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Belfast Telegraph - Saturday, 6 February, 1904

Births

GARRETT -- 6th February, 1904, at Ava House, Chichester Park, to Mrs. John S. Garrett, a daughter.

MYERS -- February 3, at 52 Finchley Road, London, the wife of Michael Myers, of a son.

Deaths

AGNEW -- February 5th, at 10 Cassidy's Terrace, Strandtown, Robert, the dearly-beloved husband of Mary Agnew. His remains will be removed, for interment in Knock Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

BAIRD -- February 5, 1904, at his late residence, Ballyregan, Hugh Baird, senr., aged 79 years. His remains will be removed from the above address, for interment in the family burying-ground, Dundonald, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at four o'clock.
HUGH BAIRD, Junr.

BEATTIE -- February 5, at Larchfield, James Beattie, aged 72 years, for over 40 years the faithful coachman to Mr. and Mrs. O. B. Graham. Funeral to Annahilt Glebe on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at three o'clock.

BLAKELY -- February 6, at her residence, 5 Belgravia Avenue, Lisburn Road, Belfast, Annie, widow of the late Jackson R. Blakely, M. D., Newforge, Malone. Her remains will be removed, for interment in Newtownbreda Churchyard, on Monday afternoon, 8th inst., at half-past two o'clock.
JAMES BLAKELY.

BROWN -- February 5, 1904, suddenly, at their late residence, 69 Grove Street East, William, and also his wife, Sarah Brown, late of Bessbrook. The remains of our dearly-beloved father and mother will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
American papers please copy.
CHRISTINA CROSBY & SAMUEL BROWN.

BURDEN -- February 5th, at the Royal Victoria Hospital (result of an accident), Joseph James, dearly beloved son of John and Mary Ann Burden. His remains will be removed from 120 Leopold Street, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

CLARK -- February 6, at Vere Street, Margaret, the dearly-beloved wife of John Clark. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Monday afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
JOHN CLARK.

FILSON -- February 6th, 1904, at the Belfast Infirmary, Lisburn Road, Thomas Alexander Filson (late of Messrs. W. R. M'Call & Co., Linenhall Street, Belfast). Funeral from above institution on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at half-past one, for City Cemetery.
M. A. FILSON.

GRAHAM -- February 6th, at her sister's residence 57 Belvoir Street, Margaret, the dearly-beloved wife of Robert Graham. Her remains will be removed , for interment in the City Cemetery, on Monday afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation

KERNAHAN -- February 5th, at his residence, 43 Hatten Drive, Woodstock Road, John, the dearly-beloved husband of Lily, and eldest son of William Kernahan, Upper Frank Street. Funeral to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at three o'clock, for the City Cemetery.

MILLS -- February 5th, at his residence, 68 Nevis Avenue, William Mills, Acting-Sergeant R.I.C., the dearly-beloved husband of Maggie Mills. His remains will be removed from above address, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in the City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.
Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Wife and Children.
      Sleep, beloved, sleep, and take thy rest,
      Lay down thy head upon thy Saviour's breast,
      We loved thee well, but Jesus loves thee best.
      Good night, good night, good night.

M'DOWELL -- February 6th, 1904, at his residence, 8 Burmah Street, Belfast. William Henry (Henry), late of Drumhirk, Newtownards. The remains of my dearly-beloved husband will be removed from above address, for interment in the family burying-ground, Movilla, on Monday, 8th inst., at twelve o'clock noon. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
ANN M'DOWELL.

M'GREEVY -- February 5th, at his residence, 10 Welsh Street, John M'Greevy. His remains will be removed, for interment in Milltown Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at half-past one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
JAMES M'GREEVY.

M'WILLIAM -- February 5, at the Throne Hospital, Thomas (Tommie), the dearly-beloved and only son of Robert and Lizzie M'William, aged 5 years and 11 months. His remains will be removed from his father's residence, 61 Spamount Street, for interment in Raloo Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Sunday) morning, at half-past ten o'clock.
"Gone to be with Jesus."
ROBERT & LIZZIE M'WILLIAM.

ROGERS -- February 5th, 1904, at her residence, 46 May Street, Rachel Rogers, dearly-beloved wife of Thomas H. Rogers, R.I.C. Her remains will be removed, for interment in City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
T. H. ROGERS.

SKILLEN -- February 5, 1904, at her late residence, 38 Bright Street, Belfast, Margaret, relict of the late Richard Skillen. The remains of our dearly-beloved mother will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Comber Churchyard, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
ANDREW & RICHARD SKILLEN.

WHITE -- February 5th, 1904, at the residence of his son, 22 Jerusalem Street, Belfast, John White. The remains of my beloved father will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Dromara, on to-morrow (Sunday) morning at nine o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
ROBERT WHITE.

WRIGHT -- On 5th February, at 123 Dunluce Avenue, Fanny, the dearly-beloved wife of John Wright. Funeral Monday, at 2.30, for City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.
JOHN WRIGHT.

In Memoriam

GRACEY -- In loving memory of our dearly-beloved son, William, who departed this life February 6th, 1902, and was interred in Drumbo Burying-ground. Deeply regretted.
Inserted by his Father and Mother. W. & M. GRACEY, Annadale Brickworks.

GRACEY -- In fond and loving memory of my dear nephew, William Gracey, who departed this life on the 6th of February, 1902, and was interred in Drumbo Burying-ground. Deeply regretted.
I have redeemed thee, I have called thee by thy name; Thou art Mine.
ESSIE WINTER. 12 Belmont Street, Woodstock Road.

KIRKWOOD -- In loving memory of my dear husband, Hugh Kirkwood, who departed this life 6th February, 1900, and was interred in City Cemetery.
MARY KIRKWOOD.

KIRKWOOD -- In loving memory of our dear brother, Hugh Kirkwood, who departed this life 6th February, 1900, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
Inserted by his Sisters, ANNIE & MARY.

KOSCHNICK -- In sorrowing remembrance of our dear daughter Marie, who departed this life on the 7th of February, 1903, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
      The light and cheer of our home we miss,
      In the better land with Christ she lives;
      It tests us severely, but she may obtain
      For us His favour to meet her again.
Inserted by her Loving Parents.

Continued on Page 3 (to late for classification)

Deaths

DOHERTY -- February 5, at his residence, 14 Sevastopol Street, James Doherty. The remains of my beloved father will be removed, for interment in the Milltown Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at two o'clock.
Friends will please accept this intimation. JAMES H. DOHERTY.

MAGEE -- February 5th, at her late residence, 45 Sunnyside Street, Agnes Magee. -- R.I.P. The remains of my dearly-beloved mother will be removed, for interment in Milltown Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at two o'clock.
MARY ANN M'CONVILLE.

SHEPPARD -- 5th February, 1904, at the residence of her niece, 51 Redcar Street, Mary, beloved sister of Robert Sheppard, Alma House, Lissan, Cookstown. Her remains will be removed on Monday morning, at 9.45, for interment in Lissan Burying-ground, Cookstown, arriving at Cookstown about 12 o'clock.
R. SHEPPARD.

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or dictates injured the smallest and humblest Protestant in the city of Dublin. (Applause.) He could go into some particular pronouncements in the handbook of the Association. One in particular he might refer to, as it affected him personally. In the handbook, which he had no doubt they had all read, there was given a very glowing description of all the large and prosperous enterprises about Dublin and connected with Ireland, particularly the railway companies, as to their terrible bigotry in appointing Protestants in preference to Roman Catholics. In those attacks the authors of the handbook thought it advisable also to mention a small railway of which he happened to be a director. As far as the religious question was concerned -- and he mentioned this merely to show that if one statement were untrue others could also be contradicted -- for the fifteen years during which he had been a director and on the Board of the railway he had never heard a question of any man's religion discussed or asked. (Applause.) He challenged the Catholic Association and its emissaries to give one single instance in which any individual who had been appointed during those fifteen years to any post whatever in the Cavan and Leitrim Railway had been asked what his religion was. (Cheers.) Now, from the statement he had read from the handbook they would naturally conclude that appointments on the railway were in the majority Protestant. In that they would be greatly mistaken. The staff, all told, numbered 142, of whom 42 were Protestants and 100 Roman Catholics. (Cheers.) Those figures had been brought to his knowledge within the past three days. It was true that their secretary, traffic manager, engineer, and locomotive superintendent were Protestants -- cheers -- but that was only the fortune of war, and it was a strong illustration of the fact that Protestants were capable of holding positions of trust in this country. (Cheers.) All the best appointments on the railways were always put up to public competition, and were open to all denominations

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CORRESPONDENCE.

ORGAN RECITALS
Sir -- I think it is high time that some arrangements were made so as to allow shop assistants and those who are not able to attend on Saturdays to hear our able organist -- say, either Monday or Tuesday evenings, which, I am sure, would meet with heartfelt appreciation. Thanking you in anticipation -- Yours, &c.,
R. COLLINS.
Combermere Street, 2nd February, 1904.

THE CATHOLIC ASSOCIATION.
Sir -- The exclusive dealing of the Catholic Association is but a new move of the League of Mr. Parnell's time. Another step will make the business perfect. If you look to Rev. 13th chapter, and 16 and 17 verses, you will see the matter perfect, which I will give in full for the information of your readers -- "And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads; and that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name." -- Yours, &c.,
January 23. "A. H."

THE ULSTER HALL PROMENADE CONCERTS.
Sir -- It was with very great pleasure I read in your advertisement columns that at last the Belfast public are about to have a series of promenade concerts in the Ulster Hall, commencing 15th inst. This announcement is all the more refreshing, coming at a time when the tastes of the public seem to be degenerating, as is instanced by the closing of the Grand Opera House and the reopening of same as a "two-night' performance music hall. There is one thing, however, I take very strong exception so in the advertisement referred to, and I cannot but think that this is a printer's error, or perhaps it pertains to some of the music halls bills -- "Smoking is allowed in body of hall." It is astounding that the ladies of Belfast are to be excluded from attending the concerts by this

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FIRE NEAR BALLYMENA.

DAMAGE ABOUT £20,000.

Last night a fire broke out in the dyeing and finishing works of Messrs. Frazer & Haughten, Hillmount, Cullybackey, and but for the plucky efforts put forth by a large number of people the large pile of buildings and machinery would have been entirely destroyed. As it was the flames wrought considerable havoc upon a splendid store, in which finished goods were kept, it being practically burned to the ground. When the fire was detected the alarm was immediately given, and the horn at the works blown for a length of time. People quickly hurried to the place, and in a short space of time a number of sets of hose were plying upon the burning building. The water seemed to have no effect upon the flames at first, but ultimately the firemen gained the upper hand,

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Belfast Telegraph - Tuesday, 9 February, 1904

Births

JONES -- February 4, at Erin, Bergville, Natal, the wife of Gervais Bolton Jones, M.B., of a son.

Deaths

ADAMS -- February 9th, at her late residence, 91 Templemore Street, Susan Adams. The remains of my dearly-beloved sister will be removed, for interment in Movilla, Newtownards, on to-morrow (Wednesday), at twelve o'clock noon. Friends will please accept this intimation.
RICHARDSON & SARAH DOUGLAS.

ALEXANDER -- February 7, at her residence, 60 Hopefield Avenue, Sarah, the dearly-beloved wife of George Alexander. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) morning, at half-past eleven o'clock.

BICKERSTAFF -- 8th February, 1904, at his residence, 9 Abbott Street, Nathaniel Bickerstaff. The remains of my dearly-beloved husband will be removed, for interment in Glenavy, on to-morrow (Wednesday) morning, at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
"Safe in the arms of Jesus."
ELIZABETH BICKERSTAFF.

BROWNE -- February 8th, at 83 Short Strand, Thomas, the dearly-beloved husband of Rose Browne, aged 51 years. -- R.I.P. His remains will be removed, for interment in Milltown Cemetery, on Thursday afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
ROSE BROWNE.

CAMPBELL -- February 7th, at her late residence, 90 Brookfield Street, Belfast, Jane Campbell. The remains of our dearly-beloved sister will be removed, for interment in the Milltown Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- R.I.P.
MARY ANN BRENNAN
CATHERINE CAMPBELL.

CHRISTIE -- On February 8th, at his parents' residence, 12 Charleville Street, William Clements, aged eleven months, the dearly-beloved son of William Clements and Jane Christie. His remains will be removed to the City Cemetery at half-past two o'clock on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
WILLIAM C. & JANE CHRISTIE.

COSH -- February 8th, at 30 Outram Street, Kathleen, dearly-beloved wife of Thomas Cosh. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
THOMAS COSH.

CROSSLEY -- February 8th, 1904, at the Belfast Union, Patrick Crossley (late of Crossnacreevy). His remains will be removed from above institution on this (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in the City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.
JAMES STEWART.

EDGAR -- February 8th, at his father's residence, 22 Enfield Street, Samuel Edgar, aged 10 years. The remains of our beloved son will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, at two o'clock on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
THOMAS & JANE EDGAR.

FALLOON -- February 6, 1904, at 2 Carleton Terrace, Ravenscroft Avenue, Belfast, Eliza, wife of John Falloon, formerly of Kilmore, Richhill. Her remains will be removed, for interment to City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock.

FOSTER -- February 9, at Balfour Street, Newtownards, Fred, the dearly-beloved son of George and Maggie Foster, aged 1 year and 2 months. His remains will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Movilla, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.

GREENE -- February 8, at 20 Dunville Street, Belfast, Elizabeth T. Greene. -- R.I.P. The remains of my beloved sister will be removed from above address, to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in Milltown Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.
ELLEN M. GREENE.

JOHNSTON -- February 9th, at 33 Hurst Street, William John Johnston. The remains of my dearly-beloved husband will be removed from his late residence, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Thursday afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.
CATHERINE JOHNSTON.

LYLE -- February 8th, at 7 Dagmar Street, Mary Jane (Minnie), eldest daughter of the late Samuel Lyle. Her remains will be removed, for interment in Killead Meeting-house Green, on to-morrow (Wednesday) morning, at eleven o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
VIOLET LYLE.

MALCOLM -- 8th February, 1904, at his mother's residence, 42 Shore Street, Holywood, Edward, second son of the late Robert Malcolm, aged 15 years and 6 months. His remains will be removed, for interment in Holywood Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) morning, at half-past nine o'clock.

MARSHALL -- February 8, at her residence, Bridge Terrace, 74 Templemore Avenue, after a short illness, Mary Ann, the beloved wife of John Marshall. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

MOORE -- February 8th, at her residence, 2 Kashmir Road, Mary, the beloved wife of John Moore. Her remains will be removed, for interment in Milltown Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock.
JOHN MOORE.

M'KEEN -- February 9, 1904, suddenly, at his residence, Seaview, Islandmagee, Hill M'Keen, J. P. His remains will be removed, for interment in Ballyprior Burying-ground, on Thursday afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.

QUIGLEY -- February 8th, at 56 Beersbridge Road, Jane Quigley. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
"Safe in the arms of Jesus."
JOHN TELFORD.

ROSS -- February 8th, at his residence, Carneal, Raloo, John Ross, aged 56 years The remains of my beloved husband will be removed, for interment in Loughmorne Graveyard, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
JANE B. ROSS.

SCOTT -- February 8, at Ballymacaramery, Saintfield, Jane, beloved wife of John Scott. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Saintfield Churchyard, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock.

SMITH -- February 8th, at her residence, 45 Beechfield Street, Janet, the dearly-beloved wife of John Smith. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
JOHN SMITH.

SPENCE -- February 8th, at her residence, 31 New North Queen Street, Margaret, the beloved wife of Thomas Spence. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
THOMAS SPENCE.

WATSON -- February 9th, at 25 Westland Street, Mary (Minnie), the beloved daughter of Lewis and Sarah Watson. Funeral notice in to-morrow's paper.
LEWIS WATSON.

WHITEMAN -- February 8, at his residence, 65 Avon Street, Archibald, the dearly-beloved husband of Mary Whiteman. His remains will be removed, for interment in Killinchy, on to-morrow (Wednesday) morning, at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
MARY WHITEMAN.

WYLIE -- February 9th 1904, at 49 M'Clure Street, Emma, the dearly-beloved daughter of Robert and Mary Wylie. Her remains will be removed for interment in the City Cemetery, on Thursday, 11th inst., at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
ROBERT WYLIE.

 

Deaths from page 5 continued on page 3

BRITISH ORDER OF ANCIENT FREE GARDENERS. ROSE OF DALRIADA LODGE, No. 288
MAGEE -- February 9th, at his father's residence, Baronscourt, Newtownstewart, County Tyrone, William Magee
ROBERT WAUGH, Worthy Master, ALEXANDER MILLAR, Secretary.

M'MURRAY -- February 8th, at his residence, Best's Row, Warrenpoint, James M'Murray. Interment on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, in family burial-ground, Clonallon, at one o'clock.

PEEL -- February 9th, 1904, at her residence, The Grove, Upper Ballinderry, Susanna Peel. The remains of my beloved wife will be removed, for interment in the Middle Church Burying-ground, on Thursday afternoon, at two o'clock, Friends will please accept this intimation.
MARK PEEL.

In Memoriam

COOK -- In fond and loving memory of Susan Mary Josephine, only and dearly-beloved daughter of Kate and Edward Cook, and granddaughter of the late Hugh Peak, Downpatrick, who departed this life the 9th of February, 1901, and was interred in the family burying-ground, Saul.
      She is gone, but not forgotten,
      Never shall her memory fade,
      Silent thoughts for ever linger
      Round the grave where she is laid.
Inserted by her loving Parents.

CROSSEY -- In sad and loving memory of my dear husband, George Crossey, who was killed by a fall in the Queen's Island on the 9th February, 1903, and was interred in Templecormick.
"Gone, but not forgotten."
Inserted by his sorrowing Wife and Family
ELIZABETH CROSSEY.
66 Dundee Street.

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REPORTED ANGLO-AMERICAN AGREEMENT.

Reuter's Washington correspondent telegraphs -- With reference to a report that Great Britain and the United States, in the event of Russia defeating Japan, would combine to insist on Russia recognising the sovereignty of China in Manchuria, failing which she would have to fight the two English-speaking nations, the officials of the State Department deny that any agreement of such a nature has been made by Great Britain and the United States. They point out hat it has been customary since the Russo-Turkish war for neutral Powers to confer at the conclusion of the war in order to assure the vanquished combatants against undue exactions. It is, therefore, within the range of possibilities that some kind of Conference will follow the present war should hostilities break out. The United States, however, has always held aloof from any combination in such cases, although its policy has been to work on parallel lines with other Powers in the cause of common good.

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ROYALTIES SUMMONED HOME.

(Reuter's Telegram.)

PARIS, Tuesday. -- The "Echo de Paris" states that a certain number of the Czar's relations and other Russian personages at present staying on the Riviera have just been recalled by telegraph to Russia. The paper adds that the friends of Prince Napoleon state that he has received no telegram from St. Petersburg asking him to hasten his preparations for departure, but that he is ready to leave at the first summons.

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CZAR'S SIGNIFICANT WORDS.

(Reuter's Telegram.)

ST. PETERSBURG, Tuesday. -- The Minister of the Interior has submitted to the Czar a resolution passed by the St. Petersburg Rural Council of the Government of Yaroslavl, and forwarded to him by telegraph, in which the Minister is requested to express to his Majesty the Council's feelings of enthusiasm at the rupture of diplomatic relations with Japan. The Czar made the following note on the report:-- "I thank you sincerely and cordially for your loyal sentiments, with which I am convinced all true Russians are now imbued."

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NO NEWS IN LONDON.

The Press Association learned upon inquiry at the Russian Embassy and Japanese Legation in London to-day that no news of the commencement of war had been received beyond that contained in the St. Petersburg telegram. While Russia is in direct communication with Port Arthur, the Japanese Government could not be officially apprised of their first success until one of the Japanese despatch boats was able to reach the nearest port. The Japanese Ministry in London has already received many congratulations.

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THE NEGOTIATIONS.

RUSSIAN OFFICIAL ACCOUNT.

(Reuter's Telegram.)

ST. PETERSBURG, Tuesday. -- An official communique was to-day published giving the Russian account of the negotiations which led to the rupture of diplomatic relations between Russia and Japan. The communication begins by stating that last year the Tokio Cabinet proposed to the Russian Government a revision of the existing treaties with Korea. The Russian Government assented to this proposal and charged Admiral Alex??eff to draw up a scheme for a new understanding with Japan. The communique proceeds to give a history of the negotiations which followed, and refers to the demands made by Japan, not only regarding Korea, but also Manchuria, demands to which Russia was unable to accede. At the same time, the Russian Government did not refuse to recognise, while the occupation of Manchuria lasted, the sovereignty of the Emperor of China or the privileges which the Powers had acquired there by treaties with China. In view of this, concludes the communique, the Imperial Government, while changing its representative at Tokio to present its reply to the last proposals of Japan, was justified in expecting that the Tokio Cabinet would take into account the considerations set forth above, and would appreciate the wish manifested by Russia to come to a peaceful understanding with Japan. Instead of this, the Japanese Government, without even awaiting this reply, decided to break off negotiations and to suspend diplomatic relations with Russia. The Imperial Government, while laying upon Japan the full responsibility for any consequences of such a course of action, will await the development of events, and the moment it becomes necessary will take the most decisive measures for the protection of its rights and interests in the Far East.

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WHERE THE MUSCOVITE IS HANDICAPPED.

(Press Association War Special.)

ST. PETERSBURG, Tuesday. -- In the case of disablement of Russian battleships there is only one dock at Port Arthur which can be utilised for repairs to modern battleships, although there are two large docks in the course of construction. The nearest point otherwise at which ships can be repaired is Vladivostok, where there are a large dock and small docks. To reach Vladivostok, however, a crippled ship would have to pass through the Strait of Korea which is practically commanded by Japan.

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EUROPE AND THE CONFLICT.

EFFECT ON THE BALKANS.

(Central News Telegram.)

FRANKFORT, Tuesday. -- The St. Petersburg correspondent of the "Frankfort Gazette" telegraphs an account of an interview with the representative of one of the leading Powers at St. Petersburg, who declared that the sudden rupture of friendly relations had surprised even the leading political circles in St. Petersburg. Japan's proceedings proved that it was not the contents of the Russian reply that caused the rupture, but the Japanese preparations for war which had gone so far that she could not draw back. The pressure of foreign influence was also partly responsible. In this connection British public opinion had much to answer for. As for the effect of the conflict on Europe there were symptoms that the Sultan, Bulgaria, and the Macedonians considered the time for carrying out their own programme unrestrained by Russian influence. Troubles in the Balkans, therefore, seemed probable, but it would depend upon the entente between Austria and Russia. Austria's loyalty could be absolutely relied on, and there was, therefore, no reason for direct apprehensions regarding the peace of Europe. It is believed that the interview was given by the French Ambassador.

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GERMAN OPTIMISTS ANNOYED.

(Central News Telegram.)

BERLIN, Tuesday. -- The German newspapers which have all along maintained that there would be a peaceful settlement now complain loudly that they have been misled by the attitude of the Government and the statements of the official Press.

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PRECAUTIONS AT PORT ARTHUR.

(Central News Telegram.)

PORT ARTHUR, Monday midnight. -- In consequence of the appearance of the Japanese torpedo boats before the harbour this afternoon, and the attack on the Russian vessels here, martial law has been declared.

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JAPANESE VERY ACTIVE.

(Central News Telegram.)

BERLIN, Tuesday. -- An official despatch from St. Petersburg says that at 1.45 yesterday afternoon a fleet of Japanese torpedo-boats attacked the Russian fleet at Port Arthur. Close upon midnight a large fleet of Japanese battleships and cruisers appeared before the Port.

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JAPAN PURCHASES CHILIAN WARSHIPS.

(Central News Telegram.)

ROME, Tuesday. -- A telegram received at the Chilian Legation here says that Japan has purchased the following Chilian warships: -- Capitao Prat, battleship, 6, 900 tons. 18.3 knots; Chacubuco, cruiser, 4,500 tons. 23 knots; and Almirante Condell, torpedo gunboat. The vessels leave at once for the seat of war, completely equipped with arms and provisions on board.

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THE FRANCO-RUSSIAN ALLIANCE.

(Central News Telegram.)

ROME, Tuesday. -- The Rome newspapers, commenting on the fact that Russia has entrusted her interest in Japan to the Austrian Minister, see in it a proof that Franco does not wish to become embroiled in the Far Eastern struggle, and to reshadow the end of the Franco-Russian Alliance.

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BEYOND MEDIATION.

Reuter's representative was informed this morning by Viscount Hayashi that he had just received a telegram announcing the departure of the Japanese fleet for the Yellow Sea. He had no news of the reported engagement and the damage to Russian warships. The Minister added that there is no other news, and he has heard nothing of the landing of the Japanese troops in Korea. With regard to the reported rumours concerning mediation, he said all mediation is too late, for negotiations have ceased.

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USE OF TORPEDO BOATS.

Reuter's Agency is informed that in the present war it is the intention of the Japanese to employ torpedo-boats to the fullest extent.

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ITALY'S INTERESTS LIMITED.

(Reuter's Telegram.)

ROME, Tuesday. -- Signor Tittorni, Italian Minister for Foreign Affairs, states in an interview that if hostilities are limited to Russia and Japan, they can have no direct consequence for Italy, since she has no interests in the Far East. In her efforts to secure peace Italy had been loyally associated with France, but the action of those Powers had not averted a rupture.

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STOCK MARKETS DEPRESSED.

London stock markets are again considerably depressed. Consols are five-sixteenths lower; Russian Fours have fallen one; and Japanese New Fives one-half.

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WAR ITEMS.

The Grand Duke Alexander of Russia, who had intended making a stay in Paris, will leave Cannes direct for St. Petersburg to-morrow. The Grand Duke Nicholas Michailovitch will probably leave for the Russian capital on Thursday. Inquiries made at St. Petersburg show that there is no foundation for the statement published in London that the Russian gunboat Mandjur is in dock at Nagasaki, and would probably be unable to leave before the commencement of hostilities.

The St. Petersburg Town Council has appointed a committee of four city councillors to present a loyal address to the Emperor on the occasion of the rupture of negotiations with Japan.

Yesterday evening the Czar, who was present at the opera in St. Petersburg, received an enthusiastic ovation from the public. The orchestra was called upon three times to play the National Anthem, which was received with a great outburst of cheering.

The Great Northern Telegraph Company has issued a notice this morning to the effect that the company's lines to Japan via Vladivostok will be closed to general traffic for the present.

Japanese circles in London are elated at what is considered a brilliant achievement by the country's navy. It is thought that the damage to the Russian vessels must be serious, otherwise the Russian admiral's telegram would have stated the damage to be slight.

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THIS DAY'S COMMERCIAL.

LONDON STOCK EXCHANGE.

"Belfast Evening Telegraph,"
City Office, 51 Cannon Street, E.C.

London, Monday Evening.

The Stock Markets, which opened lower all round, became more depressed in the afternoon on the considerable weakness of the foreign bourses. The political news took Paris and Berlin by surprise; these two bourses sold their specialities freely, and there was but little recovery at the finish. Consols, which fell to 86 11-16 recovered to 87, but closed 86 13-16 only, whilst Transvaal Threes are not better than 957/8. Russian Fours are about 4 lower at 92, and though Japanese rallied somewhat on bear covering, the last prices are 5 1/2 down at 78 for the Fives, and 67 for the Fours. There was no pressure to sell on home account, but prices were put down here by dealers to prevent sales. Berlin was responsible for the fall in Chinese and Argentines, where losses of from 2 to 5 are shown, while Paris sold Spanish Fours and Turkish Unified, both of which closed 3 1/2 down. As regards Kaffirs heavy sales were made by Paris. It is estimated that 10,000 De Beers were sold on French account, but they were absorbed here, and the big houses, though not supporting the market, took large lines of Kaffirs when they could be had at low prices. There was some bear covering, but the tendency late was dull. The general carrying-over rate was 6 to 7 per cent. on Kaffirs and Jungles, and 6 to 8 on West Australians, with lighter rates on Rand Mines, East Rands, Goldfields, and Boulders. A moderate fall in Trunks was due to bull sales. Americans were sold by the Continent, but New York took the stock offered by the arbitrage houses, and the close was steady.

London, Tuesday Morning.

CONTINENTAL SELLING OF KAFFIRS. -- WORST PROBABLY TRANSPIRED. -- BALTIMORE FIRE AND STEELS. -- POLITICAL NEWS AND STOCKS. -- FURTHER MARKED FALL UNEXPECTED. Referring to the Continental selling of Kaffirs, the "Financial Times" says -- "The general idea here is that the worst has probably transpired now, hence the disinclination to throw over holdings in the many sound companies up and down the lists.

The Baltimore fire is instanced by the "Times" as a reason for the strength of Steels.

The morning's political news leads one to expect early hostilities. We do not look for any further marked fall provided he settlement passes over well, for there must be still a fairly important bear account open, though many bears climbed in yesterday.

In view, however, of the political and market uncertainties it is impossible to feel bullish.

London, 2.30.

The stock markets are again in a bad way, except for the bears. Repurchases on yesterday's fall have been more than off-set by renewed selling. The main reason is the political situation, or rather, we must now say, the war, for news is of a Japanese attack upon Russian battleship. There is no exception to the general fall, and the feeling in the Kaffir market is especially despondent, owing to the postponement of further steps to introduce Chinese labour at the request of the home Government. Consols have been sold at 86 for cash, and are quoted 86 1/4 for account. Russian are 3 lower, at 89. Chinese and Japanese are 1 1/2 lower, and several other foreign stocks have fallen 1/2 to 1, including Tintos at but little over 46. Bulgarians are 3 down. Americans opened weak, and have further given way: and Trunks are flat at 12 1/2 and 38 1/4 for Ordinary and Thirds. Rather cheaper bankers' money at 3 1/4 to 3 1/2 has, of course, had no effect. Contango rates on foreign stocks seem stiffer than last time. The Rio exchange is quoted 12 1/8 only. Valparaiso quotes 16 1/2.

FLUCTUATIONS

The following are fluctuations between opening and closing prices: --

11-0 -- Markets all flat. Chilian 4 1/2 Per Cent. 80. Russian 4 Per Cent. 92. Japanese 5 Per Cent. 78. Japanese 4 Per Cent. 67. Chinese 7 Per Cent. Silver 84. Chinese 5 Per Cent. Gold 951/2. Chinese 4 1/2 Per Cent. Gold 86. Chinese 5 Per Cent. Imperial Railway 84. National War Loan 97. Local Loans 97 1/2. Transvaal New 3 Per Cent. 96. Rand Mines 8 5/8. East Rands 6. Chartereds 38s 1 1/2d. Goldfields 5 19-32. Chesapeakes 32 1/8. Milwaukees 143 3/8. Illinois Central 130 7/8. Louisvilles 106. Missouri Pacific 90 3/4. New York Central 118 7/8. The Canadian Pacific dividend is 3 per cent., making 6 per cent. for the year, with 2,751,783 dollars carried forward.

11-35 -- South Africans flat. Goldfields 5 7/16. Rand Mines 8 1/2. Russians 90. Japanese 4 Per Cent. 66 Reuter cables -- Three Russian boats destroyed.

11-40 -- Consols 86 1/2. Trunk Ordinary 12 5/8. Trunk Third 38 5/8. Atchison 68 5/8. Canada Pacific 118 3/8. Denver 20 1/8. Erie 26 1/8, Missouri 16 1/2. Reading 21 1/4. Southern 20 1/2. Southern Pacific 46 3/8. Union Pacific 78 1/8. South Eastern A. 48 1/2. North British Deferred 39 1/2. Caledonian Deferred 27 3/8, Midland Deferred 63 1/4, Great Northern Deferred 36 1/4. East Rands 5 7/8. Goldfields 5 7/16. Johannesburg 47s 6d. Rio Tintos 46. Spanish 4 Per Cent. Bonds 81. Argentine Recisions 73 1/2.

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COMMERCIAL & FINANCIAL NOTES.

BELFAST BOTTLE EXCHANGE, LIMITED.

The fifth annual meeting of this company was held in the registered office, 10 Arthur Chambers, Belfast. Mr. James S. Corry (president) presided, and there were also present -- Messrs. Wm. Hall (Belfast Mineral Water Co., Ltd.), Fred Wheeler (Wheeler & Co., Ltd.), J Patterson (City Mineral Water Co.), John Currie, R. H. Kinahan (Lyle & Kinahan, Ltd.), C. Boden, Newry; F. Bell (Ulster Bottling Co.), H.Lancashire, Ballymena; Wm. Rankin (Millin & Rankin), George S. Wilson, Ballymena, and John M'Connell, secretary. The annual report contained the following: -- During the year two new members joined the exchange, and one firm became subscribers. The total volume of business at the clearing-house has been somewhat smaller than in previous years. The arrangements by which members' vans are loaded and unloaded at the clearing-house by the staff has given general satisfaction. Your council decided to open a branch store in Newry at the beginning of June as an experiment. The amount of business done there has been limited, but the branch has proved a great convenience to members residing in the district. The General Dealers' (Ireland) Act, which came into force at 1st. January, 1904, will doubtless prove beneficial to manufacturers and bottlers, as it will to a large extent prevent their property falling into the hands of hawkers and dealers. The majority of the respectable Belfast marine dealers having resolved to discontinue buying lettered bottles, your council have arranged to purchase their present stocks. During the year proceedings were taken by Chancery writ against 37 offenders. Although the earnings of the clearing-house have not covered all expenses as heretofore, your council are quite satisfied with the result, as the accumulated surplus stands at a high figure. The president moved the adoption of the report and statement of accounts. Having dealt with the different matters in the report he congratulated the members on the continued prosperity of the exchange. Mr. Hall seconded. Mr. Wheeler and others having spoken, the report was unanimously adopted. The retiring members of council -- Messrs. R. J. Evans, H. Lancashire, and Joseph M'Ginley -- were re-elected, and Messrs. Thomas Henderson & Co., C.A., were re-elected auditors. A unanimous vote of thanks was accorded to the president.

According to "Kemp's Mercantile Gazette," the number of failures recorded in Ireland during the week ending 6th February, was 14, viz.: -- New bankruptcy proceedings published in the "Dublin Gazette," 6: deeds of arrangement filed at the Bills of Sale Office, 8. The number of bills of sale published in Ireland for the same week was 5. The number of bonds and judgments published for the same week was 50, of which 18 were against traders, and 32 against farmers and non-traders. The mortgages and charges (debentures) registered by limited companies in Ireland during the past week amounted to £19,050, by way of addition to £4,200 previously issued by the same companies.

The following gold mining productions are announced for January; -- Crown Deep, 7, 816 ozs.; Durban Deep, 3848 ozs.; Glencairn Main-reef 3,362 ozs.; Glen Deep, 5,527 ozs.; New Primrose, 6, 643 ozs.; Reltfontein A. 3,345 ozs.; Rose Deep, 7,393 ozs.; New Unified, 3253 ozs.; Langlaegle Deep, 5,476 ozs.; Lake View Console, 4,120 ozs.; Gloden Horseshoe, 17, 604 ozs.; Sutherland Reef, 946 ozs.; Ferraira Deep, 6,647 ozs.; Goldenhuls Deep, 9, 992 ozs.; May Consolidated, 4,649.; Nourse Deep, 5,564.; Hitcha, 2,628 ozs.; Hannins Roward, 412 ozs.

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THE UNEMPLOYED.

FREE BREAKFASTS IN BALLYMACARRETT.

SALVATION ARMY'S NOBLE WORK.

HUNDREDS OF STARVING CHILDREN.

(By our Special Commissioner.)

The Salvation Army (No. 2 Corps) are doing a very practical and disinterested work in Ballymacarrett.

I visited the Chadolly Street Hall at half-past eight o'clock this morning. The air was raw and chilly, and there was a quarter of an hour to wait before the doors were opened, but already there were scores of women and children, the latter mostly bare-footed, waiting outside, perishing with cold and hunger. The little crowd swelled by degrees, and when admittance was given they scrambled up the stairs impetuously, armed with the mugs that were handed to them at the door, and, with a thick slice of dry bread in one hand and a mug of steaming tea in the other, speedily settled down to a meal which they ate with evident relish.

They ate ravenously. Soon a lot of them wanted more, and they got it. The poverty of the fare was atoned for somewhat by its plenteousness. Poor things! It was for some their only meal for the day, and they meant to make the best of it.

"No," said Captain Ferguson, under whose superintendence and his wife's the free breakfasts are conducted, "they do not all belong to Ballymacarrett. We get them from all parts, but we don't turn any away. See those three boys. They have come all the way from Shankill Road."

I spoke to the lads.

The first told me that his father had been out of work three months. His occupation is that of a "rover" at a mill. The lad has a mother, and his only brother is in the 5th Royal Irish Lancers. He will be fourteen years of age next November, and says he is about to look for work himself. The last he had to eat was at dinner-time yesterday, when his mother sent out for "twopence of stale" and a little tea.

The next little fellow said his father and mother were alive. The former is a moulder, but has been unable to get employment for eighteen months, with the exception of earning an odd shilling at the quay. The boy has two brothers, one in the Navy, the other bringing in 8s per week. As for himself, he gathers cinders about the brickyards to make a fire. Out of the 8s earned by his brother, 2s 3d goes in rent. Apart from the free breakfast, the boy's meals are a "drop of broth" at mid-day and a "supper" of dry bread and tea at six o'clock.

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DISCUSSION AT BELFAST GUARDIANS.

LETTERS FROM LOCAL GOVERNMENT BOARD.

There was a discussion on the unemployed question at he weekly meeting of the Belfast Board of Guardians to-day, following the reading of the following letter: --

Local Government, 8th February. -- Sir -- The Local Government Board for Ireland have before them the minutes of the proceedings of the Board of Guardians of Belfast Union on 2nd inst., containing an entry to the effect that large numbers of the labouring classes have recently migrated to Belfast from other parts of Ireland in search of employment, and that as there is a scarcity of work in the district, an increase of destitution has taken place. The Board are of opinion that a circular letter addressed by the Guardians to the other Unions in Ireland on this subject would, under the circumstances, be the most desirable means of giving publicity to the Guardians' views. -- I am, sir, your obedient servant, J. W. Barlas, assistant secretary. -- The Clerk, Belfast Union.

Mr. Cherry observed that they should take some notice of the letter. The ratepayers of Belfast were keeping the majority of the people up in the South and West of Ireland, and he did not see, when the local Government Board were doing their level best to close workhouses in several parts of the country, the ratepayers should do so. They had an enormous number of poor people coming to Belfast from the South and West, and it was hardly fair that the ratepayers of Belfast were to be burdened with almost the whole of Ireland, who were settling down there. (Laughter.) The ratepayers ought to be protected against this system, and the Guardians should have powers to send these people back to the unions they came from. The sooner they took steps to stop this sending down of the poor from several unions in Ireland to Belfast the better.

Mr. O'Hare, as a member of the Admission Committee, gave a flat contradiction to the statement that the majority coming there were from the South and West. The other members of the committee would bear him out in that, and he wished to tell Mr. Cherry that his statements were purely imaginative, and the creations of his brain. By far the greater number of the people coming there were men from the city out of work, notably men from Queen's Island, and a very large number of them were Scotchmen.

Mr. Walker said he knew of nothing more calculated to do a grave injury to a general relief movement than the statements of Mr. Cherry.

Hundreds had applied to him, and he had personally investigated eighty cases, and in every instance the parties had lived ten years in the city. The people seeking relief were not habitual tramps or casuals who had come into the city, drawn by the hope of being relieved without working, but were men who had been compelled through lack of work to seek for means to keep body and soul together other than by coming to the Workhouse. He moved that no action be taken on the letter.

Mr. M'Donnell, in seconding, characterised Mr. Cherry's statements as untrue.

Mr. Cherry -- Question.

The Chairman -- Are you agreed that we take no action in the matter?

Mr. Cherry -- I wish to move that we be furnished with a return of the admissions for the last six months.

The Chairman -- That is not before the Board.

Mr. Walker's resolution was passed.

THE RELIEF SHELTERS.

The Chairman said there was another letter from the Local Government Board, who had written sanctioning the proposed arrangement for providing temporary accommodation for casual paupers but they thought it would be most desirable that a labour test should be established in connection with the relief thus afforded.

The Chairman said the arrangement was that the relief in the markets should be a week, which ended to-day, and the master was to report, and he had done so.

The Master's report was read, and from it it appeared that there had been a gradual increase in the number relieved in the shelter, last night's figures being 38.

Mr. Walker asked had the men who went to the shelter previously been admitted to the workhouse.

The Master said he had a return made for three successive nights, and found that there had only been one man out of all the number in the workhouse previously. Mr. Walker said the labour test suggested by the Local Government Board would make the men perpetual paupers. Any attempt on the part of the Guardians to compel them to break stones or pick oakum would deprive them of being able to finish in time to look for work at the quays, which was generally to be got at six o'clock in the morning. He begged to move that the communication of the Local Government Board be marked "read."

Mr. M'Donnell seconded.

Mr. Macarthur said that the labour test would defeat the object the Guardians had in view. He spoke highly of the manner in which the Lord Mayor and the Corporation had acted in the matter.

Mr. Walker added to his resolution that the shelter be continued for another week, the Master to report again.

Mr. Boyd seconded.

The Chairman agreed with the resolution, and said it continued from week to week tilll it was unnecessary.

The resolution was then agreed to.

It was intimated that there were now 3,572 inmates in the house, against 3,475 on the corresponding date last year.

PROPOSED BENEFIT CONCERT.

Further contributions to the City Relief Fund arrived at the Town Hall to-day, and the distribution of small sums to distressed families is proceeding as usual.

The benefit concert in aid of the fund which Herr Koerber, a Court violinist of marked ability, is kindly organising, will be held at the Ulster Hall on Tuesday, 23rd inst. The event, which promises to be a most successful one, will be under the patronage of the Marquis and Marchioness of Londonderry, the Earl and Countess of Shaftesbury, the Earl and Countess Annesley, the Earl and Countess of Kilmorey, and the Lord Mayor and Lady Jaffe. In addition to Herr Koerber, the following well-known artistes will appear: -- Professors Herr Joachim and Herr Angless, who are coming specially from London to give their services gratuitously; Miss Lola Johnston, Miss Warwick, Mr. E. M'Elroy, Mr. Sylvester Smith, and Mr. Lifford.

The tickets are already in large demand. They may be obtained at the leading music-shops in the city, or from Mr. Campbell at Jennymount Mills.

ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP AND THE DISTRESS.

We understand that the president of the Particular Council, Society of St. Vincent de Paul, has received a letter from Most Rev. Dr. Henry (Roman Catholic Bishop of Down and Connor), in which his Lordship says -- " As I understand that a large number of deserving working men are at present out of employment without any fault of theirs, I enclose you a cheque for £50 to be devoted to the relief of the most deserving cases in the judgment of the Council of the St. Vincent de Paul Society."

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

THE BALLYMACARRETT TRAGEDY.

MAGISTERIAL INVESTIGATION.

WILSON RETURNED FOR TRIAL.

This morning, in the Belfast Custody Court, before Mr. Garrett Nagle, R.M., the lad, Richd. J. Wilson, St. Leonard Street, was charged on remand with the manslaughter of John Curran, a fellow-employe, at Anderson's Felt Works, Short Strand, who died in the Mater Hospital a few days after receiving injuries, as alleged, at the hands of the prisoner, by, it is stated, his throwing an iron instrument at Curran in the course of a quarrel.

Mr. D. F. Spiller prosecuted, and Mr. John S. Osborne again defended. The deposition of the lad Robert Hutton, employed at the Felt Works, already taken, was read by the Clerk.

DR. MULHOLLAND'S EVIDENCE.

Dr. Hugh Mulholland, 17 College Square North, said he was one of the visiting surgeons at the Mater Hospital. On Monday last, 1st February, in the evening he was called by telephone to the hospital. He there saw a young man named Curran, aged about 22 years, in an unconscious state.

Deceased's mother at this stage came forward and said -- No, my boy was buried on his twentieth birthday. He was not twenty-two.

The doctor continued his evidence, stating that there was a bandage on Curran's forehead. On removing the bandage he found a lacerated wound about an inch and a half long and one inch above the left eye. The wound was in a septic condition. On examining the patient he had no difficulty in coming to the conclusion that he was suffering from acute meningitis, and, although the case was practically hopeless, the only chance lay in immediate operation. He operated, and in cutting down he found a compound depressed fracture of the frontal bone, about three-quarters of an inch in length and about one inch above the left eyebrow. He elevated the depressed bone, and removed the pressure from the brain, but the patient never rallied, and died next day at about one o'clock. He was a young man obviously of a healthy constitution. The cause of death was exhaustion following acute meningitis as a result of a compound depressed fracture of the frontal bone. A blow from a piece of iron such as was produced would cause a fracture like what he had described.

To Mr. Osborne -- He did not see the boy until the Monday evening, and the accident, he was told, occurred on the Friday. He heard Dr. Munn state at the inquest that whenever he saw the boy on Friday he reccomended his removal to hospital. Witness believed that if he had been removed to hospital immediately after the accident, his chances of recovery would have been greater.

Mr. Osborne said Dr. Mulholland was not the doctor who had seen the boy first. He did not know whether the Crown were going to produce Dr. Munn. He thought it would be desirable in the interests of the prisoner that he should be produced.

Mr. Nagle -- There's nothing to prevent it.

Mr. Osborne -- Unless to save the British Treasury expense.

Mr. Nagle -- I don't know about that.

Mr. Spiller -- If your Worship direct it, we will have him produced. Of course, he will be produced at the Assizes. At the present time it is unnecessary expense.

Mr. Osborne -- If he is not examined here he will not be produced at the Assizes.

Mr. Spiller -- That is not so.

Mr. Osborne said that if District-Inspector Smith would send a statement of Dr. Munn's evidence to the Crown Prosecutor at the Assizes, he would not want him here to-day

Mr. Smith -- I'll have pleasure in doing so.

Henry Hayes, Scotch Row, said he was a roller-boy in the Short Strand felt works. He remembered Friday, 29th January, and was working in the same mill as Curran was working. Robert Hutton was not working there, but came in and began to speak to witness. While so engaged, prisoner also came into the room. Wilson was feeling the edge of the felt at witness's machine, when Curran told him to go into his own mill. Wilson refused, and Curran lifted a bucket of water, and threw it about him. Wilson lifted a piece of brass, and threatened to strike Curran, but did not do so. Wilson returned to his own mill, and Curran followed him. Wilson called Curran an objectionable name, and Curran struck him on the face twice. Wilson then ran to the back of his machine, and as Curran was going into his own mill, threw the piece of iron (produced), and struck the deceased on the forehead. He almost fell, and Hutton caught him and brought him to the mechanic shop. He was afterwards sent to the doctor's. Witness subsequently lifted the piece of iron that Wilson had thrown and gave it to the manager, Mr. Oger. As far as witness knew, Curran and Wilson had been on friendly terms up to the time of this occurrence.

Cross-examined by Mr. Osborne -- It was after the water had been thrown that he called the name. He did not see Curran "guzzle" Wilson, but heard that he did so.

ASSISTANT MANAGER EXAMINED.

Mr. Francis John Oger, assistant manager at the Felt Works, said that on the morning of Friday, 29th January last, from information received, he went towards the mechanic shop. He saw Curran standing with a handkerchief up to his head. He sent him with William Murphy to Dr. Munn's. The boy handed him the piece of iron produced, which he afterwards handed to Head Constable M'Keown. Wilson had been eleven months at the Felt Works, Curran had been twelve months.

To Mr. Osborne -- He had always found prisoner a quiet and obedient lad.

William Murphy said he accompanied Curran to Dr. Munn's, and afterwards left him part of the way home. At twenty minutes later at breakfast time, he saw Curran standing in the street against a railing.

Mrs. Curran, 20 Moira Street, mother of the deceased, was also examined.

Mr. Osborne -- I have no question to ask this witness. I have only to convey to her my deep sympathy, on my own behalf, and on behalf of the boy and his people, and to say that we deeply regret the sad occurrence.

Witness -- I am sure of that, sir.

Prisoner was then returned for trial to the Assizes, and bail was allowed in the sum of £10 and two surities of £5 each.

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BELFAST RECORDER'S COURT.

CIVIL BUSINESS.

The Civil business at the Belfast Recorder's Court was entered upon to-day, by his Honour Judge Fitzgibbon, K.C., sitting in the Crown Court of the County Courthouse, Belfast. Mr. H. M. Crawford, registrar, was in attendance. A large number of undefended civil bill cases were disposed of in the forenoon.

BELL v. GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY.

This was an action brought by William Bell, cattle dealer, Belfast, against the Great Northern Railway Co. to recover £22 10s damages for the loss of a bullock, caused by alleged negligence on the part of the railway company during the carriage of the animal from Dublin to Belfast, on November 26 last.

Mr. George H. Smith, B. L. (instructed by Mr. M'Cormick), was for the plaintiff, and Mr. J. M. Whitaker, B. L. (instructed by Mr. Young), was for the railway company.

After hearing evidence, his Honour said there was no evidence that the death of the animal was brought about by the gross neglect of the company. The railway company had done all that was right and proper from evidence before him, and he would dismiss the case.

BROWN v. BARR.
MR. DEVLIN'S RETURN FROM AMERICA -- A SEQUEL.

This was an action by James Brown, trading as Brown & Co., 200 North Street, Belfast, chemists, against Hugg Barr, trading as H. Barr & Co., 96 Millfield, marine dealer, to recover £11 14s 9d, damages for that the defendant, by his workmen and servants, so carelessly and negligently drove a horse and van that same backed into plaintiff's shop window, breaking and destroying same and destroying and damaging goods in the window.

Mr. David M'Gonigal (for Mr. Thomas Barkley) appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. J. M. Whitaker, B. L. (instructed by Mr. Glass) for the defendants.

Plaintiff gave evidence as to the damage done to his property, and Constable West said the van of Messrs. Barr was being driven by a boy of about seventeen years at the time. It was about June last that the accident occurred.

Mr. Whitaker said their case was that the affair was a pure and inevitable accident. It was a night that some patriotic gentleman had returned to the city, and there were great crowds and bands out. The van was being driven quietly and peaceably, when a crowd rushed out of Millfield. The crowd cheered, and the horse shied and backed in the direction of the shop, and through the window.

Witnesses in support of the defendant were examined, stating that the accident took place on the night that Mr. Devlin returned to Belfast from the United States.

Mr. Keenan, North Street, cross-examined by Mr. M'Gonigal.

Upon this evening Home Rule was in the ascendant? -- Mr. Devlin was in the wrong place if he came to Belfast for that anyway. (Laughter.)

His Honour said there was a great deal of excitement, and the horse got nervous and became excited. The driver appeared to him to have got into much the same position. He got down and went to the horse's head. What was the effect of getting off? He got off to conhead, but the horse was jumping about and doing just as it liked, while the driver was getting off. If the driver had kept his seat he would have had control of the animal, and could have prevented him going wrong. It appeared to him that he brought about the accident by his own act. He would give a decree for £9 17s 6d.

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THE RE-VALUATION LISTS.

INSPECTION AT THE TOWN HALL.

AMOUNT OF THE REDUCTIONS.

GREAT DISAPPOINTMENT.

To-day the appeal lists in connection with what is know as the "quashed valuation" of the city were open for inspection in the City Accountant's Department at the Town Hall, and Mr. C. E. Dyer and his staff were extremely busy between the hours of ten and four giving information to the 7,023 persons who had appealed from the valuation of the city which caused such a sensation in business circles three years ago. The Commissioner of Valuation informs us neither the appeal list nor the re-valuation list which it amends will come into force for rating purposes before March, 1905. It will be recollected that the revaulation of the city was made during the years 1900 and 1901, and comprised some 86,000 items. The work was done, according to Mr. Barton, by experienced valuers and surveyors of the Irish Valuation Department, most of whom had been valuing Belfast for many years. Though the work was carried out under the direct supervision of the Commissioner of Valuation, who laid down the principles on which each class of property was to be valued, the Commissioner did not himself fix the amount of the individual valuations, this being left entirely to the judgment and experience of the valuers employed. Such a procedure was not only desirable but necessary, as the first appeal is to the Commissioner of Valuation himself, in accordance with the provisions of the statute. The appeal list now lodged deals with all the first appeals, each of which has been determined by the Commissioner. Before deciding any case he had a re-examination of the premises made by one or two experienced valuers who were not employed in making the original valuation. These officers checked all the details of the former valuation, saw the appellant or his representative, and reported to the Commissioner as to whether they considered the valuation was fair or should be amended. When dealing with the appeals the commissioners took into consideration: -- (a) The manner in which the original valuation was made, with details of same. (b) The views of the appellant, and (c) The report of the appeal valuer or valuers. Further, he had interviews with many of the principal business associations and citizens of Belfast, who put before their views as to the existing condition of the leading industries of the city and the letting value of property in it. Amongst these were the Millowners' Association, the Ratepayers' Association, the Water Commissioners, &c. Where necessary the Commissioner personally inspected the premises. It will be noted in the appeal lists that he has made considerable reductions in many cases. The necessity for this arose chiefly from the fact that just after the original valuations were made in 1900, the value of certain classes of house and other rateable property fell considerably, chiefly in consequence of a depression in many of the leading industries in the city, a depression which unfortunately still continues. Owing to the Belfast Valuation Act, of 1901, the issue of the appeal lists has been delayed considerably. As a result, many changes have taken place since the rexaluation was made in the property comprised in the revaluation and the appeal lists, some of which changes have been dealt with in the annual revision lists issued in 1902-3-4. These changes are not shown in the lists now issued, a the Commissioner is obliged when settling these appeals to deal with the property in each case as it stood when appealed against, and he has no power to take cognisance of changes which have occurred since. In order to prevent any injustice being done in those cases where a structural or other change had occurred, in the property valued, he will, before the revaluation comes into force for rating purposes, issue a revision list which will deal with all the cases already appearing in the annual revision lists since 1901, and also those brought before him in the prescribed manner prior to the coming into force of the revaluation. The revaluation list, as amended by the appeal list and this revision list, will be that used for rating purposes, and it is to be hoped that it will be recognised generally as fairly determining the just proportion which each ratepayer should pay towards the local rates of the city. Any of those whose names appear on the appeal list who are dissatisfied with the decisions given can appeal to quarter sessions provided notice is given within 21 days to the secretary of the County Borough Council (Sir Samuel Balck) in accordance with the provisions of sec. 22, 15 and 16 Vic. Cap 63. Information as to the appeal or the revision lists can be obtained during the next few weeks by applying at the valuation Office, Scottish Provident Buildings, Wellington Place, between the hours of 10 and 4.

THE REDUCTIONS.

An inspection of the appeal lists discloses the fact that the reductions upon the revaluation of 1901 range in the city from 10 to 20 per cent., and average in the case of the large residences in the suburbs 20 per cent. The valuation of a Privy Councillor is reduced from £515 to £445, and of a baronet from £520 to £410. As regards special valuations there is no reduction in that of the Water Commissioners or the City Electric Mains, but the Tramways Company have had a significant drop from £10,750 to £7,624. The Theatre Royal has been reduced from £990 to £700.

With regard to the general reductions on appeal the following cases in Donegall Place, Royal Avenue, and central thoroughfares may be taken as fair examples: -- £690 to £600, £580 to £520, £410 to £350, £420 to £380, £270 to £225, £820 to £800, £1,160 to £1,100, £600 to £590, £1,550 to £1450, £1,150 to £850, £195 to £170, £880 to £800, £260 to £200, £755 to £700.

With regard to the licensed trade it is interesting to not the following changes: -- 1901 -- £300; revaluation, £820; appeal revision, £800. 1901 -- £40, revaluation, £110; appeal revision, £90. 1901 -- £55, revaluation £230; appeal revision, £195. 1901 -- £50; revaluation £140; appeal revision, £120. Lisburn Road house, revaluation, £170; appeal revision, £120; Shankill Road, revaluation £205; appeal revision £140; Cromac Street, revaluation £180; appeal revision, £130; Moore's Place, revaluation £52; appeal revision £30; Great Victoria Street, revaluation £340; appeal revision, £300. In some cases there has been no change.

The licensed traders are not only dissatisfied with the result of the appeals, but state that they will prosecute the appeals to the Quarter Sessions, and, if necessary, go to the King's Bench, as they have a right to do so on points of law. The revised valuation means to them an enormous increase upon the existing valuation, and they are surprised that the appeal results should have been published at the present time before the general question of the revaluation of Ireland has been provided for by Act of Parliament. They point out that the method of valuation in England is not a fair criterion of what should be done here. In England, where there are many tied houses, the brewer frequently lets his premises to the occupant at a figure which may only represent about one-sixth of the actual letting value, and accordingly rent is no criterion there. The licence duty is simply added to the rates, whereas in Belfast the landlord exacts every penny of rent he can get for the public-house. The contention here is that nothing but the landlord's interest should be taxed. Mr. Barton's method has been to take a public-house as a shop and value it at that, and then to take into consideration the sum that one tenant pays to another (i.e., good-will), divide that into two, and add four per cent. to the original valuation. This is not regarded as equitable, and it is upon this point that the revaluation will be tested, if necessary, in the Superior Courts. The matter was considered at a special meeting of the Belfast and Ulster Licensed Vintners' Association this afternoon. Combined action will no doubt be taken.

With regard to small house property, there is practically no change in the appeal lists, as few appeals were lodged; while in the houses which may be described as "villadom" there are reductions varying from £1 to £5. In a few cases there has been an increase.

It may be added that the total of the suspended revaluation of the city was £1,463,045 7s 0d, but it is impossible to say what the appeal total is, as we are informed it will not be calculated until appeals to the Quarter Sessions are heard. Appeals may be served immediately; and within five days after notice of appeal is given to the Town Clerk the person appealing must enter into a recognisance in the sum of £5 before a Justice of the Peace, and give sufficient securities that he or she will prosecute such appeal at the Quarter Sessions of the Peace, "and abide the order of and pay such costs as shall be awarded by the Court at such sessions; and within three days after such recognisance shall have been entered into, the magistrate before whom such recognisance shall have been entered, or Clerk of the Petty Sessions, shall send the same by post, or shall forward the same to the office of the Clerk of the Peace for the respective county or place, there to remain on record, and open for public inspection without payment of any fees."

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GAS POISONING IN BELFAST.

FATAL RESULT.

This morning Mrs. Cordner, aged 50, caretaker of the suite of offices, 135 Donegall Street, Belfast, was removed to the Mater Imformorum Hospital, Crumlin Road, suffering from the effects of gas poisoning, to which she succumbed a quarter of an hour after her admission to the institution. It appears that a Mr. Savage, on calling at the place this morning, had his attention attracted by a strong smell of gas, which seemed to proceed from the direction of the caretaker's room. The door of the apartment was closed, and, alarmed by this circumstance, Mr. Savage informed a policeman on duty in the vicinity. They forced the door, and discovered deceased lying fully dressed on a bed in the room. She was unconscious and aparently in a very critical condition. Word was conveyed to the Fire Brigade Station, and an ambulance was promptly on the scene, in which deceased was removed to hospital. Dr. Maguire tried artificial respiration, but without avail, death ensuing, as stated.

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CLERKSHIP OF BELFAST UNION

APPOINTMENT TO-DAY.

MR. J. W. ROBB ELECTED.

The appointment of Clerk of Belfast Union in room of Mr. J. C. Neeson, resigned, was decided this afternoon at the weekly meeting of the Guardians in the Workhouse. There were four candidates: -- Mr. J. W. Robb, assistant clerk, who has been 25 years in the service of the Board; Mr. Thomas M'Watt, Clerk of Wallasey Urban District Urban Council; Mr. W. H. Gourley, Mountpottinger, and Mr. David S. Thomson, Manchester.

Messrs. Robb and Gourley were the only candidates present, and an their being sent for.

Mr. O'Hare, amid laughter, asked Mr. Robb was he at present in the employment of the Guardians.

Mr. Robb -- I am.

The candidates having retired.

Mr. M'Donnell moved the election of Mr. Robb.

Mr. Rainey and Mr. Cherry seconded the resolution simultaneously.

The appointment of Mr. Robb was warmly supported by several Guardians, and the resolution was passed unanimously.

Mr. Robb having re-entered the Boardroom,

The Chairman said it gave him great pleasure to inform him that the Board were unanimous in appointing him. (Applause.) Having known Mr. Robb for the last ten years, he was sure that every member of the Board would find as he had found in the past that in appointing him their confidence would not be misplaced. During those years he had found that Mr. Robb was always at his duties, and when any young member of the Board went to him for information on rules and regulations Mr. Robb was always able to answer them, having the matter on his finger tips. Knowing that of him, they could not see their way to place their love on anyone else. (Hear, hear.) Therefore they had unanimously agreed to appoint him as their chief clerk. (Applause.)

Mr.Robb returned thanks. He said he was sincerely grateful for their continued confidence. Since he had come there a quarter of a century ago he had received nothing but kindness from the successive Boards under which he had had the honour of serving. They had given him all the promotion they could, and it had remained for them to place him in the highest position in their power. He was very grateful for their kindness. (Applause.)

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BELFAST CONSERVATIVE ASSOCIATION.

ST. GEORGE'S WARD.

WATER BOARD VACANCY.

A meeting of the General committee of St. George's Ward was held last evening in the offices of the association, Wellington Place, for the purpose of selecting a candidate to fill the vacancy caused on the Water Board by the retirement of Mr. Andrew Mitchell. Mr. John Boyd presided, and there was a good attendance.

Mr. Mitchell wrote thanking the electors for their confidence in him for such a long time.

The Executive Committee unanimously recommended Mr. W. T. Braithwaite, and when he entered the room he was accorded a very hearty reception. In thanking the committee to rselecting him, he said he had resided all his life in St. George's Ward, and, therefore, claimed to have some knowledge of the wants and wishes of the people. Being something of a sportsman, his tastes in that direction had led him a good deal over the country, and he knew a good deal about the district of the Silent Valley, which contained the reservoir where most of the water which supplied Belfast would in future be drawn from, as well as the district through which the water flowed on its way to the city. He believed the Commissioners had been doing all they could to ensure not only a good, but also a pure, supply of water, and if returned to the Board be promised to second all their efforts in that direction. A good deal would likely be made out of the fact that he was engaged in the spirit business, but although that was so he was as strongly in favour of temperance as any man. He could never have attained the proficiency he had as a marksman if he had not been a temperate man. (Applause.) He again thanked the committee, and hoped with their assistance to represent St. George's Ward as a Water Commissioner. (Applause.)

The thanks of the Committee were accorded Mr. Mitchell for his long and valuable services, on the motion of Mr. John M'Call, seconded by Mr. Samuel Daley, after which the proceedings terminated.

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CORPORATION COMMITTEES

The Improvement Committee met to-day under the presidency of Councillor Robert Thompson, the other members present being -- Aldermen Dr. Bailie, Hugh Bell, and Samuel Lawther, D. L.: Councillors John Alexander, Vincent Craig, C. E.: Robert Dunlop, Wm. Macartney, J. J. M'Donnell, J. P.; James M'Entee, Brice M'Ilroy, and John S. Shaw, J. P. The surveyor reported that the footways in Springfield Avenue have been completed in accordance with the committee's instruction, and it was decided to recommend the works to the Council for adoption. The sub-committee appointed at last meeting to report on the necessity for crossings in Agincourt Avenue recommended that a crossing be formed at Carmel Street, and this was agreed to. The surveyor reported on the complaint of Alderman Bell as to condition of the footway between M'Clure Street and Cameron Street, and he was instructed to have same cindered up and repaired. The Town Clerk reported that he had received 63 applications for the position of caretaker, Town Hall, and on the consideration of the list several votes were taken, and John Cowzer, caretaker Free Public Library, was appointed. Councillor J. J. M'Donnell reported that he had interviewed Mr. Richard Crudden, who had consented to give the necessary ground to widen Whiterock Road at his property from Springfield Road to Mr. Patterson's boundary, and the surveyor was instructed to have the improvement carried out.

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AYLESBURY PRISON IN FLAMES.

DAMAGE £10,000.

The fire at Aylesbury Prison resulted in the whole administrative block being destroyed. This includes the governor's office, storekeeper's office, Boardroom, the Protestant chapel, and the chief matron's and clerks' offices. The prisoners' and officers' library is also burnt, together with the chaplain's theological works. Over a thousand pounds' worth of stores were burnt and damaged by water. The total damage to the building will, it is estimated, be quite £10,000.

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PREMISES INSURED AGAINST FIRE on Best Terms by the Royal Exchange Assurance Corporation (A.D. 1720), 8 Corporation Street, Belfast, or Local Agents. Claims paid exceed £41,000,000.

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Rev. James O'Laverty, P.P. -- Pope Pius X, has conferred on the Rev. James O'Laverty, P.P., M. R. I. A., Holywood, the rank and dignity of Domestic Prelate to his Holiness. Father O'Laverty is the author of the "History of Down and Conner," and is an ardent archaeologist.

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MILITARY NOTES

Captain W.T. Wilkinson, D.S.O., King's Own Scottish Borderers, on promotion is posted to the 1st Battalion at Belfast.

The move of 400 men of the K.O.S.B. from Belfast to Newry is for company training, we understand, as there is no suitable ground for such training convenient to Belfast.

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THIS DAY'S POLICE.

CUSTODY COURT

(Before Messrs. Garrett Nagle, R.M., and Robert Gageby, J.P.)

UNDESIRABLE RECORD.

William M'Gaw, an elderly man, was charged with drunkenness yesterday. Mr. Nagle -- What's his record? Head-Constable Frizzell -- 224 times -- the largest record of any man in the town. Mr. Nagle -- One month.

BRUSH AND LAMP OWNER WANTED.

Sergeant Menary charged William M'Cammond with the larceny of a lamp and brush, the property of some person or persons unknown. The sergeant said that he met prisoner yesterday at four o'clock in Peter's Hill, when he was carrying the carriage lamp and horse-brush (produced) under his arm. Witness questioned him, and he said -- "I bought them from Mr. Anderson, in Smithfield, at the eleven o'clock sale on Friday last. I paid 1s 4d for them." Witness went to Mr. Anderson's place, and found the statement to be untrue. He then arrested prisoner, who, when cautioned, said -- "I took them, and it's your business to find out from where." The sergeant asked for a remand to enable him to make inquiries. Prisoner -- "I made the wrong statement. I was sleeping in a cowyard on the Shankill Road, and I happened to take them away with me." He was remanded until Friday.

Mr. D.F. Spiller prosecuted in the Custody Court to-day.

THEFT OF CARPENTER'S TOOLS.

Constable Richard Hunt charged Joseph M'Alister with the larceny of an iron plane and a hammer, the property of William Gault, on the 6th inst. The constable arrested M'Alister last night on the Antrim Road, when he said, "I took the tools. Mr. Gault won't go against me." When searched witness found on him eight pawn-tickets. A remand was ordered until Thursday.

SUMMONS COURT

(Before Messrs. F.G. Hodder, R.M., and R. Gageby, J.P.)

EMPLOYMENT CASES.

John Donald, 49 Ormeau Road, was fined for employing a boy under 14 years of age.

Sarah Glenholmes, 23 Vulcan Street, was fined 10s and costs for privity in the use of a false certificate of age, whereby employment was obtained for her child in Belfast Ropeworks Company.

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KINGHAN MISSION FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB.

The annual meeting of this mission was held last evening in the Kinghan Hall Botanic Avenue, under the presidency of Rev. Professor Todd-Martin, D. Lit. There was a large attendance.

In introducing the proceedings the chairman said they all regretted the absence of the Lord Mayor, who had presided on the memorable occasion when Lord Dufferin had opened that hall. They should have been delighted to have had him there on the present occasion to see how the work had been prospering in the meantime. The last year was one of distinct progress and prosperity. There were two points which, he thought, marked it -- one was the enlarged interest taken outside Belfast throughout the bounds of the Presbyterian Church in Ulster. The representative of the Mission had been received everywhere by ministers and people with the greatest heartiness, and the result was that there had been a very considerable increase in the funds. Another incident of the past year should not be allowed to pass without some expression of congratulation. For the first time in the history of Presbyterianism in Ireland an ordained minister of the Church had been appointed to take special charge over that department of the Church's work. The chaplain (Mr. Dodds), by the authority of the General Assembly, was ordained to the ministry in order that he might be able to discharge all the pastoral duties in that respect committed to his charge. He had for some years, as far as his work permitted, attended the classes in the Theological College of the Presbyterian Church in Belfast, and had therefore, in addition to the zeal which he had always shown in that particular cause, acquired a considerable amount of intellectual training, which would enable him to carry on his work with greater efficiency and power. That Mission was worked for the purpose of filling the lives of those less favoured people with the light and joy and helpfulness which only trained teachers could impart. The late Mr. Kinghan had large views on the subject of the spiritual oversight of the deaf and dumb. He delighted to work in harmony with all who loved the Lord Jesus Christ in sincerity, and he was anxious to make provision that those, of whatever name, who needed the advantages of a place of meeting like that hall should have free access to it in order that their lives might be somewhat brightened and influenced thereby. Besides this, he desired that they enjoy the ministration of the Church, as their fathers had enjoyed it before them. (Applause.)

Rev. Dr. Beatty (convener) read the committee's report, which showed that a new and important branch of the work was the home for aged and infirm deaf mutes, and that arrangements were now in the hands of a sub-committee to prepare for any Presbyterian deaf mutes under the Mission's care requiring a home.

Rev. George Magill, in moving the adoption of the report, said there was nothing in it that did not commend itself to the judgment, the confidence, and the sympathy of that attentive audience. Anyone who knew the late Mr. Kinghan would regard it as a privilege to be permitted to have anything to do with the work of the Mission to the Deaf and Dumb in Ulster. Mr. Kinghan was a single-minded man, who had left an impression of his faith upon that organisation, and his worthy wife, daughter, and sons were carrying on with great faithfulness the work he had so well begun. (Applause.)

Rev. Dr. Corkey seconded the motion, which was passed.

Mr. M. Wilson, hon. treasurer, submitted his report, which showed a credit balance of £150 2s 2d.

Mr. John Sinclair, in moving the adoption of the report, said it was exceedingly creditable to find a mission that could carry over from one year to another such a substantial balance as £160. It showed that the Kinghan Mission had caught the attention of the public, and it was also a creditable memorial to the late Mr. Kinghan that the Mission which he had founded had been so well taken in charge by the General Assembly. The subscriptions had increased that year by £91, and these points showed that the public were taking a great interest in the Mission. (Applause.)

Mr. William Bell formally seconded the motion, which was passed.

Mr. J. A. Cooke, a deaf mute, ably recited the "Prodigal Son" in the sign language.

Mr. R. W. Corry moved -- "That the Mission, having proved itself an inestimable blessing to the deaf and dumb for so many years past, commended itself to the sympathetic support of the Christian public."

Rev. David Purvis seconded the resolution, which was passed.

A hearty vote of thanks was passed to the chairman on the motion of Mr. J. M.

M'Alery, seconded by Mr. S. M. Kinghan, after which the proceedings terminated.

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MOUNTPOTTINGER Y.M.C.A. -- On Sunday, 7th inst., the annual meeting of the Mountpottinger Young Men's Own Meeting was held at ten o'clock a.m., when Mr. James Price gave a very interesting address. At three o'clock the P. S. A. meeting was held -- Mr. S. Miller presiding. The Rev. Wm. Ralph, M.A., gave a very instructive address on the subject, "The Vision of God." Messrs Brown and Davidson rendered a duet.

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Wednesday, 10 February 1904

Births

MATHER -- February 7, at 24 Waverley Avenue, Fairview, Dublin, the wife of M.B. Mather, of a daughter.

Marriages

BRENNAN--KEENAN -- At the Church of the Holy Family, Newington Avenue, Belfast, by the Rev. Father Henry, Thomas Brennan, 12 Mountpottinger Road, to Lizzie, the only daughter of the late John Keenan, R.N.

Deaths

BALMER -- February 10th, at her residence, 4 Century Street, Eleanor, dearly-beloved wife of John Balmer. Funeral arrangements in to-morrow's paper.
JOHN BALMER.

DUNNE -- February 10th, 1904, at 9 Buckingham Street, Stephen, the dearly-beloved child of Michael and Rosanna Dunne, R.I.C. Funeral to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, for interment in the Milltown Cemetery, at two o'clock.
MICHAEL DUNNE.

JOHNSTON -- February 9th, at 33 Hurst Street, William John Johnston. The remains of my dearly-beloved husband will be removed from his late residence, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.
CATHERINE JOHNSTON.

LEINSTER -- February 9th, at 26 Low Road, Lisburn, James H. Leinster. The remains of my beloved father will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Hillsborough, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
THOMAS LEINSTER

MAGEE -- February 8th, Willie Magee, 29 Copperfield Street, Belfast, only son of William Magee, Baronscourt, Newtownstewart, Co. Tyrone.

MORROW -- February 9, at his residence, Killyleigh Street, Crossgar, Francis Morrow. His remains will be removed from above address, for interment in Killyleigh Meeting-house Green, to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at one o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
MARY MORROW.

M'CONNELL -- February 10th, at his residence, 11 Agincourt Avenue, William, youngest son of the late James M'Connell, of Westminster Street. His remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Friday afternoon, at two o'clock.
MARY M'CONNELL.

M'KEEN -- February 9, 1904, suddenly, at his residence, Seaview, Islandmagee, Hill M'Keen, J.P. His remains will be removed, for interment in Ballyprior Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.

PEEL -- February 9th, 1904, at her residence, The Grove, Upper Ballinderry, Susanna Peel. The remains of my beloved wife will be removed, for interment in the Middle Church Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
MARK PEEL.

SMYTH -- February 9th, 1904, at his residence, 8 Elizabeth Street, John, the dearly-beloved husband of Sarah Smyth. His remains will be removed from above address, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock, for interment in Ballylesson Churchyard. Friends will please accept this intimation.
SARAH SMYTH.

TAYLOR -- February 9th, at her residence, 18 Lewis Street, Katherine Murray Taylor, aged 3 years and 8 months. The remains of our beloved daughter will be removed from above address, for interment in the family burying-ground, Bangor, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
W. H. & M.A. TAYLOR.

WARWICK -- February 9th, at his residence, Main Street, Ligoniel, Andrew Warwick, the beloved son of Samuel and Jane Warwick. His remains will be removed from above address, for interment in the family burying-ground, Shankill, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. -- American and Dublin papers please copy.
SAMUEL & JANE WARWICK.

WATSON -- 9th February, 1904, at 26 Westland Street, Mary (Minnie), the eldest and dearly-beloved daughter of Lewis and Sarah Watson. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at two o'clock.
LEWIS WATSON.

WYLIE -- February 9th, 1904, at 49 M'Clure Street, Belfast, Emma, the dearly-beloved daughter of Robert and Mary Wylie. Her remains will be removed for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
Deeply regretted,
ROBERT WYLIE.

BOILERMAKERS' AND IRON AND STEEL SHIP-BUILDERS' SOCIETY. BALLYMACARRETT No. 1 BRANCH.
The members of this Branch and other brethren are requested to attend the funeral of our late Brother, Thomas Brown.
ARCHIBALD BLAIR, President. ANDREW CRAWFORD, Secretary.

EVANS -- February 10th, at his residence, Crew Park, Upper Ballinderry, William Evans. His remains will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Middle Church, on Friday afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

In Memoriam

FAIR -- In loving remembrance of my dear husband, James Fair, ex-Master-Gunner, Royal Artillery, and Crimean veteran, who departed this life on the 10th February, 1903, and was interred in the City Cemetery. Deeply regretted.
Sadly missed by his Wife and Daughters.
ELLEN FAIR.

STEEN -- In fond and loving memory of our dear father, Thomas Steen, who died on the 10th February, 1903, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
"Gone, but not forgotten."
Inserted by his loving Children.THOMAS & MARY STEEN. 30 Upper Glenfarne Street, Belfast.

WHITE -- In affectionate remembrance of our dear son, James, who fell asleep on 10 th February, 1895, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
"Until the day break and the shadows flee away."
J. & M. WHITE, 15 Calvin Street, Mountpottinger.

Clippings

LOCAL RAILWAY RETURNS

GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY (IRELAND). -- Week ending Friday, the 5th February, 1904:- Passengers, parcels, and mails, £7,451; merchandise and cattle, £7,561; total £15,012. Corresponding period, passengers, parcels, and mails, £7,608; do., merchandise and cattle, £7,310: total, £14, 918; increase, £94. 5 weeks' traffic, £77,022; corresponding period, £73,487; increase, £3,535.

BELFAST AND COUNTY DOWN RAILWAY. Receipts for week ending 5th February, 1904: -- Passengers, merchandise, &c., £2,104; corresponding week in last year, £2,196; Decrease, £92. Aggregate receipts for 5 weeks and 1 day in the current half year -- Passengers, merchandise, &c., £11,532; 5 week and 2 days corresponding period in last year, £10,984; increase, £543.

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AN IMPORTANT IMPORT.

One of the largest imports of Edison Phonographs and "Gold-Moulded" Records which has ever reached this country arrived per s.s. "Tusker" yesterday, consigned to MR. T. Edens Osborne, 4 Donegall Sqr. W., who reports that the Records are of very popular selections. The general public should call early before dealers obtain their supplies. Mr. Osborne is a factor for the manufacturers. -- Corrspt.

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THE CELTIC PARK DISTURBANCE.

A SUMMONS WITHDRAWN.

Before Mr. F. G. Hodder, R. M., in the Belfast Summons Court, to-day, an interesting sequel to the disturbance at a football match in Belfast on Boxing Day last was heard, when Constable M'Dermott summoned Robert M'Veigh for disorderly conduct on the occasion. The complainant, examined by Mr. Osborne, said on the occasion of the football match in Celtic Park on Boxing Day, a riot took place in the grounds, in consequence of which the match had to be stopped, and for a considerable time the two opposing and riotous mobs were stoning each other violently. He saw M'Veigh throw stones on the occasion, and there were several thousand persons present. Mr. Hodder -- Where did the stoning take place? -- In the Celtic grounds. Mr. Hodder -- The summons is for the public street. I cannot make an order on that summons. It must be withdrawn. There are other methods of dealing with the case. The summons was then withdrawn.

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DOCK AND QUAY REGULATIONS

SITTING OF THE COMMSSION.

THE BELFAST DEPUTY-CORONER EXAMINED.

At Tuesday's sitting of this Commission at Westminster, Mr. John S. Finnigan, deputy-coroner for Belfast, was examined. He stated he had been deputy-coroner for the city of Belfast for the past eight years, and had taken a deep interest, apart from his official work, in the subject of dock accidents. It was in his opinion, the persistent efforts made in Belfast to draw the attention of the Secretary of State for the Home Department to the fact that many of the causes of accidents at the docks were preventable which first suggested the propriety of sending out the Special Commissioners. In Belfast the most common causes of accidents at the quays and docks were: -- 1. The falls [Article continued...]

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

... Pope has telegraphed personally to the Mikado urging consideration for the Catholic missions in Japan and Korea during the hostilities. Feeling at the Vatican is in favour of Japan on account of her friendly treatment of the Catholic missions.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

FRENCH SHOWING THEIR HAND.

(Exchange Telegram.)

PARIS, Wednesday. -- With one voice this morning's papers condemn Japan's attack on the Russian fleet. A report has reached here that China is about to make an official declaration of her neutrality. The "Figaro," referring to Mr. Hay's Note on the integrity of China, says America's appeal might have the gravest consequences. If it only means the endorsement of Russia's reiterated intention not to mix up China in the conflict, well and good; but if America dreams of engaging the Powers in a conflict which should remain strictly in the Far East, nothing could be more imprudent, and we should expect the Powers with a desire to localise the conflict to abstain from supporting America's appeal.

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Thursday, 11 February, 1904

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES & DEATHS.

Announcements under this heading are charged for as follows: - Births, 1s 6d; Marriages, 2s 6d; Notice of death, 1s 6d; Interment Notice, 2s 6d.

Births

KAY -- January 28, at 11 Eden Quay, Dublin, to William R. and Alice Kay -- a son.

Deaths

BALMER -- February 10th, at 4 Century Street, ELEANOR, the dearly-beloved wife of John Balmer. Her remains will be removed from above address, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock, for interment in the City Cemetery. Friends will kindly accept this (the only) intimation. JOHN BALMER.

BOLE -- February 10th, 1904, at her residence, 10 Roxburgh Street, AGNES, the dearly-beloved wife of the late William Bole. Her remains will be removed for interment in the Shankill Burying-Ground, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. LIZZIE BOLE.

BRODIE -- February 11th, at his residence, 167 Silvio Street, JOHN BRODIE. His remains will be removed for interment in the City Cemetery on Saturday, 13th inst., at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. GRACE BAKER.

COLE -- February 11th, 1904, at her residence, 11 Unity Street, SARAH COLE. The remains of our dearly-beloved mother will be removed from the above address, on Saturday afternoon, at half-past one o'clock, for interment in the Milltown Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. JAMES & MARY COLE.

CRAWFORD -- On the 10th inst., at Brooklyn, Lansdowne Road West, Didsbury, Manchester, ANNA MARIA (ANNIE), the beloved wife of Joseph Crawford. Interment at St. John's Church, Hillsborough, on Saturday, the 13th inst., about two o'clock, leaving the Fleetwood steamer at ten o'clock.

CROCKARD -- February 10th, at her residence, 14 Gregg Street, Lisburn, ELLEN, widow of the late Adam Crockard. The remains of our beloved mother will be removed for interment in Lisburn Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at half-past tow o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. ELEANOR & LIZZIE CROCKARD.

EVANS -- February 10th, at his residence, Crew Park, Upper Ballinderry, WILLIAM EVANS. His remains will be removed for interment in the family burying-ground, Middle Church, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

EWING -- February 10th, at the Thompson Memorial Home, Lisburn, JAMES EWING. The remains of our beloved father will be removed for interment in the family burying-ground, Kilrush, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at half-past three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. WM. H. JAMES & THOMAS EWING.

FERGUSON -- February 11th, at his residence, 3 Yew Street, WILLIAM FERGUSON. The remains of my dear husband will be removed from the above address, for interment in the City Cemetery on Saturday afternoon, in the 13th inst., at three o'clock. MAGGIE FERGUSON.

INDEPENDENT ORDER OF RECHABITES.
The members of the Alexandra Tent and of the Order will please attend the funeral of our late Brother Ferguson,
(Signed) WM. MOOREHEAD, District Chief Ruler. DUNCAN KIRKWOOD, District Secretary.

HUSTON -- February 10, at the residence of her parents, 27 Bruce Street, RACHEL (DOLLY), fourth daughter of James and Rachel Huston, late of Killylea, County Armagh. The remains of our dearly-beloved daughter will be removed for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.

LEWIS -- February 11th, at his father's residence, 99 Bellevue Street, DAVID, the eldest and only son of Edward and Annie Lewis, aged 6 years and 2 months. His remains will be removed from the above address, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at two o'clock for interment in Shankill Graveyard. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
      He has taken many a loved one,
      We have seen them leave our side,
      But with Jesus we shall meet them,
      When we cross the rolling tide.
EDWARD & ANNIE LEWIS.

MORROW -- February 9, at his residence, Killyleigh Street, Crossgar, FRANCIS MORROW. His remains will be removed from above address, for interment in Killyleigh Meeting-house Green, on this (Thursday) afternoon at one o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. MARY MORROW.

MURPHY -- February 10th, at the Union Hospital, ELIZABETH, dearly-beloved daughter of James and Rachel Murphy, Ardoyne. Her remains will be removed from above Institution, for interment in the Shankill Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

M'BRIDE -- February 11th, at her parent's residence, 148 Cromac Street, MAGGIE, youngest daughter of John and Margaret M'Bride. Funeral will leave for the family burying-ground, Drumboe, to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. JOHN & MARGARET M'BRIDE.

M'CONNELL -- February 10th, at his residence, 11 Agincourt Avenue, WILLIAM, youngest son of the late James M'connell, of Westminster Street. His remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at two o'clock. MARY M'CONNELL.

M'CORMICK -- February 10, at 25 Hillview Terrace, John Street, Newtownards, SAMUEL M'CORMICK. The remains of my beloved husband will be removed for interment in Movilla Cemetery, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. ELIZABETH M'CORMICK.

M'CORMICK -- February 1oth, 1904, at her residence, 15 Frere Street, MARY M'CORMICK. The remains of my beloved mother will be removed from the above address, for interment in Milltown R.C. Cemetery, on Saturday afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. JOHN M'CORMICK.

TEUTON -- February 10th, at the residence of his parents, 3 Ulsterdale Street, Connswater, ALEXANDER, the youngest and dearly-beloved son of John and Mary Teuton. His remains will be removed, for interment in Derriaghy Graveyard, on Saturday afternoon, 13th inst., at half-past one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. "He giveth His beloved sleep." JOHN & MARY TEUTON.

WARING -- February 10th, at his residence, Castle Robin, Lisburn, PAUL WARING, aged 79 years. His remains will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Derriaghy, on to-morrow (Friday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Too late for classification

INDEPENDENT ORDER OF RECHABITES.
STRAIN -- Members of the Star of the North Tent, No. 30, and of the Order are requested to attend the funeral of our late Brother, DAVID STRAIN.
WM. MOOREHEAD, D.C.R. D. KIRKWOOD, D.S.

In Memoriam

DAVIDSON -- In loving remembrance of my dear wife, MAGGIE, who fell asleep in Jesus on 11th February, 1902, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
"And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying; neither shall there be any more pain, for the former things are passed away."
Her Husband, JAMES DAVIDSON. 55 Beechfield Street.

HUNTER -- In sad and loving memory of my dear husband, JOHN HUNTER, who departed this life on February 11th, 1902, and was interred in Blockley Baptist Cemetery, Philadelphia, U.S.A. -- American papers please copy. SARAH HUNTER. 217 Cupar Street, Belfast.

HUNTER -- In fond and loving memory of my beloved father, JOHN HUNTER, who departed this life 11th February, 1902, and was interred in Brockley Baptist Cemetery, Philadelphia, U.S.A. -- American papers please copy. MRS W.J. ANDREWS. 150 Shankill Road, Belfast.

M'CALLUM -- In loving memory of TILLIE M'CALLUM, who departed this life on February 11th, 1903, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
      She is not dead, but sleepeth;
      Her breath alone is fled,
      The Lord her spirit keepeth;
      Oh! Weep not for the dead.
      She is not dead, but sleepeth,
      A long, long peaceful rest;
      Her Saviour now she meeteth;
      In the mansions of the blest.
Her sorrowing Mother, MATILDA M'CALLUM. 27 Abingdon Street.

TOLAND -- In loving memory of our dear daughter, RACHEL TOLAND, who died 11th February, 1903, and was interred in the City Cemetery. "Safe in the arms of Jesus."
Inserted by her Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sisters. 5 Craig's Terrace.

WILSON -- In loving memory of my dear mother, CHARLOTTE M. WILSON, who departed this life on the 11th February, 1901, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
      Time may roll on, and years go past,
      Whate'er may be my lot,
      But still as long as memory lasts,
      Mother by me will never be forgot.
Her loving Daughter, MARY F. BRIDGET. 16 Brook Street, Bloomfield Avenue.

-- -- -- -- -- --

M'DUFF'S WREATHS, CROSSES, and other DESIGNS are admitted to be the finest human skill can produce. M'DUFF, the Leading Florist in Ireland, 85 High Street, Belfast. Telephone No. 450. Telegrams -- "M'Duff, Belfast."

Clippings

THE FOG IN BELFAST

LAMENTABLE OCCURRENCE AT THE DOCKS

MAN AND HORSES DROWNED

The fog again descended on the city this morning, and caused considerable inconvenience to traffic. It was not so bad as yesterday, and the cross-Channel steamers arrived at their berths in good time. A sad fatality, as the result of yesterday afternoon's fog, was brought to light this morning, about six o'clock, when the body of a man named Thomas Tinsley was found in the water near the North Twin Island. Tinsley was a driver in the employment of the Provincial Mineral Water Company, Bain's Place, and it appears that yesterday afternoon, at 2.45, he went to the Twins with a load of rubbish in his van for depositing at a place known as the Pithead, contiguous to Workman, Clark, & Co.'s North Yard. He had been there earlier in the day with a similar load, but after he had left in the afternoon nothing was heard of him till to-day with his body was found in the water beside his horse and van. The horse was also dead.

The van was empty, and it was obvious that the unfortunate man had driven into the water in the fog. It is probable that when he was returning to the city he took a wrong turn, the fog being especially dense at this place yesterday afternoon.

The police at York Road Barracks were informed, and Constable Andrew Dougald had the remains conveyed to the Morgue, pending an inquest. The deceased was about 45 years of age, and resided at 13 Cape Street, Falls Road.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

BELFAST CONSPIRACY CHARGE

FURTHER EVIDENCE

TWO DEFENDANTS COMMITTED TO ASSIZES.

At the Belfast Police Court this afternoon Mr F.G. Hodder, R.M., resumed the hearing of the summonses brought by Mary Davidson, 12 Earl's Place, against John Marshall, 199 Donegall Road; Samuel Fisher, 22 College Street; Wm. Joseph Fisher, 22 College Street, and Owen Aiken, 105 Newtownards Road, for having within the past six months unlawfully and maliciously conspired by false pretences to obtain from complainant certain goods and monies -- viz., 4s 11/2d in cash, three kitchen chairs, 2 tables, 17 pictures, a set of drawers, a bed and bedding, 2 bedroom chairs, 4 sets of vases, 2 pairs of boots, bedroom rug, knitting machine, quantity of clothing and other goods with intent to cheat and defraud.

Mr. George Hill Smith (instructed by Mr. Wm. Tughan) appeared for the prosecution. Mr. D. M'Callum represented W.J. Fisher, and Mr. John Duff Marshall and Aiken.

When the case was called, his Worship inquired if Samuel Fisher was present. Mr. Tughan said he was not.

His Worship said that, if necessary, he would issue a warrant for him.

Counsel said he proposed to call another witness, and strike out the summons against William J. Fisher, and utilise him as a witness.

Alexander McIntosh, commission agent, was then sworn. He stated that he met the defendant Marshall once in the house of Aiken. Aiken asked him in Marshall's presence to go to Mr. Duff's office in Donegall Street. Aiken gave him £3 and he went to the office accompanied by Marshall.

They saw Mr. Duff, and witness gave him £3, telling him he got then from Aiken to hand to him. Mr. Duff wrote some document and handed him £2 to give to Marshall. Witness was not asked to sign the document, and he did not sign it. He remembered signing a document on another occasion, which Aiken said had to do with the Appeal Court. He never made any arrangement with Aiken in Marshall's presence to purchase decrees which the latter had against people. At that time he had heard nothing of a decree in the name of Marshall against Robert Davidson or a person called Crangle. He gave no instructions on that occasion for the preparation of any document in Mr. Duff's office, and he did not hear Marshall give instructions for the preparation of a document. He never had a decree by Marshall against Davidson, and never handed such a document to a bailiff. He never got any of Davidson's goods or the proceeds, and did not know the Fishers in the transaction at all. He had no interest in the decree by Marshall against Davidson.

On cross-examination by Mr. Duff, the witness said Aiken told Marshall to accompany him to Mr. Duff's office. Witness did not tell Mr. Duff to prepare the document. He signed no document before he left the office, and he had never sworn he had. In November he saw Mrs. Davidson at his own house, and she gave him 3s, which he credited in her pass-book. He did not know what it was for. He was going to give it to Aiken one day, and he said to keep it for the present.

Mr. Hodder -- And you have kept it since.

Mr. Duff -- Was it not because the debt was assigned to you, you took the money?

Witness -- No; I knew nothing about an assignment.

Re-examined by Mr. Smith -- The signature on the deed produced was his, but the document was not read to him. He did not sign it in Mr. Duff's office.

William Joseph Fisher, the defendant against whom the summons was withdrawn, was then examined. He said he acted as bailiff, and in October last got two decrees at the suit of a Mr. John Marshall for execution. They were given him by Marshall. Davidson's decree was signed when he received it, and he had to pay for the other one, that against Crangle, out of his own pocket. Marshall told him to take everything in Davidson's house, including bedding, and not to leave a stick. Aiken was present at the time, and the two of them instructed him. M'Intosh did not see him at all about it, and he never knew him. He made the seizure on the morning of 23rd October, and cleared the entire house. Removing the contents to his brother's at 103 Mountpottinger Road, where they were stored till 27th, when they were sold by public auction.

How do you account for the fact that they were seen there on 29th October? -- There were only two pictures there then. What Mrs. Davidson said was untrue.

Witness, continuing, said that he made the return of the sale to Marshall's agent, Mr. Aiken. The proceeds of the sale were £4 odd, and the balance was returned to Aiken, who gave him no receipt.

To the Court -- Marshall instructed him to pay over the proceeds to Aiken.

In the course of further evidence Fisher said that as a result of the sale in Crangle case he handed the proceeds to Aiken on the direction of Marshall. Aiken gave him a receipt in that case. In the whole proceedings he had no transactions with M'Intosh.

To Mr. Duff -- It was not true he kept Davidson's goods from the 23rd to the 27th, and that was why he swore it. He had been examined in the case of Crangle v. Marshall for illegal seizure at the Recorder's Court.

In reply to the Court, Mr. Smith said that the interpleader decree of the Recorder set out that the goods were the separate estate of Mary Davidson.

Counsel having put in the interpleader order and the decree.

Mrs. Davidson was recalled, and gave formal evidence as to the receipt of the order.

Mr. Tughan, solicitor, proved to the institution of proceedings on foot of the Sheriff's order at the Recorder's Court, and to the decree pronounced by Judge Fitzgibbon.

To Mr. Duff -- Both Marshall and McIntosh were sued in the interpleader proceedings. The formers name was struck out by the Recorder.

Mr. Duff submitted there was no case.

His Worship returned Marshall and Aiken for trial at the next assizes, allowing bail in £20 and two sureties of £10 each. The defence was reserved.

No application was made in the case of Samuel Fisher, and his name was struck out.

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BELFAST RECORDER'S COURT.

The business of this Court was resumed to-day in the County Courthouse, Belfast, before his Honour Judge Fitzgibbon. Mr. H.M. Crawford, registrar, was in attendance.

MAGILL v. GRAY.

Elizabeth Magill, 2 Castlereagh Place, Belfast, sought to recover £24 18s 4d from Joseph Gray, Edinburgh Street, Belfast, amount of principal and interest due on foot of his promissory note bearing date November 17, 1898, given by defendant to plaintiff for a sum of £20, and payable within three months. Mr. F. J. Orr represented the plaintiff, and Mr. T. J. Campbell, B.L. (instructed by Mr. Thomas Maguire) the defendant. For the defence, it was stated that the plaintiff did not apply for payment for five years, and that he did not attach any signature to the note. His Honour gave a decree for the amount and interest thereon at the rate of 5 per cent.

M'CRUM v. SMITH.

This was an action by John B. M'Crum, trading as B. M'Crum & Co., Catherine Street North, against Robert Smith, 10 Waring Street, to recover £3 6s 9d damages for breach of contract by the defendant on the sale of seven bicycles to plaintiff, and also the value of a bicycle of which defendant had been the bailie. For complainant, Mr. D. McGonigal (for Mr. T. Barkley) appeared, and Mr. W. Tughan for the defendant. The case was dismissed on the merits.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

ACCIDENT AT CLARENDON DOCK. -- Yesterday evening, owing to the fog, a harbour workman fell into the Clarendon Dock as he was leaving his work by taking the wrong side of the bridge at the Harbour workshops slip bridge. He was rescued in an exhausted state, and partially restored by boatmen Duffy and Hunsdale, of the Harbour Works, and had to be taken to the hospital in the ambulance.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

H.M.S ST. GEORGE -- We understand that the recent sea trials of the cruiser St. George, refitted at the local yard, were most satisfactory. The trials consisted of eight hours at half-speed and eight hours continuous steaming at full-speed. Although a heavy sea was running during the trials, the St. George reeled off 21 knots at natural draught and 23 knots with forced draught. Her previous best speed was 20 knots.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

THE ALLEGED MANSLAUGHTER AT BELFAST.

CORONER'S INQUEST.

VERDICT.

This morning at eleven o'clock the deputy coroner (Mr J. S. Finnigan) held an inquest in the Magdalene Schoolroom, Shaftesbury Square, into the circumstances attending the death of James Allen, a washer in the service of the Belfast Street Tramway Company, which occurred on Sunday morning last as the result of violence at the stables, Sandy Row.

Thomas Hall, also a washer in the same service, is at present in custody charged with caused Allen's death.

Head-Constable McGuigan watched the inquiry on behalf of the police. Mr. Frank Kerr, solicitor, represented Hall, and Mr. J.S. Osborne was present on behalf of the next-of-kin of deceased.

Mrs. Allen, widow of the deceased, stated that her husband was forty-three years of age, and was a strong man. His hours of employment were from 6-30 p.m. to 6 a.m. He was perfectly sober on leaving his house, 21 Gaffikin Street, at 6 o'clock on Saturday evening last.

FELLOW-EMPLOYEE'S EVIDENCE.

Henry Bell, of 63 Donnybrook Street, was the next witness. At an early hour on Sunday morning last he was engaged washing the platform of a tramcar in the tramway yard, Sandy Row, and the deceased was similarly engaged. Thomas Hall, when passing deceased, told him to brush the platform of his car, and the latter said he would not do so. A noisy conversation between the two men followed, and he heard angry words exchanged. Deceased replied, "It is no wonder some person beat you," or words to that effect. He then saw deceased and Hall engaged in a struggle. He heard deceased challenge Hall to fight him, and they commenced to "square" at each other. Deceased attempted to strike Hall, and in doing so he fell forward, his head coming in contact with the ground. Deceased was not able to rise, and did not speak. Witness bathed his head, and tried to revive him, but failed. This happened at 1-30. He left deceased where he was, resumed his work, and returned at 3-30, bringing tea to him. He was still unconscious. He told Hall to go for brandy, but he could not get any. He thought deceased had some drink taken, but Hall had none so far as he could observe. The deceased and Hall were always on friendly terms up to this time.

Coroner -- Why did you leave the man lying there for two hours? -- I went back to my work.

Coroner -- You allowed this man to lie there from 1.30 to 3.30 without making the slightest effort to get any relief. I say, advisedly, you are a disgrace to humanity.

Head-Constable McGuigan -- Why didn't you go for the doctor? -- I knew Allen was unconscious.

Coroner -- Sure, that is a stronger reason why you should have gone for a doctor.

Witness added that he was a teetotaller.

Mr. Kerr -- You thought he would revive? -- Yes.

FRANCIS CINNAMOND

was the next witness. He was in the yard on the occasion in question, and was employed as a nightwasher there. He did not witness the struggle between deceased and Hall. The latter came to him after the row, and said that he and Allen had some words, and that he had struck deceased, and he suggested that Allen was scheming -- that he wanted a sleep. Witness and Hall lifted deceased, and put him inside a tramcar. Allen might have had a bottle or two of stout, and so might Hall.

Coroner -- Why didn't you send for a doctor? -- I did suggest a doctor being sent for.

RICHARD M'NAMARA

foreman of the stables stated that he was awakened at 3.25 on Sunday morning by Hall, who told him that Allen was unconscious. Hall said he did not like to send for a doctor. Witness told him to go for a doctor at once. Witness got up and went and saw deceased, who was dead. Hall was perfectly sober.

To Mr. Osborne -- Deceased had been twelve years in the Tramway Company's service.

The Coroner -- You acted with promptitude, and the interests of the company are well looked after as long as you are in charge of the yard.

DR. SIMPSON

stated that he was called upon to go to the stables shortly before four o'clock to see Allen who was dead, inside a tramcar. Deceased had an incised lacerated wound on the corner of the right eye. He afterwards made a post-mortem examination, as a result of which he found an effusion of blood at the centre of the base of the brain. There was considerable congestion of the brain surface, and of the membrane covering the brain. There was no fracture of the skull. It was hard to say whether the rupture of the blood vessel was caused by a fall such as had been described. He would not say it was impossible.

Coroner -- Was it likely to have been caused by a man falling on the back of the head, after a blow delivered in the front? -- No. The effusion was in the centre of the base of the brain.

Would it be caused by a blow on the top of the head? There was no indication.

Mr. Osborne -- If you had been sent for earlier would his chances of life have been greater? -- I think not.

Head-Constable McGuigan -- Do you think he was dead from the moment he fell? -- I could not answer that question.

Witness added that the wounds on the head had nothing to do with the death. It was the effusion of blood which caused death. The excitement under which the man was labouring might have caused the effusion of blood.

DR. IRVINE

who assisted at the post-mortem, agreed with the evidence of the last witness. In his opinion the amount of violence the deceased received, if he had been an ordinary healthy man, would not have caused the hemorrhage at the base of the brain.

In reply to the Coroner,

Mr. Kerr said Hall, his client, was on remand charged with a connection with the affair.

The widow of deceased was recalled, and stated, in reply to Mr. Osborne, that her husband was, as a rule, a sober steady man, and was not quarrelsome. She had six children, and her husband had been her only support.

This concluded the evidence.

Mr. Osborne, in addressing the jury, asked them to add a rider to their verdict commending the widow and orphans to the kindly consideration of the tramway company, who were about to dispose of their undertaking.

The Coroner said as a result of this affair this poor woman had been left destitute, and she had no legal claim on the tramway company, and unless they gave something to her out of their indulgence she would be left on the world for dependence. He would represent to the directors that this woman should not be treated as being a stranger altogether. He knew Mr. Nance would consider as graciously as he could anything he would say to him on the subject.

THE VERDICT.

The Jury, after short deliberation, found that death was caused by an effusion of blood on the brain, and that death was accelerated by the violence of Thomas Hall; and they recommended the widow and orphans to the earnest consideration of the tramway company.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

THE UNEMPLOYED.

MEETING OF SHIPYARD WORKERS.

Among the subscriptions received by Mr. F. W. Moneypenny to-day for the unemployed relief fund was a cheque for £25 from the Council of the Irish Football Association, per Mr. John Reid, secretary. The generosity of the association in this matter, together with the sympathetic remarks of Mr. Foy, the chairman, has been spoken of in terms of the highest appreciation in football circles.

This afternoon, at the South Yard of Messrs. Workman and Clark, a meeting of workers in the Queen's Island Shipbuilding Yards was held for the purpose of organising a collection in behalf of the relief fund. There was a very large attendance. Mr. Alexander Boyd, who presided, gave a rapid outline of the good work done by the relief committee, and urged the necessity for increased funds to assist the numerous cases of distress that had to be dealt with. Councillar [sic] S. M'Cormick also made a strong appeal on behalf of the City Relief Fund. Councillor McInnes said he had come through a very trying winter, and there was a great amount of distress in consequence. Regarding the ship-building trade, he was glad to announce that there was a bright prospect that day. In the morning he received a telegram from Newcastle-Upon-Tyne intimating that the masters had withdrawn their notice of a reduction. (Applause.) The war would also, he expected, have a stimulating influence upon shipbuilding. Speaking of the Relief Fund, he said that many of the persons who had been assisted were most deserving cases; and he instanced several where the temporary aid given had helped men to preserve their superannuation benefit. There were hundreds of cases brought before the committee every day, but they only gave relief to the really deserving. They took especial care to discriminate between the unemployed and the unemployable. He thanked goodness that the worst would be over within a few weeks; but meantime there were hundreds in need of help, and he hoped the response of the men he saw before him would be as generous as the necessities of the occasion demanded. There was no consideration for politics or religion in the administration of the fund; all that the committee insisted upon was that each case should be deserving. (Applause.)

The men voted unanimously, at the close of the meeting, in favour of making a general collection.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

DONAGHADEE NOTES.

A movement is on foot in Donaghadee to present a petition to the County Down Railway Company, requesting them to collect only tickets at either termini -- Donaghadee and Belfast. This is to obviate the delay at present caused by the collection of tickets at intermediate stations. The memorial is being extensively signed, and in the hands of Mr. Milligan, of Warren House. It is intended to have the support of the Bangor people, whose delays at Sydenham and Carnalea are as grievous to business men as those on the main branch.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

CHARGE AGAINST A BELFAST POLICEMAN.

A FURTHER REMAND.

Constable William Barrett, Cullingtree Road Barracks, appeared to-day in the Belfast Custody Court -- before Mr. F. G. Hodder, R.M. -- charged with having assaulted Hugh Gray on the 22nd January last in Mackin's bazaar, Mill Street, Belfast.

Mr. Spiller prosecuted for the police, and Mr. A. M'Erlean also appeared to prosecute on behalf of the friends of the injured man. Mr. J. Donnelly was for the prisoner.

Head-Constable Horan, in reply to Mr. Spiller, said he was not prepared to proceed further with the case, to-day, and desired a further adjournment.

Mr. Hodder -- Is the man's life out of danger?

Witness -- It is; he is getting along nicely.

Mr. Donnelly did not oppose the application, and as the man's life is now out of danger the bail of the prisoner was reduced to £10 and one surety of £10.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

Yesterday the troopship Dunera, from Durban, via Las Palmas, arrived at Queenstown, having on board 41 officers and 1,208 non-commissioned officers and men. The troopship disembarked the 19th Hussars, consisting of 19 officers and 798 men. The Hussars were despatched by special train to Kingsbridge. The Dunera conveys to Southampton 21 officers and 371 men made up of details of various corps.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

THIS DAY'S POLICE.

CUSTODY COURT
(Before F. G. Hodder, R.M.)

Mr. Spiller prosecuted for the police in this court to-day.

LARCENY OF PAINT.

Robert Ingram, Upper Canning Street, was charged with the larceny of a number of paint brushes, a quantity of paint, and several buckets, the property of James Brown, Newtownards Road Upper. Sergeant Cusack, who arrested the prisoner and recovered the missing property, applied for a remand for a week, which was granted, on bail.

A WHISKEY HAUL.

Mary Magee was charged by Sergeant P. Cusack with the larceny of thirteen bottles and a quantity of whiskey, the property of Patrick Connolly, Spamount Street, on Monday evening last. The sergeant said he visited the prisoner's house, and found on the scullery floor the five bottles produced, which corresponded with the description of the missing bottles. When cautioned, the prisoner said, "I did not take the whiskey. It was my daughter gave them to me. We were in having a drink, and my daughter opened a wee door with a key. She gave me the bottles, and I rolled them in my lap. It was on Monday evening we took it. I'm sorry for doing it, and I'll pay what they cost." In a drawer in the kitchen the sergeant added he found a key which fitted the door of the store from which the whiskey had been stolen. Mr M'Erlean was for the prisoner, and a remand was granted.

SMART DETECTIVE WORK.

Wm. Moneypenny, Crimea Street, was charged with the larceny of horse harness and covers and also forty fowl, the property of James Dick, Ballycoan, Co. Down. Sergeant White gave evidence of the arrest of the prisoner and finding the harness and a cover in his house. When arrested, the prisoner inquired whether the articles had all been identified. Constable Connolly corroborated. After evidence of identification had been given by the son of Mr. Dick, Mr. Hodder said a splendid piece of detective work had been done in the case, but it was only what might be expected from those in charge of the case. A remand for a week was granted.

PLEADED GUILTY.

Joseph M'Allister was charged on remand with the larceny of a quantity of carpenter's tools; he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to two month's imprisonment.

A JUVENILE PRISONER.

Robert M'Cann, a young lad, was charged with wounding another boy, named M'Kenna, on Monday last. Evidence was given that the prisoner had threatened the boy M'Cann, owing to the latter having given evidence against him in a former case, and on the date stated he came up and struck him a severe blow on the eye with a knuckle duster. A remand for a week was granted. Mr M'Erlean was for the prisoner.

FOND OF SWEETS.

Two young boys were summoned for having taken sweets from an automatic machine at the Great Northern Terminus. Mr. W. Tughan appeared for the complainants, and Mr. J. Donnelly and Mr. A.J. Lewis were for the defendants. Mr. Tughan, having stated the facts, Mr. Hodder said it appeared to him to have been a thoughtless act. These machines were only a temptation to boys. It was a case where the complainants ought to be satisfied with damages. Were they prepared to accept 20s? Mr. Tughan consulted with his clients, and said they desired to proceed with the case. Mr. Hodder -- Very well. Even on your own statement of it, I adjourn the case for six months.

SUMMONS COURT.
(Before Messrs. Charles M'Lorinan, James Jenkins, and Joseph Macauley).

SMART PENALTY.

The police summoned John Reilly for having kept an improper house at 47 49 Millfield, within the past month. Mr. A. J. Lewis prosecuted and Mr. N. Tughan defended. Evidence having been heard, a fine of £10 and costs was imposed. Mr. Tughan intimated that an appeal would be taken against the decision.

DEFICIENT WEIGHT.

James Ball, coal hawker, 252 Beersbridge Road, was summoned by Sergeant Currie for having exposed for sale a bag of coal which was deficient in weight. Mr. Lewis prosecuted, and Mr. Tughan (for Mr. M'Kee) appeared for the defendant, and entered a plea of guilty. The sergeant said the bag was 14lbs. light. Mr. Macauley said it was a gross fraud. A fine of £3 was imposed.

IMPROPER HOUSE.

A summons was brought by the police against Eliza Doran for having managed an improper house, No. 3 North King Street. Mr. M'Callum defended. It appeared that the house was now closed, and a fine of 40s was imposed.

LICENSING CASE.

Annie Ryan, spirit grocer, Woodstock Road, was summoned by Head- Constable Peate for failing to admit the police, on demand, between the hours of eleven o'clock on the night of the 6th inst., and the hour for opening next day. Mr. J. Donnelly was for the defence. Evidence was given by the prosecutor that at 2.20 on the morning of the 7th inst., he observed a light on defendant's premises and heard the sound of men's voices in the kitchen. He knocked at the door, which was not opened. Afterwards he heard noises in the yard as if someone was escaping over the wall, and a little later the door was opened, but no person was found on the premises. Defendant stated that the reason for the delay in admitting the police was that when the rapping was heard she was not sufficiently dressed. A fine of 20s was imposed.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

HONOUR TO SIR DANIEL DIXON, BART.

MEETING OF CITIZENS.

As may have been seen by advertisement the Earl of Shaftesbury, as H.M. Lieutenant of the city, requests a meeting of the citizens to be held in the Council Chamber, Town Hall, on Saturday, at eleven o'clock a.m. to consider the desirability of making a presentation to the Right Hon. Sir Daniel Dixon, Bart., in recognition of his invaluable services to the city as Lord Mayor. Lord Shaftesbury is coming specially to Belfast for the occasion. The presentation will be entirely independent of that of the Corporation, which will consist of a beautiful silver casket to contain the scroll conferring the freedom of the city upon the ex-Lord Mayor.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

CORPORATION COMMITTEES

POLICE.

Councillor Curley presided at the meeting of this committee to-day, the other members present being Councillors John S. Shaw, J.P.; F.C. Johnston, J.P.; John M'Caughey, J.P.; Dr. N.J. M'Donnell, Dr. James D. Williamson, James N. M'Cammond, Robert Thompson, Robert Dunlop, James M'Entee, James Gregg, and Robert Johnson. The wages &c., for the week amounting to £126 3s 11d were passed for payment, and a cheque signed therefore. The chief officer of the fire brigade (Mr. George Smith) reported that during the week two calls of fire and 45 ambulance cases had been attended to, and 61 factories or workshops inspected; in 46 of these the Act did not apply; as less than 40 persons were employed. In the remaining cases minor alterations are to be carried out in compliance with requests made by the department. The chief officer of the brigade also submitted a report upon the telephone exchange system at the head quarters fire station, more particularly as affects the connection between the Town Hall and the various depots of the Corporation, and made certain recommendations for reducing the number of wires to the station. The committee, however, in view of the early removal to the new City Hall, did not consider it advisable to make any changes in the present arrangement, but directed that a copy of the report should be forwarded to the Improvement Committee for their information when considering the telephone arrangement in the new building. The committee approved of the views expressed by the superintendent of the Fire Brigade in his report as to the possibility of extending their powers under section 15 of the Factories and Workshops Act, 1901, and the making of regulations which should deal with the means of escape in all factories and workshops, and it was decided to forward the report to H.M. Superintending Inspector of Factories in accordance with his request. The city accountant (Mr. C.E. Dyer) laid before the committee the estimates for the year ending 31st March, 1905. The committee went carefully through the various items, and made reductions where they considered economies might be effected without endangering the efficiency of the department concerned. Notwithstanding this, however, there will be an increase in the expenditure, due principally to the increase in the police force, the equipment and working of the two new sub fire stations, and additional lighting required in the city. Councillor Dr. M'Donnell drew attention to the quality of the lighting power in the lamps in the upper part of Grosvenor Road, which was much complained of, and it was arranged to draw the attention of the Gas Department to the matter. Councillor M'Caughey, referring to the matter which he mentioned to the committee some time ago of the police having successfully traced a quantity of stolen property, taken from vacant houses, terminating with the arrest of the offenders, and reported that the cases had been dealt with by the Recorder, and the parties sentenced to six months' imprisonment each, with hard labour, and he considered Sergeant Kerrigan and the other members of the force associated with him were to be congratulated on the vigilance they displayed in the matter. The committee heartily endorsed Councillor M'Caughey's remarks.

PUBLIC HEALTH.

Smallpox and its prevention was the principal subject of discussion at the meeting of the Public Health Committee to-day. Alderman Dr. King-Kerr presided. It was reported that there had been three fresh cases, and that those already in hospital were doing satisfactorily. With regard to re-vaccination, it was suggested that the dispensary officers should vaccinate the children in the National Schools, but it appeared that in two or three instances the head teachers objected. There is but a slight increase in the number of notified infectious diseases as compared with last week. Measles, whooping cough and influenza are not scheduled under the Act, but the Corporation, by resolution have the power to do so.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

THE SUICIDE AT DONEGALL QUAY. -- The body of Alexander M'Manus, a winchman on the SS Magic, who jumped into the river on Monday, was recovered at Donegall Quay last night. The grappling irons failed to find him, and he was brought to the surface on a number of fishing-hooks.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

INQUESTS IN BELFAST.

DEATH OF A CHILD.

An inquest was held this morning in the Magdalene School, Shaftesbury Square, touching the death of a five-year-old child named Geo. Alex. Reid, which took place at the house of its father, James Reid, 23 Abingdon Street. The father of deceased was a shoemaker. It was sworn by the mother that the child had been delicate from its birth. He suffered from bronchitis. She did not send for the doctor until some time after the child was taken ill the last time for want of money. Dr. James M'Cullough, Donegall Pass, proved that death was due to convulsions caused by congestion of the lungs and the jury found accordingly.

SUDDEN DEATH IN GREAT VICTORIA STREET -- THE SALE OF COCAINE.

In the Recorder's Court in the afternoon an inquest was held on the body of Rosa B. Boseman, who died suddenly on the 7th inst., in the London Hotel, Great Victoria Street, where she lodged. The body had been identified by Henry Boseman, brother of deceased, who lives in Dublin. She was 44 years of age. She had been a professional nurse, and while in India she suffered from snake-bite poisoning, and he had been informed she took cocaine to deaden the pain.

Mrs. Gibson, proprietor of the hotel, stated that the deceased had lived with her for two years and three months. She suffered from bad health, and died suddenly on 7th inst. She had been confined to bed since Christmas last, and for a long time had not left the house.

Dr. Charles O'Neill said he had treated deceased for asthma and heart disease. He learned that she took cocaine for snake-bite poisoning, and refused to prescribe as long as she took it. She did not promise to discontinue the practice.

The Coroner -- Is it possible to get cocaine from a chemist without a medical prescription? -- I don't think so.

A Juror -- I knew a person who was addicted to taking cocaine and they obtained it from chemists without a medical certificate.

Dr. Irwine, who made a post-mortem examination, said it was due to heart failure following upon pneumonia. Several of the organs were diseased. He could not say whether she had taken an overdose of cocaine. An overdose of this drug would of course cause heart failure. Two bottles were found in her room labelled "poison."

Sergeant Hughes, Great Victoria Street barracks, said one bottle bore the name of Mr. D. W. Elliott, chemist, Shaftesbury Square, and the other that of Mr. H. R. Rutherford, chemist, Great Victoria Street.

Both these chemists were examined, and stated that the cocaine had been obtained on a medical prescription. Deceased, who was a very intelligent lady, did not inject it, but snuffed it in solution form up the nose. The bottles produced when full did not contain an overdose of the drug.

The Coroner said it was only fair to the chemists that they should be afforded an opportunity of explaining their position, seeing their names had been mentioned in connection with the matter. Otherwise an injustice might be done them.

The jury returned a verdict of death from heart disease.

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Monday, 22 February, 1904

Births

BROWN -- February 22nd, at 100 Donnybrook Street, Belfast, the wife of Robert Brown, of a son.

JAMESON -- February 17, at Pietermaritzburg, to Henry Lyster and Millicent L. Jameson -- a daughter.

O'FLAHERTY -- February 20th, at High Street, Antrim, to Mr. and Mrs. W. O'Flaherty -- a son.

Deaths

BEATTIE -- February 22nd, at 47 Jameson Street, Willie, infant son of William and Lucy Beattie, aged 2 years. Funeral to-morrow, at three o'clock, for City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.
"Safe in the arms of Jesus."

BELL -- February 21, at her late residence, 71 Seaview Street, Shore Road, Eliza Bell, widow of the late Joshua Bell, Lurgan. Her remains will be removed for interment in the family burying-ground, Maralin, to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at half-past ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
THOMAS BELL

BOYD -- February 21st, at 12 Burton Street, John Boyd. The remains of my beloved husband will be removed from his late residence on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock, for interment in the City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
"Safe from this world's care and toil."
SARAH BOYD.

BROCK -- 21st February, 1904, at 77 Cavehill Road, after a lingering illness, Madeleine Eleanor, the dearly-beloved daughter of William John and Emma Brock. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

DARRAGH -- February 21st, at his residence, 72 Pernan Street, James, the dearly-beloved husband of Margaret Darragh. His remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
MARGARET DARRAGH.

FERRIS -- February 21st, at her daughter's residence, 1 Mountjoy Street, Belfast, Isabella, relict of the late Joseph Ferris. The remains of our beloved mother will be removed from above address, on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at half-past ten o'clock, for interment in the family burying-ground, Carnmoney. Friends will please accept this intimation.
JAMES AND JOSEPH FERRIS.

GILL -- February 20th, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Annie, youngest and dearly-beloved daughter of the late Richard Gill, and niece of Robert Emery. Her remains will be removed from her late residence, 186 Grosvenor Road, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
ELIZABETH GILL.

I.O.G.T. -- LAGAN LIFEBOAT LODGE, No. 123.
The members of above Lodge and members of the Order are requested to attend the funeral of their late Sister, Annie Gill.
D. FERGUE, C.T., J. HIGGINS, Secretary.

HANNA -- February 21, at his residence, 57 John Street, Newtownards, Hugh Hanna. The remains of my dearly-beloved husband will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Greyabbey, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock.
JANE HANNA.

HANNA -- February 21st, at 32 Sultan Street, Belfast, Ellen, (Nellie), the beloved daughter of Joseph and Mary Hanna. Her remains will be removed, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at half-past one o'clock, for interment in Milltown R.C. Cemetery. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.

HARPER -- February 21st, at his father's residence 5 Chamberlain Street, Henry, youngest and dearly-beloved son of Thomas and Mary Harper. His remains will be removed, for interment in Moneyrea Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at one o'clock.

HATTON -- February 20th 1904, at her late residence, 7 Blondin Street, Martha Hatton, the beloved wife of Joseph Hatton. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. "Safe in the arms of Jesus."
JOSEPH HATTON.

HAUGHEY -- February 21st, at 21 Glasgow Street, Shore Road, Ellen, beloved wife of Patrick Haughey, and youngest daughter of the late Daniel Magee, Ballymacward. -- R. I. P. Her remains will be removed from above address, on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at 8.45, for train, per B. and N.C.R., at 9.45 to Cookstown, and thence to Lissan Catholic Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this intimation.

HIGGINSON -- January 31st, at Jeppes Town, Johannesburg, South Africa, John A. Higginson, eldest and dearly-beloved son of John and the late Anna J. Higginson, 28 Roseleigh Street, Belfast, and formerly of Largymore, Lisburn.

JOHNSTON -- February 22nd, at her residence, 64 Short Strand, Dorothea, the beloved wife of James Johnston. Funeral will lift at 10.0 a.m. on Wednesday, the 24th inst., for interment in Trummary Burying-ground.
JAMES JOHNSTON

MAGEE -- 21st February, 1904, at his father's residence, Main Street, Doagh, Frank, youngest and dearly-beloved son of Robert and Mary Magee, aged 6 year and 6 months. His remains will be removed for interment in Killbride Burying-ground on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
      None knew how sad the parting,
      Nor what the farewell cost,
      But God and His bright angels
      Have gained what we have lost.
ROBERT & MARY MAGEE.

MAGEE -- February 22nd, 1904, at his residence, Commercial Hotel, Ardglass, John Magee, Spirit Merchant and Fish Salesman. -- Fortified by the rites of the R. C. Church. Funeral on Wednesday, 24th inst., at 1.30 p.m. -- R.I.P.

MALONE -- February 20, at his residence, No. 1 George Street, John Malone, late of Carnagh Mills, Co. Armagh. -- R. I. P. The remains of my beloved husband will be removed from the above address, on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at half-past seven o'clock, to Great Northern Railway, for the family burying-ground, Annyallow, Co, Monaghan. Friends will please accept this intimation.
ELLEN MALONE.

MILLS -- February 22nd, at her residence, 64 Henry Street, Jane, the relict of the late Alexander Mills. The remains of our dear mother will be removed from above address for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground on Wednesday afternoon at 2.30 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
WILLIAM AND SARAH MILLS.

M'CARTNEY -- February 22nd, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, John, the beloved husband of Dorothea M'Cartney, late of Queen's Island. His remains will be removed from his late residence, 101 Rathmore Street, for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground, on Wednesday afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
DOROTHEA M'CARTNEY.

M'FARLANE -- February 21st, at his residence, 48 Harrisburg Street, Robert M'Farlane, the dearly-beloved husband of Christina M'Farlane. His remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted.
CHRISTINA M'FARLANE.

BOILERMAKERS' AND IRON AND STEEL SHIP-BUILDERS' SOCIETY. BELFAST (No. 2) BRANCH.
Members of above Branch are requested to attend the funeral of our late Brother, Robert M'Farlane. (By order)
R. CAMPBELL, President. J. FOSTER, Secretary.

M'KEE -- February 20th, at her residence, Ballygrott, Elizabeth Wallace, widow of the late Hugh M'Kee, aged 74 years. Interment in the family burying-ground, Bangor, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock.

M'KNIGHT -- February 22nd, at Carnmoney, John Kerr, infant son of Arthur and Maggie M'Knight, aged 7 months. His remains will be removed, for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
A. & M. M'KNIGHT.

PATTERSON -- February 21st, at his residence, Maralin, Robert Patterson, aged 80 years. His remains will be removed, for interment in the Old Burying-ground, Maralin, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.

PURDY -- February 21st, at his residence, 61 Lanark Street, Robert, dearly-beloved husband of Bella Purdy. His remains will be removed, from the above address, for interment in Carnmoney on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock.
BELLA PURDY.

REFAUSSE -- February 22nd, at his father's residence, Pond Park, Lisburn, Samuel Harris, the youngest son of Robert and Minnie Refausse. His remains will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Derriaghy Churchyard, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
ROBERT & MINNIE REFAUSSE.

SKILLEN -- February 21st, at his residence, 23 Penrith Street, Robert Skillen. His remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
MARGARET SKILLEN.

SMYTH -- February 20th, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, John Smyth (the result of an accident). The remains of my beloved father will be removed from the Royal Victoria Hospital, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in the Castlereagh Burial ground. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
WILLIAM D. SMYTH.

STANARD -- February 21, at his residence, 2 Havelock Street, John Stanard, Church Lane, aged 65 years. Funeral to Balmoral Cemetery on Wednesday morning, 24th inst., at ten o'clock.

In Memoriam

LEWSLEY -- In loving memory of my dear husband, Andrew Lewsley, who departed this life, 22nd February, 1903, and was interred in Milltown Cemetery.
      Farewell, dear wife and children, I must go,
      And leave you in this world of woe;
      Weep not for me, nor sorrow take,
      But love each other for my sake.
ELIZABETH LEWSLEY.

MAGEE -- In loving remembrance of my dear father, Robert Magee, late of 13 Ormeau Road, who departed this life February 21st, 1901, and was interred in the Knock Burying-ground.
Deeply regretted.
MINNIE GRADEN. 28 Churchill Street.

M'CORMACK -- In sad but loving memory of my sear son Willie, who fell asleep in Jesus on the 22nd February, 1903, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
      Why should the teardrop dim the eye,
      As round the clay the fond friends weep?
      The lost are with the Lord on high,
      He giveth His beloved sleep.
       The weary tossing now is past,
      The heavy moan, the hot pulse leap,
      A holy calm has come at last,
      He giveth His beloved sleep.
Never forgotten.
Inserted by his loving Mother, MARGARET M'CORMACK

SHANKS -- In memory of Tom, beloved son of Edward and Anna Shanks, aged 16 years, who departed this life 22nd February, 1900, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
      Time, like an ever-rolling stream,
      Bears all its sons away;
      They fly forgotten, as a dream
      Dies at the opening day.
EDWARD & ANNA SHANKS.

SHAW -- In fond and loving memory of my dear wife, Maggie, who departed this life on February 22nd, 1903, and was interred in the family burying-ground, Carnmoney.
Inserted by her sorrowing Husband and Children,
JAMES SHAW, 3 Seaview Street.

SHERMAN -- In affectionate remembrance of our dearly-beloved son, George, who departed this life on the 22nd day of February, 1903, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
      "Gone, but not forgotten."
      Just gone from sight a little while,
      Our loved one in God's keeping;
      We praise Him for our blessed rest
      Beyond this world of weeping.
      We sorely miss his presence here,
      Yet have sweet hope in sorrow,
      Since those with Christ and those with him
      We'll share a glad to-morrow.
THOMAS & SARAH SHERMAN. 20 Avonbeg Street.

WALLACE -- In sad and loving memory of our dear daughter, Bessie, who died on the 22nd February, 1900.
      Severe have been her sufferings here,
      But God who bade her die
      Looked kindly from his throne above,
      And called her to the sky.
      We loved our Bessie dearly,
      We loved her very well
      But the angels loved her better,
      And they took her home to dwell.
Inserted by her sorrowing Father & Mother.
JAMES & E. A. WALLACE. Tandragee.

Clippings

THE BALTIC FLEET.

The "Daily Mail" Kiel correspondent telegraphs yesterday: -- In well-informed naval circles it is reported that the Russian squadron destined for East Asia will return to the Baltic Sea on account of the great superiority of the Japanese fleet.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

HELP FOR THE JAPANESE WOUNDED
(Through Laffan's Agency.)

NEW YORK, February 22. -- Yesterday the Japanese Consul attended a mass meeting of Finns and Scandinavians residing in Brooklyn. He thanked them for their efforts on behalf of Japan, and said their contributions would be devoted to the ambulance corps fund and hospital ship.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

SECOND BERLIN CONFERENCE PREDICTED
(Through Laffan's Agency.)

NEW YORK, February 22. -- The "Sun," reviewing the financial situation, dwells upon the effect the war has had, and concludes: -- The impression deepens amongst dispassionate observers that the upshot of the present affair is likely to be a second Berlin Congress, which will not only delimit the Russian-Japanese possessions in the Far East, but will settle the rights of Christians in Turkey.

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Tuesday, 23 February, 1904

Births

FALKNER -- February 20, at Wellington, Nilgeri Hill, Madras, India, the wife of Captain Percy Hope Falkner, of a son.

Marriages

IRWIN--M'INTYRE -- February 16, at Albert Bridge Congregational Church, by the Rev. W. J. Calvin, John, eldest son of Henry Irwin, Richhill, Co. Armagh, to Maggie Home, youngest daughter of the late John M'Intyre and Mrs. M'Intyre, Barrow-in-Furness, England.

Deaths

JOHNSTON -- February 22nd, at her residence, 64 Short Strand, Dorothea, the beloved wife of James Johnston. Funeral will lift at 10.0 a.m. on to-morrow (Wednesday), for interment in Trummary Burying-ground.
JAMES JOHNSTON.

LARMOUR -- February 22nd, at his residence, 126 Earl Street, John Larmour. His remains will be removed from above address, to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock, for interment in City Cemetery.
MARGARET LARMOUR.

LAVERTY -- February 22nd, at her residence, 19 Waterville Street, Sarah Laverty. -- R.I.P. The remains of my dearly-beloved mother will be removed from above address, for interment in Milltown Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
FRANK LAVERTY.

MAGEE -- February 22nd, 1904, at his residence, Commercial Hotel, Ardglass, John Magee, Spirit Merchant and Fish Salesman. -- Fortified by the rites of the R.C. Church. Funeral on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at half-past one o'clock. -- R.I.P.

MILLS -- February 22nd, at her residence, 64 Henry Street, Jane, the relict of the late Alexander Mills. The remains of our dear mother will be removed from above address for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
WILLIAM AND SARAH MILLS.

MILLAR -- February 23rd, at Emerson Row, Ballysillan, George, eldest and only surviving son of the late John Millar. Funeral on Thursday afternoon, at half-past two o'clock, for City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.
JANE MILLAR.

MUNCE -- 22nd February, 1904, at 23 Grampian Street, off Holywood Road, Robert John Munce (late Commissionaire at the Bank Buildings). His remains will be removed from the above address on to-morrow (Wednesday) morning, at nine o'clock, for interment in the City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.

MUSGRAVE -- At Drumglass House, Belfast, 22nd February, Sir James Musgrave, Bart., D. L., eldest surviving son of the late Dr. Samuel Musgrave, Lisburn. Funeral at 9.30 on Friday morning. No flowers.

M'BRIAR -- February 23rd, at the residence of his son-in-law, Joseph M'Corry, 9 Castleview Terrace, Ballyhackamore, William, beloved husband of Martha M'Briar. His remains will be removed from above address, for interment in the New Meeting-house Green, Killinchy, on Thursday morning at eleven o'clock, passing through Comber at 12.30. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
MARTHA M'BRIAR.

M'CARTNEY -- February 22nd, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, John, the beloved husband of Dorothea M'Cartney, late of Queen's Island. His remains will be removed from his late residence, 101 Rathmore Street, for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
DOROTHEA M'CARTNEY.

STANARD -- February 21, at his residence, 2 Havelock Street, John Stanard, Church Lane, aged 65 years. Funeral to Balmoral Cemetery on to-morrow (Wednesday) morning, at ten o'clock.

WATSON -- February 23rd, at 34 Lewis Street, Robert, infant son of Arthur and Rachel Watson. His remains will be removed from the above address, for interment in City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
ARTHUR WATSON.

IN MEMORIAM

BOYD -- In fond and loving remembrance of Robert Crosbie, who was accidentally killed at Messrs. J. & T. M. Greeves, February 23rd, 1903, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
      No loved ones stood around him
      To bid a last farewell,
      No word of comfort could he leave
      To those he loved so well.
      Time will roll on, and years pass by,
      Whate'er may be our lot,
      But still as long as memory lasts
      He'll never be forgot.
Inserted by his Mother, and Brother and Sister.
ALEC. & BELLA BOYD, 86 Brookmount Street.

KIRKER -- In loving memory of my dear wife, Priscilla Kirker, who entered into rest 23rd February, 1903, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
      "Gone, but not forgotten."
      We shall come with joy and gladness,
      We shall gather round the throne,
      Face to face with those that love us,
      We shall know as we are known,
      And the song of our redemption
      Shall resound through endless day,
      When the shadows have departed,
      And the mists have rolled away.
THOMAS KIRKER. Killyleagh

LYNESS -- In loving memory of our dear mother, Ellen, who departed this life on February 23, 1900, and was interred in Ballylesson Burying-ground. Ever fondly remembered.
HER LOVING CHILDREN.

M'BRIDE -- In loving memory of our dear mother, Mary M'Bride, who departed this life on February 23rd, 1903, and was interred in Killough Churchyard, Co. Down.
      'Twas hard to see her suffer,
      And yet 'twas hard to say
      Oh, take her, Heavenly Father,
      To dwell with Thee for aye.
      We loved her; yea, no tongue can tell,
      How deep, how dearly, and how well;
      Christ loved her too, and thought it best
      To take her home with Him to rest.
Inserted by her sorrowing Son and Daughter,
JAMES & HANNAH M'BRIDE. 11 Dock Street, Belfast.

M'CUNE -- In loving remembrance of my dear brother, John M'Cune, who died on 23rd February, 1902, and whose remains were interred in the Knock Burying-ground.
MARY M'CUNE

M'MULLAN -- In loving memory of our dear aunt, Ann M'Mullan, who died at 10 Mill Street, February 23rd, 1884, and was interred in Milltown Cemetery, "Rest in peace."
HER NIECES AND NEPHEWS. 4 Hardcastle Street.

WILLIS -- In sad but loving memory of my dear wife, Letitia, who fell asleep in Jesus on the 23rd February, 1902, and was interred in Dundrod Burying-ground. Sadly missed.
      Gone, dear mother, much we miss thee,
      No dear form like thine is near,
      No sweet voice to soothe or comfort,
      None like thee our hearts to cheer.
Inserted by her sorrowing Husband and Children.
WILLIAM WILLIS, 9 Elm Street.

WILLIS -- In loving memory of my dear mother, who departed this life 23rd February, 1902, and was interred in Dundrod Burying-ground. Never to be forgotten.
      Her sufferings were not all in vain,
      God marked the throb of every pain,
      At last He said -- "Let trouble cease,
      And let her come to Me in peace."
      Father, in thy gracious keeping,
      Leave I now my dear mother sleeping.
Inserted by her loving Son,
JAMES D. WILLIS. 109 Benburb Terrace.

Clippings

ENGLISH COLLIERY DISASTER.

KILLED -- SEVERAL INJURED

Six men were killed and several injured by a rope breaking in the Aldwork Colliery, Rotherham, to-day.

The Central News Rotherham, correspondent, giving details of the Aldwark colliery disaster, telegraphs:-- A descending cage, containing eight men fell when forty yards from the bottom owing to the rope breaking.

Five men were killed, their names being -- Mark Dyson, of Victoria Road; Peter Rockett, of Ashwood Road, Parkgate; Wm. Downing, of Pottery Street, Rawmarsh; Albert Kent, of Eastwood View, Rotherham; and Thomas Ramsden, of Nottingham Street, Rotherham.

The injured men were Martin Nash, of Shaftsbury Square; Arthur Ramsden, of Nottingham Street, Rotherham; and Henry Wright, of Bear Tree Road, Parkgate.

All except Arthur Ramsden were married.

This was the third set of men to go down, there being only sixteen men in the pit and hundreds of others waiting at the pit head.

The shaft is 405 yards deep, and is not now used for drawing coal, but only for raising and lowering the men.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

BALKAN UNREST.

STREET FIGHT IN BELGRADE.

PARIS, Tuesday. -- The "Rappel" publishes a message from Belgrade, which says the revolutionary Macedonian partizans of Sarafaff encountered in the streets the partizans of Yonkcheff. In the fight which ensued one man was killed and several injured.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

SCOTCH STEAMER SUNK.

The steamer James Hall, belonging to the Aberdeen, Leith, and Moray Firth Co., and the steamer Luddick, belonging to the Aberdeen, Hull and Newcastle Co., collided in Aberdeen Bay this morning. The Luddick crashed into the port side of the James Hall, which began to sink. The crew were at once rescued, and the steamer drifted on to the land.

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - 29 February, 1904

Births

BARLOW -- February 25, at 19 Inglewood Road, West Hampstead, London, N.W., the wife of Arthur Barlow, of a son.

M'ILROY -- February 26th, at 31 Cheviot Avenue, Belfast, the wife of John M'Ilroy, R.I.C., of a daughter.

PLUNKETT -- February 27, at 15 Cliftonville Street, Cliftonville, the wife of S. J. Plunkett, of a son.

Marriages

CUSINS--MOORE -- On 4th February, 1904, at Greyville, Durban, by the Rev. T.C. Macauley, Presbyterian Minister, James Cusins, Pretoria, Transvaal, eldest son of J. Cusins, Broadway, Belfast, to Jennie, only daughter of Samuel Moore, Broadway, Belfast.

HANNA--PEARSON -- February 22nd, at Balmoral Methodist Church, by Rev. J. Elliott, J. Alexander Hanna, youngest son of Gordon Hanna, to Mary Shannon, third daughter of George Pearson, both of Belfast.

Deaths

ATKINSON -- February 27th, suddenly, at his residence, 261 Beersbridge Road, John Atkinson, sen. (late of Bessbrook). The remains of my dearly-beloved husband will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. --
American papers please copy.
SARAH ATKINSON.

BANKS -- February 29th, at his residence, 450 Newtownards Road, Joseph, the dearly-beloved husband of Jane Banks. His remains will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Moira, on Wednesday morning, at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

CLARK -- February 28th, at her residence, 51 Ship Street, Gardina, the dearly-beloved wife of Peter Clark. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
PETER CLARK.

DOWIE -- February 28th, at the Union Hospital, Robert James, the dearly-beloved husband of Ellen Dowie. His remains will be removed from above institution, for interment in Maralin, on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
ELLEN DOWIE.

BOILERMAKERS' AND IRON AND STEEL SHIPBUILDERS' SOCIETY.
BALLYMACARRETT (No. 1) BRANCH.
The members of the above Branch and other brethren are requested to attend the funeral of our late Brother, Robert Dowie.
ARCHIBALD BLAIR, President. ANDREW CRAWFORD, Secretary.

GARLAND -- February 28th, at 60 Tobergill Street, Mary Morrow, the beloved wife of James Garland (late of Dungannon), after a lingering illness borne with Christian fortitude. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock.
JAMES GARLAND.

GAWN -- February 27, at his residence, Carnearney, Andrew Gawn, eldest son of the late James Gawn. His remains will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Second Donegore, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at one o'clock.
THOMAS JOHN GAWN.

GREEN -- February 28th, 1904, at her parents' residence, 3 Rutland Street, Ormeau Road, Belfast, Veronica, second daughter of William and Maggie Green, aged two years. Funeral will leave above address, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for Milltown Cemetery. -- R.I.P.
WILLIAM GREEN.

MAGEE -- February 29th, at his father's residence, 4 Market Square, Lisburn, Patrick, second son of John Magee. Notice of interment in to-morrow's paper.

MORTON -- February 28, at Earl Shilton, Leicestershire, Nathaniel Morton, M.D., eldest son of the late James Morton, Bellaghy, County Derry.

MUSGRAVE -- February 28, 1904, at the residence of his sisters, 150 University Avenue, Belfast, David Musgrave, Licentiate of the Reformed Presbyterian Church. Funeral from above address, for interment in the family burying-ground, Knockbracken, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
JANE MUSGRAVE.

PARKER -- February 29th, 1904, at his parents' residence, Greenhill, Ballyutoag, James, youngest child of William James and Mary Parker, aged two years. Funeral on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for Umgall. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.

PETRIE -- February 27th, at her residence, 77 Bayview Terrace, Strandtown, Annie, the dearly-beloved wife of James Petrie. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
JAMES PETRIE.

REID -- February 28, Robert Reid, eldest son of the late James and Elizabeth Reid, Mountpottinger. His remains will be removed from the residence of his brother, 32 Castlereagh Place, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock.
T. D. REID.

SHAW -- February 28th, 1904, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, of bronchitis and cardiac failure, Annie Shaw, the faithful servant of John M'Caw, 7 Haypark Avenue, Belfast.

SKEATES -- February 29th, at his residence, 49 North Boundary Street, William (Wee Willie), the dearly-beloved son of Henry and Elizabeth Skeates, aged 7 months. His remains will be removed for interment in the City Cemetery, on Wednesday afternoon, 2nd March, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
      This bud the Gardener gave me-
      A fair and lovely child;
      He gave it to my keeping,
      To cherish undefiled.
      It lay upon my bosom,
      It was my hope, my pride;
      Perhaps it was an idol
      That I should be denied.

TAGGART -- February 28th, at her residence, Carr's Glenn, Oldpark, Jane, the dearly-beloved wife of James Taggart. Her remains will be removed, for interment in Ballynure Burying-ground on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
JAMES TAGGART.

THOMPSON -- February 28th, at her residence, Ballymacward, Esther, relict of the late William Thompson. Interment in Dundrod Burying-ground, on Wednesday, 2nd March, at 12 o'clock noon.

Too late for classification on page 5

DIAMOND -- February 29, at her father's residence, Newmills, Coleraine, Ellen, beloved daughter of Henry Diamond, aged 37 years. Interment in Drumagarner R.-C. Burying-ground, on Wednesday, 2nd March, at ten o'clock a.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

QUINN -- February 28th, at 21 Lee Street, James Quinn. The remains of our beloved father will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
ROBERT JAMES QUINN & MARY M'CREA.

In Memoriam

FERGUSON -- In loving memory of our dear mother, Minnie Ferguson, who departed this life February 28th, 1902, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
      Yes, life has fled, the soul has winged
      Its flight to realms of bliss,
      With angels to another world,
      More happy far than this.

      Then why these tears? Oh, weep not thus,
      But rather sing for joy
      That she whom we did love so well
      Is where no pains annoy.

      Where worldly sorrows cannot come,
      Where all things work for good,
      Where Christ in glorious Majesty
      Shall unite us all above.
Sadly missed by her sorrowing
HUSBAND & CHILDREN. 52 Victoria Terrace.

Too late for classification on page 5

MAXWELL -- In loving memory of my dear mother, Sarah Maxwell, who departed this life on 28th February, 1901, and was interred in Mount Norris Churchyard, Co. Armagh
      Although I cannot clasp thy hand,
      Your face I cannot see,
      Yet let this little token tell
      I still remember thee.
Inserted by her daughter,
MAGGIE A. BOYD. 132 Templemore Avenue, Belfast.

Clippings

THE NEW YORK LINEN TRADE
(Special Cablegram to the "Belfast Evening Telegraph.")

NEW YORK. February 27. -- Linens have thorough-out the week continued to exhibit great strength, and prices are still stiffening. Business has been good in all kinds of linens with reorders of increasing importance. Linen dress goods, all household goods, and crashes have been specially in request. Jobbers report a good trade done this week at full prices. Their stocks are small. Many new buyers have arrived here during the week. It is expected that retail houses will soon advance their prices.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

FISHGUARD AND ROSSLARE RAILWAYS AND HARBOURS CO.

Today we publish a prospectus announcing the issue by this company of £750,000 3 1/2 per cent. guaranteed preference stock. The total share capital of the company is £2,321,500, consisting of £1,321,500 3 1/2 per cent. guaranteed preference stock (of which the present issue forms part) and £1,000,000 ordinary stock. The preference stock bears interest upon the full nominal amount of the stock from the date of allotment, during construction, at the rate of 3 per cent. per annum, and from the inauguration of the through service at the rate of 3 1/2 per cent. per annum in perpetuity, such interest being secured by the joint guarantee of the Great Western Railway Company of England and the Great Southern and Western Railway Company of Ireland. The price of issue is par, payable 5 per cent. on application, 30 per cent. on allotment, 35 per cent. on 1st May, and 30 per cent. on 30th June. The Fishguard and Rosslare Railways and Harbours Company was reconstructed in 1898, and the control of the company was vested in the Great Western Railway Company of England and the Great Southern and Western Railway Company of Ireland, who have subscribed in full for the whole of the ordinary stock. The undertaking will afford a better route for some of the existing cross-Channel traffic between Ireland and certain parts of England and Wales, and it will develop a large and entirely new traffic, especially of passengers (including tourists) to the South of Ireland. The new route will be the shortest to the tourist districts of the South and South-West of Ireland, and this affords a prospect of profitable traffic. The list of applicants will close on or before Friday, 4th March.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

WARDEN, LIMITED.

The report of the directors of this company from the period from 4th January, 1903, to 30th January, 1904, states that the net profits amount to £4,640 1s 5d to which has been added the amount carried over from last account, £760 1s, making a total of £5,400 2s 5d. Out of this there has been written off, outlay on scenery for the year £180 8s 9d, and transferred to furniture and renewal account £1,000. With the balance the directors declare a dividend of 5 per cent. for the 13 months on the preference shares, 4 per cent. on the ordinary shares for a like period, and carry forward to next account £807 3s 8d. The balance-sheet shows a sum of £5,494 18s 9d as cash in hands and in bank.

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - 27 February, 1904

Births

CARDWELL -- February 19, at North Lea, Eastbourne, the wife of Hugh Brodie Cardwell, of a son.

Marriage

BEGGS -- M'FADDEN -- February 25th, 1904, at St. Mary's Church, Crumlin Road, by Rev. E.M. Gumley, B.A., George Beggs to Annie M'Fadden, both of Belfast.

Deaths

ARMSTRONG -- February 27th, at his residence, 39 Conlon Street, Patrick S., the dearly-beloved husband of Sarah Armstrong. His remains will be removed, for interment in Killead Meeting-house Green, on Monday morning, at eleven o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
SARAH ARMSTRONG.

BATTERSBY -- February 26th, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, William, the dearly-beloved husband of Thomasina Battersby, of 58 Upper Canning Street. His remains will be removed from 58 Canning Street, for interment in the family burying-ground, Shankill, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
THOMASINA BATTERSBY.

BATTERSBY -- February 26th, at the Royal Victoria Hospital. The remains of my dearly-beloved husband, William Battersby, will be removed from his late residence, 58 Upper Canning Street, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock, for interment in Shankill Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this intimation.
THOMASINA BATTERSBY.

AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS. BELFAST (7) BRANCH.
The members of above Branch are requested to attend the funeral of our late Brother, William Battersby.
WM. DOWEY, President. JAMES FRENCH, Secretary.

CASSELLS -- February 27th, at 5 Rockmore Road, Maggie, youngest daughter of William Cassells, aged 6 years. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Monday afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
"Jesus called a little child unto Him."

COPELAND -- February 27th, at her residence, Railway Street, Comber, Mary, the dearly-beloved wife of John Copeland. Her remains will be removed, for interment in Comber New Cemetery, on Monday, 29th inst., at one o'clock.
"Gone to be with Christ, which is far better."
JOHN COPELAND.

DYSART -- February 26th, at 96 Broom Street, Hugh, the dearly-beloved infant son of James and Elizabeth Dysart. Interment in the family burying-ground, Blaris, on to-day (Saturday), at two o'clock.
"He shall gather the lambs with His arms."
JAMES & ELIZABETH DYSART.

ELLIS -- February 26, at her residence, Legmore, Moira, Jane, widow of the late William John Ellis, Lurgan. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Moira Churchyard, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at one o'clock.

FITZSIMONS -- February 26, at her residence, 28 Brougham Street, Mary, relict of the late Thomas Fitzsimons, Ballyplunt, Co. Down. -- R.I.P. Her remains will be removed from above address, on Monday, February 29, at 9.30 a.m., for interment in the family burying-ground, Saul, Downpatrick, arriving about 1.30 p.m.
L & M. FITZSIMONS.

FLEMING -- February 27th, at her father's residence, 7 Rosebank Street, Crumlin Road, Charlotte (Wee Lottie), youngest daughter of John and Maggie Fleming. Her remains will be removed, for interment in Carmavey Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
      Good-bye, thy little blooming bud,
      Just bursting into flower
      We give thee up, but, oh, the pain
      Of that last parting hour.
JOHN & MAGGIE FLEMING

GREEN -- February 26th, at her residence, 44 Jocelyn Street, Martha Green. Her remains will leave G.N.R. on Monday morning, at 11.15, for interment in the family burying-ground, Killyman, Co. Tyrone, leaving the above address at 10 a.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.
G. & T. GREEN.

HEADON -- February 26th, at her residence, 74 Sugarfield Street, Belfast, Mary, the beloved wife of Fred C. Headon. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
FRED C. HEADON.

HERDMAN -- February 26, at 82 Duncairn Gardens, Jennie, the dearly-beloved wife of William Herdman. Her remains will be removed, for interment in Moneyrea Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Sunday) morning, at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
Deeply regretted
WILLIAM HERDMAN.

KENNEDY -- February 27th, at Castle Chester, Whitehead. The remains of my beloved daughter, Catherine, will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Monday, 29th inst., passing Northern Counties Railway about three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
JANE KENNEDY.

JOHNSTON -- February 26th, at his late residence, 36 Langford Street, Richard Johnston, the dearly-beloved husband of Sarah Johnston. His remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
SARAH JOHNSTON.

MAGEE -- February 26, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Margaret Magee. The remains of my dearly-beloved wife will be removed from the above institution for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
DANIEL MAGEE.

MONTGOMERY -- February 26th, at 6 Cavour Street, William John, dearly-beloved son of John and Matilda Montgomery. His remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
      For him the daily strife is o'er,
      For him the battle's won,
      Only for us 'tis left to say,
      "Father, Thy will be done."

I.O.R. -- LAGAN LIFEBOAT JUVENILE TENT (No.1.)
The members of the above Tent are requested to attend the funeral of our late Brother Montgomery.
D. ROBINSON, Superintendent. R. M'BURNEY, Secretary.

MOORE -- February 26th, at 194 Sandy Row, Eliza Moore. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the Shankill Graveyard, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation
ALEXANDER MOORE.

MOORE -- February 26, at his residence, 31 Sugarfield Street, John, the dearly-beloved husband of Rachel Moore. Interment on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock, in the City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation
RACHEL MOORE.

MORRISON -- February 26th, at 72 North Street, Belfast, Robert Stuart (Little Bobbie) Morrison, eldest and dearly-beloved son of R. N. and L. Morrison, aged 12 years. Funeral strictly private.
"He giveth His beloved sleep."

M'CONNELL -- February 26th, at 68 Newington Avenue, Mary, the dearly-beloved wife of Samuel M'Connell. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Greyabbey, on to-morrow (Sunday), leaving above address at ten o'clock a.m. Friends will please accept this intimation
SAMUEL M'CONNELL.

M'DONALD -- February 26th, 1904, at 19 Leopold Street, Maggie Josephine, dearly-beloved daughter of Hugh and Maggie M'Donald. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
HUGH & MAGGIE M'DONALD.

M'MULLAN -- February 26th, at 68 Heather Street, Annie Teresa, infant daughter of Eugene and Cassie M'Mullan, aged 6 months. Funeral will leave above address at 9 a.m. on to-morrow (Sunday) morning, for interment in Loughinisland.

M'MULLAN -- February 27th, 1904, at her late residence, 27 St. Kilda Street, Belfast, Sarah, the fourth and dearly-beloved daughter of James and the late Mary M'Mullan. Funeral will leave above residence on Monday morning, at nine o'clock, for interment in Donacloney Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
      Where the grassy hillock rises,
      There our darling Sarah sleeps,
      Nothing now can hurt or harm her,
      Jesus safe her spirit keeps.
JAMES M'MULLAN.

I.O.R. -- PRIDE OF RAVENHILL LODGE.
The members of the above tent and Order are requested to attend the funeral of Sister Sarah M'Mullan.
WILLIAM MOOREHEAD, District Chief Ruler, DUNCAN KIRKWOOD, District Secretary.

NEILL -- February26th, at her residence, Linwood Terrace, Alfred Street, Bangor, Alice, the dearly-beloved wife of Charles Neill. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the New Cemetery, on Monday, the 29th inst., at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
CHARLES NEILL.

PROUD -- February 26th, at her residence, 67 Roundhill Street, Margaret, the dearly-beloved wife of Thomas Proud, and eldest daughter of William Knox, 7 Grove Street. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
"Gone, but not forgotten."
THOMAS PROUD.

STEWART -- February 26th, at her father's residence, 41 Finvoy Street, Agnes Frances, youngest and dearly-beloved daughter of David and Mary Stewart. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in Comber New Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
"Gone to be with Christ, which is far better."
DAVID STEWART.

STEWART -- February 26th, at her mother's residence, Irish Quarter South, Carrickfergus, Mary Jane Stewart. Her remains will be removed, for interment in Ballylinney Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at half-past one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
PAUL STEWART

In Memoriam

FERGUSON -- In Loving memory of our dear father, Richard Ferguson, who departed this life February 27th, 1884, and was interred in Old Abbey Burying-ground, Downpatrick.
"Gone, but not forgotten."
A. GRACEY, S. SWEENEY.

MAINS -- In loving memory of my dear son, Sergeant Joseph Mains, R.I.C., Musgrave Street, City, who departed this life on 27th February, 1903, and was interred in Clare Meeting-house Green, Co. Armagh.
      He left his daily toil, his earthly care,
      In answer to the summons there;
      It seemed to us too soon for him to go,
      But surely God must know.
Inserted by his sorrowing Mother,
JANE E. OWENS, 34 Euston Street.

M'ALLISTER -- In loving remembrance of our dear daughter Mary (Minnie), who departed this life on 27th day of February, 1903, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
      Long days and nights she bore in pain,
      To wait for cure 'twas all in vain,
      But God alone who thought it best,
      Has eased her pain and gave her rest.
Inserted by her loving father and mother.
THOMAS & MARY M'ALLISTER. 60 Thames Street.

M'CANCE -- In loving and affectionate remembrance of my dear father, William M'Cance, who departed this life 27th February, 1903, and was interred in the City Cemetery. Deeply regretted.
WILLIAM M'CANCE, 13 Seaview Street.

Clippings

THIS DAY'S POLICE.

CUSTODY COURT

(Before Messrs. Garrett Nagle, R.M.; J.C.C. Payne, and R.M. Young.)

A TREACHEROUS DOMESTIC.

Constable S. Gilkeson charged Annie Simpson, a respectable-looking young woman, with the larceny of an umbrella, a fur, and a pair of slippers, the property of Martha Jane Hanna, 113 Park Road, on the 26th February. Constable Gilkeson said that from information received he went to 126 Raglan Street, yesterday, and charged prisoner with the offence. She then said, "All right; Mrs. Hanna gave them to me, and I am sorry I took them." He found the articles produced in the prisoner's possession. Mrs. Hanna identified the articles as her property. Prisoner was a domestic servant with her, and left her employment about noon on the 26th inst. Shortly after she left she missed the articles produced, and reported the matter to the police. Prisoner had only come to the house on the Monday previous. The umbrella was value for 8s, the fur 7s 6d, and the slippers 2s 9d. Prisoner pleaded not guilty, and was put back. When brought forward subsequently she said she was guilty. She had never been up before, and asked for a chance. The magistrates ordered her to stand back again until they considered her case. Prisoner said she would go to a home, and the case was adjourned. Mr. J.S. Osborne prosecuted for Mr. Spiller in this court to-day.

JUVENILE CASE.

Sergeant Baird charged a boy named John Mooney with the larceny of a bedtick and two pair of trousers, the property of Margaret M'Cusker, Smithfield. It was stated that the boy had been under observation, as he had been stealing about Smithfield for some time past. The magistrates ordered the boy to be sent to an industrial school.

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OLDPARK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

LAYING OF MEMORIAL STONES.

This afternoon at three the memorial stones of the new Presbyterian Church, now being built in a commanding and picturesque position on the continuation of the Cliftonville Road to Oldpark, were laid by the Lady Mayoress (Lady Jaffe), Mrs. M'Robert (Rademon), and Mrs. Hanna (Knock). The Moderator of the Belfast Presbytery (Rev. John MacDermott, M.A.), presided, and among those who participated in the ceremony were Rev. Dr. Workman (convener of the Church Extension Committee) and Rev. W.J. Jackson, M.A. -- There was a large attendance, and contributions were taken up on behalf of the Building Fund, which will ... ... ...

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