Railway, which occurred on Sunday morning at the residence of his son-in-law, Rev. James Smith, I.L.D., Epworth, Donaghadee, after a comparatively brief illness. Mr. Humphreys was one of Enniskillen's most useful and respected citizens, and the news of his death was heard with unfeigned sorrow and pained surprise by all creeds and classes in the town. For some time past he had not been in robust health, and about two months ago he had a somewhat severe attack. He was confined to his room for two or three weeks, but under the care of his medical advisors his health improved considerably, and he was able to resume business. He attended the service in the Methodist Church on Sunday week, and a few days ago left Enniskillen to pay a visit to his son-in-law at Donaghadee, intending to return early this week. The deceased gentleman, who was a native of Cootehill, Co. Cavan, was almost forty years in the railway service, and was held in the highest esteem by the travelling public. Early in life he entered the service of the Irish North-Western Railway Company at Derry, and by the adoption of those honourable principles which always ensure success in life he rapidly obtained promotion. For many years he was chief clerk at Enniskillen Station to Mr. Henry Plews, now Lieutenant-Colonel Plews, general manager of the Great Northern Railway, and here as in Derry he gained the confidence of the company, and the respect of all with whom he came in contact. He afterwards was appointed traffic manager of the Sligo, Leitrim, and Northern Counties Railway, and some ten years ago he took up the onerous and responsible position of general manager, and recently the secretarial duties were entrusted to him. In his dealings with the travelling public Mr. Humphreys was exceedingly civil and courteous. He possessed wonderful energy, and in the railway world was considered one of the ablest of the Irish managers. It is admitted that the success of the Sligo, Leitrim, and N.C. Railway is mainly, if not altogether, due to his skilful and judicious management. For many years he was the superintendent of the Enniskillen Methodist Sunday School, and by his death the Methodist Church has lost one of its staunchest members. He was a member of the Governing Board of the Methodist College, Belfast, and treasurer of the Orphan Society of the Irish Methodist Church. He always evinced a keen interest in educational matters, and was one of the members of the Governing Board of Portora Royal School. For many years the deceased was a Governor of the Fermanagh County Hospital, and was a generous contributor to the funds of the institution. As a director of the Lough Erne Steamboat Company he took an active interest in the development of the tourist traffic of the district. Everything appertaining to the welfare of Enniskillen had his strongest sympathy, and a few years ago he took a prominent part in endeavouring to establish a linen weaving factory in the town. In him the poor had a sincere and never-failing friend, and he will be greatly missed by them. We tender our sympathy to his widow and relatives in their bereavement. At the morning service in the Methodist Church, Enniskillen, on Sunday, Rev. J. W. Parkhill, referring to the death of Mr. Humphreys said -- "We are a chastened congregation this morning. During the week "Jesus called a little child unto Him" when the sweet angelic little life of Dodo Smith passed into the skies, and early this morning God summoned His servant Mr. Humphreys to the higher service of the skies. Last Sunday morning he worshipped with us in this church, and to-day he has joined the worship of Heaven. Our church is poorer for the removal of such a character, and Heaven is enriched by his entrance. The sad event is so recent and crushing it is impossible to trust oneself to speak as one would like on the occasion, but I feel that I ought to say that for some time our dear brother was, through failing health, unable to engage as formerly in the work of helping others. This was a real grief to him, but I know by personal contact with our dear friend that he rendered the passive service of submission to his Master's will. I ask your sympathy and prayers for the circle of bereaved ones."

THE FUNERAL.

The funeral of the late Mr. Humphreys will take place on Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock from Fort Lodge, Enniskillen, the remains having been conveyed from Donaghadee to-day.

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BELFAST DROWNING CASE.

BODY FOUND AT ALBERT QUAY.

Shortly before eight o'clock this morning the body of a well-dressed man of middle age was recovered from the River Lagan at Albert Quay. The remains were brought ashore and conveyed to the morgue by Harbour-Constable Armstrong. A search was made in the deceased's pockets, in which were found a postcard with the name and address, "William M'Kenzie, 7 Cameron Street," a gold watch with the name of the makers (Stewart, Dawson, & Co.) inscribed on it, and a gold albert and chain.

Inquiries were at once instituted by the police, who communicated with the address given on the postcard, and about eleven o'clock a Mr. John Seawright called at the morgue and identified the body as that of Donald M'Kenzie, who had lodged in the same house with him. Deceased was about 50 years of age, and was a clerk.

It is not known how the man got into the water. He could not have been many minutes in it, as his watch was going when he was brought ashore.

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THE AGRARIAN TROUBLES.

FAMILY CHARGED WITH ASSAULT.

A whole family, comprising Michael Conway, his wife Sarah, and their four children, two sons and two daughters, appeared at Nenagh (Co. Tipperary) Petty Sessions on Saturday, charged with assault on a man named Breslane at Toomevarra, near Nenagh, recently. Breslane had, 15 years ago, purchased a 20 acre farm from a Mr. Dempsey, to whom it had been mortgaged by Conway. They attacked the man with sticks and stones, and a riot ensued, which the three policemen stationed were unable to cope with. The constables hustled Breslane into a house, and sent for the local Roman Catholic clergy, but pending their arrival the Conways besieged the building, and smashed all the windows, shouting, "We want our land or your life." The priests eventually managed to restore order. Conway admitted that he entertained murderous feelings towards Breslane, and he and his two sons were sentenced to two months' hard labour, and ordered to find bail to be of good behaviour. The charges against the female defendants were adjourned for six months.

ALLEGED RAIDERS' TRIUMPHANT MARCH.

A remarkable procession took place at Kilbeggan, Co. Westmeath, petty sessions, on Saturday, when John Kelly, Daniel M'Loughlin, Daniel Reed, and Patrick Lynam were on their way to appear before Mr. Dunsterville, R.M., on the charge of driving cattle off the lands of Hugh Cullen, near Horseleap. Defendants rode into the town wearing green sashes, and were accompanied by a large crowd with bands and banners. The case was adjourned on the ground that negotiations were pending for the sale of the lane to the Estate Commissioners.

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BELFAST BANKRUPTCY COURT.

Mr. T. C. Houston, registrar, presided at the sitting of this court to-day in the absence of his Honour Judge Fitzgibbon. Mr. R. Grainger, official assignee, was in attendance. There were three arrangements, in which the solicitors engaged were -- Mr. Jas. Alexander, Mr. D. M'Gonigal, and Mr. A. J. Lewis.

In re DAVID S. WRIGHT

This case was listed for adjourned audit on composition lodged. The bankrupt had been a hardware merchant in Belfast. Mr. James Alexander read the report, which showed that there was not any balance on hands. The debts proved amounted to 218. The sitting was passed without any order for dividend or payment of costs.

In re SARAH RAINEY.

The bankrupt had been a spirit grocer in Medway Street, and the case was listed for adjourned audit on composition lodged. Mr. James Alexander said his client had been promised assistance during the week, and he asked for an adjournment for a week. Mr. Ross said the matter had been frequently adjourned. Under the circumstances he would consent to a further week, but no more.

In re JAMES CUNNINGHAM.

This matter was listed for audit and dividend. The bankrupt had been a publican in Little Patrick Street. Mr. James Alexander, for Mr. P. J. Magee, read the report. There was a balance of 27 in hands, and the debts due amounted to 151. The usual order for distribution and payment of costs was made in the matter.

In re JOHN R. SIMMS.

The bankrupt had been a grocer in Holywood, and the case was listed for audit and dividend. Mr. S. Ross read the report, which showed a balance of 70, and the debts proved were 331. The usual order was made in the case.

In re ROBERT FINNIE.

The bankrupt had carried on business in Duncairn Gardens, and the case was before the Court for audit and dividend. The balance in hand was 55, and the debts proved amounted to 242. The usual distribution order was made. Mr. Ross read the report.

In re WILLIAM S. SPROTT.

This matter was listed for adjourned first and second public sittings. On the application of Mr. M'Gonigal, Mr. Maurice Goldring was appointed creditors' assignee, and the sittings were further adjourned.

In re ALLEN BURNS.

The bankrupt had been a grocer in Belfast, and the case was listed for first public sitting. The bankrupt was examined by Mr. S. Ross as to certain entries in the schedule of assets, and the sitting was subsequently passed.

In re CRAWFORD BROS.

The case was listed for the examination of witnesses. The bankrupts had carried on business in North Thomas Street. Mr. S. Ross represented the petitioning creditors, and Mr. D. M'Gonigal (for Mr. N. Tughan) appeared for Mr. Samuel Crawford, a witness in the matter. Mr. Samuel Crawford said he was the father of both bankrupts, of whose whereabouts he did not know anything at present. He held the lease of the premises as a sort of security for about 800 which he had advanced to them for the business, and that was all he had for his money. The matter was further adjourned.

In re MAURICE REUBENS.

The bankrupt had been engaged in the furniture trade in Belfast, and the case was listed for the adjourned examination of witnesses. Mr. James Alexander intimated that the sitting might be adjourned. An offer would be made later, which, if accepted, would probably end the matter.

In re S. M. KINGHAN.

In this matter the bankrupt had carried on business in the linen trade, and the matter was listed to confirm the sale of the bankrupt's reversions in certain interests. On the application of Mr. Boas (Galway & Boas), the offer of Mr. Edward Bailey at 1,505 was accepted by the Court.

In re JOHN OGLE.

This matter was listed for the hearing of a charge and discharge. Mr. James Alexander (for Mr. A. J. M'Clelland), who appeared for the chargeants, applied that the matter stand for a week. The application was adjourned.

In re MIREM MYERS.

This was an adjourned application to set aside adjudication. Mr. D. M'Gonigal said he was in the position that his client, the bankrupt, had died. On the motion of Mr. James Alexander, solicitor, the application was struck out, with costs against the estate.

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HUSBAND'S ALLEGED BRUTALITY.

WOMAN DETAINED IN HOSPITAL.

PITIFUL TALE IN BELFAST POLICE COURT.

In the Belfast Custody Court to-day, before Mr. A. Newton Briday, R.M., a middle-aged man, named Patrick Day, was charged, at the instance of Constable Shanahan, with assaulting his wife, Agnes Day, thereby causing her serious bodily harm. Mr. A. J. Lewis prosecuted. Constable Shanahan proved arrest.

The woman was unable to appear in court, and the clerk read a deposition made by her on Sunday in the Royal Victoria Hospital, where she is detained.

The deposition was to the effect that on Saturday night the prisoner went home in a state of intoxication, and the woman was assisting him to bed when he struck her with his clenched fist, and alleged that she had picked his pockets. She left the room, and on returning about half an hour later she found the prisoner asleep. She went to bed, and at about 1-30 on Sunday he awoke her, and said, "Aggie, will you go down and get me a piece of bread and butter." She did as requested, and had hardly returned to bed when accused hauled her pout, and said he would be hung for her. He then caught her by the hair, and pulled her about the floor. He danced on her, and she lay on the floor for nearly an hour until the police arrived on the scene. She seemed to be paralysed, and could not protect herself. Accused continued to jump upon her, and said he might kill her at once, as he would not get an hour for her. He also bit her arm. The police assisted her into bed, and while she was there she asked prisoner to lift her upon the pillow. He caught her by the hair and pulled her up. He also said he wished she was smothered. She asked him for a drink of water, and he said he would give her a drink of poison.

The deposition continued to state that prisoner had often beaten the woman, and that he was of a very jealous disposition.

Accused, on the application of the Crown, was remanded for a week.

SIX MONTHS FOR WIFE-BEATER.

William Galway, 25 Cumberland Street, was charged in the same court with assaulting his wife, Isabella Galway.

Mr. John Osborne, who prosecuted, described the case as the most brutal that he had ever been engaged in.

The complainant stated that she had been married for five and a half years, and had two children. Accused was a very violent man, and was greatly addicted to drink. He beat her repeatedly. On Friday he came home in a drunken state, and commenced to fight with another man, smashing a number of articles in the house. She was obliged to go out, and when she returned he kicked her about the body. He also struck her some violent blows about the body with his clenched fist.

Mr. Brady, R.M., said the case was a very bad one, and sentenced accused to six months' imprisonment.

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DEATH FROM HEART FAILURE.

A verdict of death from heart failure following convulsions was returned to-day at an inquest held in the Boardroom of the Union Workhouse on the body of John Rooney, aged four weeks. Bridget Rooney, mother of deceased, said she was a servant, and belonged to Enniskeen, Dundalk. The child was born in the Workhouse. She put it to bed at 7 p.m. on Sunday night, and fed it again at midnight. It was then in the best of health. On visiting it again at 3 a.m. she found the child was dead. Mrs. Allen, night nurse, corroborated. Dr. M'Cune said that the child died from heart failure following convulsions. It was a fine, strong, healthy child, and had received every attention. Dr. Graham (City Coroner) said he wished some of the children outside got the same attention as they did in the Workhouse. There would be less cause for complaint. Sergeant Wm. M'Kinley watched the proceedings on behalf of the police.

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DEATH OF MR. DAVID M'QUILLAN, J.P., LARNE.

The death of the above well-known Larne gentleman took place late on Saturday night, after a comparatively short illness. Mr. M'Quillan was one of the most prominent business men of the town, and held in the highest regard by all who knew him. For nearly a quarter of a century he was a member of the Larne Town Commissioners and Urban Council, retiring about four years ago, and had served nine terms as chairman of the local governing body. A couple of years ago he was appointed a magistrate for County Antrim, and in a marked degree he held the respect and esteem of his fellow-townsmen. He was an active and faithful member of the Methodist Church, and his death will prove a great blow to that body in Larne district.

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MR O'BRIEN'S RESIGNATION.

Mr. William O'Brien's decision to abandon the fight for the new All-for-Ireland League has aroused quite a sensation in Cork, and especially as his most intimate followers had no idea he intended taking such a step. The new crisis can scarcely disappear without interesting if not startling developments. Meantime interest is centred in the fate of Mr. O'Brien's paper, "The Irish People."

Alderman Forde, who was very closely connected with Mr. O'Brien, said he could only put down Mr. O'Brien's resignation to treachery on the part of his colleagues. He had been simply inundated with people insisting that Mr. O'Brien shall not resign during the present, and have the country given over to the bludgeon men of Belfast, who would suppress free speech, the Irish party, and freedom of political action.

Mr. John Redmond, speaking at Liverpool on Sunday, referred to Mr. O'Brien's resignation, and said that the Nationalists were now an absolutely united party, while Mr. T. P. O'Connor expressed his gratification that Mr. O'Brien, a man with a glorious past, had submitted to the will of the Irish people.

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CORPORATION PROSECUTIONS.

CONVICTIONS IN BELFAST SUMMONS COURT.

Several Corporation prosecutions were heard to-day at Belfast Sessions Court by Messrs. Garrett Nagle, R.M., and W. S. Rimmer. In the first case the defendant was John Smyth, Oldpark Farmyard, Oldpark Road, and the summons was taken under Article 7 (1) of the Dairies, Cowsheds, and Milkshops (Ireland) Order, 1908, which states "That every cowkeeper shall cause every part of the interior of every cowshed in his occupation to be thoroughly cleansed from time to time as often as may be necessary to secure that such cowshed shall be at all times reasonably clean and sweet."

Mr. William Tughan (for Mr. D. F. Spiller) prosecuted.

Inspector M'Bride said he visited the premises on the 4th February, and found the cowshed in a dirty state. He again visited the cowshed about 7 a.m. on the 24th inst., and found a very offensive smell.

The magistrates imposed a penalty of 10s and costs.

Mary Jane Bentley, 29 Foreman Street, was summoned under the provisions of the Diaries, Cowsheds and Milkshops (Ireland) Order, 1908, which states, "that a person following the trade of cowkeeper or dairyman or purveyor of milk shall not keep any horses, calves, swine, dogs, or poultry in any cowshed or other building used by him for keeping cows, or in any milk store or other place used by him for keeping cows."

Inspector M'Bride, proving the offence, said he inspected defendant's premises on 23rd inst., and found a calf tied in the passage behind the cows. Defendant had been informed previously that the premises were unsuitable for cow-keeping purposes. On several occasions he had been unable to get into the premises, and the defendant once told him that she had got an old-age pension, and didn't care a "rap" for him or anyone else. The byre was in a filthy condition, and when the door closed there was neither light nor ventilation in it.

Defendant's sister, who appeared in answer to the summons, said that defendant had met with a fall, and could not attend.

ADULTERATED BUTTERMILK.

A summons was brought against a farmer named John Milliken, of Ballynadolly, Co. Antrim, and George Milliken, his son, for having sold buttermilk adulterated with 21 per cent. of water over and above the 25 per cent. allowed by the Board of Agriculture. Mr. Wm. Tughan (for Mr. D. F. Spiller) prosecuted, and defendant was represented by Mr. John Graham.

Inspector Reynolds proved to having taken the sample from defendant's son in Belfast market. On analysis it was found to be adulterated as stated. The father was not present on the occasion.

Mr. Graham having addressed the Court, pointing out that the defendant was not a type of man who would deliberately commit such an offence, the magistrates imposed a fine of 20s and costs on the summons against the father.

NO LIST OF OUTWORKERS.

John Kerr, 120 Shankill Road, was defendant in a summons at the suit of the Corporation charging him with an offence under section 107 of the Factory and Workshops Act, 1901.

Mr. Tughan, for the prosecution, explained that under the section persons in the position of the defendant were required to keep a list of the people to whom they supplied outwork from time to time, and to send the list once every six months to the local authority which in this case was the Corporation. Defendant had not kept the list, and had not supplied the necessary particulars to the local authority. Defendant was in the habit of giving out wool to be made into stockings, and on the 25th February Miss Agnew, one of the Corporation lady inspectors, found a woman in Cumberland Street knitting stockings with wool supplied by the defendant.

Miss Agnew stated that she had called on Miss Kerr on four occasions. She informed him he was required by law to keep a list of his outworkers and notify the Corporation every six months. Miss Kerr was quite straightforward, and told her he gave wool out to be made into stockings, but he did not think she had a right to get the names and addresses of the parties.

Defendant informed the Court that he had acted in ignorance of the law. He would be the last man to break the law, and he was willing to fill up any forms which might be required. The lady had been very nice to him, and he thought it was all a matter of form.

Mr. Tughan said the importance of that prosecution was to see that wool or goods of that kind were not being sent to houses where there might be infectious disease.

Miss Agnew -- And sweating.

Mr. Nagle instanced a case reported from London where trousers had been made in a house where there were several people suffering from scarlatina, and sent to one of the highest houses in the land.

The magistrates imposed a fine of 5s and costs, and intimated that the penalties would be heavier in future.

 

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