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Margaret Drury


Mary Louise Donnelly tells us that Margaret Drury married John Tant (also spelled Taunt). At the time of their marriage John Tant received a tract of land from Robert Drury. John Tant also received two patents in his own name for a total of 200 additional acres of land on 12/14/1683 (patents 25:35 and 25:44). Whether the land he received from Robert Drury was "Dry Docking" or "Dry Docking Addition" is not clear from her text. She calls it "Dry Docking" which was the tract patented to Robert Drury on 8/12/1672 (patent 12:571), but the date and patent number she cites are those for "Dry Docking Addition" (10/20/1683 patent (25:36). In any case this would not have happened if Margaret were not Robert’s daughter. This land was probably her dowry with Robert filing a patent almost immediately for a second 100 acre tract. We can see this from the consecutive patent numbers for John Tant (25:35) and Robert Drury (25:36). 

Other researchers disagree citing the fact that land was usually devised to sons and Robert had three of them. They say it is more likely that Margaret Tant’s maiden name was Bloomfield. This is based on the facts that first, John Tant (and after his death his widow Margaret Tant) owned portions of “Revelle” which was formerly owned by Luke Barber and Elizabeth Young and which came into the Bloomfield family through Elizabeth’s second marriage to John Bloomfield; second, that John Tant’s will in 1702 left bequests to Jaffel and Maryann Bloomfield (children of John Bloomfield and Elizabeth Young) who would have been his nephew and niece by marriage; and third, that he named his son Mark possibly after the child’s uncle Mark Bloomfield.

The key here may be the ownership of "Revelle” verses the ownership of “Dry Docking”. This confusion leaves us with several possibilities. Perhaps John Tant married twice, first to Margaret Bloomfield and second to Margaret Drury. Perhaps, as we originally surmised, he married only to Margaret Drury, or third, and perhaps most disturbing, there never was a Margaret Drury at all. Donnelly’s reference to Margaret Drury is the only place I have ever seen her mentioned and my estimation of her birth is derived solely from her supposed marriage date with John Tant.



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