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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Tuesday, 23 December 1902

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES & DEATHS
Announcements under this heading are charged for as follows:-- Births, 1s 6d; Marriages, 2s 6d; Notice of Death, 1s 6d; Interment Notice, 2s 6d.

Births

BEATTIE -- December 22nd, 1902, at The Corner, 109 Peter's Hill, Belfast, Mrs. ALEXANDER BEATTIE, of a son -- both well.

WARING -- December 20, at Dunseverick Rectory, Bushmills, the wife of Rev. T.P. WARING -- a son.

WILLIS -- December 20th, at 46 Sandhurst Gardens, Stranmillis Road, Belfast, the wife of John WARING WILLIS, of a son.

Marriages

PATTERSON--COLEMAN -- December 23rd, at Trinity Church, by the Rev. R. J. Clarke, THOMAS PATTERSON, third son of Mr. John Patterson, to MARY COLEMAN, late of County Cavan, both of Belfast.

Deaths

BUTLER -- December 21st, 1902, at her residence, 206 Manor Street, ELIZA, the dearly-beloved mother of William Hunt. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. WILLIAM HUNT.

BROWN -- December 22nd, at 101 Upper Canning Street, MARGARET (MAGGIE ), second and dearly-beloved daughter of Thomas and Sarah Brown. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted. THOMAS & SARAH BROWN.

CONN -- December 22nd, at his late residence, Allistragh, Armagh, JOHN CONN. His remains will be removed for interment in Old Cathedral Burying-ground, Armagh, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at one o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. His Sorrowing Family.

COURTENAY -- December 22nd, 1920, at her residence, 10 Roe Street, LIZZIE (WEE LIZZIE), the youngest and dearly-beloved daughter of Violet A. Courtenay. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. VIOLET A. COURTENAY.

DOBBIN -- December 23rd, at Plainfield, Donaghadee Road, Bangor, WILLIAM MARTIN DOBBIN. Funeral to Bangor Churchyard, on Thursday morning, 25th inst., at eleven o'clock.

ELLISON-MACARTNEY -- On the 22nd inst., at Clogher Park, ELIZABETH PHOEBE, wife of John Ellison-Macartney, D.L., aged 75.

FALOON -- December 22, at her residence, 206 Snugville Street, MARY (MAY), youngest and dearly-beloved daughter of Charles and Minnie Faloon, aged 2 years and 9 months. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. CHARLES & MINNIE FALOON.

JOHNSTON -- December 22nd, at his residence, 40 Candliss Street, Belfast, JOHN JOHNSTON. The remains of my dearly-beloved son will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
     It is the blood, it is the blood
          Which hath atonement made;
     It is the blood which once for all
          Our ransom price has paid.
MARY JOHNSTON.

MAHAIR -- December 22nd, suddenly, at his residence, 42 Hatfield Street, Belfast, DAVID MAHAIR (late G.P.O.). The remains of my dearly-beloved husband will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Thursday afternoon, 25th inst., at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. MARY ANN MAHAIR.

BALMER -- December 22, at her residence, 17 Glenwood Street, Belfast, MARY, the beloved wife of James Balmer. Her remains will be removed from above address for interment in Hillsborough Churchyard, on Thursday morning, the 25th inst., at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. JAMES BALMER.

KELLY -- December 22nd, at 12 Seymour Street, Belfast, RACHEL KELLY. -- R.I.P. The remains of my beloved wife will be removed for interment in Milltown Roman Catholic Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. HUGH KELLY, Sen.

MITCHELL -- December 23, at her mother's residence, 37 Witham Street, Newtownards Road, LIZZIE, the dearly-beloved daughter of Isabella Mitchell. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Thursday afternoon, 25th inst., at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. ISABELLA MITCHELL.

ROBINSON -- December 23rd, at Hospital, Lisburn Road, THOMAS ROBINSON. His remains will be removed from above institution, at three o'clock on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, for interment in the City Cemetery. -- Canadian and South African papers please copy.

RODGERS -- December 22nd, at 24 Grampian Avenue, ANN RODGERS, relict of the late George Rodgers. The remains of my beloved mother will be removed from above address, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Thursday morning, at eleven o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. JOSEPH RODGERS.

SHANKS -- December 23, at his residence, Riversdale Terrace, Stockman's Lane, Balmoral, THOMAS SHANKS.

TODD -- December 23rd, at her mother's residence, 41 Upper Charleville Street, LUCY ANNIE VICTORIA WILSON, youngest and dearly-beloved daughter of Annie Todd. Her remains will be removed for interment in the City Cemetery, on Thursday afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- English papers please copy.
     "To be with Christ, which is far better."
ANNIE TODD.

WRIGHT -- December 21st, at 137 Ormeau Road, SARAH WRIGHT. The remains of my beloved wife will be removed, on to-morrow (Wednesday) morning, at eleven o'clock, for interment in First Boardmills Presbyterian Church Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this intimation. James Wright.

The following announcements were received too late for Classification on Page 5:-

DEATHS.

TAYLOR -- December 23rd, at his residence, Milltown, Shaw's Bridge, JAMES, the dearly --beloved husband of Sarah Taylor. His remains will be removed for interment in Ballylesson, on Thursday afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted.

In Memoriam

IRVINE -- In sad and loving remembrance of my dear wife, who entered into rest on the 23rd December, 1901, and was interred in Carnmoney Burying-ground.
     "Till the day break, and the shadows flee away."
38 Moyola Street. JAMES IRVINE.

Clippings

FOYLE COLLEGE, LONDONDERRY.

DISTRIBUTION OF PRIZES.

The Marquis of Hamilton was present at the annual meeting held to-day in Foyle College, and distributed the prizes won by the pupils there, who distinguished themselves at the recent University and Intermediate examinations held in connection with the college this year.

His Lordship, Right Rev. Dr. Chadwick presided. There was also present -- The Mayor (Sir Henry Miller), and Messrs. William Tillie, H.M.L.; John Cooke, D.L.; Rev. Canon Potter, T.B. Montgomery, J.P.; and Professor J.C. Dick, head-master of the college, who submitted his report for the past year.

The Marquis of Hamilton then addressed the pupils and parents who assembled. He congratulated the pupils who distinguished themselves so highly, and also congratulated the masters on the success of Foyle College.

The Lord Bishop then addressed the assemblage, and congratulated their late master, and all the masters on the success of the college this year. He said there were very few schools in Ireland that took 79 per cent, the same as Foyle College did this year. He spoke of the great interest taken by the Marquis in the college.

The Mayor then handed over to Professor Dick the beautiful silver shield presented to the college by the old pupils in commemoration of their winning the Schools Challenge Cup in 1900.

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POST OFFICE EMPLOYEE'S SUDDEN DEATH.

Mr. J.S. Finnigan (deputy coroner) held an inquest this afternoon in Shaftesbury Square Hall into the circumstances attending the death of David Mahair (aged 54), a Post Office employee, which occurred very suddenly at his residence, Hatfield Street, Belfast, yesterday.

Mary Ann Mahair said deceased was her husband. He went to work early yesterday morning, apparently in good health, returning about 11 a.m. He remained indoors until he had his dinner, when he went to the scullery to wash his hands. Witness heard a thud and hastened to the scullery, where she saw deceased lying on the floor. She endeavoured to raise him, but without success. Medical assistance was sent for, but Dr. James Taylor on his arrival pronounced life extinct. The evidence of the doctor went to show that death was due to heart failure.

The Coroner said he was sure he was voicing the general sentiment when he expressed to Mrs. Mahair his sympathy in her sad bereavement.

Mr. Ross Bell, as foreman of the jury, said they entirely associated themselves with the Coroner's remarks. Personally he had known the deceased for the last twenty-five years, and entertained the highest opinion of him. Regret was general among the Post Office employees of all grades when intelligence of his death became known. A sad feature in connection with the case was that deceased would have retired on a well-earned pension at the end of the present year. The jury found in accordance with medical testimony.

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The body of a man named James M'Ateer, of Ballyholland, was found yesterday in the Newry Canal, near the locks, about three miles from the town.

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King Edward has telegraphed to Lord Minto expressing delight at the success of Marconi's wireless telegraphy, which brings England and Canada still more closely together.

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The Tyne shipbuilding returns show that 140 vessels were launched during the year. In the early part of the year there was considerable activity in shipbuilding, but in the latter part there was a falling off.

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CAROL SINGING IN BELFAST. -- The band and singers connected with the Salvation Army Citadel, Dublin Road, will sing carols in the Dublin Road district during the week on behalf of the Army Farthing Breakfast Fund and Xmas, free tea to 250 poor children. It is to be trusted that the object, and the self-denying efforts of these men and women, may meet with a generous reward from the public.

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MOVEMENTS IN THE CIVIL SERVICE. -- It has just been officially notified at the Customs headquarters in London that Mr. F. Paisley, boatman and second-class officer, Belfast, has been promoted to preventive officer (lower section), Liverpool and district. In the Valuation Office, Ireland, Mr. J.T. Kelly has been appointed assistant clerk (abstractor), under clause V11. of the Order in Council of June 4, 1870. In the Post Office service the following have been appointed learners:- Miss E.J. Tully, Belfast; Messrs. J. Logue and W.M. Sweeney, Londonderry; Mr. W.A. Forde, Enniskillen; Miss M.A. Beattie, Belfast; and Mr. W.C. Judge, Portarlington.

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COMBER STREET MISSION SABBATH SCHOOL. -- A cantata entitled "Santa Claus' Arrival" was rendered on Friday evening last in Mountpottinger Presbyterian Church Lecture Hall by a choir of over 100 voices, selected from the children of Cherryville National School, under the leadership of Mr. H. Gillespie, principal. At the conclusion of the cantata a number of miscellaneous items including fan, tambourine, and pinafore songs and dumb-bell drill were given by the children under the supervision of Miss Lily Wylie, Miss Campbell, and Mr. Baxter. Miss Wylie acted as accompanist throughout the entertainment. Rev. R. Duff occupied the chair.

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CORK CLERGYMAN'S DEATH. -- Andrew Moore was yesterday brought before Mr. B.R. Burdon, R.M., and charged with the murder of the Rev. William Bell, Kilmeen, Co. Cork. The charred remains of the deceased, with the exception of the head, which has not been discovered, were found in a hayshed at the rectory, and it was first thought he had been accidentally burnt to death, but subsequently the authorities ordered the exhumation of the body. On the application of the Crown solicitor, the proceedings were conducted in private.

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YORK STREET PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH BAND OF HOPE. -- The usual monthly meeting was held on Thursday evening, 18th December. The Rev. W.A. Watson presided, and the attendance was large and representative. An interesting programme of a miscellaneous character was gone through, to which the following contributed:- Miss Hedley, Miss Florrie Glasgow, Miss Jeannie Glasgow, Messrs. W. M'Alister, and Richard Bailie. The Band of Hope Choir also rendered two items under the leadership of Mr. Gilmore. Mr. J.B. Macrory delivered an impressive temperance address. The accompaniments were supplied by Miss Kathleen Henderson and Miss Jeannie Glasgow. After the customary vote of thanks, the meeting terminated with the pronouncing of the benediction.

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SAD DROWNING CASE AT LISBURN.

A very sad death has occurred in Lisburn. A young man named Smith, between twenty and thirty years of age, who suffered from epilepsy, was walking along the tow-path at the Lagan Canal, when he was suddenly seized by a fit, and falling he rolled down a high bank into the river. The poor fellow being unable to help himself sank, and was drowned before assistance could be rendered. The body was recovered soon after, and an inquest will be held this evening.

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Mr. J.B. Lonsdale, the member for Mid-Armagh has joined the steadily growing army of automobilists. At present he is in possession of an electrically propelled brougham. Mr. Lonsdale has ordered a petrol motor, which he intends using in town and country. In becoming an automobilist the hon. Gentleman joins a numerous company of Parliamentary colleagues. Among them may be named the Prime Minister, Lord Wimborne, Sir Charles Cayzer, Mr. Pemberton, Mr. Scott Montagu, Captain Arthur Hill, Mr. Louis Sinclair, and Mr. Dalziel.

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The Lord Lieutenant has intimated his intention of conferring the honour of knighthood on Mr. Charles Bent Ball, Regius Professor of Surgery in Trinity College, Dublin. Dr. Ball performed the recent operation on the Countess of Dudley for appendicitis, from which her Excellency is happily recovering. He is the youngest son of the late Robert Ball, LL.D., Dublin, the well-known naturalist, and is a brother of Sir Robert Ball, the Lowndean Professor of Astronomy, Cambridge University, who was knighted in 1886.

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DEATH OF A NONAGENARIAN IN WARINGSTOWN.

The remains of Mrs. Sarah Page, who had attained the ripe old age of 96 years, were laid to rest in the Waringstown Churchyard, a few days ago. Deceased leaves fifty-one descendants -- three sons, two daughters, thirty grandchildren, and sixteen great-grandchildren. The husband, Mr. Joseph Page, pre-deceased his wife by some 25 years.

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The Duke of Connaught called at Aden yesterday on his way to India, and inspected the Dublin Fusiliers.

The Duke and Duchess of Fife have arrived at Portman Square, London, from Brighton, and are expected to leave St. Pancras to-morrow for Sandringham on a visit to the King and Queen.

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Wednesday, 24 December 1902

Births

M'MURTRY -- December 22, at 122 York Street, Jarrow-on-Tyne, to DR. W.D. and MRS. M'MURTRY -- a daughter.

Marriages

M'CLELLAND--MITCHELL -- December 23rd, at Elmwood Presbyterian Church, by the Rev. David Purves, M.A., WILLIAM TINDALE M'CLELLAND, City Missionary, Belfast, and late of Ballymena, to MINNIE, second daughter of Joseph Mitchell, Esq., Ballynaskeagh, Banbridge.

Deaths

BALMER -- December 22, at her residence, 17 Glenwood Street, Belfast, MARY, the beloved wife of James Balmer. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in Hillsborough Churchyard, on to-morrow (Thursday) morning, at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. JAMES BALMER.

BYRNE -- December 24, at her residence, Moneymore, MARY JANE, dearly-beloved wife of Henry Byrne. Interment on Friday, 26th inst., at two o'clock, to the New Churchyard, Moneymore.

CALLANS -- December 24th, at her daughter's residence, 39 Bank Street, MARGARET CALLANS, widow of the late Patrick Callans, Smithfield. -- R.I.P. The remains of my beloved mother will be removed from above address, for interment in Milltown Cemetery, on Friday, the 26th, at half-past one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. MAY M'CORMICK.

CLARKE -- December 24th, 1902, at her late residence, 8 Adelaide Avenue, MARY, widow of the late Aeneas Clarke. The remains of our dear mother will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Hillsborough, on Friday morning, at ten o'clock. ANNIE & MINNIE CLARKE.

CONNOR -- December 23, 1902, at the residence of his son-in-law, 227 Cregagh Street, ALEXANDER CONNOR. The remains of our dearly-beloved father will be removed for interment on Friday, 26th inst., at eleven o'clock.

DUNBAR -- December 23, 1902, at the residence of her mother, 64 Damascus Street, off Agincourt Avenue, Belfast, ANNABELL, youngest and dearly-beloved daughter of Mary and the late James Dunbar. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Friday afternoon, 26th inst., at half-past one o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
     After twelve long years of suffering,
          All her earthly pain is o'er;
     Now she shares the joys of heaven,
          With her Saviour evermore.
MARY DUNBAR.

DOBBIN -- December 23rd, at Plainfield, Donaghadee Road, Bangor, WILLIAM MARTIN DOBBIN. Funeral to Bangor Churchyard, on to-morrow (Thursday) morning, at eleven o'clock.

GILPIN -- December 24th, suddenly, at the Royal Hospital, ROBERT D., eldest son of William and Fanny Gilpin, of 91 Thistle Street, Mountpottinger. Notice of interment in the later editions.

JENKINS -- December 23, at her late residence, Cloughfern, Whiteabbey, MARGARET, widow of the late William Jenkins. The remains of our dearly-beloved mother will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Christmas Day), at twelve o'clock noon. MATTHEW & MAGGIE JENKINS.

LAWTHER -- December 24th, at her residence, Lismoyne, ELIZA LAWTHER. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in Donegore Burying-ground, on Friday, 26th inst., at half-past nine o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. JAMES LAWTHER.

MAHAIR -- December 22nd, suddenly, at his residence, 42 Hatfield Street, Belfast, DAVID MAHAIR (late G.P.O.). The remains of my dearly-beloved husband will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. MARY ANN MAHAIR.

MITCHELL -- December 23, at her mother's residence, 37 Witham Street, Newtownards Road, LIZZIE, the dearly-beloved daughter of Isabella Mitchell. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. ISABELLA MITCHELL.

QUINN -- December 24th, at his residence, High Street, Antrim, FELIX QUINN. -- R.I.P. His remains will be removed, for interment at St. Congall's, Antrim, on Friday morning, at half-past ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.

RODGERS -- December 22nd, at 24 Grampian Avenue, ANN RODGERS, relict of the late George Rodgers. The remains of my beloved mother will be removed from above address, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Thursday) morning, at eleven o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. JOSEPH RODGERS.

SHANKS -- December 23, at his residence, Riversdale Terrace, Stockman's Lane, Balmoral, THOMAS SHANKS.

TAYLOR -- December 23rd, at his residence, Milltown, Shaw's Bridge, JAMES, the dearly-beloved husband of Sarah Taylor. His remains will be removed, for interment in Ballylesson, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted.

TODD -- December 23rd, at her mother's residence, 41 Upper Charleville Street, LUCY ANNIE VICTORIA WILSON, youngest and dearly-beloved daughter of Annie Todd. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- English papers please copy.
     "To be with Christ, which is far better."
ANNIE TODD.

In Memoriam

CARSWELL -- In fond and loving memory of my dearly-beloved father, WILLIAM CARSWELL, who departed this life December 26, 1900, at his residence, 57 Gaffikin Street, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
     Shall we meet with many a loved one,
          Who was torn from our embrace?
     Shall we listen to their voices,
          And behold them face to face?
Inserted by his beloved Daughter, MINNIE KEENAN, 2 Rainey Street.

MAGILL -- In loving remembrance of my dear mother, AGNES MAGILL, who departed this life on 24th December, 1901, and was interred in Old Churchyard, Ballymena.
     Oh, the hallowed name of mother,
          How it echoes through the soul,
     When the tie that binds her to us
          Severs at the dying goal.
     Sweetly now her dust is sleeping,
          Fanned by cadences of love,
     But her spirit basks in sunshine,
          On the golden shore above.
Inserted by her Daughter, MARY J. SEMPLE. 90 Halliday's Road, Belfast.

M'ARTHUR -- In loving remembrance of my dear wife, MARY, who departed this life on the 24th December, 1898, and was interred in Donegore Burying-ground.
     In a humble, earthly dwelling,
          There stands a vacant chair,
     For the one that used to fill it
          Will never more be there.
     Her pains are past, her joys are full,
          Her heart can ask no more,
     Save the dear ones she left behind
          May meet her on that shore.
Sadly missed. Inserted by her loving Husband, JOHN M'ARTHUR. 60 Portallo Street.

Clippings

LOCAL BREVITIES.

We received to-day a fine sample of primroses, grown in the open air, from Mrs. Johnston, 5 Mountcollyer Avenue, Shore Road, Belfast.

It may be of interest to the public to know that there are some fashionable pickpockets, male and female, just now in the city, but thanks to the police, they have been unsuccessful in their operations up till the present.

For the past week, fog signals have been used at Greencastle Railway Station on the down line warning the engine drivers of express trains to Carrickfergus and other stations to reduce their speed, owing to improvements being made on the down line below this point.

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THE EARTHQUAKE HORROR.

5,000 LIVES LOST.

The "Daily Mail" St. Petersburg correspondent telegraphs -- The earthquake shocks in the vicinity of Andijan are increasing in severity every day, and now take place throughout an area of about 200 English square miles. The suffering caused by the earthquake shocks is intensified by the bitterly cold weather, while famine is general. Up to the present about 1,000 bodies have been extricated from the ruins. Work must proceed with extreme caution, as masses of ruins keep collapsing. There are now 2,000 workmen employed in excavations, in addition to three battalions of Sappers. It is now expected that in all about 5,000 people perished, yet probably the final total will be far higher. Those who survived are at present living in large camps of tents, but there is great suffering through want of food. The material damages are reckoned at several million pounds.

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SENTENCE OF DEATH AT GLASGOW.

In Glasgow Circuit Court today a jury by a majority of one found George Aitken guilty of murdering his wife, in their house at Gascube Road, Glasgow, by cutting her throat, and accused was sentenced to death. After the crime Aitken went to the police office, and said that he had cut his wife's throat. The accused had returned from the front. The defence was that he had been peculiar in his manner. Jealousy was the cause of the crime.

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BANGOR PETTY SESSIONS.

This bi-monthly Court was held to-day, before Lieutenant-Colonel Sharman-Crawford, D.L. (presiding), Colonel Bowlby, R.M., and Messrs John M'Meekan and W.S. M'Lean. James M'Ker, Newtownards, was summoned by Constable Reilly for drunkenness on the 16th inst. Fined 5s and costs. James Ware, for a like offence, in Bangor, was fined 5s and costs. Francis Fowler was summoned for having worked a horse which was suffering from a sore. Constable Griffin proved the case. Fined 10s and costs. At the Town Court James Wilson was fined 5s and costs for disorderly conduct on the public street in Bangor. Wm. R. Macauley was fined 10s and costs for drunkenness.

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ROYAL IRISH RIFLES.

Two Companies in the Royal Irish Rifles have just been filled by the promotion of Lieutenants James W. Alston, who is with the 2nd Battalion at Modder River, and was all through the late war (King' and Queen's medals), joined the Rifles eight years ago. Captain Charley, who belongs to a well-known Antrim family, is with the depot companies at Belfast. He got his first commission a little over seven years ago.

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CHRISTMAS GIFTS TO RAILWAY MEN.

At a meeting held in Coondarragh, Donaghadee, the residence of Mr. D. H. Hughes, J.P., on the evening of Tuesday the annual Christmas gifts to the engine drivers, firemen, guards, and assistant guards, who work the passenger trains on the Newtownards and Donaghadee section of the County Down Railway, and the passenger porters at Newtownards and Donaghadee stations were allotted. Mr. Hughes presided, and there were present Mr. William Aiken, treasurer, and Messrs. R. Evans and A. S. Robertson, joint secretaries. With each gift was enclosed a typewritten copy of the list of contributors, kindly supplied by the railway company. Each engine driver received 15s, and each fireman 7s 6d, each guard 15s, and smaller sums were allotted to assistant guards. Each passenger porter at Newtownards and Donaghadee stations received 5s. These gifts are cheerfully contributed by residents in Newtownards and Donaghadee, and by summer visitors to the latter popular resort, in recognition of the courtesy and attention to duty displayed by the men.

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DIVORCE AND MURDER.

A terrible tragedy was enacted on Monday in Rue Francois Miron, Paris, where a man named Jean Flechier was living with a divorcee, Melina Soulages. The former husband of the last-named, hearing after a three years interval where Melina was, called at the house to demand the return of his little daughter, aged 8. Flechier opened the door and warned his rival that he would shoot him like a dog if he attempted to get in. Despite this, the enraged father advanced a few paces, but was at once shot down by three discharges from Flechier's revolver in the presence of the child. Soulages died on his way to the hospital. His daughter is to be one of the witnesses against her mother's paramour. -- "Daily Express."

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Friday, 26 December 1902

Births

YUILL -- December 24th, at 46 Hopefield Avenue, the wife of Robert D. Yuill -- a daughter.

Marriages

POLLOCK--HOLLAND -- December 24th, at St. Columba's Church, Knock, by the Rev. R. E. Waters, rector, J. ARCHER, second eldest son of the late Thomas Pollock, Contractor, Keady, to MABEL FITZGERALD, youngest daughter of the late Joseph Holland, Holland House, Knock, and Mrs. Holland, Bloomfield.

M'GINLEY--BRADY -- December 24th, at Magdalene Church, Donegall Pass, by the Rev. D. H. Hall, DANIEL M'GINLEY, Motherwell, Scotland, to SARAH JANE, youngest daughter of Francis Brady, Belfast.

Deaths

ATKINSON -- December 25th, at his residence, Glencairn, Strandtown, MOSES ATKINSON, aged 78 years.

CAMERON -- December 25th, at his residence, 16 Trillick Street, THOMAS CAMERON, the dearly-beloved husband of Catherine Cameron, who departed this life to be present with the Lord. His remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery on Lord's Day, 28th, at two p.m. All brotherhood earnestly invited. CATHERINE CAMERON.

DARRAGH -- In sad and loving memory of our dear brother, LANCE-CORPORAL HUGH DARRAGH, 60th Company Irish Imperial Yeomanry, who died of enteric fever, at Winburg, Orange River Colony, on 26th December, 1901.
Deeply regretted by his loving brothers and sister.

GAMBLE -- December 26, 1902, at the Royal Hospital, ROBERT JOHN GAMBLE. The remains of my beloved husband will be removed from the above institution, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Saturday morning), at half-past ten o'clock.
MINNIE GAMBLE. 6 Ardmoulin Avenue.

HOEY -- December 25th, suddenly, at her brother's residence, 54 Oldpark Avenue, ELIZABETH, the dearly-beloved sister of George Hoey. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Kilrush, Lisburn, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. GEORGE HOEY.

HOEY -- December 25, at the District Asylum, Grosvenor Street, SAMUEL HOEY. His remains will be removed from his sister's residence, 33 Paxton Street, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at half-past one o'clock. JOHN MURPHY.

HOWIE -- December 26th, at her residence, Mounthill, Raloo, Larne, MATILDA HOWIE, relict of the late Alexander Howie, aged 74 years. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Ballynure, on to-morrow (Saturday), at twelve o'clock noon. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted. ROBERT HOWIE.

M'CORMICK -- December 25th, 1902, at her residence, 6 Farnham Street, SARAH, second and dearly-beloved daughter of the late Isaac M'Cormick. Her remains will be removed from above address, on to-morrow (Saturday), at twelve o'clock noon, for interment in Movilla Burying-ground, Newtownards. Friends will please accept this intimation. SARAH M'CORMICK.

O'HARA -- On Christmas Day, at the residence of her son, Daniel O'Hara, Bridge Street, Ballymena, HARRIET, relict of the late Daniel O'Hara, Ballylesson. -- R.I.P. Funeral to Crebilly on Sunday morning first, at ten o'clock.

WARING -- December 26th, at her residence, 97 Lilliput Street, MATILDA (TILLIE) WARING (nee BLAIR). The remains of my beloved wife will be removed from above address, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Sunday afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. CUNNINGHAM WARING.

On page 5 -- Too late for classification on page 2

MORRISON -- December 24, at 48 Brougham Street, ADELAIDE, wife of George Morison. Funeral private. GEORGE MORRISON.

M'BURNIE -- December 25th, at 14 Collyer Street, THOMAS SCOTT, the dearly-beloved son of Thomas and Louisa M'Burnie. His remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
     The cup was bitter, the sting severe;
          To part with him we loved so dear;
     The trial is hard, we'll not complain;
          But hope in heaven to meet again.
THOMAS AND LOUISA M'BURNIE.

In Memoriam

MOORE -- In sad and loving remembrance of our dear mother, SARAH JANE, the dearly-beloved wife of the late John Moore, who departed this life on the 25th December, 1901, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
     Her loving face we'll ne'er forget,
          Though years may pass away,
     The loss of her we sadly miss,
          As keen, as the first day.
Inserted by her loving family.

M'AULEY -- In loving remembrance of my dear mother, ELIZABETH M'AULEY, who departed this life on the 26th day of December, 1901, and was interred in Ballinderry Presbyterian Churchyard.
     How I miss the hand so gentle,
          How I miss the look so kind,
     How I miss the voice so cheery,
          That, bespoke the happy mind.
     And the ear that always listened,
          And the heart that always cared,
     And admitted all my sorrows,
          And my gladness always shared.
By her loving daughter, SARAH LOWE. 12 Telford Street, Belfast.

On page 5 -- Too late for classification on page 2

DARRAGH -- In sad and loving memory of our dear brother, LANCE-CORPORAL HUGH DARRAGH, 60th Company, Irish Imperial Yeomanry, who died of enteric fever, at Winburg, Orange River Colony, on 26th December, 1901.
Deeply regretted by his loving brothers and sister.

Clippings

FATAL ACCIDENT NEAR BALLYMENA. -- While supervising some work at a building undergoing repairs at the village of Rasharkin, on Wednesday last, a man named John Kilpatrick, [age unclear] , overbalanced himself and fell to the ground, a distance of about seven feet. In the fall his head came into contact with some hard substance, with the result that his skull appeared to have been fractured, death being almost instantaneous.

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Saturday, 27 December 1902

Births

EDWARDS -- December 19, at 1 Wilson Grove, Southsea, the wife of Brevet-Major W.E. Edwards, Royal Field Artillery, of a daughter.

GREER -- December 25th, at No. 6 Paxton Street, the wife of W.J. Greer, of a daughter (prematurely).

Marriages

POLLOCK--GREEN -- December 25, at York Street Presbyterian Church, by the Rev. W.A. Watson, B.A., ALEXANDER, eldest son of Alexander Pollock, to ELLEN, eldest daughter of Robert Green, both of Belfast.

Deaths

ATKINSON -- December 26th, at his residence, Glencairn, Strandtown, MOSES ATKINSON, aged 78 years.

CAMERON -- December 25th, at his residence, 16 Trillick Street, THOMAS CAMERON, the dearly-beloved husband of Catherine Cameron, who departed this life to be present with the Lord. His remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery on Lord's Day, 28th, at two p.m. All brotherhood earnestly invited. CATHERINE CAMERON.

GREER -- December 26th, at 25 Pandora Street, HUGH, the beloved husband of Mary Greer. His remains will be removed for interment in Antrim Churchyard, on to-morrow (Sunday) morning, at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

BRITISH ORDER OF ANCIENT FREE GARDENERS.
WATER LILY LODGE No. 229.
The Members of above Lodge and other Brethren are requested to attend the funeral of our late Brother, HUGH GREER.
DANIEL C. LITTLE, W.M. HENRY FAIR, Secretary. JAMES PARKHILL, District Secretary.

HERRON -- December 27, 1902, at the residence of her brother-in-law, 56 Southport Street, CASSIE HERRON, the youngest sister of Elizabeth Kelso. Her remains will be removed on Monday, 29th inst., at eleven o'clock, for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. Deeply regretted. ANDREW & ELIZABETH KELSO.

IRELAND -- December 26th, at her residence, 22 Wesley Place, Ligoniel, ELIZABETH IRELAND. The remains of my dearly-beloved wife will be removed from above address, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in Clifton Street Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. ALEXANDER IRELAND.

LENNON -- December 26, at her residence, 4 Ship Street, Belfast, ROSIE, relict of the late Captain Lennon. Her remains will be removed from the above address for interment in the family burying-ground, Greencastle, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- R.I.P. M.A. & E. LENNON.

LOUGHRAN -- December 26th, at his mother's residence, 18 North Ann St., JAS. LOUGHRAN -- R.I.P. The remains of my beloved son will be removed from above address for interment in the Milltown Cemetery, on Monday morning, at half-past eleven o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. ROSEANNA LOUGHRAN.

MILLAR -- December 26th, at Barn Mills, Carrickfergus, JOHN, third son of John Millar, Engineer. His remains will be removed, for interment in St. Nicholas' Churchyard, Carrickfergus, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. JOHN MILLAR.

M'KEE -- December 27th, at her late residence, 40 Mourne Street, LIZZIE, the dearly-beloved daughter of Hugh and Alice M'Kee. Deeply regretted.

RODGERS -- December 27th, 1902, at Clandeboye, WILLIAM RODGERS, formerly of Tamanore, Co. Tyrone. The remains of my dearly-beloved husband will be removed for interment in Bangor New Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday), at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. American papers please copy. S. RODGERS.

SHANNON -- December 26th, 1902, at her father's residence, 141 Castlereagh Road, SARAH, the dearly-beloved daughter of John and Elizabeth Shannon. Her remains will be removed for interment in the Gransha Burying-ground, on Monday afternoon, at one o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
     "Gone to be with Jesus, which is far better."
     "Absent from the body, present with the Lord."
JOHN & ELIZABETH SHANNON.

TODD -- December 26, at his residence, M'Connell's Row, Comber, JOHN TODD (late of Ballyloughan). The remains of my beloved father will be removed for interment in the family burying-ground, Comber, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at three o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. JOSEPH TODD.

WARING -- December 26th, at her residence, 97 Lilliput Street, MATILDA (TILLIE) WARING (nee BLAIR). The remains of my beloved wife will be removed from above address, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. CUNNINGHAM WARING.

WILLIAMSON -- December 27th, suddenly, at the Royal Hospital, JAMES WILLIAMSON. His remains will be removed from his late address, 118 Nelson Street, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Monday afternoon, 29th inst., at two o'clock. DAVID WILLIAMSON.

The following Announcements were received too late for Classification on Page 5:-

HOLMES -- December 26th, at 30 Donnybrook Street, Lisburn Road, LIZZIE HOLMES, late of Philipsborough, U.S.A. Interment on Monday morning, at eleven o'clock, in Dunmurry Burying-ground. ALEX HALL.

REA -- December 27th, at Windsor Terrace, Clonavon, Ballymena, MARY A., relict of the late Hugh Rea, Mount Street. Funeral to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, for Old Churchyard, at two o'clock.

In Memoriam

DAVIS -- In affectionate and loving memory of our dear brother, WILLIAM JOHN DAVIS, who died at Port Elizabeth, South Africa, on the 27th December, 1901.
Sadly mourned. Fondly remembered.
     Gone, dear brother, gone forever;
          Strange and lonely is thy grave;
     But, forget thee we shall never,
          Though you sleep beyond the wave.
     Still thy memory we shall cherish,
          Till life's sorrows all are o'er;
     Love in Heaven can not perish,
          Where we hope to meet once more.
Inserted by his sorrowing brother and sister, FRANCIS DAVIS & MAGGIE WILKINSON. Belfast, December 27, 1902.

HAMPTON -- In fond and loving memory of our dear brother, JOHN HAMPTON, who departed this life, 29th December, 1900.
     "For the Lord Himself shall descend from Heaven with a shout with the voice of the Archangel, and with the trump of God; and the dead in Christ shall rise first.
     "Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the cloud to meet the Lord in the air; and so shall we ever be with the Lord." -- 1st Thessalonians, c.4, vs. 16, 17.
FRANCIS HAMPTON. ISABELLA MOHAN. MARIA MITCHELL. ROBERT HAMPTON.

IRWIN -- In sad and loving remembrance of our dear child, ALBERT, who departed this life, the 27th December, 1901, and was interred in the Lisburn Cemetery.
     Shall I grieve because he's happy?
          Shall I bring him back to weep?
     No! I'll joy, because my Saviour
          Placed my lamb amongst his sheep.
Inserted by his loving father and mother, DAVID & ELLEN IRWIN. 15 Brookland Street.

MACAULEY -- In loving memory of our dear mother, ELIZABETH MACAULEY, who departed this life on 26th December, 1901, and was interred in Ballinderry Presbyterian Burying-ground.
     Gone, dear mother, gone for ever;
          Here with us no more thou art,
     Suddenly it came upon us,
          Mother, dear, with thee to part.
Inserted by her loving son and daughter, JOHN & MARIA MACAULEY. Ballymacash, Lisburn.

The following Announcements were received too late for Classification on Page 5:-

HIGGINSON -- In fond and loving memory of our dear mother, MARY JANE HIGGINSON, who departed this life, 28th December, 1899, and was interred in Shankill Burying-ground.
For ever remembered by her family, 7 California Street.

Clippings

CUSTODY COURT.
(Before Messrs. Garret Nagle, R.M.; R.M. Young, J.C.C. Payne, A. Crawford, Geo A. Doran, and Chas. M'Lorinan.)

HIGHLANDER IN THE DOCK.

Thomas Kerr, a private in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, and William Caughey were charged with breaking and entering the spirit grocery of William Shields, North Derby Street, on the night of the 25th inst., and stealing several bottles of whisky. It was stated that evidence would be produced bearing on the charge at a later date, and prisoners were remanded till next Friday.

ASSAULTING A RELIEVING-OFFICER.

Bridget Timmony, an old woman, was charged with being drunk and assaulting Joseph Stewart, a relieving-officer, at Belfast Workhouse. Mr. Stewart said prisoner left the workhouse at 2 p.m. yesterday and returned a few hours later under the influence of drink to ask for "a line." When he declined she rushed at him, spat upon him, and caught one of his fingers in her teeth. She was accustomed to doing this sort of thing. Prisoner, whose record was very bad, including every possible kind of offence, was sentenced to two calendar months' imprisonment. Mr. Harper prosecuted for the Union authorities.

ASSAULT.

Samuel Mahaffy was charged on warrant with serious assaults upon William Bones and his daughter, Sara Jane Larkin, on Christmas Day. Mr. D. M'Callum prosecuted. The prisoner was sentenced to a month's imprisonment in one case and two weeks in the other.

A YOUNG PRETENDER.

James P. Maxwell, aged 15 years, was charged on remand with begging in the street, falsely representing himself to be deaf and dumb. It appeared from inquiries by the police that the boy had been in the employment of a confectioner, but his father, who is a ticket-of-leave man, went there under the influence of drink and took him away, saying he was going to put him to a trade. Prisoner's father told the magistrate that the boy had learned to feign being deaf and dumb at school. (Laughter) The Bench committed James, who is a Roman Catholic, to Philipstown Reformatory.

======================

INQUEST AT BALLYMENA.

Mr. A. Caruth, jun., coroner, and a jury, of which Mr. John Robinson, R.D.C., was foreman, attended to-day at the Ballymena Cottage Hospital, and held an inquiry touching the death of Patrick Maybin, Lower Broughshane, who died in the hospital yesterday morning. Sergeant Shields, Broughshane, assisted by Sergeant Dancy and Constable Cox, watched the inquiry on behalf of the Crown, and Mr. John K. Currie, solicitor, represented the Raceview Woolen Factory Company. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased, who was a married man, about forty years old, and a labourer by trade, was working on the 11th inst., assisting a millwright named Hugh O'Loan, and his son, to put a heavy metal gutter on a new roof at Raceview Mills, when the scaffolding went accidentally agee, and all three were thrown off it. Hugh O'Loan, sen., was caught by the rafters, but his son and the deceased fell to the ground, a distance of about eleven feet. The deceased sustained a lacerated wound on the right thigh and one fractured, and two bruised ribs, and the other two men were practically uninjured. Dr. Stuart deposed that the immediate cause of death was a clot of blood getting into deceased's heart. Verdict according.

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STABBING AFFRAY AT ENNISKILLEN.

On Thursday night Patrick M'Cafferty, of the Inniskilling Fusiliers, was, it is alleged, stabbed by Private Sherlock with a bayonet during a quarrel. M'Cafferty has been removed to the Military Hospital, and Sherlock has been placed under arrest.

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BURNING FATALITY IN BELFAST.

INQUEST AND VERDICT.

An inquest was held this afternoon in Templemore Avenue Baths, Belfast, by the Deputy Coroner (Mr. J.S. Finnigan), touching the death of Minnie Parks, 5 years, which occurred at the Royal Hospital on the morning of the 25th inst., following burns received at her parents' residence, Bloomfield Street, Belfast, on the previous day.

Head-Constable M'Keown appeared for the police.

From the evidence it appeared that the parents, who are employed at Belfast Ropeworks, left for work after dinner on Wednesday, leaving their eldest child, a little girl of 12, in charge of the four other children. The deceased was burning paper at the fire when her clothes ignited. The screams of the frightened children attracted the attention of a neighbour named Ina Fleming, who hastened to the house, and succeeded in extinguishing the flames, not, however, before the child was badly burned. The ambulance was then sent for and deceased was removed to the Royal Hospital, where death occurred as stated. Having heard the testimony of Dr. S.R. Hunter, the jury found that death was due to shock following extensive burns, and added a rider in which they stated -- We desire to urge upon parents throughout the city the necessity that exists for the provision of fire-guards in their homes to protect the children from the danger incurred by open grates.

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GOLF.

COUNTY DOWN CLUB. -- An open medal competition was brought off yesterday. There was an open stroke competition, for which sixty-four players entered. The result showed that Mr. W.A. Matthews was the winner with the very fine score, considering the meteorological conditions, of 95, 10-85.

MALONE CLUB. -- The annual Boxing Day mixed foursomes took place yesterday, when Miss A.G. Hewitt and J. Lytle proved to be the winners, Miss Agnew and C.C. Gotto being the runners up.

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PETTY SESSIONS COURTS.

SEAFORDE.

This monthly court was held yesterday, before Mr. G. Allen, J.P. (in the chair); Colonel Bowlby, R.M.; Mr. John M. Perry, J.P.; and Mr. W.L. Stronge, J.P. The district-inspector prosecuted Francis Fitz, Knocksticken, for assaulting Constables Clarke and M'Corkell in the execution of their duty on the night of the 26th ult. Mr. D. M'Cartan defended. The case in respect of M'Corkell was first disposed of; the allegation being that defendant struck the constable with his fist on the shoulder as he returned from pursuing a man who had struck him with a stick and a stone. For the defence, it was sworn that the defendant was not at all to blame; in fact, he received very rough usage from the police on the way to the barrack. The majority of the magistrates dismissed this case. Constable Clarke was next heard, his complaint being that when he went to assist his brother constable, the defendant kicked him on the knee. The prosecutor, at a stage when he considered the constables had been exonerated from certain insinuations, withdrew his charge.

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MAN DROWNED IN CO. ARMAGH.

A very regrettable incident occurred here yesterday morning whereby a young man named Robert Willis, aged 27 years, and unmarried, met his death. A young man named Peter Hughes was passing along the canal bank when he observed something in the water which, unfortunately, turned out to be the deceased. It appears that he was in Middletown on the previous night, and it is supposed that in making his way home he fell into the canal, the night being very dark. Sergeant Boyd had the remains conveyed to Middletown, where they are awaiting an inquest. The greatest sympathy is felt for his brother and sister in their sad bereavement.

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SERIOUS GUN ACCIDENT NEAR BALLYMENA.

Yesterday afternoon a boy named Samuel M'Cullough, belonging to the townland of Glenwherry, about eight miles from Ballymena, met with a serious accident while out fowling with a young man named Maine. It appears that the latter had the gun at full cock, and was in the act of letting down the hammer for safety, when it suddenly came down on the cartridge, when it discharged. The boy M'Cullough was then standing only a short distance off and the shot entered at, and lodged in, his left shoulder. He was promptly conveyed to Ballymena and examined by Dr. Robert Currie, and subsequently he was taken to the Ballymena Cottage Hospital, where amputation of the left arm at the shoulder joint was considered necessary, this operation being skillfully performed by Dr. Currie.

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MILL WORKERS SAD DEATH AT ARMAGH.

To-day, Mr. Thomas George Peel, coroner for Mid-Armagh, held an inquest in the County Infirmary touching the death of John M'Crea, a mill worker, who died in that institution on Christmas Day from the effects of injuries accidentally received on the 13th inst., caused by falling off hobby horses. It appeared that the deceased never regained consciousness from his admission till death. After hearing the evidence of Doctor Palmer, Mr. Flint, the proprietor, and two employees, the jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

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WORKHOUSE INMATES ON THE SPREE.

SERIOUS CHARGE OF WOUNDING.

John Dunbar and Thomas Foley escaped from the Belfast Workhouse by climbing over the wall, taking their pauper uniform with them, and celebrated Boxing Day in a manner literally appropriate to the name of the day, as disclosed in the profusion of bandages and sticking-plaster which adorned the brows of both when they appeared in the Custody Court this morning to answer a charge of insubordination preferred by Mr. Harper on behalf of the Guardians, and a subsequent charge of assaulting and occasioning actual bodily harm to a citizen named Alexander Baker.

Mr. W. Tughan appeared for the police.

Mr. Nagle said that, judging from the appearance of the men they seemed to have been "in the wars" to a considerable extent.

Alex. Baker, whose left eye was concealed in a bandage, deposed that between 8 and 9 o'clock last night he was in his house when he heard a noise in the entry. On going out he saw the prisoners fighting, and tried to separate them. Dunbar pulled out a knife and wounded him with it near the eye, afterwards running away. Witness held Foley until the police came.

The police evidence showed that the wound inflicted was an incised wound, but the doctors did not consider it dangerous.

Foley was committed for fourteen days for insubordination at the Workhouse, while Dunbar was remanded for a week.

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ROYAL INNISKILLING FUSILIERS.

Lieutenant-Colonel Gerald M. MacKenzie, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, just appointed to the command of the 2nd Battalion, at historic Mafeking, has been over 23 years in the Fusiliers. He accompanied the 2nd Battalion as second in command from India to the front, last March, and a few days later brought it out of action at Pietersburg, where the battalion made one of the finest bayonet charges of the war; after Lieut.-Colonel A.J.A. Murray, D.S.O., had been badly wounded. Since then Lieutenant-Colonel MacKenzie commanded the battalion pro tem.

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A REVIEW OF THE YEAR -- 1902.

THE CORONATION.

The year that is just drawing to a close is one which will long live in the memory of all Britons, and, without reservation, it may at once be classed as the most important for some decades. Apart from the many minor events that vary year by year, it will always be marked in history by the Coronation of King Edward VII, and the successful conclusion of the Boer War, our most important campaign since the days of the Crimea and the Mutiny. It has, also, been a year of considerable political and scientific interest, and has contained several sensational events -- above all, His Majesty's sudden illness. In interest, the Coronation, naturally, took precedence of everything, especially coming as it did after the psychological declaration of peace, and for many months of the year the talk was of little else, and the papers were full of it. The date chosen by King Edward was June 26th for the actual ceremony, and June 27th for the procession through London, with the Naval Review on the 28th.

Under the Duke of Norfolk, as Earl Marshal of England, Lord Knollys, the King's Secretary, Viscount Esher, Secretary to the Board of Works, the whole elaborate programme was duly drawn up in every detail. The first of the great series of celebrations was the great review on Laffan's Plain, at Aldershot, on Monday, June 16th, which was to be preceded by a tattoo on the Saturday night. His Majesty was present at the last named, but at midnight Sir Francis Laking was summoned to Aldershot, and during the Sunday the King was confined to the Royal Pavilion "slightly indisposed."

Duke of Norfolk Lord Knollys
The Archbishop of Canterbury The Archbishop of York

On the Monday, Queen Alexandra, supported by the Prince of Wales, took the salute at the great review, King Edward being absent by his doctor's orders. In the evening, however, he drove with the Queen to Windsor Castle, where they were entertaining a brilliant gathering of notabilities for Ascot week. But not once during the week was His Majesty well enough to appear in public or attend this great social function. Public anxiety was aroused to a keen pitch.

Sir F Treves Lord Lister

On Monday, June 23rd, however, in accordance with the arrangements of the royal programme, the King came up from Windsor with the Queen, and drove to Buckingham Palace, receiving a tremendous ovation from the huge crowds on the route, but it was noticed that he looked terribly ill. That night he was unable to preside at the great state banquet to the foreign representatives and royalties at the Palace, and the next morning came the news, about noon, like a thunderclap, that His Majesty was suffering from appendicitis, and was to be operated upon at once. Lord Lister, Sir Tom Smith, Sir Frederick Treves, Sir Thomas Barlow, and Sir Francis Laking were all in attendance at the Palace.

The Royal Progress, Departure from Buckingham Palace

By two o'clock the news came that the operation had been successfully performed by Sir Frederick Treves. In a minute the whole empire, and London in particular, had been plunged from festivity into mourning. The King's splendid constitution, however, and devoted nursing worked wonders; and little by little the King made a marvellous recovery, and for the second time in his life was brought back to health from the very gates of death.

THE END OF THE WAR.

The other great event of the year was the declaration of peace in South Africa, after two years and eight months of continuous and terrible fighting, which cost the country so dear in blood and gold.

Lord Kitchener Rt. Hon. J. Chamberlain
Gen. N. Lyttleton Lord Milner

The Boer War, which seemed such a simple affair to the ignorant at its inception, developed into the greatest campaign of modern times. Only at the close of last year came the news of the disaster to the Yeomanry at Tweefontein, on Christmas Eve, and in February, General Delarey made the most important capture of the campaign, at Tweebosch, when he surprised some details of Infantry and Yeomanry, and took Lord Methuen prisoner, severely wounded. However, from that time on the vigour of the Boers began to dwindle, and rumours of the approach of peace became more pronounced. The Boer leaders, Steyn, Botha, De Wet, Delarey, and Schalk Burger, met in conclave at Klerksdorp, with passes from Lord Kitchener, and then they specially visited Pretoria, after which they toured amongst the various commandos, addressing them and taking votes for peace or war at a special conference at Vereenjging. Then came the signing of the peace at Pretoria, at 10.30 p.m. on Saturday, May 31st, the terms amounting practically to an unconditional surrender, with certain assurances from us on our side.

Louis Botha Delarey
De Wet Steyn

Lord Kitchener returned home almost at once, handing over supreme command in South Africa to General Neville Lyttleton, to whom the military side of the settlement had already been officially assigned. Lord Kitchener arrived on July 15th, and his reception in England was tremendous after his great exploits. Close on his heels followed Generals Botha, Delarey, and De Wet, who arrived in August, and were warmly received on all hands, from the King down to the populace. Mr. Chamberlain had an abortive and unsatisfactory interview with them prior to their going abroad, but a better understanding was arrived at upon their return, and as an outcome of this came Mr. Chamberlain's decision to visit South Africa.

OTHER WARS.

From the very size of its empire, Great Britain is always involved in one or two minor wars; and this year is no exception, with the trouble in Somaliland, the Waziri expedition, and the Aro campaign in Southern Nigeria.

Col. Swayne Gen. Egerton

The last named was more or less successfully concluded with little loss of life, under Colonel Montancio; but though successful, General Egerton found the Waziris a tougher nut to crack than was anticipated, considerable loss being sustained, including the death of Colonel Tormochy. But of the three, the Somaliland expedition against the Mullah proved the most disastrous, as, cramped by shortness of guns, insufficient troops, and unreliable levies, Colonel Swayne, after some preliminary success, was beaten back by the Mullah in a waterless desert, and had to retreat. Gen. Manning is now in command, Col. Swayne having been invalided home from the front about a month ago. The year has seen an exciting time in Venezuela, whence the British and German warships were sent to teach President Castro international manners.

THE YEAR ABROAD.

In France the most notable events of the year have been the elections, the change of Premier, and the discovery of the Humbert fraud.

The Kaiser Prince Henry of Prussia

Mr. Waldock-Rousseau, after a record Premiership under the Republic, during which he steered his country through the shoals of the Dreyfus case, was again returned to power, but resigned the post of Prime Minister, in which he was succeeded by M. Cambon, who has since May held office without event, except for M. Pelletan's injudicious anti-British speeches. The Humberts have been living in Paris by a most marvellous system of frauds, by which they amassed millions of pounds, but this year by chance the whole deception was discovered, and the entire family took refuge in flight. They have not yet been caught. It is said that too many people were involved to make their capture desirable. Germany has had a quiet year internally, but it has been much in evidence abroad, with the visits of the Kaiser to England, and Prince Henry of Prussia to America and to England in June for the Coronation. The Kaiser's visit to King Edward at Sandringham had for its main object the desire to offer his Royal uncle personal congratulations upon his recovery and Coronation, and was strictly private, except for his review of the 1st Royal Dragoons, of which he is Colonel-in-Chief. Prince Henry of Prussia, who was to have represented his brother at the Coronation, went as his representative to America in February, to be present at the launching of the Kaiser's new yacht, the Meteor, by Miss Alice Roosevelt, the President's daughter; and this scion of the house of Hohenzollern was feted throughout the length and breadth of this great democracy.

Pres. Roosevelt Mr. Pierpont Morgan

There is no doubt that the launching of the yacht was merely an excuse on the Kaiser's part to establish cordial personal relations with America. The United States this year have been excellently administered by Mr. Roosevelt, who is making a wonderfully good and undeniably strong President. His year, however, has been broken by a short illness, due to an injury to his leg, caused by a collision between his coach and an electric car, which all but ended fatally for him. The trouble with his shin fortunately turned out less serious than was at one time anticipated, though an operation was found to be necessary. The remarkable feature of the year has been the growth and spreading of the Trusts, to which the President is strenuously opposed.

The King of Spain The King of Portugal

The most important addition to their ranks was the shipping trust, by which Mr. Pierpont Morgan hoped to capture the monopoly of the Atlantic by combining various American lines and purchasing the famous White Star Line. But the Cunard assisted by the British Government, formed a counter trust, and dealt their Yankee rivals a severe and unexpected blow. The American tobacco trust's great campaign to capture the British market failed still more ignominiously and had to come to terms with the British Trust, formed at the beginning of the year; and now these two organisations are pulling in harmony, each with its limits arranged and defined.

The Late Queen of the Belgians
The Queen of Italy The Czarina

The coal strike in America at one time assumed serious proportions; and it is mainly due to the President's good offices that arbitration was arranged and a working arrangement come to. In May the King of Spain attained his sixteenth birthday, and assumed full regal powers, after taking the oath before the Cortes on the 17th of that month. Though in Spain there is no actual coronation ceremony, the festivities lasted some ten days; and the Duke of Connaught, attended by the Duke of Wellington, went over to represent Great Britain on the great occasion. Dom Carlos, the King of the sister-country, Portugal, left his country under the regency of his consort for a considerable period this autumn, visiting, amongst other places, England, where he stayed with the King at Windsor, arriving on Monday, November 17th, two days after the Kaiser had left Sandringham. His visit, also, was purely a friendly one, though he met all our leading Ministers and was entertained to a state banquet. Italy, Russia, and Holland all have again been disappointed of heirs to their respective thrones. The Czarina and the Queen of Holland have both been very ill and suffered from miscarriages; but in the case of the latter, fresh hopes have been raised of good news early next year.

The King of Uganda The Shah of Persia

Russia itself has been greatly disturbed by riots amongst the students, which resulted in the murder of the Minister of Education. Baron de Staal, who for eighteen years had been Russian Ambassador, to St. James's retired. The Queen of Italy gave birth to a second daughter this autumn; and it is impossible to disguise the keenness of the national disappointment. The King of Italy paid the Kaiser a visit at Berlin, and the friendly relations of the two countries are once more firmly established, after having been somewhat strained for a time. The Queen of the Belgians passed away peacefully at the end of October, after a life of unspeakable sadness; and her death-chamber was the scene of a disgraceful contretemps between King Leopold and his daughter, the Countess of Lonyav, which shocked the whole of Europe. A month later this monarch's life was attempted unsuccessfully by an Anarchist, named Rubino, who fired three shots at the wrong carriage in a royal procession. Amongst other royal visitors to England this year were the Shah of Persia and the King of Uganda. The former potentate was received by the Prince of Wales in August and had Marlborough House placed at his disposal during his visit. He spent the day with King Edward on the Royal yacht at Portsmouth, as His Majesty was not strong enough to journey up to town; so for the most part his entertainment fell to the lot of the Prince of Wales by proxy for his royal parent. Young Prince Arthur of Connaught, who has since sailed to join his regiment in South Africa, was in immediate attendance upon him during his stay in England, and greatly delighted the Eastern potentate.

(To be continued on Monday.)

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Monday, 29 December, 1902

Births

GOFF -- December 24, at Lisadel, Serpentine Avenue, Dublin, the wife of the Rev. J. Richards Goff, M.A., of a son.

Deaths

ARTHURS -- December 28th, at 44 Cultra Street, DAVID ARTHURS, son of the late William Arthurs. Funeral to the City Cemetery on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation MARY E. ARTHURS.

BINGHAM -- December 27, 1902, at her residence, 51 Hooker Street, Belfast, CHRISTIANA, the eldest daughter of Alexander Bingham, formerly of Dundrine, Castlewellan. Her remains will be removed, for interment in Bangor Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- American papers please copy.

CALVERT -- December 29th, 1902, at the Royal Hospital, WILLIAM JOHN CALVERT, Tullyveary. Funeral from above institution, on Wednesday morning, at nine o'clock, for interment in Killyleagh Meeting-house Green. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. Deeply regretted. MARY A. CALVERT.

CARROLL -- December 29th, 1902, at his father's residence, 31 Thorndyke Street, EDWARD, infant son of William and Jeannie Carroll. His remains will be removed, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in the City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. WILLIAM CARROLL.

CLOSE -- December 28th, at the Union Hospital, Lisburn Road, WILLIAM CLOSE. His remains will be removed from above institution, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in Shankill Graveyard. Friends will please accept this intimation. JAMES CLOSE.

EDWARDS -- December 28th, 1902, at his residence, 275 Newtownards Road, ANDREW EDWARDS. The remains of my beloved father will be removed from the above address, for interment, in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. -- American papers please copy. SARAH L. EDWARDS.

FERRIS -- December 29th, at 6 Wilton Square South, MARY JANE, the beloved wife of William Ferris. Her remains will be removed, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in the Shankill Burying-ground. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. "Peace, perfect peace." ALEXANDER FERRIS.

GREENLEES -- December 28th, at his residence, 27 Palmer Street, Belfast, ARTHUR GREENLEES. The remains of our beloved father will be removed, for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. ARTHUR & DAVID GREENLEES.

MOORE -- December 29th, at 14 M'Cavana's Place, LOUISA M., the dearly-beloved wife of Edward C. Moore, Coach Trimmer. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Wednesday afternoon, at one o'clock. EDWARD C. MOORE.

M'COLGAN -- December 28, at 5 Little Ship Street, ANNIE, dearly-beloved child of Samuel and Mary M'Colgan, aged two years and ten months. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. -- English papers please copy. Deeply regretted. SAMUEL & MARY M'COLGAN.

M'ILVEEN -- December 28th, 1902, at his mother's residence, 15 Taylor Street, THOMAS, youngest son of the late Joseph M'Ilveen. The remains of my beloved son will be removed for interment in Hillsborough Churchyard, on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at half-past ten o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. JANE M'ILVEEN.

M'KEE -- December 29th, at her residence, 6 Posnett Street, ELIZA, relict of the late William M'Kee.

PERIOLI -- December 28th, at 2 Lilac Villas, Crumlin Road, VIRGINIA MILDRED, infant daughter of J.P. Perioli.

PULLINS -- December 27, at his residence, 11 Springfield Village, ANDREW PULLINS. The remains of our dearly-beloved father will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted. JOHN & ALEXANDER PULLINS.

MURRAY -- December 28th, at Annagh House, Portadown, THOMAS MURRAY, Moy. His remains will be removed from above address, on to-morrow (Tuesday) morning, at ten o'clock, for interment in the family burying-ground, Moy.

SWEENEY -- December 28th, at her father's residence, 32 Silvio Street, ISABELLA, the beloved child of Samuel Sweeney, aged 4 years. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock.

TODD -- December 28th, at his father's residence, 13 Cosgrave Street, Belfast, WILLIAM, the dearly-beloved son of Samuel and Jane Todd, aged 5 years. His remains will be removed, for interment in Friends Burying-ground, Balmoral, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. SAMUEL & JANE TODD.

WELCH -- December 28th, at his residence, 3 Ravenscroft Street, JAMES, son of the late James Welch. The remains of our beloved brother will be removed from above address, on to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in the City Cemetery. INSERTED BY HIS SISTERS.

In Memoriam

GRAHAM -- In loving memory of JEMIMA, dearly-beloved wife of David Graham, who departed this life 29th December, 1901. Deeply mourned. 19 Maryville Street.

HAMPTON -- In fond and loving memory of our dear brother, JOHN HAMPTON, who departed this life 29th December, 1900.
"For the Lord Himself shall descend from Heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God; and the dead in Christ shall rise first."
"Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air; and so shall we ever be with the Lord." -- 1st Thessalonians, 4th chapter, 16th and 17th verses.
FRANCIS HAMPTON, ISABELLA MOHAN, MARIA MITCHELL, ROBERT HAMPTON.

HUMPHREYS -- In loving remembrance of our dear mother, who departed this life 28th December, 1899, and was interred in Bangor Cemetery.
     How we miss the hand so gentle,
          how we miss the look so kind,
     how we miss the voice so cheery,
          that bespoke the happy mind.
     And the ear that always listened,
          and the heart that always cared,
     and admitted all our sorrows,
          and our gladness always shared.
MINNIE & WILLIAM KENNEDY. 33 Grosvenor Street.

PRITCHARD -- In loving memory of my dearly-beloved husband, THOMAS PRITCHARD, who departed this life on the 28th December, 1901, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
     Sleep in peace, oh dearest husband,
          though we now thy loss deplore,
     fleeting time will soon be over,
          thou art only gone before.
     Never did a heart more faithful,
          throb within a human breast,
     than the one now stilled for ever,
          passed into eternal rest.
Inserted by his loving wife, Minnie Pritchard. 36 Westmoreland Street.

The following Announcements were received too late for Classification on Page 5:-

Deaths

DOLAGHAN -- December 28th, at her mother's residence, 70 Durham Street, MARY, youngest daughter of the late James Dolaghan, aged 16 years. -- R.I.P. The remains of my beloved daughter will be removed from the above address, for interment in Milltown Cemetery, on Wednesday afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. Martha Dolaghan.

JACKSON -- December 29th, at his residence, 34 Bloomfield Avenue, JOHN BRISTOW JACKSON, dearly-beloved husband of Lizzie Jackson. Notice of interment in to-morrow's paper.

M'KEE -- December 29, 1902, at her residence, 6 Posnett Street, Belfast, ELIZA M'KEE, relict of the late William M'Kee. The remains of our dearly-beloved mother will be removed for interment in the Balmoral Cemetery, on Wednesday, 31st December, 1902, at half-past one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. W M'Kee.

Clippings

LOCAL BREVITIES.

Work was generally resumed in the city to-day after the Xmas holidays.

Major H. M. Cliff, Royal Irish Rifles, has been posted on promotion to the 2nd Battalion, at Modder River.

Sergeant Flaherty, Antrim Road, and Sergeant Kinnane, Glengall Street, have passed the head-constableship examination, and will be promoted as vacancies occur in the city.

The many friends of Mr. John Martin, who for the past week has been lying seriously ill at his residence, Galwally, will be glad to know that he is so much better than yesterday he was able to sit in his chair in his bedroom.

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BELFAST SHUNTER'S DEATH.

INQUEST AND VERDICT.

This afternoon, in Castleton Lecture Hall, Belfast, the Deputy-Coroner (Mr. J. S. Finnigan) held an inquest touching the death of James Loughran, shunter, in the employment of the Northern Counties Railway Company, who died at his residence, North Ann Street, last Friday.

The police were represented by District-Inspector Keaveney, Head-Constable M'Erlean, and Sergeant Elliott. Mr. D. M'Donald (solicitor), and Mr. S. P. Kerr appeared for the company, while Mr. A. M'Erlean was present in the interests of the next of kin.

The mother of deceased deposed to his having returned home on the 4th inst., shortly before four o'clock, and informed her that he had been hurt at his employment by being caught between buffers. He was attended by Dr. Core, and subsequently by Dr. Wilson. Asked as to what her son earned, witness replied that she did not know, but that he gave her 17s a week. Mr. M'Donald here stated that the earnings of deceased was 22s 6d per week. The company admitted that the injuries from which he died had been sustained in the course of his employment.

Wm. Beggs, shunter, said that on the 4th inst. he was on duty in the goods yard at the Northern Counties Railway, and was about fifty yards from deceased at the time the accident occurred. He saw deceased going forward to attach two waggons to a train engaged in shunting operations.

There were already some fifteen waggons attached to the engine. Witness saw the buffers going past each other, and suspecting that something was the matter, he gave the signal to the engine-driver, James Russell, to stop, which the latter accordingly did. Witness on going up to deceased saw that he had been severely hurt, and advised him to consult a doctor.

James Russell, engine-driver, said deceased had been shunting with him on the day of the accident. The engine of which he was in charge had fifteen waggons attached, and witness, in obedience to a signal from deceased, moved forward to where the two waggons mentioned by the previous witness were lying. The engine was going dead slow. He saw deceased between the waggons, and then lost sight of him. Shunter Beggs gave witness a signal to reverse, which he accordingly did. Beggs then came up to him and said that the waggons were on different roads, and that they had got foul of each other, and that Jimmy Loughran had been hurt.

The Coroner here entered a strong protest against the custom of shunting described by the witness.

William Reavy, horse shunter, said that at a quarter to four on the 4th inst. he was engaged shunting some waggons. He saw deceased, who was engaged similarly with engine 42, driven by Russell. Witness left two waggons at the points, and he saw Russell's engine with Loughran hooking on to these waggons. The waggons had separated and had gone on different lines, and the buffers passing each, deceased was crushed in the act of hooking the couplings. Witness could not remember if the lamps were lighted at the time. The answering of this witness was severely commented on by the Coroner.

The evidence of Dr. Wilson having been heard, the Coroner summed up, and the jury found that death was due to septic peritonitis. They recommended that more care should be exercised in shunting operations, particularly after dusk.

======================

PROVINCIAL NEWS.

(Summarised from our Early Editions of this date.)

The dead body of a man, name unknown, and about sixty years of age, was found in a quarry hole at Ligoniel on Saturday evening.

A special court was held at Aughnacloy, when William Oliver, who was charged with riotous and disorderly conduct, was ordered fourteen days imprisonment.

A man named James Scanlon, aged about 96 years, was found dead on the mountain about one and a half miles from Irvinestown, County Fermanagh, yesterday morning.

At the meeting of the Downpatrick Rural Council there was received from the Local Government Board an order directing that the cost of sanitary works to be executed in Crossgar should be assessed on the rural district excepting the five exempted towns, viz., Downpatrick, Castlewellan, Ballynahinch, Killyleagh, and Portaferry.

The clerk (Mr. S. Lecky) submitted his annual estimate and demand to meet expenses for the year ending 31st March, 1904, at the meeting of the Coleraine Guardians on Saturday. It showed that the amount required for the period was £804 less that what was demanded last year, which would make a difference of 2d in the £ on the rates. The estimates were approved of.

Joseph Moan, who was charged on remand, at Omagh, with the wilful murder of Rose Ann M'Cann, at Badoney, near Trillick, on the night of the 20th November last, has been again remanded in custody.

A man named Faughey, residing in Callan Street, Armagh, has been remanded to the next petty sessions there on a charge of having discharged a revolver at a man named James Ward.

Mr. Thomas H. Sloan, M.P. was the principal speaker at a meeting held in Conway Square, Newtownards, on Saturday evening, under the auspices of the Belfast Protestant Association.

At the meeting of the Cookstown Rural Council Mr. M'Keown gave notice of moving at next meeting that the Tyrone County Council be requested to put into operation the provisions of the Compulsory Education Act in Cookstown rural district.

At Maghera (Co. Derry) monthly petty sessions, William Neilson was returned for trial to the March Assizes, on bail, for having, as alleged, seriously assaulted James O'Kane on the night of the 26th inst.

======================

DEATH OF REV. DR. M'CAW, LONDONDERRY.

The death took place to-day of Rev. Dr. M'Caw, Londonderry, in his eighty-fourth year. Deceased, who was married to a sister of Mr. Robert M'Geagh, Belfast, was until a few years ago in the ministry of the English Presbyterian Church. He was also Clerk to the English Presbyterian Synod body corresponding to the General Assembly in Ireland. Since retiring from the ministry he lived in Londonderry.

======================

AGAINST THE DOCTOR'S ORDERS.

An inquest was held this afternoon in Castleton Lecture Hall, Belfast, by the Deputy Coroner (Mr. J. S. Finnigan) touching the death of Geo. Thompson (aged 76), of 13 Jennymount Terrace, Belfast, who died on Friday last. The evidence of the son and daughter of the deceased went to show that he had been suffering from pains for the past two years principally in his foot. These developed recently to such an extent that Dr. M'Ilroy advised his removal to the hospital. Deceased was taken to that institution on 12th December, and remained there for nearly a fortnight, when he was removed to his residence by his relatives, apparently at his own request. Dr. S. R. Hunter said that this removal was in opposition to his wishes, owing to the serious condition in which deceased then was. Deceased was suffering from gangrene in the toes due to arterial degeneration, and had a very feeble heart and a weak circulation. Death was, in his opinion, the result of cardiac failure. The jury found accordingly. Sergeant Elliott conducted the examination of the witnesses.

======================

MAIL AND SHIPPING NEWS.

BROW HEAD, Monday. -- The Cunard R.M.S. Ivernia, from Boston for Liverpool, passed at 1.30 a.m.

NEW YORK, Monday. -- The Cunard R.M.S. Saxonia, from Liverpool, arrived at 2 a.m.

CARMANAH POINT, Sunday. -- The Tartar, from Hong Kong for Vancouver, passed.

NEW YORK, Sunday. -- The Frankfurt, from Bremen, arrived.

SOUTHAMPTON, Sunday. -- The Moltke, for New York, left.

QUEENSTOWN, Monday. -- The Ivernia, from Boston, arrived at 4.55 a.m., and proceeded for Liverpool immediately.

BOSTON, Sunday. -- The Commonwealth, from Liverpool arrived.

ADEN, Monday. -- The Arcadia, for Sydney, arrived.

LIVERPOOL, Sunday. -- The Ottoman, from Portsmouth, Maine, arrived.

GRAVESEND, Monday. -- The Oceana, from Sydney, passed.

GLASGOW, Friday. -- The Arabia, for Bombay and Corean, for Portland, Maine, left.

======================

CHRISTMAS DAY TRAGEDY.

An inquest was held at Wells, Norfolk, on Saturday, on the body of a boy named Adcok, who was accidentally shot dead on Christmas Day by his brother. The lads, it was stated, after target shooting with an airgun, decided to play Briton and Boer. The younger, seeing his father's gun in the greenhouse, and thinking it unloaded, secured it, pointed it at his brother and pulled the trigger. The father said a cartridge had jammed in the breech, which he intended firing away, and before doing so placed the gun in the greenhouse while he had dinner. The father was so overcome that it was with difficulty he gave evidence. The jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

======================

SAD AFFAIR AT LIGONIEL.

MAN FOUND DEAD IN A QUARRY HOLE.

On Saturday evening last three men, named Harper and Magills, went out along with some dogs for the purpose of rat hunting convenient to the quarry at Upper Ballysillan, and when they reached Mr. M'Broom's quarry they saw a man lying at the bottom. Upon close examination they found that he was dead, having his skull badly fractured. Information was at once conveyed to Ligoniel police, but as the occurrence was not in their district, they had the news sent to the constabulary at Whitewell, and Sergeant Scarlett had the body removed to an out-house belonging to Mr. Sands, publican, Upper Ballysillan. The facts were made known to Dr. Mussen, J.P., Coroner, and an inquest will be held. The place where the unfortunate man was found is an old unused quarry, and it is probable that he missed his footing and fell to the bottom, a distance of about 100 feet. He was a stranger in the district, and had the appearance of a sailor, about 60 years.

======================

THE TRILLICK MURDER.

ACCUSED AGAIN REMANDED.

A special Court of Petty Sessions was held in the Courthouse, Omagh, on Saturday last, before Messrs. M. Devlin and L. I. Scott, when Joseph Moan was charged on remand with the murder of Rose Ann M'Cann, at Badoney, near Trillick, on the night of the 29th November last. District Inspector Wall, in a deposition, stated that he had not yet completed his inquiries, and he asked that the accused be remanded for a week. The accused was accordingly remanded until Monday, the 5th of January.

======================

SALE OF "ARLINGTON HOUSE."

Messrs. Ferguson & Harvey, auctioneers, Belfast and Lisburn, put up for sale to-day that commodious residence known as "Arlington House", 53 Cliftonpark Avenue, Belfast, the property of the late Robert Ferguson, held under lease for the residue of a term of 9,999 years, at the yearly rent of £4 16s. After spirited competition, Mr. John Murphy was declared the highest bidder and purchaser at £690. Messrs. Harper & Mills, 84 Donegall Street, Belfast, were the solicitors having carriage of the sale.

======================

BELFAST SHIPPING NOTES.

We understand that after the White Star R.M.S. Majestic leaves Belfast, her sister ship, The Teutonic, will be sent here for an extensive overhaul. The work being executed on the Majestic at the Alexandra Dock consists chiefly in replacing her boilers and overlooking her machinery. She is not expected to leave Belfast for four months.

A Lloyd telegram reports that the barque G. S. PENRY, bound from Brunswick (Ga.) to Granton, has been wrecked off the Scaw. The entire crew, with one exception, was drowned. The G. S. Penry was for some years engaged in the timber-carrying trade between this port and North America, and was owned by a local firm, which sold her to Norwegians.

The Head liner Bengore Head, which was seriously damaged in the St. Lawrence by stranding some time ago, has been docked at Halifax, where the necessary repairs can be effected.

Foreign arrivals in the harbour during the last few days have been few. The Torr Head, from New Orleans, is discharging in the York Dock; and the Malin Head has cleared for the same port. The Carrigan Head is also on passage from New Orleans.

To-morrow there will be launched from Messrs. Workman, Clark, & Co's south yard (County Down side) a steamer named the Colonial, for a Liverpool firm. She will have a gross tonnage of 5,400.

======================

THIS DAY'S SHIPPING.

Wind -- W.N.W.

Arrived at this port on the 28th and 29th insts.

- The ss Kyanite (M'Glashan), from London, with cement. The ss Tadorna (Mugford), from Ghent, with a general cargo -- sundry consignees; James Little & Co., agents. The ss Plasma (Campbell), from Glasgow, with barley. The ss Minnie Hinde, from Whitehaven; the ss Balniel, from Garston; the ss Eveleen; the ss Greenisland, and the ss Llewellyn, from Ayr; the ss Empress, from Irvine; the ss Parkmore, the ss Helen Craig, and the ss Ferris, from Troon; the ss W. M. Barkley, from Ardrossan -- all with coals.

Sailed from this port on the 28th and 29th insts. -- The ss Glen Head (Kennedy), for Reval; the ss Malin Head (McKee), for Swansea; the ss Theory, for Glenarm; the ss Dunrowan, for Dalbeattie; the ss Topic, for Ulverston; the ss Rosabelle, for Londonderry.

Arrived -- At Caen, on the 23rd inst., the ss Raloo (Nicholas), from Cardiff; at Liverpool, on 24th inst., the ss Star of Victoria (Willis), from Rosario; at Barry, on the 24th inst., the ss Curran (Mulholland), from Rouen; at Troon, on the 25th inst., the ss Gransha (Roberts), from St. Malo; at Glasgow, on the 25th inst., the ss Isle of Dursey (Evans), from Belfast.

Sailed -- From Rouen, on the 24th inst., the ss Glynn (Napier), for Penarth; from New Orleans, on the 24th inst., the ss Carrigan Head (Orr) for Belfast.

======================

ALLEGED SHOP-BREAKING IN BELFAST.

THREE YOUNG MEN CHARGED.

Daniel M'Aleese, Francis J. M'Kenna, and Hugh M'Manus, three young men, aged about twenty years, appeared to-day in the Belfast Custody Court, charged with having broken and entered the spirit grocery of Patrick Rooney, 65 and 67 Cavendish Street, Belfast, and stolen therefrom, on the 20th inst., a quantity of whisky, cigars, cigarettes, beef, and other articles.

Mr. Spiller prosecuted, and the prisoners were not represented.

The evidence of Constable M'Grath, who arrested M'Aleese, was that after he had brought him to Springfield Road Barracks, M'Aleese made a statement in which he alleged that M'Kenna broke the window, and then pulled back the catch, when M'Aleese entered, followed by M'Kenna, M'Manus meantime remaining outside to keep watch. They took four small bottles and one big bottle of whisky, some cigarettes and cigars, some currant bread, all the coppers in the drawer, and three bottles of Bass's ale. After coming out they went to a vacant house in Clowney Street, and drank some of the stuff, after which they went to the Brickfields, and remained there all night. On Saturday evening, about four o'clock, they went back to Clowney Street. M'Manus went for some sticks to the shop, and lighted a fire. They had already got a bag of coal that same morning on the street beside a steam roller. They entered by the back door, and when they walked in the noise of a key was heard in the front door, and they "bolted."

Constable M'Grath also gave evidence as to the arrest of M'Kenna at his own house, in 39 Forfar Street. When cautioned he said, "I know nothing about this; I'll see more about this." Shortly before twelve o'clock on Saturday night M'Manus was arrested at 6 Odessa Street, and then stated, "I was along with M'Aleese and M'Kenna right enough, but I was not in the house, I stopped outside to watch. When they came out they had bottles and ëcigs.,' and I got some ëcigs.,' and anything that was going. I took anything that was reached to me, but I got no money." The statement of M'Aleese was read over to the other two prisoners in the barrack, when M'Kenna again stated that he knew nothing about it. M'Manus replied, "That's the truth M'Aleese stated; them are the two that was along with me."

The prisoner M'Kenna at the completion of the constable's evidence called out from the dock, "He said nothing of the sort. He said the statement was false you had written down."

Mr. Spiller then applied for the discharge of M'Manus, who was released, and was put into the witness-box, and on being sworn, stated that on Saturday morning, the 20th, about four o'clock, he was along with M'Aleese and a lad named M'Kenna, but not the prisoner Francis M'Kenna. The two who went in brought out sausage roll, corned beef, cigars, cigarettes, whisky, and some bottles of Bass from Rooney's shop at Cavendish Street.

Samuel Clarke, assistant in Mr. Rooney's spirit grocery, Cavendish Street, said some days previous to the robbery he had observed M'Kenna and M'Aleese loitering about the premises. On the night previous to the robbery the premises were securely locked up before twelve o'clock. On coming downstairs at seven next morning he found a window broken, and a door in the store burst open. Four shillings worth of coppers were missing from the drawer, and also three boxes of cigarettes, one box of cigars, a fruit cake, a tin of preserved corned meat, 8 lbs. of sausage roll, four naggings of whisky, three bottles of ale, and 3 lbs. of bacon. The total value of what was missing would be about £1 12s.

Mr. Spiller applied for a remand, which was granted.

======================

SUNDERLAND BAILIFF COMMITS SUICIDE. --

Albert Swailes (29), a county court bailiff, committed suicide at his home in Sunderland yesterday by hanging himself to a bedstead.

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A REVIEW OF THE YEAR -- 1902.
(CONTINUED FROM SATURDAY)

THE YEAR AT HOME.

The principal event in the year at home after the Coronation was the Marquis of Salisbury's resignation of the Premiership, after a record holding of this first office in the Empire. A meeting of the Unionist party was held on Monday, July 14th, and Mr. Balfour's selection was warmly affirmed on every side. Of course, Cabinet changes and a certain re-shuffling of offices had naturally to result, but in the main things went on unchanged. Sir Michael Hicks-Beach, who had been for so long connected with Lord Salisbury, and had stuck by him through thick and thin, despite the necessary unpopularity of his recent Budgets, decided to go out of office with him, and Mr. Ritchie, from the Home Office, stepped into his shoes.

Lord Salisbury Rt. Hon. A. Balfour

The vacancy at the Home Office was filled by Mr. Akers-Douglas, who was succeeded at the Board of Works by Lord Windsor. The Duke of Devonshire, while retaining his post of President of the Council, resigned the Presidency of the Board of Education, and was succeeded by the Marquis of Londonderry as Minister of Education, he making way for Mr. Austen Chamberlain at the Post Office. Lord Cadogan gave up the Lord-Lieutenancy of Ireland, and the Earl of Dudley was appointed in his place, taking up office and making a State entry in September; while George Wyndham was raised to Cabinet rank. Sir W. H. Walrond succeeded Lord James of Hereford as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, but otherwise the Cabinet remained unaltered.

Mr. Ritchie Sir M. Hicks-Beach

Parliament has been particularly busy this year with an autumn session, principally due to the Education Bill, which was introduced on March 24th, and fought every inch of the way. Mr. Balfour, also, introduced his new rules for the procedure of the House of Commons, but these had to give way to the highly contentious Education Bill. A committee, under Lord James of Hereford, was held on the pressing subject of alien emigration, and presented its report. The formation of the British Shipping and Tobacco Trusts was a commercial development of a far-reaching nature, forced upon this country by American competition.

The Earl and Countess of Dudley

The announcement of the Anglo-Japanese agreement gave considerable satisfaction. Some surprise was caused throughout the Empire by the resignation of the Earl of Hopetoun (now the Marquis of Linlithgow) of his post of Governor-General of Australia last May. This post he had taken up upon its institution about eighteen months before, and during the celebrations of the inauguration of the Federation, and his short term of office, he had made himself very popular with the Colonials. His reason was simply that of the expense of keeping up this great position properly, as he found that he had spent about £25,000 in excess of his salary and allowances.

Lord Tennyson The Earl of Hopetoun

Lord Tennyson, who was Governor of South Australia, was temporarily appointed until a successor was chosen, and was, in November himself nominated to the post, to the satisfaction of the Colonies, though, by his own special request, the appointment was only for one year. This year the Colonies and the Mother Country have established more intimate and business-like relations through a great conference held at the Colonial Office.

OBITUARY OF THE YEAR.

The death which stands out most prominently is that of Mr. Cecil Rhodes, the great African millionaire and empire-builder, who gave his name to the immense country of Rhodesia. His name will always be indissolubly connected with the history of the development of South Africa, and be handed down to posterity amongst the geniuses of the nineteenth century.

Late Rev. H. Price Hughes Late Dr. PArker
Late Mr. J. Kensit Late Mr. C. Rhodes

A great loss to the Liberal party was the Earl of Kimberley, who had so long led them in the Upper House and had been a great ally of the late Mr. Gladstone. However, he had been ill for a considerable time, and his end was expected. Another prominent peer who passed away earlier in the year was the Marquess of Dufferin and Ava, who had served his country with unique success in almost every diplomatic post of importance, and had a most distinguished career. Lord Pauncefote was another distinguished diplomatist, but he was still in harness, and died at his post at Washington, where he was British Ambassador to the United States. His death was widely regretted in both countries, and his position was filled by Sir M. Herbert. Other peers who died this year were the old Earl of Perth, the little known doyen of the peerage; the Earl of Munster, a victim of the war; and Lord Cheylesmore.

Late Marquess of Dufferin & Ava Late Prince Edward of Saxe-Weimar
Late Earl of Kimberley Late Lord Paunceforte

Lady Sophia Cecil passed away at a very advanced age. Prince Edward of Saxe-Weimar, a Crimean veteran and a field-marshal was the most prominent soldier who died during the year, and he was buried in Chichester Cathedral with full military honours. General Sir Andrew Clarke was another well-known soldier, and Don Francis of Assisi, ex-King Consort of Spain, was greatly before the public at times during his life in most paradoxical capacities. Herr von Krupp, the great German gun manufacturer, and Sir Frederick Abel, the inventor of cordite, left behind them a great mark on modern warfare, and had more to do with changing the character of hostilities than any other living men; and M. Bloch, the famous Russian, who denied the possibility of war under their conditions, also joined the great majority.

Late Mr. Bret Harte Late Commissioner Kerr
Late Sir R. Temple Late Herr von Krupp

Sir Richard Temple and Sir E. Hertslet were well -- known public servants; and eminent in the religious world were Mr. Hugh Price Hughes, Dr. Parker, Dr. Newman Hall, Mr. John Kensit, and Dr. Talmage. Mr. Commissioner Kerr, the celebrated lawyer, who retired only last year died in November. Sir Ellis Ashmead -- Bartlett, M.P., died early in the year.

THE CHURCH.

Changes in the Church have not been many, and deaths conspicuous by their absence amongst leading prelates. Dr. Bradley, the aged Dean of Westminster, continued in his post until after the great Coronation ceremony, though too feeble to take actual part in it, but resigned immediately after it. He was succeeded by Dr. Armitage Robinson, one of the Canons of the Chapter of Westminster, and the appointment, Mr. Balfour's first piece of Church preferment, gave general satisfaction.

Dr. A. Robinson Dr. Bradley
Canon Gore The Dean of Ripon

Canon Gore was duly installed Bishop of Worcester after tremendous opposition, owing to the exception take to his views by the Low Church party. Dr. Freemantle, Dean of Ripon, caused considerable sensation in the religious world, both inside and outside the Church by a remarkable paper he read at the Church Congress, which raised heated discussion on every side by the unusual opinions expressed.

THE LAW.

This has been a year of interesting legal cases, first and foremost of which stood the cases of Dr. Krause and ëColonel' Lynch, M.P., arising out of the South African War. Libel cases on a large scale have been very much to the front, and the Truth articles on the Article Club resulted in three which dragged over many months.

Mr. Cowen Mr. Labouchere
R. B. Molineux William Gardiner

The affairs of the London and Globe Company occupied a good deal of the Official Receiver's time, and the personal examination of Mr. Whittaker Wright, the managing director, was decidedly sensational; while the inquest on the girls killed in the City fire excited widespread interest. The leading society divorce cases were the Downshire and Hartopp ones, and the most sensational murder trial were those of George Chapman, the Southwark publican, and William Gardiner, the Peasenhall deacon, both of which are still sub judice.

SCIENCE.

Air-ships and motor-cars have been the principal features of the scientific world this year, and both have undoubtedly made considerable strides forward. M. Santos Dumont has continued his experiments in France with some success, and Dr. Barton and Mr. Stanley Spencer have made marked progress in England. However, this necessarily dangerous form of locomotion has resulted in two terrible accidents in France, both of which resulted in loss of life to the aeronauts, M. Severo and Baron de Bradsky, with their engineers. But, on the whole, the science of aerial navigation has made a considerable advance towards practicability, if not perfection.

M. Santos Dumont
Baron De Bradsky M. Severo

Automobilism, also, is forging ahead, and the improvement in the old types and constant fresh types of car have been more marked this year than ever before, and a most successful show was held at the Crystal Palace. The King has become an ardent automobilist, and lent his conntenance to this progressive industry. Signor Marconi, aided by the Italian Government, has made advances in his system of wireless telegraphy, which is now in practical use at long distances.

LITERATURE.

It has been a dull year in literature, and there is nothing to record beyond the prodigious sale of Miss Marie Corelli's latest effort, Temporal Power, which went off even more successfully with her public than her other works. But, on the whole, publishers were afraid of trying any experiments in view of the counter-attractions of the Coronation, and the literature surrounding it in and out of the papers. On the other hand, there are several deaths to record, and that of M. Zola, who was accidentally suffocated in his town house in Paris by an imperfect stove, was peculiarly sad.

Late M. Zola Late Mr. G. A. Henty

Equally sad was the early demise of Frank Norris, a frank disciple of Zola, and one of the cleverest novelists of his age in the world. He could unquestionably have made his mark had he lived. Two other American authors, who were almost equally English, were Bret Harte and F. R. Stockton, both of whom had enjoyed a long innings of popularity and a big vogue. Their deaths were a sorrow to their admirers, but were more in season than the others, as was Mr. G. A. Henty's. The last-named will long continue to be popular with boys, and his historical romances were certainly the best tales ever written for this class.

DRAMA.

The play of the year, so far as popularity is concerned, was undoubtedly Madeleine Lucette Riley's Mice and Men, which Mr. Forbes Robertson produced at the Lyric early in the year, and has only recently taken off.

Mr. J. M. Barrie Mr. Forbes Robertson

The autumn production at the Vaudeville, Mr. J. M. Barrie's Quality Street, promises to rival it in due course, and is obviously in for a long run. Mesdames Sarah Bernhardt, Rejane and Jane hading were all over for the Coronation season, and had a great reception from the British public. This summer the old Lyceum, made famous by Sir Henry Irving, closed its doors finally, owing to being condemned as structurally unsafe by the London County Council.

SPORT.

This year the royal colours have again been on the Turf, the King racing under his own name. The most successful owner has been Mr. R. S. Sievier, the well-known professional plunger, who has won £23,000 odd, principally by the aid of his wonderful mare, Sceptre, who is undoubtedly the horse of the year. She has won many races, including the Two Thousand, One Thousand, the Oaks, and the St. Leger. St. Maclou is another horse who has made a name for himself. W. Lane, who has come to the front very quickly, heads the list of jockeys with 170 odd wins.

A. C. Maclaren V. Trumper
J. Darling T. L. Taylor

Johnny Reiff and Milton Henry have joined Lester Reiff and Tod Sloan in the ranks of the unlicensed for foul riding in France. The Australians paid a most successful visit to England this year, and returned home covered in glory, and almost undefeated. They just won the test match rubber of five, and, playing consistently, had a splendid record to show under the clever captaincy of Darling. Clem Hill did not come off particularly brilliant, as had been expected, but Victor Trumper set up many records, and proved himself one of the best batsmen ever seen. T. L. Taylor and the veteran Shrewsbury headed the English batting average for the season.

Mr. R. S. Sievier W. Lane
Spectre

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Tuesday, 30 December, 1902

Births

HARTE -- December 26th, at Castle Street, Strabane, the wife of A. J. Harte, of a daughter.

MANSELL -- December 19th, at 1 Jubilee Villas, Bangor, the wife of Frederick Mansell, of a daughter, birth doing well.

REA -- December 25, at 19 Jersey Street, to Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Rea, a son.

Deaths

BINGHAM -- December 29th, 1902, at his father's residence, 12 Upper Charleville Street, ROBERT, the dearly-beloved and youngest son of James and Maria Bingham. His remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation. -- Glasgow papers please copy.
JAMES & MARIA BINGHAM.

CALVERT -- December 29th, 1902, at the Royal Victoria Hospital, WILLIAM JOHN CALVERT, eldest son of the late George Calvert, Tullyveary. Funeral from above institution, on to-morrow (Wednesday) morning, at nine o'clock, for interment in Killyleagh Meeting-house Green. Friend will accept this (the only) intimation. Deeply regretted.
MARY A. CALVERT.

MASONIC.
THE RICHARD IRVINE MASONIC LODGE, 255.
The Brethren of above Lodge and other brethren are requested to attend the funeral of our late Brother, WILLIAM J. CALVERT, on Wednesday morning, leaving Royal Hospital at 9 a.m.
JAMES JESS, W.M.; WILLIAM GILLESPIE, P.M., Sec.

GREGG -- December 29th, 1902, at her father's residence, 11 Thorndyke Street, CHRISTIANA (WEE TENNIE), the dearly-beloved daughter of John and Jane Gregg, aged three years. Her remains will be removed for interment, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at one o'clock, in Comber Cemetery. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
     She was a flower too fair for earth,
          Sent here but for a while,
     God marked her when He gave her birth,
          And took her with a smile.
JOHN & JANE GREGG.

DUNLOP -- December 30th, DAVID DUNLOP. The remains of my dearly-loved brother will be removed from his late residence, 112 Sandy Row, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in the City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.
ELIZABETH DUNLOP.

HEWITT -- December 29th, at his father's residence, Culcavey, Hillsborough, SAMUEL, second son of James Hewitt. The remains of my dearly- beloved son will be removed for interment in the family burying-ground, Maragall Churchyard, to-morrow (Wednesday), at twelve o'clock noon. Friends will please accept this intimation.
JAMES HEWITT.

JACKSON -- December 29th, at his residence, 34 Bloomfield Avenue, JOHN BRISTOW JACKSON, dearly-loved husband of Lizzie Jackson. Funeral to the City Cemetery at half-past one o'clock, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon. Deeply mourned.
L. JACKSON.

MOORE -- December 29th, at 14 M'Cavana's Place, LOUISA M., the dearly-beloved wife of Edward C. Moore, Coach Trimmer. Her remains will be removed from above address, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at one o'clock.
EDWARD C. MOORE.

M'CAW -- December 29, at his residence, Dunfield, Victoria Park. Londonderry, the REV. WILLIAM M'CAW, D.D., aged 84 years. His remains will be removed from his late residence, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Friday next, the 2nd January, at twelve o'clock noon. Friends will please accept this intimation.

M'CONNELL -- December 30, at the Belfast Union Infirmary, JOHN M'CONNELL, Painter, after a long illness. The remains of our beloved father will be removed from the above institution on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in Milltown R.C. Cemetery. -- R.I.P.
JOHN & FRANCIS M'CONNELL.

M'CLATCHEY -- December 29th, at 60 Britannic Street, JANE, dearly-beloved daughter of Edward and Mary Jane M'Clatchey, aged three years. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
     Where the grassy hilltop rises
          There our lovely darling sleeps
     Nothing now can hurt or harm her
          Jesus safe her spirit keeps.
     Shall I grieve to see her happy?
          Or shall I wish her back to weep?
     No, for Jesus, loving Saviour
          Counts my lamb amongst His sheep.

M'KAY -- December 29th, at Ramsay, I.O.M. (the result of an accident on board ss Apollo), SAMUEL, eldest and dearly-beloved son of William and Rebecca M'Kay, 19 Willowfield Street, Belfast.

M'KEE -- December 29, 1902, at her residence, 6 Posnett Street, Belfast, ELIZA M'KEE, relict of the late William M'Kee. The remains of our dearly-beloved mother will be removed, for interment in the Balmoral Cemetery, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at half-past one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
W. M'KEE.

The following announcements were received too late for classifications on page 5:-

DUNN -- December 29th, at Crawfordsburn, AGNES, wife of James Dunn, aged 91 years. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the family burying-ground, Bangor, on to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon, at two o'clock.
JAMES DUNN.

TITTERINGTON -- December 30th, at her father's residence, 14 Spring Street, HESSIE, the dearly-beloved daughter of Joseph and Jane Titterington. Interment notice later.
JOSEPH & JANE TITTERINGTON.

In Memoriam

ANDREWS -- In loving remembrance of ROBERT (LITTLE BOBBIE), youngest son of Robert and Lizzie Andrews, who died 30th December, 1900, aged nine months.
     Jesus took my flower away
          Yet I will not repine
     For Jesus in His bosom wears
          The flower that once was mine.
ROBERT & LIZZIE ANDREWS. 277 Shankill Road.

REDDICK -- In sad and loving remembrance of our dearly-beloved daughter, LIZZIE, who fell asleep in Jesus, 30th December, 1901, and was interred in Broomhedge Church Burying-ground.
     How we miss the hand so gentle
          How we miss the look so kind
     How we miss the voice so cheery
          That bespoke the happy mind
     And the ear that always listened
          And the heart that always cared
     And admitted all our sorrows
          And our gladness always shared.
"Jesus said, Weep not, she is not dead, but sleepeth." -- St. Luke viii., and 52.
MAURICE & ANNIE REDDICK.

WATTERS -- In sad and loving memory of my dearly-beloved brother WILLIAM (WEE WILLIE), who departed this life on 30th December, 1900, and was interred in Soldierstown Burying-ground.
     I loved my brother dearly
          I loved him very well
     But the angels loved him better
          And they took him home to dwell
Inserted by his brother, JOHN WATTERS.

YOUNG -- In loving memory of our dear father, DAVID YOUNG, who departed this life 30th December, 1901, and was interred in the City Cemetery. Sadly missed.
     One less is left to love us now
          Since our dear father has gone
     But memory points us to the rock
          He loved to lean upon.
     We miss his kind and loving hand
          His fond and earnest care
     Our home is lone without him
          We miss him everywhere.
Inserted by his loving family. 8 North Thomas Street.

Clippings

1902.

LOCAL REVIEW OF THE YEAR.

During the past twelve months there has been little of an exciting or unusual character in the municipal life of Belfast. Sir Daniel Dixon's fourth year of office as chief magistrate opened without any agitation concerning a "burning question." Nevertheless municipal work proceeded in a quiet, steady manner. Technical instruction was the chief problem under the consideration of the Corporation, and it was advanced in a most unmistakable manner during the year, the building of the new Institute in College Square North being rapidly proceeded with. The model lodging house known as "Carrick House," was opened early in the year, and was so rapidly taken advantage of that it is now being considerably enlarged. This is largely due to the enterprise of the Baths and Lodging-House Committee, of which Mr. Robert Gageby is chairman. The latter received the honour of a Justiceship of the Peace during the year, and no appointment of the kind ever gave greater satisfaction to the general public. The erection of the Ardoyne Fire Station commenced during the year, and it is largely to form an important feature in the arrangements for the extinction of fires within the extended city boundary. Mr. Carnegie, whose generosity is of world-wide fame, offered to contribute to the Council a sum of £15,000 for the erection of three branch libraries provided a rate were struck that would support these institutions. After some discussion the offer was accepted, and the thanks of the Corporation were returned to the liberal minded millionaire. A new branch library is being built in Templemore Avenue, and reading rooms have been provided at the Falls Baths, the North Belfast Working Men's Club in Tennent Street, and at York Road.

Early in the Session the Belfast Corporation Bill and the Cavehill and Whitewell Tramway Bill came before Parliament, and after considerable discussion before Select Committees of the House of Commons they were agreed to. The Corporation Bill provided for the acquirement of the Ulster Hall, for the construction of a bridge over the Great Northern Railway at the Donegall Road and other matters. The Tramway Bill was for the purpose of confirming the sale of the Glengormley line to the British Electric Traction Company and for providing electric traction. The proposed purchase of the interests of the Belfast Street Tramways company has occupied a good deal of attention within the last few months. The Council made an offer to purchase the lines. This was rejected, and the negotiations which took place at the instance of Sir William Q. Ewart, Bart., were terminated. At a later period the Tramway Company intimated to the Corporation that they had decided to acquire the Ligoniel and Sydenham tramways, and this was followed by notice of a Bill to obtain powers to electrify these lines, and also the connecting lines of the Belfast Street Tramways Company, and the line from Carlisle Circus to Fortwilliam Park.

In the month of April we announced first in these columns the Atlantic Shipping Combine brought about by Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan and the Right Hon. W. J. Pirrie. The news produced quite a sensation in shipping circles, and considerable consternation in Liverpool and on the Clyde, but the people of Belfast were reassured when they found that the combine agreements included one with Messrs. Harland & Wolff for the building of the new steamers required by the International Company and for repairs to existing vessels. The details of the formation of the company and of the action of the Government resulting in a subsidy of the Cunard Line form an interesting chapter in the mercantile history of the year.

The sale of the Belfast and Northern Counties Railway to the Midland Railway Company of England is also an important feature in the events of the year. The leading English railway companies have all been trying to get a foothold in this country, and the Midland Company have undoubtedly secured a payable and prosperous railway system. The agreement must be confirmed by Parliament next session.

The Royal Victoria Hospital at Grosvenor Road has advanced very rapidly towards completion. Of the £100,000 originally promised for the building of the institution all but £4,000 has been actually paid to the treasurer, the Right Hon. W. J. Price. The amount received, with the interest received from the bankers, and on deferred subscriptions, amounts to considerably over £100,000. The Endowment Fund has also made considerable progress, and it is expected that when the hospital is opened the endowment scheme, to which Mrs. Pirrie is now devoting herself, will be in a gratifying position.

The question of the purification of sewage has occupied considerable attention during the twelve months, and the formation of bacteria beds under the direction of Professor Letts, of the Queen's College, has greatly advanced. The success of the experiments made has been most satisfactory.

Electric lighting has greatly extended during the year and a further reduction in the cost of electricity for lighting and motor purposes is confidently anticipated. At present the Police Committee are engaged in the laudable work of improving the illumination of leading thoroughfares by the erection of large gas lamps.

The port of Belfast has been advancing in prosperity during the year. The Harbour Commissioners have proceeded with the construction of the Musgrave Channel (which is expected to relieve a good deal of the existing congestion), and the development of the Clarendon Dock property has been frequently under discussion, but is to be kept in abeyance for the present. In the latter portion of the year H.M.S Melampus, was for a time berthed in the York Dock.

The Belfast City and District Water Commissioners have to their credit the opening of the Knockbracken reservoir and the introduction to the city of the water of the Annalong river. Negotiations have proceeded with the tenants in the Woodburn district for the purpose of rendering the water supply for that locality beyond reproach, and a Bill is being promoted in Parliament to enable the Commissioners to supply Cultra and Craigavad, to render the Mourne scheme more effective, and to sanction additional borrowing powers.

The Poor Law Guardians have been chiefly concerned with matters of routine and administration. The question of the erection of much needed new offices and a boardroom has been repeatedly discussed, but no scheme has yet been sanctioned by the Local Government Board.

June 26 was the date fixed for the Coronation, and extensive preparations had been in progress in Belfast for a week or two previous to celebrate the auspicious event in fitting manner. With startling suddenness the city was overcast in a heavy gloom when, on Tuesday, the 23rd of June, the announcement was made that the King had taken so seriously ill as to render an immediate operation necessary, and that, in the words of the Earl Marshal, the Duke of Norfolk, "the solemnity of the Coronation of their Majesties King Edward the Seventh and Queen Alexandra is postponed from the 26th inst, to a date hereafter to be determined." In an instant a gay and festive populace was plunged into the deepest mourning, and the greatest anxiety was manifested as to the possible outcome of the tragic event which literally shook the world. His Majesty, however, made favourable progress, though for days and weeks his life was in grave danger, and at his request the local arrangements were, with certain modifications, carried out. June 26 and 27 were observed as public holidays. Commemorative medals were presented to the children of the schools, hospitals, and other institutions, 3,000 poor people were entertained to a dinner in St. George's Markets, 1,200 infirm persons each received a new florin, many cripples were sent to the seaside, and services of intercession were held in a number of the churches. The decorations were allowed to remain, and in the magnificent weather the city presented a splendid spectacle: while at night there were brilliant illuminations. On June 27 over 10,000 Sunday School children were entertained in the Ormeau, Woodvale, Alexandra, and Botanic Gardens Parks. The postponed Coronation took place on Saturday, August 9, when the town was brightly decorated in honour of the event, and at night many public buildings were illuminated and bonfires were burnt. Coronation oaks were planted in the parks, in which there were band promenades; and in the afternoon a special service was held in St. Anne's Church, which members of the City Council attended.

The chief local event of the year, both in a public and a social sense, was the visit of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland and the Countess of Dudley. Their stay in the city extended over ten days, during which time they filled a programme of engagements altogether remarkable for its length and variety. The weather was, unfortunately, of a disagreeable character throughout the visit, but this notwithstanding the populace assembled in thousands in the streets daily and extended an enthusiastic reception to their Excellencies, which was quite in keeping with the loyal and hospitable traditions of the city. During their stay the Earl and Countess of Dudley received addresses of welcome from all the representative bodies of Belfast and district; visited the leading institutions, works, and public buildings, and performed several important ceremonies, including the laying of the foundation stone of the new Municipal Technical Institute, and the opening of the Ulster Medical Institute. A banquet was given in honour of the visit by the Lord Mayor, and Viceregal luncheons were given by the Harbour Commissioners and the Chairman of the Chamber of Commerce (Right Hon. Thomas Sinclair, D.L). The Viceregal reception given by their Excellencies in the Ulster Hall was the great event of the week, and, partaking of the nature of a levee, proved one of the most brilliant society functions ever witnessed in Belfast. During their stay here -- Belfast Castle being their headquarters -- the Viceregal party paid visits to Coleraine and Bangor, and on their departure from Belfast they spent a few days with the Earl and Countess Annesley at Castlewellan. The presence of the Home Fleet in Belfast Lough added to the Èclat of a memorable occasion, which was not the less interesting from the fact that a hint was given by Lord Dudley that there was a probability of the King visiting Ireland in the year 1903. It was with keen regret that shortly after the return of Lady Dudley to Dublin the news was received in Belfast of her serious illness. Her malady was appendicitis that dreaded disease which attacked the King in such tragic fashion on the eve of the Coronation and necessitated a postponement of the historic event. An operation was performed successfully, and her Excellency has happily made rapid progress towards complete recovery.

Lady Gladys Hamilton, youngest daughter of the Duke and Duchess of Abercorn, was, on January 14, married to the Earl of Wicklow, at St. Mark's Church, Audley Street, London.

Nearly a fortnight later, on January 26, the wedding took place of Lady Helen Stewart, the charming daughter of the Marquis and Marchioness of Londonderry, with Lord Stavordale, eldest son of the Earl and Countess of Ilchester. The ceremony took place in presence of a large and distinguished congregation, which included the Duke of Cambridge and the Duke and Duchess of Connaught, in St. Peter's Church, Eaton Square. Previous to the marriage, her ladyship was the recipient of a number of valuable presentations from the Belfast Conservative Association, the ladies of Belfast, the County Down Staghounds Hunt Club, and the tenantry of Newtownards and Comber.

The marriage of Miss Dixon, eldest daughter of the Lord Mayor of Belfast (Sir Daniel Dixon, D.L.) with Mr. Charles Owen Slacke, son of Sir Owen Slacke, C.B., was solemnized in Holywood Parish Church, on June 14, by the Lord Bishop of Ossary (Dr. Crozier). At Ballymenoch, the Lord Mayor's residence, a few days before the wedding, Miss Dixon was presented with a number of gifts from friends in Belfast, the subscribers including members of the Corporation and Harbour Board, from the office staff of Messrs. Thomas Dixon & Son, and from the captain, officers, and engineers of the s.s. Downshire.

The protracted war in South Africa came to a termination on June 1st. It was on a Sunday night when the news arrived here that peace had been declared, and the glad intelligence was announced from the pulpit in many of the churches. Next day there were rejoicings on a large scale, and the utmost enthusiasm was manifested. Monday, June 2, was observed as a holiday, the town was gaily decorated, and at night there were bonfires and illuminations, while bands paraded the town, and, in a variety of ways, the people demonstrated their intense satisfaction at the termination of the deadly warfare between Briton and Boer.

In consequence of the death of Mr. William Johnston, a vacancy occurred in the Parliamentary representation of South Belfast, for which the candidates forthcoming were Mr. Dunbar-Buller, nominated by the Conservative Association, and Mr. Thomas H. Sloan, a workingman candidate who came forward as an independent Unionist at the nomination of the Belfast Protestant Association. Mr. Dunbar-Buller was late in entering the lists and his cause was only championed in a luke-warm fashion by the leaders of the Conservative party; whereas Mr. Sloan and his friends made a determined and energetic fight, and as a result won the seat. The election took place on August 18, the result being as follows:-- Sloan, 3795; Dunbar-Buller, 2969 -- majority 826. On the night following the declaration of the poll a great demonstration in honour of the successful candidate was held, a monster procession taking place through the leading streets of the city. Mr. Sloan's maiden speech in Parliament was appropriately enough, a reply to the structures of Mr. J. Devlin upon the proceedings on Sundays at the Custom-house Steps -- a speech which earned him a merited compliment from the Chief Secretary, Mr. Wyndham.

A contest that aroused much interest in Belfast occurred in East Down in the early part of the year, when a vacancy arose through the appointment of Mr. J. A. Rentoul to the judicial bench in London. The candidates were Colonel R. H. Wallace, then in South Africa with his regiment, the South Downs, and Mr. James Wood. The result of a stiff fight, which was fought a great disadvantage to the side of the official Conservative candidate owing to his absence, was declared as follows:- Wood, 3576; Wallace, 3429 -- majority, 147.

The Orange Institution continues to prosper and to enlarge its borders. The annual Twelfth demonstration was held at Castlereagh, the Rt. Hon. Colonel Saunderson, M.P., Grand Master, presiding. There was an enormous turn-out of the Brethren, and their regalia, banners and bands made an imposing display. Several new lodges have been opened, and the Institution has to-day a firmer hold upon the affections of the loyal and law-abiding Protestants of Belfast than it ever had in the brightest days of its splendid history.

For the third time, the British Association held its annual meeting in Belfast, the previous visits being in 1852 and 1874. Elaborate arrangements had been made by the local reception committee, and the provision for the accommodation of the Association and the facilities for conducting the work of the different sections were everything that could be desired. The President, Professor Jas. Dewar, LL.D., F.R.S., delivered his inaugural address in Grosvenor Hall on Wednesday evening, September 10, and it was remarkable, as was the address of Professor Armstrong to the Educational Science Section, for the vigour with which the deficiencies of the educational system were attacked. Valuable contributions to scientific knowledge were made in the different departments of the association, and the debates proved highly instructive and interesting. Hospitality on an extensive scale was extended to the visitors to the meeting, and many enjoyable excursions were held. The meeting was attended by 1,620 members -- 243 old life members, 21 new life members, 314 old annual members, 84 new annual members, 647 associates, 305 ladies, and 6 foreign members. At the first meeting 1,108 members attended, and in 1874 the number was 1,951.

The Institute of Auctioneers of the United Kingdom held its annual conference here at the end of August, when there was a large attendance of delegates. A banquet was given by the local committee in the Grand Central Hotel, and a successful excursion to Portrush and the Giant's Causeway was held.

In a theatrical sense the past year has been one of the most remarkably successful in the history of the local stage. Madame Sarah Bernhardt appeared at a matinee in the Theatre Royal on July 1, in "Camille", and drew an overflowing and fashionable audience. Sir Charles Wyndham presented "David Garrick" at a flying matinee in the same theatre on October 29; and we had visits from such old favourites as Sir Henry Irving, Miss Ellen Terry, and Mr. Edward Terry. During Sir Henry's visit he performed the record feat of travelling to and from Sandringham before the King and Queen and the German Emperor, while only absenting himself from Belfast for one night. Other most successful engagements of the year were "The Silver Slipper", "The Christian", "English Nell", "My Lady Molly", "Are you a Mason?", "Mice and Men", "san Toy", and "The Toreador". At the Grand Opera House, the pantomime "The Sleeping Beauty" with Miss Julie Mackay and Miss Mabel Love as principal boy and girl, established a record, which promises to be broken in the Xmas production of "Jack and the Beanstalk" now running, while the Easter pantomime "Beauty and the Beast" with Mr. Arthur Milton and the popular Minnie Cunningham in the cast, drew crowded houses throughout the run.

The year was comparatively immune from casualties of a serious character, but of the few that did occur one was a memorable and most distressing one. The Smithfield flax-spinning and weaving mill was, on January 20, the scene of a deplorable catastrophe which resulted in the death of 14 employees, and serious injuries to a large number of the workers, the majority being females. A section of the mill collapsed, and the task of removing the debris and extricating the victims occupied nearly a day and a half. At the inquest, held on February 10 and 11, the jury found that the disaster was due to defects in the base of the piers which could not be discovered by ordinary inspection, and the opinion was expressed that power should be given to some public body to periodically examine and inspect buildings. A public funeral was given to the victims, and a fund for the relief of the sufferers subscribed to by the citizens.

In May there was a serious outbreak of smallpox in the city, which gave rise to considerable alarm; but, thanks to the precautions taken, the disease was checked in the course of a few weeks. Otherwise the public health has been of a fairly satisfactory character throughout the past twelve months. As a result of the agitation caused by the smallpox scare, a provisional hospital was erected at Purdysburn, pending the building of a permanent and properly-equipped structure for the reception and treatment of infectious diseases.

On September 3, Belfast was visited by a heavy flood, which wrought enormous havoc, involving heavy loss to property and occasioning grave inconvenience in industrial establishments and the houses of hundreds of the citizens. The streets in the low-lying parts of the city were submerged to a great depth, and in many cases the inhabitants of houses and shops had to resort to the upper storeys for shelter and safety. An exhaustive inquiry has been held by the Corporation into the causes of the floods, which are attributed in some degree to defective drainage, and steps are being taken to prevent, if possible, a recurrence of so calamitous a state of affairs. Mr. Bretland, city surveyor, and Mr. Gullan, superintendent of works, at the request of the Corporation, prepared an important joint report, which is still under the consideration of the Corporation.

During the year the South Downs and the 1st Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers arrived here from South Africa. The South Downs, under Colonel Wallace, returned on July 24, and had a magnificent reception. They were presented with their medals by General Leach, who complimented them upon their splendid work on the field. At the Exhibition Hall the Lord Mayor entertained the officers and men to luncheon; and a complimentary banquet to the officers and men was held on July 29, Lord Londonderry presiding over a numerous company of guests. The Fusiliers arrived in Belfast on October 17, and had also a cordial greeting. On August 29 the officers and men of the Belfast Companies of the Imperial Yeomanry were the guests of the Lord Mayor at a complimentary luncheon in the Exhibition Hall. Unhappily Sir Daniel Dixon was prevented by the death of his son, Lieutenant Percy Dixon, from being present in person, but the chair was capably filled in his absence by Sir Robert M'Connell, Bart.

During the year the honour of knighthood was bestowed upon Dr. (now Sir) William Whitla and Mr. (now Sir) Richard Lloyd Patterson, while Sir Daniel Dixon, D.L., the Lord Mayor, was made a member of the Privy Council.

The death roll has been a fairly heavy one. One of Ireland's greatest and most distinguished sons, the Marquis of Dufferin and Ava passed away, amid world-wide regret, on February 12. As a diplomatist and a man of culture and wide knowledge he had few equals and none superior. The Marquis was born at Florence on June 21 1826, and died in his 76th year. He was buried in the family burying-ground at Clandeboye on February 15. A public subscription was shortly afterwards opened, and a large sum accumulated for the purpose of erecting a statue to Lord Dufferin in Belfast.

Another celebrity who passed away in the course of the year was Mr. Wm. Johnston, M.P., of Ballykilbeg, who died on July 17, having taken a lading part a few days previous in a great Twelfth demonstration at Ballynahinch. He was the most notable Orangemen of his time, and a steadfast temperance reformer. He died in his 73rd year.

Rev. Professor Wm. Doole Killen, D.D., the venerable president of the General Assembly's College, Belfast, died on January 10, at the ripe old age of 96 years. He was one of the most distinguished ornaments of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland.

The obituary of the year also includes:- Mr. S. M'Murray Davis, died January 19; Mr. Robert Atkinson, J.P., died March 6; Dr. James Irvine, died April 29; Mr. George Preston, M.A., died March 14; Rev. Hans Woods, M.A., died June 6; Mr. John Thompson, J.P., died June 25; Head-Constable Wade, died July 6; Dr. Wm. Warwick, died July 10; Mr. Robert S. Allen, died September 16; Rev. Dr. Crawford, died October 5; Mr. Thompson Kelly, died October 7; Mr. Daniel M'Donnell, died October 10; Mr. Joseph Pike, died November 5; Dr. Hugh Lewers, died November 12; Mr. Wm. Thompson, ex-secretary of the Belfast Harbour Board, died November 15; Mr. John Wilgar Allen, died December 3.

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LOCAL BREVITIES.

Mr. J. J. Sims, the well-known Canadian evangelist, is announced to give an address on Eternal Punishment to-night in the Iron Mission Hall, Templemore Avenue.

This afternoon Mary M'Ilveen, 77 years, of 43 Mary Street, was conveyed to the Royal Hospital in the ambulance suffering from a fractured thigh, received by a fall in the street in which she resides.

====================

INQUESTS IN BELFAST.

UNCERTIFIED MIDWIFES.

An inquest was held this afternoon in the Peter's Hill Baths, Belfast, on the body of Maggie Kelly, aged 30, of 37 Lancaster Street, Belfast, who gave birth to a child on Christmas evening, and who died yesterday.

The deputy coroner (Mr. J. S. Finnigan) presided and Sergeant Fogarty appeared for the police. Ellen Gorman, mother of the deceased, who lived in the same house, said that she was present at the birth of the child, and that there was no doctor in attendance. Deceased had had -- children before, and witness was present at each birth. At none of the births was there a doctor engaged. Witness was not a certified mid-wife. Deceased progressed favourably till Sunday night, when she took a weak turn and died yesterday. Medical assistance was not engaged.

Dr. Beggs said that he had made an examination of deceased to-day. From the evidence of his examination, he could say nothing more definite than that death was the result of the birth. Death may have been caused by puerperal fever.

Mr. Finnigan expressed himself very strongly on the question of "handy women" at births, and warned Mrs. Gorman that if she was ever again concerned in a case of the sort, where a death took place, there would be no escape for her from a charge of manslaughter. If he had been satisfied that puerperal fever had been the cause of death, he would have directed the jury to find a verdict of manslaughter.

The following verdict was arrived at:- "That deceased came to her death from cardiac failure after child-birth, and we consider that the mother of deceased showed great neglect in not calling in a doctor, and that this neglect was through ignorance, and was not done deliberately." Two inquests were held in the Danube Street Hall this afternoon, the Deputy Coroner presiding.

One was in reference to the death of a newly-born female child of Ellen Henry, Ewart's Row, Belfast. From the evidence it appeared that the child had been born on the morning of the 29th inst., and that no certified midwife nor doctor was in attendance. The mother had asked her sister to stay with her, but she had not sent for a doctor nor a certified midwife till after the child was born. Dr. Quinn was called in after the birth, but on his arrival the child was dead. The jury returned a verdict to the effect that deceased came to her death from strangulation through inattention at birth.

It was represented to the Deputy Coroner by the foreman of the jury that the mother was lying in a neglected condition in the house, and he (the foreman) suggested that if she was permitted to continue in that state, there might be another inquest, and asked could nothing be done. Mr. Finnigan said he would direct the police to bring the dispensary doctor and the relieving officer to the house and have the woman removed to the Infirmary, where she would be properly cared for. He thanked the foreman for bringing the matter under his notice.

The second inquiry related to the death of Thomas Harrison, 71 years, who resided with his daughter at 91 Sydney Street West. From the evidence of Mrs. Steele, daughter of deceased, it appeared he had been in delicate health and did not work for five years. He complained of asthma and bronchitis. On the 28th inst., he went to bed and his food was brought to him during the day. That night he complained of being sick, and at 8 o'clock when witness spoke to him, he did not reply, and she discovered that he was dead. The medical evidence attributed death to cardiac failure following an acute attack of diarrhoea, and the jury found accordingly.

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THIS DAY'S POLICE.

CUSTODY COURT.
(Before Mr. F. G. Hodder, R.M.)

UNSOUND MEAT.

Inspector David Adgey applied for and obtained an order for the destruction of a carcase of unsound beef which he had seized.

A TROUBLESOME CUSTOMER.

Patrick Keenan, who appeared in the dock this morning on a charge of assaulting a constable, seems to have been a somewhat troublesome customer. Patrick was arrested on a warrant for having failed to pay a school attendance fine, but having been arrested after ten o'clock it was then too late to have him lodged in prison. He was placed on a car for conveyance to the police office, but on the way a wild desire for freedom seems to have entered his mind, for he suddenly let out at the constable, and with such effect that he knocked that officer's helmet spinning on the street. Patrick, taking advantage of the accident, then leaped from the car, and started off in a grand dash, but the constable was quickly in pursuit, and a long gruelling sprint resulted in a victory for the representative of law and order. Patrick will not partake in any further handicap events on the street for a month.

ONLY THE HOUSE LEFT.

Esther Shannon was charged with the larceny of two quilts, two sheets, two saucepans, and some other articles belonging to Michael Monaghan. The prisoner said she had been employed by Monaghan to clean down the house, and had been drinking with him. He told her to pawn a sheet and she took the lot. The prosecutor created much laughter by saying that he could not say whether this was so, but there was now only the empty house left, which was locked up. Seven days' imprisonment was ordered.

A MISSING GOLD WATCH.

Mary Toner appeared on remand charged with the larceny of a gold watch, the property of a man named William Leckey. Evidence was now given that the prisoner had offered a gold watch for sale, and had admitted to another person that she had stolen a gold watch on the night of the larceny. On hearing the evidence now produced the prisoner pleaded guilty, and his Worship said he would impose a sentence of six months' imprisonment, which would be reduced to three months if the watch was produced before the rising of the court.

TOOK IT FOR THE STARVING CHILDREN.

Margaret Pratt, Bangor Street, was charged with the larceny of £1, the property of Annie Murray, Euston Street. It appeared that the prisoner had been in the habit of working in Murray's house. On the occasion of the larceny the front door was open and the prisoner took a letter which contained a postal order for £1, which she cashed. On being arrested she handed to the constable 10s 6d of the money, and offered to pay the remaining 9s 6d if granted four weeks. She took the money to get bread for her starving children. His Worship adjourned the case for a month.

ALLEGED ASSAULT.

Clugston Davison was again charged on remand with an assault upon a man named M'Crum. Mr. Brian M'Erlean appeared for the prosecution, and Mr. Tughan for the defence. The injured man was still unable to attend the court, and the case was further adjourned for a fortnight.

SUMMONS COURT.
(Before Messrs. Garrett Nagle, R.M., Dr. King Kerr, J.P., and Robert Gageby, J.P.)

ILLEGAL CANVESSING FOR HIRE.

The Corporation of Belfast at the suit of Inspector Auld, summoned William Wilson, 30 Vere Street, Belfast, licensed cardriver, for having on the 26th December paraded the street at Station Street, Belfast, in search of employment, contrary to the by-law in that case made and provided. The Inspector stated that on the 26th December at about 11.15 a.m. he was on duty at the Co. Down railway terminus. He saw defendant drive his horse and car down Station Street. He stopped at the corner of Scrabo Street, where a number of men were standing. He saw defendant speak to the men. Witness came forward and spoke to defendant, and asked him if he was engaged. He replied that he was engaged by the men to whom he had been speaking. The men told witness that he had been canvassing to drive them to Newtownards. Witness ordered him to go back to the carstand, but he refused, and afterwards drove away. A fine of 10s and costs were inflicted. Mr. A. J. Lewis prosecuted in the Summons Court to-day.

ANOTHER CARMAN FINED.

John Campbell, Cambermere Street, licensed cardriver, was summoned by the Corporation for drunkenness while in charge of a horse and car on Christmas Day. From the evidence it appeared that defendant was so drunk that his horse and car had to be taken in hands by another jarvey. Defendant, who had been summoned before was fined 20s.

SCHOOL ATTENDANCE PROSECUTIONS.

The following were prosecuted at the instance of the School Committee for failing to cause their children to attend regularly at school:-

William Boyd, 41 Sancroft Street
Timothy Hogan, Crimea Street
Joseph Blain, 39 Joseph Street
James Gibson, 27 Sancroft Street
Parker Leeburn, 20 Henderson's Avenue
Samuel Rainey, 28 Benwell Street
Joseph M'Cullough, Lower Lodge
William Ferguson, 29 Ayr Street
Patrick O'Neill, 37 Shore Street
Michael Ewing, 32 Ivan Street
Felix Hagan, 41 Ritchie Street
Hugh M'Nabb, Harrisburg Street
Ellen Murphy, 51 Osborne Street
Annie Lundy, 13 Jennymount Street
Abraham Dowling, 38 St. Ives Gardens
George Campbell, 75 Armoy Street
Thomas Cairns, 232 Blythe Street
James Small, 30 North Boundary Street
Mary Finnegan, 84 Boundary Street
Robert Willis, 58 Bellevue Street
William Milan, 20 Haddow Street
Henry Jelly, 18 Third Avenue
Samuel Peacock, 60 Kingswood Street
Thomas Jackson, 11 Major Street
Hugh Donnan, 24 Quinton Street
John Conway, 59 Hornidge Street
Thomas Bennett, Perry Street
Samuel Turner, 6 Baywood Street
William O'Hara, 16 Short Strand
Mary M'Cullough, 5 Anderson Street
Edward Quigley, 43 Hornidge Street
Patrick Doran, 93 Tildarg Street
Patrick Clarke, 39 Vulcan Street
Felix Hart, 72 Methuen Street
James Bonnar, 94 Saunders Street
Gawn Girvan, 14 Lackagh Street
David Duff, 43 Joseph Street
William Reilly, 32 Cluan Place
Robert Walls, 73 Saunderson Street
Robert Mulholland, 89 Saunders Street
Arthur Monaghan, 37 Ravensdale Street
Samuel Carlisle, 6 Hanwood Street
John Geddis, 17 Stoneyford Street
William Parker, 59 Frazer Street
Alexander Hart, 82 Foundry Street
James M'Aleese, 14 Spinner Street
James Campbell, 50 Wolff Street
William Briggs, 43 Middlepath Street
Eliza Murphy, 28 Boyd Street
Frederick Graham, 16 Ballynure Street
Richard Metcalfe, 48 Foyle Street
William Clarke, 4 Matlock Street
David Smyth, 2 Ballynure Street
Thomas Woods, 49 Fortingale Street
John Moorhead, 14 Linwood Street
Kate Ardis, 45 Joseph Street
Alexander M'Kenzie, 40 London Street
Joseph Allen, Market Street
Ann Larkin, 57 Vulcan Street
Frank Gibson, Newforge
Annie Lavery, 16 Theodore Street

All was fined 5s and costs for falsely representing their child as being over 14 years, thereby obtaining employment in Messrs. Ross & Company's factory.

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RUNAWAY HORSE IN YORK STREET.

Yesterday afternoon a horse attached to a four-wheeled dray was observed galloping at a high speed along York Street, near the Northern Counties Railway terminus. Several ineffectual attempts were made to stop the animal, which turned at full speed into Whitla Street, where its progress was cleverly cut short by a bystander, who in a most determined manner, and at a considerable risk, succeeded in reaching the horse's head, and promptly put an end to his race.

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EXCITING INCIDENT ON A TRANSPORT.

The transport Wakool landed at Southampton this morning upwards of eight hundred troops from India, the principal drafts belonging to the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, the 1st Gloucester Regiment, and the Royal Artillery. Two exciting incidents occurred during the Wakool's voyage. When the vessel was at Singapore one of the firemen fell overboard, and, seeing his peril, Captain French, of the Royal Army Medical Corps, gallantly dived into the sea, which is whereabouts infested with sharks, and succeeded in resouing him. Later a soldier of weak intellect jumped into the water but he was saved.

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DARING BURGLARY IN BELFAST.

A BIG HAUL.

VALUABLE JEWELLERY AND MONEY STOLEN.

One of the most daring burglaries that have been committed in Belfast for some time was effected in the early hours of this morning at the residence of Mr. E. Agnew, surgeon, dentist, 1 University Square, the house being entered, and money and other articles, value in all between £30 and £40, taken away.

From the particulars to hand it appears that Mr. Agnew returned home about one o'clock this morning, and retired to bed. On rising at seven o'clock he discovered that his bedroom had been entered, and his watch and chain, which he had left on the dressing-table, were missing.

A sovereign purse, containing a few sovereigns, which was attached to a chain, was also gone. Further search revealed the fact that several other valuables were carried off, and Mr. Agnew's trousers, which he had left in his bedroom on retiring for the night, were found in the dining-room.

In one of the pockets he had left his keys, and with these the drawers in the dining-room had been opened and ransacked. A large amount of costly material used by Mr. Agnew in his dentistry work has also been taken.

The other occupants of the house were Mrs. Agnew and three servants, but by none of these was any suspicious sound heard during the entire night.

The police have been communicated with, and are of opinion that the entrance to the house was effected through the door, which was found standing quite open this morning by one of the servants. The manner in which the intruders have carried out their plans, would certainly suggest that they are no novices at the game. However, it is hoped that the police will be successful in tracking the miscreants.

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LAUNCH IN BELFAST.

The last launch of the year in Belfast took place this forenoon, when a steamer named the Colonial, built to the order of Messrs. T. & J. Harrison, Liverpool, left the ways at Messrs. Workman, Clark's south yard. The Colonial, which is a much smaller vessel than the Wayfarer, launched for the same firm on 19th ult., has a gross tonnage of 5,100 (including erections 5,400) with an I.H.P. of 2,750. She will have triple expansion engines, which have been made at the Queen's Road works. After the launch the vessel was moored at the Alexandra Wharf to be fitted up. The Harrison Line trades to almost every quarter of the globe.

 

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Belfast Evening Telegraph - Wednesday, 31 December, 1902

Births

SERVICE -- December 28th, at 20 Bentick Street, the wife of John Service, of a daughter.

Marriages

M'DOWELL--HAMILL -- December 24th, at Rosemary Street Presbyterian Church by the Rev. James Wilson, M. A. (Moderator Belfast Presbytery), SAMUEL M'DOWELL, Springfield Road, Belfast, to JANE PETTICREW (JENNY), only daughter of the late Stewart Hamill, Springfield Road, Belfast.

POSTLETHWAITE--COLLINS -- 24th December, at St. Thomas's Church, Malone Road, by the Rev. H. D. Hall, WILLIAM HENRY JAMESON POSTLETHWAITE, eldest son of the late W. H. Postlethwaite, formerly of Belfast, to CHRISTIANA, the youngest daughter of the late Joseph Collins, of Portadown, Co. Armagh.

Deaths

CARSWELL -- December 30th, at 15 Linfield Street, her son-in-law's residence, ELIZABETH, widow of the late William Carswell, of 27 Gaffikin Street. Her remains will be removed, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

CORBETT -- December 30, FRANCIS CORBETT. The remains of my dearly-beloved husband will be removed from his late residence, 6 Vicarage Street, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at two o'clock, for interment in the City Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.
MARTHA CORBETT.

CONNERY -- December 30th, FREDDY, youngest son of the late Robert Connery. His remains will be removed from 42 Excise Street, for interment in the City Cemetery, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
E. PAXTON.

IRVINE -- December 31st, at his late residence, Dunlambert Cottages, Fortwilliam Park, THOMAS, the dearly-beloved husband of Isabella M. Irvine. His remains will be removed, for interment in Carnmoney Churchyard, on Friday, 2nd January, at two o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
ISABELLA M. IRVINE.

M'CLELLAND -- December 30th, suddenly, at her residence, 59 Beechfield Street, ELIZA, the dearly-beloved wife of Robert M'Clelland. Her remains will be removed, for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at half-past one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
ROBERT M'CLELLAND.

M'DONALD -- December 30th, at his residence, 30 Sackville Street, DRE____ M'DONALD. The remains of my dearly-beloved husband will be removed from the above address, for interment in the City Cemetery, on Friday, 2nd January, 1903, at half-past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
AGNES M'DONALD.

PATTERSON -- December 31st, at 16 Campbell's Row East, FRANCES, the dearly-beloved wife of James Patterson. The remains of my dearly-beloved wife will be removed, for interment in the Knock Burying-ground, on Friday afternoon, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted.
JAMES PATTERSON.

STERLING -- December 29th, ROBERT H. STERLING, Watchmaker, Tandragee.

SINCLAIR -- December 30, 1902, at her father's residence, 51 Ruth Street, LILLIE, the dearly-beloved daughter of Thomas and Agnes Sinclair, aged 4 years. Her remains will be removed, on to-morrow (Thursday) afternoon, at one o'clock, for interment in Derriaghy Churchyard. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
THOMAS & AGNES SINCLAIR.

TEMPLETON -- December 30th, at her father's residence, Rushpark Lodge, Whitehouse, ROBINA, infant daughter of Hugh and Robina Templeton, aged six months. Her remains will be removed, for interment in Carnmoney Burying-ground, on to-morrow (Thursday), at 12 o'clock noon. Friends will please accept this intimation.
HUGH & ROBINA TEMPLETON.

The following announcements were received too late for classification on page 5:--

M'KIBBEN -- December 31st, at his brother's residence, Causeway End, Lisburn, JOSEPH M'KIBBEN, aged 77 years. His remains will be removed, for interment in Blaris, on Friday afternoon, at one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
SAMUEL M'KIBBEN.

O'BOYLE -- December 31st, 1902, at his residence, 15 North Ann Street, JOHN, the dearly-beloved son of Mary Ann O'Boyle. His remains will be removed, for interment in the Milltown Cemetery, on Friday afternoon, at half-past one o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.
MARY ANN O'BOYLE.

SURGENOR -- Died at his residence, Ballyclare, JAMES SURGENOR. His remains will be removed, for interment on to-morrow (Thursday), at 12 o'clock noon. Friends will please accept this (the only) intimation.
MARGARET SURGENOR.

In Memoriam

MOORE -- In ever-loving remembrance of my dearly-beloved husband, JOSEPH MOORE, who departed this life on the 31st December, 1899, and was interred in the City Cemetery.
Ever remembered.
     A few more years shall roll
          A few more seasons come
     And we shall be with those that rest
          Asleep within the tomb.
Inserted by his sorrowing wife and family.
RACHEL MOORE. 202 Sandy Row.

MOORE -- In affectionate and loving remembrance of my dear father, JOSEPH MOORE, who fell asleep in Jesus 31st December, 1899, and was and was interred in the City Cemetery. Sadly mourned. Fondly remembered.
Inserted by his loving daughter
AGNES BOYD.

YOUNGER -- In loving memory of our dear mother, MARGARET WRIGHT, wife of John Younger, who died on the 31st December, 1899, and is laid to rest in the City Cemetery.
Ever remembered as the years are rolling on.
MAGGIE & AGNES. 6 Little Brunswick Street.

The following announcements were received too late for classification on page 5:--

HEARST -- In loving memory of CATHERINE HEARST, who died 28th December, 1901.      How we miss her, but she's shining
          In the glorious throng above
     As we mourn her, she's exulting
          In her Saviour's matchless love. Gone but not forgotten by her daughter-in-law
AGNES HEARST.

Clippings

UNITED IRISH LEAGUE MEETINGS.

INJUNCTIONS SERVED ON COUNTY CORK GUARDIANS.

As the result of recent proceedings instituted by the Local Government Board for Ireland against the Midleton (Cork) Board of Guardians for allowing their Board-room to be used for United Irish League, East Cork executive meetings, Chancery injunctions were to-day and yesterday served on several members of the Board, restraining then from perpetually granting in future the Board-room for such meetings, and also on the Board generally, including their servants and agents.

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THE SUICIDE OF A DERRY SOLICITOR.

THE DECEASED'S CAREER.

Our Derry correspondent wires:-- Mr. Gilbert V. Craig, solicitor, Derry, was son of Mr. John Craig, late manager of the Bank of Ireland, Derry, and who a few years ago retired on pension. Deceased was admitted as a solicitor in the year 1889, having served his apprenticeship with the late Mr. Crawford M'Cay, city solicitor. On his admission he entered the office of the late Mr. Thomas Chambers, and subsequently entered into partnership with Sir R. Newman Chambers, the present town clerk. The latter, about nine years ago severed his connection with the firm, but Mr. Craig continued to carry on the business under the name of the firm, Chambers & Craig. For about fourteen years he has been

UNDER SHERIFF FOR THE COUNTY AND CITY OF DERRY

and in that capacity was held by all classes in the greatest respect and claim. He was born in the city of Derry, and educated at Foyle College. Only a few months ago his amiable wife, after a few days illness, died at her sister's residence, Chichester Street, where she had gone on a holiday, and since then the deceased has somewhat been depressed. For the purpose of recruiting his health, he decided a few days ago to go on a trip, and the sad news of his death crated quite a sensation throughout the city this afternoon.

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CHILD'S DEATH IN BELFAST WORKHOUSE.

An inquest was held this afternoon in the Boardroom of the Belfast Workhouse by the Deputy Coroner (Mr. J. S. Finnigan) into the circumstances attending the death of Bridget Fulton, aged six weeks, the daughter of Robert and Jane Fulton, which occurred in that institution yesterday morning. Jane Fulton, mother, said deceased was born in the workhouse. She was delicate from birth. On the night of the 29th inst. witness went to bed with the child shortly after six o'clock. She awakened at half-past six yesterday morning, and fed deceased. On awakening again an hour later the child was lying dead close to her right arm. She called one of the inmates, who in turn informed Mrs. Young, assistant wardmistress, by whom the doctor and the superintendent were summoned. After hearing medical testimony, the jury found that death was due to suffocation from overlying.

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LOCAL SHIPPING ITEMS.

On her last outward voyage the Belfast steamer Lord Charlemont while taking soundings in a snowstorm in lat. 43 22 N' long., 58 22 W., located an uncharted shoal. Soundings were taken at the place, and average depths of 30 fathoms were found. On arrival at New York the existence of the shoal was reported by the captain.

The Harrison Line, which had a steamer launched in Belfast yesterday, and one on 19th ult., had another vessel named the Comedian launched to-day in Glasgow.

Shipping is rather dull at the quays at present, and arrivals from abroad are scarce.

The Austrian ss Neritea, which was built in Derry, and subsequently went ashore in the Foyle, having to be repaired in Belfast, had a successful trial trip on the Tyne last week.

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THIS DAY'S SHIPPING.

Wind -- N.W.

Arrived at this port on the 30th inst. -- The ss City of Oporto (Marlow), from Hamburg, with a general cargo -- sundry consignees; J. Pinkerton & Co., agents. The ss Minnie Hinde, from Whitehaven; the ss Parkmore and the ss W. M. Barkley, from Ardrossan; the ss Empress, from Irvine; the ss Moor, ss Lyra, and ss Gorgon, from Glasgow; the ss M. J. Craig, from Garston. The ss Opal, from Partrington; the ss Fulwood, from Preston; and the ss Balmarino, from Ayr -- all with coals.

Sailed from this port on the 30th inst. -- The ss Minnie Hinde, for Whitehaven; the ss Tourmaline, from Fleetwood; the ss Opal, for Garston; the ss Kathleen, for Manchester; the ss Plasma, for Ayr.

Arrived -- At Hamburg, on the 27th inst., the ss City of Belfast (Gough), from Swansea; at Dublin, on the 27th inst., the ss City of Malaga (Harper), from Belfast; at Londonderry, on the 30th inst., the ss Whitehead (Suffern), from Riga.

Sailed -- From Llanelly, on the 26th inst., the ss Inver (Brown), for Rouen; at Rotterdam, on the 27th inst., the ss City of Stockholm (Donnelly), for Belfast; at Hartlepool, on the 28th inst., the ss Clonlee (Woods), for Rouen; from New York, on the 29th inst., the ss Lord Charlemont, of Belfast (Fulton), for Baltimore.

Passed -- Copenhagen, on the 30th inst., the ss Teelin Head (Graham), from Riga, for Belfast.

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COUNCILLOR CORRY AND THE MARKETS CLERKSHIP.

Councillor Robert Corry, J.P. (Cromac), has, we regret to say, been unable to ill-health to give his usual active attention to Corporate affairs, and he will for this reason be unable to attend the Corporation meeting to-morrow. Without knowing the merits of either man in regard to the clerkship of the markets, he is in favour of each committee being entrusted -- subject to the final approval of the Council -- with the appointment of its officers. In his opinion all the officials of the Corporation should be thoroughly trained up in the service and promoted, as they become qualified, to positions for which they are fitted.

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A TULLAMORE TRAGEDY.

A shocking tragedy occurred at Ballybrien, a district near Tullamore, on Christmas night. The victim is Patrick Bermingham, 86 years old, a small farmer, and his son Peter is now on remand, charged with having caused his death. A grandson of the deceased, named Patrick Leonard, states that during Christmas Eve and Christmas Day the father and son were drinking heavily, and the latter was in bed most of the day in a state of stupor. At ten o'clock that night Leonard, coming into the kitchen, found his grandfather stretched on the floor, his feet facing the fire, and his head and face covered with blood. The unfortunate old man's nose was broken in pieces, and his head and face were a mass of wounds. He died the following day.

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FALL INTO MILEWATER BASIN.

An apprentice boilermaker in Messrs. Workman & Clark's, named George M'Kee, of 13 Merview Street, when leaving his work this evening, fell into the water at Milewater Basin. He was rescued, and conveyed in the ambulance to the Royal Hospital, suffering from the effects of his submersion. He was detained.

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AUDACIOUS BURGLARY IN BELFAST.

This morning two young fellows, named Francis J. M'Kenna, Forfar Street, and Daniel M'Aleese, Spinner Street, appeared on remand before Mr. Hodder, R.M., charged with having broken and entered the premises of Mr. Patrick Rooney, Cavendish Street, on the night of the 20th inst., and stolen therefrom a quantity of whisky and other goods.

Mr. Spiller prosecuted, and the prisoners were not professionally represented. At the previous hearing evidence was given to the effect that M'Aleese had admitted that M'Kenna and himself had together broken and opened a window in the premises, and through this an entry was effected, and the goods, which included whisky, cigars, cigarettes, tinned meat and the contents of a cash drawer, were removed to a vacant house in Clowney Street, and part of the edibles consumed. At a later stage on the same day they returned to this vacant house, but had no sooner entered by the back door than the noise of a key was heard in the front door, and then they bolted, leaving the stolen articles behind.

Thomas Fox, a labourer in Mr. Murphy's brickyard, was called to-day, and stated that about 7-30 on the morning of the 25th inst. he saw three boys coming from the direction of Clowney Street. He identified the two prisoners as amongst the three referred to. He had previously known M'Kenna. He read a report in the "Belfast Evening Telegraph" of last Monday evening, which stated that Rooney's had been broken into, and he then went and informed the manager of the place what he had seen.

In cross-examination by the prisoner M'Kenna, the witness stated that he knew him since the time he (M'Kenna) had been charged with breaking into Patrick Clarke's house, in the same street.

M'Kenna pleaded not guilty, and said he had not been out of his house from ten o'clock on the previous night until eleven o'clock the next day. M'Aleese pleaded guilty. Both prisoners were returned for trial.

At the conclusion of the case, Mr. Hodder said he felt bound to express his opinion that Constable M'Grath had worked up the case with an unusual amount of skill.

Mr. Spiller said he would convey his Worship's remarks to the proper authority.

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SPECIAL COURT IN NEWTOWNARDS.

A special court was held to-day at Newtownards, before Mr. John M'Clements, J.P., when a woman of the tramp description, giving her name as Mary Sweeney, alias Smith, was charged by Constable Kenny with drunkenness and disorderly conduct on the previous evening. It was her third similar offence within twelve months. Fined 21s or a month's imprisonment. She preferred the latter.

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FISHING BOAT SUNK AT LARNE.

ONE LIFE LOST.

Last evening two young men named Edward M'Cambridge, of Bay Road, and Frank Lynas, of Glynnview Avenue, went out in a sailing boat belonging to the former for the purpose of trawling in Larne Lough, and, when returning, about half way across the lough, opposite the Olderfleet Hotel, between five and six o'clock, a squall struck the boat, and before the sail could be lowered the boat filled and sank almost immediately. M'Cambridge, who was a good swimmer, was able to keep afloat until picked up by a ferryman named English, but no sign of Lynas, who was about eighteen years of age, could be seen. M'Cambridge, who was unconscious on being brought ashore, was conveyed to the Olderfleet Hotel, where two men named M'Clelland and M'Cormick rendered valuable assistance in restoring him to consciousness until the arrival of Dr. Killen, who in a short time was successful in restoring consciousness. M'Cambridge was detained in the hotel, and is progressing as well as can be expected. No trace of the boy Lynas could be found, and it is thought he was entangled in the ropes of the boat or was caught in the net which was in the boat. Search was made by the coastguards and a number of fishermen, but the only thing found was a basket belonging to the rescued boy, which was picked up on the shore at Islandmagee. The greatest sympathy is expressed for the parents of the boy Lynas.

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WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY.

INTERESTING SPEECH BY SIGNOR MARCONI.

(Reuter's Telegram.)

HALIFAX, N.S., Wednesday. -- The citizens of Cape Breton Island entertained Signor Marconi at a banquet last night. Responding to the toast of his health, the distinguished inventor thanked the Canadian and Italian Governments for their assistance, which had materially helped him to achieve success. He said when his system of wireless telegraphy was further developed it would be possible for ships in distress to signal passing ships. When the cable companies began they charged pounds per word -- they were now down to shillings, and his starting at ten cents might soon lead to a charge of one cent per word, thus binding England and the colonies more closely together.

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AGNES STREET PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

A Christmas party in connection with Agnes Street Presbyterian Church Christian Endeavour Society and Fortingale Street Mission was held in the schoolroom adjoining the church on Friday evening last, the room being tastefully decorated for the occasion. The Rev. James Maconachie, B.A., occupied the chair. After tea, an enjoyable programme was rendered, Miss Busby presiding at the piano. The principal feature of the evening was a Christmas tree (kindly provided by Mr. M'Calla.) Much amusement was caused by the entrance of Father Christmas, who presented the toys to the children. Everyone seemed delighted with the proceedings, and a bright and profitable meeting was brought to a close with the dexology and benediction.

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BELFAST ENGINEER FATALLY INJURED.

News has been received in Belfast of a fatal accident to Mr. Samuel M'Kay, chief engineer of the ss Apollo. Deceased, who was the eldest son of Mr. Wm. M'Kay, 19 Willowfield Street, Belfast, was seriously injured on Xmas Day while his steamer was proceeding from Fleetwood to Glasgow. The vessel, it seems, gave a lurch, and threw him from the house over the engine-room to the main deck. He was landed by the lifeboat from Ramsey, I.O.M. and died there on Monday from his injuries.

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DECEMBER 1902.

CIVIL SERVICE RESULTS.

During the month of December (1902) the following successes have been gained from

HUGHES'S ACADEMY

CUSTOMS -- FIRST IRISH PLACE ON FIRST TRIAL AND AT MINIMUM AGE.

This candidate writes:-
Ballykinlar, Clough, Co. Down, December 24th, 1902.

Dear Mr. Hughes,

I have just been notified by the Civil Service Commissioners that I have obtained FIRST IRISH PLACE at the recent Customs Examination.

As I have never attended any other Civil Service Academy but yours, I must entirely attribute my success to the "exact" Civil Service style of tuition pursued in your classes, and haste to tender you my sincere thanks for the careful way in which I was coached for this examination.

My success on FIRST TRIAL AND AT MINIMUM AGE should be a sufficient recommendation to intending candidates of the excellency of the tuition obtainable at your Academy.

Again thanking you, and wishing continued prosperity to your Academies, I remain, yours sincerely,

CHARLES MACGUIRE.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

MALE SORTING CLERKS,

G.P.O., LONDON.

The following candidates have been declared successful at the recent exam, gaining the Majority of the Irish Successes.

ALL ON FIRST TRIAL AND AT MINIMUM AGE:-

Mr. Fred Gillingham, Strangford, Co. Down.
Mr. James Joyce, Gilford, Co. Down.
Mr. John Mullan, Foyle View Lodge, Limavady.
Mr. Joseph Linton, Frocess, Cloughmills, Co. Antrim.

-- -- -- --

SPECIMAN TESTIMONIAL.

Strangford, County Down, 15th December, 1902.

Dear Mr. Hughes,

The Civil Service Commissioners have just informed me that I have taken the 16th place at the recent exam for male sorters, G.P.O., London. This success is entirely due to the able tuition which I received at your academy,

Yours Truly,

FRED GILLINGHAM.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

FURTHER CIVIL SERVICE.

RESULTS TO HAND.
Boy Copyists.

The C.S. Commissioners have declared the following students successful at the recent exam:-

First trial -- Mr. P. Flynn, 60 Tate's Avenue, Belfast.
First trial -- Mr. H. F. Mateer, 342 Woodstock Road, Belfast.
First trial -- Mr. J. Brown, Kilcross, Templepatrick.
First trial -- Mr. W. Browne, Lisburn View Manse, Lisburn.
First trial -- Mr. J. Wright, 111 Obin Street, Portadown.
First trial -- Mr. F. Smyth, 173 Divis Street, Belfast.

-- -- -- --

SPECIMAN TESTIMONIAL.

342 Woodstock Road, Belfast, 30th December, 1902.

Dear Mr. Hughes,

The C.S. Commissioners have informed me of my success at the recent Boy Clerk's exam. I attribute my success to the excellent guidance and instruction I received at your academy. The fact that I scored 89 per cent in arithmetic and 80 per cent in geography, after attending your classes for only a short period, bears testimony to the efficient manner in which these subjects are taught.
I remain yours sincerely,

HUGH F. MATEER.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

HUGHES CIVIL SERVICE ACADEMY,

ROYAL AVENUE,

BELFAST.

 

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