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A Precis of Deeds and Wills 

for the Combs and Chapel area 


My thanks to Mike Gregg for allowing me to add these to the website.  If you have - or would like -more information about the properties or people mentioned do get in touch with Mike on candmgregg@hotmail.co.uk        

Alston Lee, Combs 

Bagshaw

Bank Hall

Baslow Glebe Tithe Land

Bole Hills

The Hurst or Hazelhurst Farm

Haylee rents

Shireoaks

Sundry

Whitehall

Whitehills Piece

Alston Lee, Combs

1712 Copy plan of allotment of commons in Bradshaw Edge and Combs Edge

4 April 1744

Radcliffe to Wild

Between William Radcliffe of Coldharbour in Glossop yeoman and Mary his wife and Samuel Wild of the Hurst yeoman. Radcliffe sells for £520 Allstone Lee formerly in the possession of Edward Jackson and now in the possession of William Swindells particularly the Rose Croft, the two Barn Crofts, Preminhey, the two Nether or Lower Preminehys, Broadlee Meadow, Wickin Meadow divided into two parts. Wickin Hill meadow, New Close, Tom Clough and the Carr Meadow and 20 acres of the freeholders part of the common together with the lane and herbage leading from Preminhey to the said piece of common land now commonly called the New Piece which lane William Radcliffe lately purchased from his brother Anthony Ratcliffe.

Also lease of previous day.  

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1765 (fifth year of Geo III) agreement

Final agreement made in court between William Bosley and George Heathcote and Susannah his wife.

A messuage, barn, stable, cowhouse, two gardens, an orchard, fifteen acres of land, fifteen acres of meadow, twenty acres of pasture, thirty acres of furze and heath, common of pasture for all manner of cattle, turbary have been granted by George and Susannah to William Bosley for £60.

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30 March 1796

Mary Christiana Walker and Hannah Walker of Fairfield within Droylsden spinsters; Sarah Dain of Stockport and Dorothy Dain of Chapel (the two daughters and co-heirs of Ralph Dain late of Alstone Lee) who died intestate and also sisters and co-heirs of Henry Dain late of the same place, son of Ralph, who survived his father and died an infant; and Edward Robinson of Alstone Lee, farmer.

For five shillings they convey the messuage at Austee Lee otherwise Alston Lee and lands called the Garden fold and lane adjoining the meadow and Calf Croft now laid together and the ?Rushie Croft of 4a 34p all belonging to Edward Robinson for a pepper corn with the intention that a sale takes place the next day having the same adherents plus John Slater of Fairfield chaplain and Henry Bagshaw of Chapel innkeeper.

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12 May 1797

Office copy will of Henry Bagshaw

(Extracted from Lichfield)

Henry Bagshaw, Innkeeper, sick in body on 12 May 1797 leaves to his good friends William Lingard and John Pickford the profits of Allstone Lee on trust to pay to his wife Mary £20 p.a.; to his brother Thomas £15p.a. and the remainder to Thomas’s children. On the death of Mary and Thomas as soon as Thomas’s youngest child is twenty one Allstone Lee is to be sold and the proceeds divided between Thomas’s children.

Leaves freehold estate called Show Meadows at Crossings together with two cottages adjoining to his nephew Robert on marriage or being twenty one. Before that date Robert is to receive £5p.a. and the rest to the younger children of Thomas. If Robert does not succeed the property is left to nephew John, or if he fails, to the younger children of Thomas.

Proved 2 April 1798.

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17 May 1798 lease for a year to Curacy of Baslow

Mary Christiana Walker and Hannah Walker of Fairfield, Sarah Dain of Stockport only sister and heir at law of Dorothy Dain who died intestate (Ralph Dain their father described as yeoman) let to John Barker, curate of Baslow for a year for 5s the Great Old Lee of 3a 35 14p; the Little Old lee of 2a 2r and 6p; the Long Meadow of 1a 12p; Little Meadow 1a 36p; Little Lay Field 1a 35p; Lay Field at the ?Stile 1a 3r 39p; Great Lay Field 2a 3r 38p; Rough Meadow 2a 3r 10p; Barn Filed and the barn 1a 3r 24p; Upper Barn Field 6a 12p; Upper or Higher Piece 8a 7p; Lower Piece 13a 2r 28p.

Long Meadow, Little Meadow, Great Lay Field and Barn Field were known as ?Corn Broad Lee, Over Broadlee Meadow, Nether Broadlee Meadow and Lower Broadlee.

Lay Field at the Stile was called Old ?Corn Meadow; Upper Barn Filed was formerly Rustic Broadlee; Upper or Higher Piece and Lower Piece were called our third part of Hopkill Edge.

In total 47a 1r and 21p at Allstone Lee formerly in the occupation of Ralph Dain and now of Septimus and Philip Renshaw and Thomas Robinson as tenants. For one peppercorn for the purpose of taking a grant and release to Barker

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18 May 1798 Release and assignment

Mary Christiana Walker, Hannah Walker, Sarah Dain. Sarah and Dorothy Dain were the only two daughters of Ralph Dain late of Allstone Lee who died intestate and also sisters and co-heirs of Henry Dain only son of Ralph Dain who survived his father but died an infant.

To the governor of Queen Anne’s Bounty, John Barker curate of Baslow, John Slater of Fairfield Droylsden chapman, Richard Richards of Middlesex, William Chatterton of Marple and Edmund Chapman of Middle Temple.

In 1770, 1775, 1787 and 1789 the governor agreed to augment the revenue of Baslow by £200 (£800 in total) and has been ordered to purchase land. Ralph Dain at the time of his death owned a dwellinghouse at Allstone Lee including the Rushie Broad Lee, the C? Broad Lee, Over Broad Lee Meadow, Nether Broad Lee Meadow and Long Broad Lee.

By indentures of lease and release of 1 and 2 October 1777 made between Thomas Phillips gent and Ann his wife and William Chatterton and Mary his wife (Ann and Mary being all the daughters then living of Francis Vernon their late father and also devisees of his will); Robert Rider of Fetter Lane, London, gent; Edward Vernon yeoman; William Gould gent; William Phillips and Joseph Holdgate yeomen; and of a common recovery in 1777/8 (18 Geo III) Thomas Vernon was ???? the said Robert Rider ??????????????????????

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30 November 1805 

Bagshaw to Lomas

Conveyance of interest in certain parts of the estates of the late Henry Bagshaw and William Lingard under their wills

Between Robert Bagshaw butcher and John Lomas innkeeper. Henry Bagshaw innkeeper decd by his will 12 May 1797 gave and devised to William Lingard and John Pickford (who are also his executors) his freehold estate of Allstone Lee on trust to pay his wife £20p.a, £15pa to his brother Thomas and his widow and when the youngest of Thomas’s children is twenty one the estate to be sold.

William Lingard yeoman by his will 22 September 1801bequeathed to his nephew John Lingard Langworth son of James Langworth of Sheffield all his share of lands and premises at Waterside leased to Thomas Gaskell charged with the payment of 50s to John ?Bill son of Charles ?Bill of Manchester until the age of twenty one and then £50 out of those lands or if he died without issue to the children of Nancy Slater of Fairfield. And if John Lingard Langworth died without issue his gave his share to the children of his nephew Thomas Bagshaw and he appointed Thomas Dogill innkeeper and Joseph Bennett of Stodard Lodge as his executors.

Robert Bagshaw is the eldest son and heir apparent of Thomas Bagshaw the brother of the said  Henry Bagshaw and nephew of William Lingard. John Lomas contracted with Bagshaw for the purchase of his interest for £40.

Verso receipt for £40 (the sum within mentioned and also a faded note re Pemming Hay and Thorn Dole and Joseph Green dated 2 Sept 1819 [see document below]

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27 April 1809 

Bagshaw and Lomas

Between John Bagshaw late of Chapel yeoman but now a private in fifty ninth regiment of foot and James Lomas of Cock Yard yeoman.

John  Bagshaw (son of Thomas Bagshaw shoemaker who was nephew of William Lingard and brother of Henry Bagshaw hereafter mentioned) is entitled to a share from certain lands and buildings at Waterside in Chapel in the event of the death of John Lingard Langworth without lawful issue and which was given by the will of William Lingard aforesaid yeoman dated 22 September 1801 to de divided equally among the children of the aforesaid Thomas Bagshaw.

John Bagshaw is entitled to a share from Allstone Lee after the death of Mary the widow of the late Henry Bagshaw innkeeper and also after the death of the said Thomas Bagshaw and on the youngest child of the said Thomas Bagshaw attaining the age of 21 which was given by the will of the said Henry Bagshaw dated 12 May 1797.

James Lomas contracted with John Bagshaw for all his right or title for the sum of £21

Witnessed by John  Hutchinson; Ann Lomas

2 September 1819 James Lomas has this day released his interest to the Thorn Dole and Pumming hay to Joseph Green being part of the premises comprised within 

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13 March 1815

Renunciation of executorship by Stephen Bellott

Stephen Bellott of Brook Houses gent and Joseph Green of Allstone Lee, farmer. Thomas Robinson late of Allstone Lee farmer made a will of 7 August 1811 appointing Green and Bellott as executors. Robinson died soon after making the will and Bellott has refused to accept the executorship and renounces it.

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15 March 1815

Mary Robinson and others to Joseph Green

Mary Robinson the younger of Combs Smithy, spinster, William Fletcher of Stockport labourer and Ann his wife, Sarah Mellor of CELF widow, Richard Newton of Bollington shoemaker and Hannah his wife, Betty Cartledge of Chapel, widow, Thomas Pickford of Macclesfield labourer ands Mary his wife and John Bennett of Goits Moss labourer on the one part and Joseph Green Allstone Lee farmer.

For five shillings lease for a year the lands late the property of Thomas Robinson decd of Allstone Lee farmer which he purchased during his lifetime from Sarah Daine called Ralph Meadow with all buildings to the intent of transferring to Green the next day.

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12 August 1819 Original and also a copy Renunciation of executorship by Pickford

Pickford confirms he has never acted and renounces his executorship under Henry Bagshaw’s will of 1797

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4 September 1819

Green to Bellott, mortgage

Between Joseph Green; Thomas Brittlebank of Oddo lately appointed by Green as a trustee; and Stephen Bellott of Brook Houses. Bellott has given Green £150 at 5% for a mortgage on the Thorndole of 1a 2r 35p on the west side of Allstone Lee house bounded in north by Lands of Bradbury on the south by church land on the east by the highway and on the west by lands of Bellott and the Pemminghay of 3a 24p on the east side of Allstone Lee House bounded on the north by lands of Heathcote on the south by church land on the east by Mr Dicken and on the west by Heathcote. All of which in the occupation of Green and purchased by him from trustees of the late Henry Bagshaw.

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30 August 1820 

Bagshaw and Langworth to Joule (Allstone Lee)

Between Thomas Bagshaw of Chapel (only brother and heir of Henry Bagshaw of Chapel, innkeeper deceased) and John Lingard Langworth of Sheffield, cutler, of the one part and Stephen Joule of Wardlow, gent

For a year for five shillings for the purpose of taking a grant and release of eight parts to be entered into the next day Bagshaw and Langworth sell all that dwelling house and tenement late occupied by Henry Bagshaw deceased known as Allstone Lee and now tenanted by Joseph Green and the pieces of land known as Rough Hay, Corn Hay, New Meadow, Ralph Carr, Brook House Croft, Paddock, Wickin Hill, Coal Meadow, Broad Dole, Great Low Flat otherwise Further Low Flat, Little Low Flat otherwise Near Low Flat and Breedy Meadow totalling 45 acres 

Parties to the grant and release:

Thomas Bagshaw (1)

Thomas Bagshaw and John Lingard Langworth (2)

John Lomas of Chapel, nurseryman; James Lomas late of Cockyard now of Adlington yeoman; John Arnfield of Chapel, innkeeper and Mary his wife; Thomas Hobson of Chapel, shopkeeper and Ann his wife; Matthew Broadhead of Kettleshulme, yeoman and Margaret his wife; William Wright of Castleton, yeoman and Sarah his wife; Henry Bagshaw of Chapel, tailor (3)

Thomas Bagshaw (4)

John Orgile of Chapel, gent and Robert Unwin of Chapel, timber merchant and Elizabeth his wife (5)

Stephen Joule (6)

John Vaughan of Heaton Norris, gent (7)

Roger Rowson Lingard of Heaton Norris, gent (8)

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31 August 1820

Jowle to Green, covenant to produce deeds

Jowle of Wardlow, gent and Joseph Green of Alstone Lee, yeoman.

The deeds relate to an estate called Allstone Lee formerly the property of the late Henry Bagshaw, innkeeper part of which was purchased by Green from Thomas Bagshaw cordwainer and John Lingard Langworth of Sheffield, cutler as devises in trust for sale under Henry Bagshaw’s will and the remaining part of the estate has recently been purchased by Jowle by a lease of the previous day (see above) and a grant of today and Jowle`s portion is of much greater value than Green’s and therefore Jowle keeps the deeds.

Jowle agrees he will show Green the deeds on request these being:

30 November 1805 (see above); 27 April 1809 (see above); 12 August 1819 (see above)

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22 January 1853

Ralph Meadow - Newton, Pott and Bennett

Henry Newton of Macclesfield shoemaker; Amos Pott of Combs yeoman; William Bennet of Chapel, gent. Newton is entitled to one eleventh of the messuage at Alston Lee with garden and Ralph Meadow of 3a 3r formerly in the occupation of Joseph Green the elder then Joseph Green the younger and now George Heathcote and has agreed to sell to Pott for £21 to the use of Bennett during the life of Pott and Potts heirs.

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31 January 1856

Copy will of George Heathcote

George Heathcote of Alston Lee appoints his wife Sarah, two sons George and Samuel and George Timms of Chapel, corn dealer as executors. Leaves everything to his wife until his youngest child is 21 and then one third to be invested for his wife, the rest to his children. Will 6 May 1854. Heathcote died 31 January 1856

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13 November 1862

George to Edward Heathcott

William Bennett; Ann Glossop of Chinley and Mary Glossop of Glossop; George Heathcott of Alston Lee farmer, Samuel Heathcott of the same place farmer and George Timms of Audenshaw railway guard; Simeon Heathcott of Ludworth farmer, Joseph Arundale of Werneth farmer and Sarah his wife and John Carrington of Ashton under Lyne farmer and Mary his wife; Edward Heathcott of Sutton relieving officer.

By an indenture of 25 March 1846 between George Heathcott the father and Ebenezer Glossop dissenting minister and William Bennett the property was mortgaged for £160. Glossop died 4 March 1857 leaving his estate to his wife Nancy. She died 24 April 1857 and her wil appointed as executors her daughters Ann and Mary.

George Heathcott the father appointed as his executors his wife Sarah, his two sons George and Samuel and George Timms of Chapel, corn dealer. The will left all his estate to his wife Sarah to bring up and educate his children until the youngest was 21. Executors were then to sell the estate. One third of proceeds to be used to pay interest to his wife during her life and then to be divided amongst his children, the other two thirds divided amongst his children.

Sarah died 8 February 1857. The children of George were Edward, George, Samuel, John, Simeon, Sarah Arundale and Mary Carrington and Mary the youngest was 21 on 21 August 1861. The executors sell to Edward Heathcott for £1500. £167 of 1846 mortgage is outstanding. Edward pays off the mortgage and the balance to the executors.  He buys the closes of the Thorndole and Pemming Hay and the farm of Allstone Lee formerly in the possession of Edward Jackson afterwards of William Swindells and now of George Heathcott, including Rose Croft, two Barn Crofts, Pumin Hay, the two nether or lower Pumin Hays, Broadlee meadow, Wickin meadow, Wickin Hill meadow, New Close, Tom Clough and Carr Meadow and the twenty acres of New Piece and the lane and herbage which run from Pumin Hay to New Piece (then gives acreages of fields).

Edward married Hannah 24 June 1847

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22 December 1868 

Heathcott to Ledley - Sale of Alstone Lee

Indenture of 22 December 1848 between Edward Heathcott of Sutton near Macclesfield relieving officer; John Taylor of Ollerset land surveyor; and John Bradley Ledley of Bollington gentleman

Edward Heathcott is seized of a will entitled to the inheritance to a messuage (subject to a mortgage dated 19 November 1862 made between Heathcott and Taylor securing £1300). Heathcott has agreed with Ledley to sell for £1940 and £1300 is still owing to Taylor but interest has been paid. Ledley pays to Taylor £1300 and £640 to Heathcott.

The two closes at Alstone Lee, one commonly called the Thorndole of one acre two rods and thirty five perches on the west side of Alstone Lee house and bounded on the north by land formerly of Mr Bradbury on the south by church land on the east by the highway and on the west by the church land.

The other called Penning Hay of three acres twenty four perches situated on the east side of Alstone Lee house and bounded on the north by lands of George Heathcott (parcels of the land conveyed below) on the south by church land on the east  by lands now or formerly in the occupation of George Barrett and on the west by lands of  George Heathcott (and now sold below).

The messuage of Alstone Lee sometime formerly in the possession of Edward Jackson, afterwards of William Swindells, since of George Heathcott and the lands known as the Rose Croft, the two Barn Crofts, the Pumin Hay, the two Nether or Lower Pumin Hays, the Broadlee Meadow, the Wickin Meadow (divided into two parts), the Wickin Hill meadow, the New Close, the Tom Clough and the Carr Meadow and the parcel of land of 20 acres known as the New Piece together with all that lane and herbage which led from Pumin Hay to the New Piece which are now better known as Homestead Garden (1a6p); Tom Clough (1a1r); New Close (4a29p); Far Wickin Hills (1a3r21p); New Wickin Hills (2a38p); Wickin Meadow (3r21p); Broadlee Meadow (3a1r3p); Piece (19a3r8p); Far Pemmin Naze (3a); Pemmin Naze (2a1r24p); Great Pemmin Naze (5a1r24p); Water Croft (20p); Carr (2a5p); Barn Croft with barn (2r12p); Lane (3r30p) and Common Land (20a)

And also Ralph Meadows (3a3r statute acres) and formerly in the occupation of Joseph Green the elder, afterward of Joseph Green the younger but now occupied by George Heathcott

And JB Ledley who was married since 1 January 1834 declares that no woman who may become his widow shall be entitled to dower out of the property

Edward Heathcott; John Taylor; JB Ledley

[verso] witnessed by FW Wheeton; Joh Stockport; Will ? Mair

Receipts for the £1300 and £640

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13 September 1870

Ledley and Heathcott

Memorandum of an agreement between Ledley of Bollington and George Heathcott of Allstonlee farmer

Heathcott holds Allstonlee farm as yearly tenant. Obligations of Heathcott on how to maintain the lands and buildings.

Scheduls of lands totalling 80a including 20a common land; old pasture not to be mowed or put under tillage; meadow land not to be tilled; arable not to be tiled 

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6 January 1880

Mortgage Ashton to Ward and Harrison

Jonathan Thornhill Ashton of Stockport, surgeon (mortgagor) and Henry Harrison of Romiley, agent and Joseph Edwin Ward of Bredbury manufacturer (mortgagees). For £1,000 at 4.5% Ashton assigns the lands in the schedule.

House, homestead; Green and part of lane; Breedy meadow; Ralph Carr; Rough Haycorn, Hay and New Meadow, Brookhouse Croft, Cote Meadow; Paddock; Wickenhill; Broad Dole; Great Low Flat; Little Low Flat; Lower Piece; Upper Piece; unenclosed common;  totalling 54 a 1r 34p all of which are delineated on a plan on an indenture of 25 June 1849 made between James Ashton and Annie his wife; Hannah Dorothy Thornhill; Amy Kezia Thornhill; Ann Thornhill; and George Chapman

Indenture 26 October 1883 between Ward and William Knowles of Bredbury, chemist and druggist. Harrison died 5 September 1883. Mortgage now held by Ward and Knowles.

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5 March 1888

Transfer of mortgage

Between Emily Bradley Wilkinson of Bryn Castle, Caergwrle, Flint and Ashton now of 53 St John’s Wood Terrace Middlesex and James Wood, farmer. Refers to 6 January 1880 (above) and this had been endorsed by an indenture 26 October 1883 between Ward and Ward and William Knowles of Bredbury, chemist after the death of Harrison. Mortgage assigned to Ward and Knowles. Ward died 7 March 1886. Indenture 2 April 1886 and mortgage assigned to Wilkinson. Wilkinson now transfers the mortgage to Wood.

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23 October 1893

Transfer of mortgage

Between James Wood of Goyt Hall Farm, Bredbury and Agnes Ada Goodwin of Bakewell. Supplemental to (1) 6 January 1880 deed (above) and (2) 26 October 1883 between Ward on the one part and Ward and William Knowles of the other being a transfer of the mortgage to Ward and Knowles on the death of Harrison and (3) 22 April 1886 between Knowles (the surviving mortgagee); Ashton; and Emily Bradley Wilkinson being a transfer of the mortgage to Wilkinson and (4) 5 March 1888 (above).

All interest paid but £1000 remains owing. Goodwin pays £1000 to Wood  and takes on the mortgage.

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1 May 1901

Receipt for purchase by AP Shaw for £1300

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2 May 1901

Given to AP Shaw

James Given, incumbent of CELF, transfers Glebe Lands with consent of Board of Agriculture of 18 April 1901, to AP Shaw for £1300 all that farmhouse buildings land and hereditaments known as Alston Lee of 39a 35p late in the occupation of Miss Wild and now by AP Shaw. Field numbers on 1898 OS map 2228; 2274; 2277; 2279; 2502; 2505 (say half); 2504; 2507; 2508; 2532; 2533; 2536; 2537; 2570

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23 August 1923

Hartle to TA  - lease of Rifle Range 

Edward Hartle the elder of Allstone Lee, farmer, Samuel Bramwell of Whitehall, Edward Hartle the younger of Allstone Lee, farmer and the Territorial Army Association of Derby.

The rifle range on the attached plan is on the land of EH senior and SB and EH junior are owners of adjoining land. Range only to be used on Sundays and the odd Saturday. Ranges of 600 and 1000 yards.

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Bagshaw

John Rylands University Library Bagshawe deeds

Bag/13/3/7 18 Feb 1707

Release by Robert Wainwright and Mary his wife to Edmund Ogden of Macclesfield of 2 messuages at Bagshawe. With bond and final concord

For £200. Lately in possession of Robert Gibb late grandfather of Wainwright and lately in possession  of Wainwright himself.

Bag/13/3/8   15 and 16 June 1707

Marriage settlement of Robert Wainwright and Mary his wife

a)Lease

b)Release. Marriage has already happened. Mary is daughter of James Carrington the elder of Blackbrook. To the intent the capital messuage at Bagshaw and further Broadfield, nearer Broadfield, great Broadfield, great meadow, the Tongue, Tongue Head, Stephen Croft leys, lower Bothoms, wheat croft, Kilne Croft,etc etc, To Robert Middleton and John Bennett for the use of Robert, his wife Mary as jointure and dower subject to the mortgage to Ogden of £200.

BAG/13/3/9 24 June 1708

Articles of agreement for sale of Bagshaw between Robert Wainwright and Samuel Frith

Robert and Mary his wife agree to sell within a month to Samuel the messauge at Bagshaw including the Green headfield, Dyer Bank, Bank beyond the water, Kilne Croft, Over Close, Nook Close, great little and nearer Broadfields, Stephen Croft lays, Wheatcroft, Lower Botham, Tongue Head, great Meadow, Tongue Green head and the two cottages in possession of John Carrington and John Sidebottom.

Samuel to pay £589 by the following 25 March

BAG/13/3/10 3 and 4 Dec 1708

Conveyance by Ogden and Wainewright to Samuel Frith

Of the premises in 13/3/9. Ogden received £300 and Wainewright the balance.

Privately held deed 2 May 1710

Samuel Frith settlement on marriage of John Frith

Between Samuel Frith of Peak Forest in the parish of St Charles the Martyr, yeoman and John Frith son and heir apparent; Anne Kirke widow and relict of Henry Kirke late of Martinside yeoman deceased and Joan Kirke youngest and third daughter of Henry and Anne; Arnold Kirke of Martinside son and heir of Henry Kirke and brother of Joan and Richard Broadhurst of ?Sooker in Prestbury; Thomas Kirke of Spire Hollins yeoman and Jasper Frith second son of Samuel Frith.

A marriage is shortly to be had between John Frith and Joan Kirke. A messuage in Hanley is conveyed pursuant to a marriage agreement made by Henry Kirke in his lifetime with Samuel Frith as marriage portion for Joan and for the provision of Joan and £150 to be paid to Samuel Frith.

Samuel Frith sells to Arnold Kirke and Richard Broadhurst the messuage at Bagshaw previously held by Robert Gibb deceased and lately in the possession of Robert Wainwright his grandson and now in the possession of Samuel Frith known by the several names ////, the Greenhead field, the bank, the bank beyond the water, the ////, the Kilns croft, ///// the Greatfield, the Lower Broadfield, the Steven croft, /////, the ?Toninge and the Great ///// to the use of Samuel Frith until the marriage and to John Frith during his life.

Then to be held by Thomas Kirke and Jasper Frith or their executors for five hundred years to the use of the first sons of John and Joan and of the male heirs of such first son and in default to the use of the second, third fourth, fifth and ensuing sons and in default of such issues to any daughters as tenants in common and in default to the issue of John to any after taken wife and in default of such issue to Samuel Frith and his heirs.

And Samuel Frith promises within eighteen months to surrender all that piece of copyhold land called the Greenhead croft part parcel of and enjoyed with the said messuage and land in Bagshaw to the same uses.

By indenture of 21 June 1695 between Peter Legh of Lyme in Hanley and Henry Kirke, Peter Legh for £50 and other consideration devised to Henry Kirke all that messuage or tenement in Hanley then in the possession of Henry Kirke for the lives of Henry, Anne his wife and Joan.

Henry Kirke bequeathed to Joan the messuage in Hanley to hold after the decease of Anne for the duration of the lease and the will appointed Anne his relict and Thomas Kirke his executor.

And Anne and Thomas have consented to the devise of the premises in Hanley whereby Joan becomes entitled during the remainder of the term after the death of Anne.

Anne and Joan sold the messuage in Hanley to Arnold Kirke and Richard Broadhurst for 99 years upon trust that they allow John Frith during his life or the life of Anne and Joan and after his death for Joan Kirke for her provision and maintenance which together with the yearly sum of £5 to be paid to her during her life out of the lands at Bagshaw is agreed to be her dower.

To let the children of John and Joan to enjoy the premises during the remainder of the term. If no issue then to Henry Kirke or his executors 

If John Frith doesn’t pay to Samuel Frith £150 within three years of the marriage Jasper Frith and Thomas Kirke are to sell the property to raise the sum. And if John survives Joan and they leave a child and he then remarries pay to that child £150 on reaching the age of 21 (or split if several children).

If John dies before Joan then Thomas Kirke and Jasper Frith pay the £5 to Joan out of the Bagshaw lands for 500 years.

It is agreed that Samuel Frith and John can at any time, with the approval of Arnold Kirke, sell the land as long as it is reinvested in land in Derbyshire or Cheshire.

Witnessed by ?? Chas Bagshaw, Thos Mellor?, Samuel Frith, Edw  ?? Brocse, Mary Kyrke, Ruth Lomas (her mark), Samuel Frith

BAG 13/3/14b

Copy of John Frith’s will 8 April 1775

Messuage and farm at Bagshaw;  and messuage and farm at Bowdon Head lately purchased from John White; freehold estate at Smalldale; freeholds and copyholds at Sparrowpit; freehold land at Slack and Middleton Piece near Blackbrook; share of Pye Greave piece; freehold land in Chinley called the Beets all left to Mary Steele who has to pay £40 p.a. to her husband Peter.

To cousin Elias Needham’s children £300 after Mary’s death

To cousin Robert Needham’s children the same

To cousin Mrs Jane Frith’s children (Elizabeth Roe; Mary, Martha and Hannah Frith) the same

To cousin Hannah Champion’s children the same

To cousin Samuel Webster’s children the same

To late cousin John Needham’s children the same

£100 to Thomas Bowden son of my kinsman Thomas Bowden of Laneside and £200 to be divided between his son and daughters Samuel, Martha and Hannah

Cousin Samuel Needham £100

Cousin Samuel Frith £100

Cousin Miss Sarah Bower £5

Kinswoman Martha Dalton £10 and to her children £100

All these legacies to be payable from freeholds before mentioned and for that end and purpose bequeath to kinsman Samuel Needham of Rushop Edge yeoman and Samuel Frith of Bank gent on trust all freeholds subject to rights of Mary Steele.

Provided always that John Frith son of my late nephew John Frith can pay off the bequests and have the lands, or have what remains of the lands after the bequests are made. If JF dies before attaining 21 then Samuel gets them.

Bequeaths £10 to Rev John Byrom out of personal estate.

£30 each to servant men George Green and James Green

£10 to servant woman Mary Shalcrosse and £5 to servant lad John Shalcrosse

£125 to son in law Peter Steel, Samuel Frith and John Byrom on trust to earn interest, half to go to putting out as an apprentice a poor boy of CELF  and half for woollen cloth for the poor of CELF

£40 on trust to Samuel Needham, Samuel Frith and Rev John Ashe to earn interest for woollen cloth for the poor of Peak Forest

Bequeaths his messuage at Lime Handley held under lease of lives from Peter Lee to Mary Steele. Also leaves Mary an Ark at Sparrowpit, three Arks at Bagshaw, two chests at Bagshaw with my name on one. One Cawfer at Bagshaw number 1683, three mares and two cows, two carts and all my husbandry gear for life and then to John Frith.

Leaves to Mary one half of the estate and his tenant right of Castleton Close and one half of the undivided flock of sheep depastured in the said Pasture; and eighty sheep belonging to the premises at Sparrowpit for life and then to John Frith.

Rest of personal estate to Mary. Mary to leave £400 in her will to her deceased mothers relations.

Executors to be Peter and Mary Steele and Samuel Frith

BAG/13/3/18 7 and 8 June 1793

Mortgage John Frith to James Stelfox for £1000

a)Lease 7 June 1793

John Frith of Manchester cotton merchant and James Stelfox gent of Crowley Lodge, Cheshire. The messuage at Bagshaw and all lands (as in 13/3/8 above) in possession of Edmund Ogden and sold by him to Samuel Frith afterwards in the possession of his eldest son John Frith and now the inheritance and in possession of John Frith.

b)Release  8 June 1793

5% interest.

BAG 13/3/20 31 Dec 1816 and 1 Jan 1817

John Frith to Hannah Dixon release and conveyance

Indenture 31 December 1816

John Frith of Pendleton merchant to Hannah Dixon widow.

Messuage at Bagshaw and lands  - Greenhead Field, Dyer Bank, Bank beyond the water, Bull Croft, Well Croft, Kilne Croft, Over Close, Three Nooked Close, Great Broadfield, Little Broadfield, Wheat Field, Nearer Broadfield, Stepehen Croft Layes, Wheat Croft, Lower Botham, Tonguehead, The Tongue and the Meadow in possession of Ogden afterwards of Samuel Frith since of John Frith his eldest son and now or late in the tenure of Samuel Frith of Bagshaw.

Also messuage at Wormhill and the Croft of 2r 24p, Cote Close 2a 20p, Old Close 5a3r30p, the Two Acres 4a2r20p, Little Margery 2a2r26p, Further Horne 3a2r39p, Lose Piece 1a32p, School Broads 2a1r16p, Paddock 1a1r31p, Newfield 2a1r37p, Upper Gospel Greave 2a2r10p, West Hole 3a3r27p, Greenlow 3a2r210, Upper Field 3a1r11p, Nether Field 5a1r32p, Lowest Field 2a. Altogether 52a 3r5p.

Also three other parcels at Wormhill – the Piece taken in from the Sheep Pasture 5a; Sheep Pasture 30a and the Common Piece at Small Knowle End of 15a all lately allotted to John Frith by enclosure commissioners for Wormhill. All of which messuage and lands in tenure of William Potts.

Witnessed Frances and Ann Worthington at Pendleton. (Copy of 2 April 1834 by a clerk of Wm Barnes of Manchester)

Indenture 1 January 1817

Between Frith and Dixon. Refers to Stelfox mortgage of 1793.

Refers to indentures of lease and release of 23 and 24 September 1816 the release made by Samuel Frith; John Thomson of Manchester gent; Ralph Ellis of Chancery Lane London; the said John Frith; the said John Thomson; Susannah Grimshaw of Manchester widow (and by a common recovery) the Wormhill lands to Susannah Grimshaw subject to a proviso for redemption and conveyance to John Frith of the mortgaged premises on payment of £1000 plus interest.

The 1793 mortgage is outstanding as is the Grimshaw mortgage, plus interest, altogether £2075.

John Frith is indebted to Hannah Dixon to the sum of £5166 of principal and interest under two bonds, both dated 1 January 1815. Frith has agreed to sell to Dixon for £2587 10s and this will be offset against the £5166.

BAG/13/3/23 21 and 22 November 1827

Conveyance by Hannah Dixon  to Richard Roe of Manchester, drysalter and William Tait of Ashby de la Zouch, dissenting minister of premises in 13/3/20 (Bagshaw and Wormhill)

a)Lease for a year between Hannah Dixon widow of John Dixon of Manchester merchant, Roe and Tait of messuage and lands at Bagshaw (see 13/3/20) and messuage and lands at Wormhill (ditto) and also certain tithes of corn and the messuage at Leaden Knowle with the barn shippon and garden adjoining and six closes of land all late in occupation of Abraham Lowe, and the parcel of land at Smalldale known as Gorses, New Closes, Close and Kedward Barn. Six Acres, Lowe Tops, Close next to the Fold late in occupation of Samuel Frith, and also the closes known as Great Margery, Lower Gospel Greave, Stanter Pringle and Common Piece in Wormhill with a third part of the tithes of certain tithes of corn.

Also conveys all lands and tenements referred to in lease and release of 31 December 1816 and 1 January 1817 between John Frith and Hannah Dixon;  also of 1 and 2 January 1817 between John Frith and Hannah Dixon; also of 6 and 7 November 1820 the release by Samuel Frith, John Frith, Hannah Dixon, Edward Chesshyre and Charles Hedges Ware and by a common recovery suffered in respect of the last mentioned indentures (save and except out of these presents the Upper End, the Nether Field, and Lowest Field of 11a 3p. Also the Common Piece of 15a. Also a close of 9a part of the Gorses. Also except a messuage and several closes at Leaden Knowle of 11a 3r 19p and three pieces of land in Chinley called the Intakes of 6a 2r 35p and a close at Smalldale of 3a being the several lands heretofore sold by Hannah Dixon).

b)Release. Between Hannah Dixon, George Gibbs of Ashby de la Zouch as executor of James Dixon deceased, the said George Gibbs and Mary his wife, Robert Newey of Appleby in Derby and Leics yeoman and Alice his wife (Mary and Alice are the only surviving daughters of Thomas Dixon of Siston, Leics, deceased) and Richard  Roe and William Tait.

John Dixon by his will of 23 December 1796 left the residue of his personal estate to Hannah Dixon for life. On Hannah’s death half to James Dixon son of the aforesaid Thomas Dixon and the other half to the daughters of Thomas Dixon and Dixon appointed his wife and partners John Frith and John Corns executors of his will. Dixon died 11 January 1797. Hannah possessed herself of the personal estate which at the time of John Dixon’s death and afterwards continued in the hands of John Frith on his personal security. Hannah applied to John Frith for the moneys but it was not convenient to him to pay the residuary personal estate and Frith, being seized or entitled to certain freehold estates hereafter mentioned of the value of £4000 and upwards over and above two sums or charges of £1000 each affecting part of the estates, proposed conveying the freeholds to Hannah in consideration of the personal estate which she assented to as the best means of securing the residuary estate from loss.   

Therefore 31/12/1816 and 1/1/1817 transaction entered into. Mentions that Wormhill lands referred to therein conveyed by Gell to Jasper Frith. Lease and release of 1 and 2 January 1817 was for John Frith to convey to Hannah the Leaden Knowle land, the Chinley land in the occupation of Lowe and the Smalldale land.

Certain of the Wormhill lands were mistakenly not conveyed and therefore deeds of 6 and 7 November 1820 rectified this. 

James Dixon died 5 August 1807 a bachelor leaving by his will of 22 October 1805 his property to his brother in law George Gibbs and also what was left him by his late cousin John Dixon. By an agreement between Hannah, George Gibbs and his wife Mary and Robert Newey and his wife Alice, and also for the purpose of discharging two sums of £1000 charged upon Hannah’s estates, Hannah had contracted to sell certain parts of the same estates but the contracts had not been carried out.

Gibbs and Newey, in right of their wives, would become entitled to the residuary estates of John Dixon on the death of Hannah and requested her to secure the residuary personal estate. She agreed to do this by settling the estate on trust for herself for life and then to Newey and Gibbs when requested.

Since that date she has carried out the contracts and converted part of the estate in to money and discharged one of the charges of £1000. Newey and Gibbs have asked for remaining property to be put into trust but she has objected. To prevent litigation Hannah releases to Roe and Tait on trust for her life the remaining lands.

BAG/13/24f 22 October 1833

Conditions of sale of property at Bagshaw in occupation of Samuel Frith

A farm house, barn, stable, and other outbuildings with several fields of arable and pasture together with a detached dwelling house containing in the whole 49a 3r 23p in occupation of Samuel Frith as yearly tenant.

[ This is an auction sale.] Money to be paid to William Barnes. Vendors will supply title commencing from will of John Frith 8 April 1785.

Memo of 24 October that not sold at auction but Thomas Marriott of High Lane will buy for private contract for £2200 and has paid a deposit of £220

a and b) [draft and] Notice from Marriott’s solicitors to Richard Roe and Barnes his attorney of 29 October that Marriott will not complete as a lane believed to be part of the property is in fact part of Bowden Hall.

c) Affidavit of Samuel Frith as to the identity of the Bagshaw Farm.

Samuel Frith of Bagshaw farmer states he has been yearly tenant since spring 1816 and paid rent to John Frith of Manchester for the first year and then Hannah Dixon until her death in 1831, and then to Roe and Tait. Frith has made the Kiln Croft, the Clough and Wheatcroft and Lower Wood into one field called the Woodside.

d) Affidavit of George Gibbs (20 Jan 1834) - Hannah Dixon died September 1831 

e) Affidavit of Thomas Shalcrosse of Ford, farmer (6 Feb 1834) Mary Steel died 1785. Shalcrosse lived in Bagshaw as a servant in husbandry with John Frith at the time of his death and afterwards with Mary Steel until her death. Shallcrosse became tenant of Bagshaw after the death of Mary and paid rent to John Frith of Manchester for three years. John Frith is now living at Bank Hall and is a widower.

BAG/13/3/25 March 19 1834

Abstract of title to a farm house at Bagshaw

19 Jan 1782 Mary and Sam Frith proved John Frith’s will (Peter Steel being dead in the lifetime of John Frith)

John Frith attained the age of 21 in 1785. All of the legacies arising out of John Frith of Bagshaw’s will were paid by Samuel Frith 40 years ago.

BAG/13/3/25 25 June 1834

Release by Roe and Tait to Thomas Marriott of Bagshaw

Doc d) Mentions default on Stelfox mortgage occurred in June 1827

Doc e) Mentions payment of John Frith legacies all on 21 April 1788. Total £2305. Bowden Head sold for £472 and Sparrowpit for £250 to help pay for this. Also land at Slack £220, Middleton Piece £115, Pye Greave Piece £107; Peets land £170 and Rushop £600

Sam Frith was buried 9 Sept 1828. Mary Steel 18 April 1785

Hannah Dixon died 28 Sept 1831 and buried 3 Oct 1831

Main release says that all interest paid on mortgage of £1000. Marriott pays off mortgage of £1000 and £1200 to Roe and Tait.

----------------

Bank Hall, Chapel-en-le Frith  (see notes)

Bank Hall, Chapel-en-le-Frith, stands at an altitude of 1150 feet beneath Castle Naze at the northern end of Combs Moss. Hidden by trees there is no public view of the frontage but a side view can be gained from the footpath that leads from Long Lane up towards Castle Naze. The hall is Grade II listed.

The writer has film of the 1930’s and 1940’s showing Bank Hall functioning as a smart country house. After the second world war it was turned to various uses including flats for retired army officers, a nursing home, a special school and a homeless hostel and is currently semi-abandoned.

The hall and estate buildings which exist today are largely the work of Henry Constantine Renshaw, a Salford flax spinner, who bought the estate in 1864 and lived there until his death in 1894. Renshaw, whose initials are preserved on one of the gates to the hall, largely rebuilt the hall into its present guise, laid out the grounds and built the adjacent farm, lodge and Garden Cottage (now Top Lodge).

The most famous resident of Bank Hall was Squire [Samuel] Frith, a name well known in Chapel. But why is his name well known and who was he? The sources tell us that “His father amassed a considerable fortune in the carrying trade”; “Squire Frith was a typical specimen of the old-fashioned rollicking, hunting, drinking squire” (1) and that “Some curious tales used to be told of [the Frith’s] love affairs, gambling etc. of sacks of golden guineas brought from The Chamber [at Peak Forest] on the backs of ponies” (2)

Bank Hall is not as old as many of the other halls surrounding Chapel, but it appears that Squire Frith’s personality made Bank Hall into a well known county seat.      

Samuel inherited from his father in 1766, when he was thirteen, and lived until 1828 when he was seventy five. He was undoubtedly wealthy, enlarging the family estates, and his brother’s gravestone records that Samuel Frith was a JP, deputy lieutenant for the county, high sheriff of Derbyshire in 1781 at the age of twenty-eight and colonel of the Bowden Chapel volunteers, formed in response to Napoleonic invasion threats. His local prominence was also enhanced by his fox hunting prowess, commemorated both in song and a picture of him with his hounds which hung latterly until the 1970’s in a local pub, the Roebuck, in the Market Place.

This paper gathers what is known about Bank Hall and the Friths. The main local historians are Kirke who gives no references or factual basis for his comments but was widely published; Bunting who doesn’t often give references but does say in an earlier book that he “state[s] as fact only what he has good reason to believe to be fact” (3) and Bellhouse (4) who has collected from many sources but sometimes appears to state as fact what may only be supposition. We were helped immeasurably by the gift to one of the authors of a collection of original documents and deeds relating to the hall and the Friths. Whilst these will not give a full picture of all the history of the hall they do throw more light on some aspects, confirming what otherwise might be supposition, and therefore are calendared in the appendix.

The authors can be contacted at candmgregg@hotmail.co.uk and we would be both grateful for and pleased to supply further information. Our researches will continue.

Brownes and Gaskills

Perhaps the earliest reference to Bank is a lease of 1605 from the Leghs of a neighbourship in the herbage of “little Rissh” (5). Whether or not that is so the Brownes of Marsh Hall, situated below Bank Hall, who seem to have been a substantial Chapel family, are recorded as paying tithe for Bank in 1614 at the same amount as for their main residence of Marsh Hall (6) and in 1618 Nicholas Browne the Elder is recorded as living at Little Ridge alias Bank (7).

Our story starts in 1683, towards the end of the reign of Charles II. Following the death of Randle Browne, the head of the family, Bank Hall, also known as Ridge (confusingly as Ridge Hall is nearby) was sold by the Brownes to John Gaskill a yeoman and Peter Gaskill a tanner, both of [Lyme] Hanley (8).

The Gaskills were a large clan and their relationships difficult to unravel. Other Gaskills acquired property in Chapel (9) at this time and at Ingerlsey in Rainow (10).

John Gaskill sold his interest in Bank Hall to Peter in 1684 (11). Peter may have been the same Peter who was left a tannery at Hagg by his father (12) and is likely to have been the man who married Anne Booth in November 1684 (13). Anne is likely to have been from the family of the Booths of Charlesworth.

Peter and his wife had, at Bank Hall, a property of about thirty five acres (14). Little else is known of him but he died in or before 1718, his heirs being his four daughters.

The Friths

In 1670 John Frith, a husbandman of Peak Forest, together with Jeffry Hollingshead, acquired the lease of Chamber in the Forest, with one hundred and seventy acres of land, from the Devonshires (15). He rapidly rose in status as by 1684 he is described as a yeoman when he sold his interest in property at Malcalfe (present day Malcoff) to his son Samuel who was described as a husbandman (16).  

Samuel himself also rose in status. By 1703 he is described as a yeoman when he took a joint tenancy of Chamber and almost two hundred acres and in 1713 he describes himself as bailiff of the Devonshire estate at Peak Forest (17).  In 1701 he was able to settle Bagshaw Hall on his eldest son John following his marriage to Joan Kirke (18) and by 1714 he held the tenancy of Chamber outright, leased another Peak Forest farm (19) and held a third of Castleton Close which totalled six hundred acres and a quarter of Oxlowe (20), all from the Devonshires.

Samuel died in 1715 (21), leaving monetary legacies of over £500 to his children and the nether parlour in the Chamber to his still surviving father (22). His second son, Jasper, a tallow chandler, stepped into his father’s position as bailiff of Peak Forest and continued to receive the £17 salary (23). That Samuel’s third son, another Samuel, was left Chamber suggests that, like John at Bagshaw, Jasper may have already received some lands from his father. If he had, that property could have been at Meadow. Jasper Frith acquired Bank Hall in 1718, early in the reign of George I, when he married Ann Gaskill, the second of Peter Gaskill’s four daughters (24). Bank Hall was settled in trust until Jasper paid the other three daughters for their shares and Jasper’s property at Meadow, Wormhill was settled on Ann Gaskill (25). A safety clause was included in the agreement that, should Ann die within six years then Bank Hall was to revert to her sisters and Jasper would be paid for any improvements he had carried out, such as building, sowing or liming.

What is clear is that Jasper was buying and selling land. In 1724, by which time he was called a gentleman, he bought formerly enclosed common land at Peaslows; in 1730 he sold land in Cowdale and Kingsterndale (26) and bought land near Coal Pit Hole, Sparrowpit, (which was added to in 1760 and 1781) (27); in 1745 he leased Salts Farm in Tideswell (28) and seventy five acres of other land in Peak Forest in 1747 (29). His son John, at the age of twenty one in 1747 leased lands formerly occupied by the Vernons in Peak Forest for £40 (30) at the same time as taking a joint lease with his father on twenty one acres (31). Jasper was also involved in church affairs at Chapel (32) where he was churchwarden in 1732/3 when the church was rebuilt (33).

What is noticeable is the cooperation between the three brothers. When Jasper came to Bank Hall in 1718 his elder brother John was at Bagshaw and his younger brother Samuel was at Chamber. In 1722 Jasper and Samuel jointly leased over forty acres of pasture at Flagg (34). In 1736 John, Jasper and Samuel took a joint lease of the six hundred acres of Castleton Close at a rent of £175 (which their father had had a third share of in 1714) (35). In 1748 Jasper leased lands to his brother Samuel, we assume to secure a mortgage which included Bank Hall, now of eighty acres, and a further seventy three acres comprising sixteen acres of common on Peaslows awarded to Bank Hall on enclosure and a further twelve acres purchased, a small parcel at Stony Ford Clough, thirty six acres at Rushop (Coal Pit Hole) and seven acres adjoining Dove Holes Lime Kilns (36)

Individually also the brothers added to their holdings. In 1736 the lease at Chamber was renewed to Samuel at a rent of £90. It was described as having two barns, a stable, brewhouse and calfhouse and it appears that the holding was expanded to include smaller farms including another barn, two beasthouses and a sheep pen together with twenty eight acres; a further forty two acres; a barn and five acres and a house and thirty six acres (37).  A year later, in 1737, Samuel added another twenty acres in Blating Dale (38) and Fearney Slack in 1743 (39) whilst John Frith of Bagshaw was assigned Enoch Vernon’s holding at Peak Forest in 1755 when the rent was thirty months in arrears (40).

As well as expanding their agricultural holdings the Friths invested in lead mining. Coalpithole lead mine was most productive in the period 1755 to 1764John Frith, Jasper’s son, is recorded as owning a share in 1754 (41) and the Friths were principal owners of the mine from the 1760’s until the 1780’s making a good deal of money (42). Elsewhere Jasper had a twelfth share in Chance Mine at Burbage, “Jasper Frith and Partners” mined lead at Bennit Part Dirtlow Rake in 1753 and “Jasper Frith and Company” at Lords Knowl in 1763 (43)

When Jasper Frith died in 1765 (44) he had considerable agricultural and mining interests to pass on to his family. Whilst he may have had a daughter, visited by Dr Clegg in 1742 (45), she had evidently not survived as John Frith is recorded as his only child (46)John, who had married Jane Wood in 1749 (47), survived his father by only a few months and died aged 39 in 1766 (48) leaving his wife, who lived for at least another thirty years (49), and a young family of four daughters (50) and two boys, Samuel and John.  The eldest, Samuel, later to be known as “Squire” Frith was thirteen at the time and became the guardian of his uncle Samuel of Chamber (51).

Samuel (Squire) Frith 

In 1773, during the reign of George III, and the year before Samuel attained his majority, his guardian, his uncle Samuel, died childless and left his extensive leasehold properties at Chamber and Peak Forest to young Samuel (52) who, on attaining his majority in 1774, was also possessed of his grandfather Jasper’s lead mines and freehold lands at Bank Hall.  Not surprisingly Samuel enjoyed social prominence becoming high sheriff of Derbyshire when he was twenty-eight in 1781. At the age of thirty three he became treasurer and master for life of the United Society (a local friendly society) (53). Two years later he had an epic day fox hunting which was remembered both in song and a painting he commissioned (54). He was also a JP, deputy lieutenant for Derbyshire and commander of the local volunteer force (55) and the trustee of certain charities of which the Charity Commissioners found that his record keeping was not the best (56).

Peak Forest was the area of much of the Friths` land. In 1775 the total value of rents of the Devonshire Peak Forest estate was £1394. The largest tenants were Needhams paying £200; Hartleys paying £292 and Friths £557 or forty percent of the total (57)Samuel held 453 acres, John 120 and together they held the pastures of 742 acres (58).

The rents paid by the Friths in 1775 had doubled from those at the inception of the leases in 1748.  Arthur Young wrote, in 1771, that the Duke of Devonshire raised rents which drove agricultural improvement as his tenants needed to become more efficient in order to pay the increased rents. Young noted that “Around Tideswell for many miles there has been worked as great improvements as in any part of England: all this country was black ling but a few years ago, and common land. It is now all inclosed by act of parliament.” He describes the liming of the land which cleared the heather and was then used for pasture. “These improvements are also carried on all the way to Castleton and around that town. In the road from Tideswell by Elden Hole are very many large closes of good grass, gained in this manner from the moors; all of which are full of very large herds of cows fattening” (59). In this description he is almost certainly referring to some of the Frith lands at Peak Forest. Certainly Jasper and Samuel had planned to cultivate and improve their lands at Flagg (60).

Samuel quickly added to his landholdings at Bank Hall buying adjacent farms, Down Lee in 1775; Upper and Lower Owlgreave in 1776 (61); land at the Bole Hills above the hall in 1787 (62) and Castle Naze in 1790 (63). By 1804 he also owned another one hundred and forty acres of meadow (64) and by 1806 held the Kings Arms public house in Chapel, Bolt Edge, Hordern and a smithy at Lower Crossings (65). He exchanged his land at Flagg for forty acres adjacent to Bank Hall in 1814 (66).

Elsewhere Samuel reduced his holdings. Thirty four acres at Whiteside (Rushop) were sold in 1827 (67) and the family lands around Peak Forest seem to have diminished by 1823 as compared to 1775 but were still substantial and continued to include Chamber together with Loads Knowl, Old Stud Close and Sheep Pasture altogether totalling some four hundred acres (68).

Samuel continued to engage in lead mining throughout his life. In 1787 he worked veins on Loads Knowl where he had eighty mines and Barmoor Great Vein (both near the present A6/A623 junction) where he had thirty (69). He is also recorded mining at Fearney Slack in 1806 (70) and opened the New Portaway mine in 1826.

Whatever building was at Bank Hall in 1683, and a map of 1675 (71) depicts a stylised farm house similar to many others in the locality, it is unlikely to have been the hall pictured for the first time by Hutchinson in 1809 and described as Samuel’s elegant seat (72). That picture shows a substantial Georgian building which, if not entirely new, must have been significantly improved or rebuilt. In the foreground several cows are depicted and it is tempting to believe that these could be some of the Devon cows which Farey records as being owned by Samuel in 1817 (73). At a later date (1861) we have an estate map showing the hall close to the farm so possibly the farm (now demolished) was the original Bank Hall?

Squire Frith never married but, at the age of seventy two he fathered an illegitimate daughter who was brought up in Penistone (74). Consequently when he died in 1828 his lands passed to his brother John, then aged about sixty five. 

John Frith and the Websters

John must be responsible for the bridge above Downlee, now in some disrepair, which carries a date stone of 1830 and the initials JFJohn Frith’s will of 1837 records further properties owned by the family including Shireoaks, Upper Fold Farm near Hayfield, lands at Dove Holes and Cracken Edge slate quarry (75), presumably the slate quarry recorded by Farey in 1817 which was noted to be close to the Peak Forest railway. His will records that several properties should be sold to discharge all his debts and legacies, the first suggestion that the family wealth was reducing.

John himself had two sons but neither succeeded to their father`s property. The legitimate heir, John, died in 1831 aged thirty five and an illegitimate son, Nathan Woodroofe, schoolmaster of Bamford at the time of his father’s death, had been born in 1810 (76).  Bank Hall therefore passed to a nephew, Godfrey Webster, the son of John’s sister Martha who had married Paul Webster of Chesterfield in 1783 (77).

Godfrey put his mark on his new estates by remodelling the layout of fields and probably rebuilding the hall in the latest style as in 1857, two years after his death, White describes the house as “a handsome stone residence in the Italianate style, the seat and property of Mrs Hannah Webster.” We can also see from maps that the shape of the hall has changed from a building of two wings in 1847 (78) to more of a square shape in 1861 (79). However something had by now gone awry with the Frith Webster finances as presumably these schemes are the reason that Godfrey took out a mortgage of £2,500 in 1845 (80).

On Godfrey’s death Castle Naze was left to his daughter (81). Godfrey’s wife Hannah died in 1860 and the hall passed to her son Samuel Frith Webster who took out another mortgage, his father’s still outstanding, of £1,400 in 1861 (82).

Businessmen purchase a country seat

Both of these mortgages were outstanding, and in default, when in April 1864 Samuel Frith Webster signed an agreement for the sale of the Bank Hall estate, comprising the hall and farm, Downlee and Owlgreave, altogether comprising 240 acres. The purchaser, Henry Constantine Renshaw was to get immediate possession of the hall, but not title until completion (83) which happened in October (84).

It is possible that Renshaw’s interest was stimulated by the opening of the Stockport, Disley and Whaley Bridge Railway, Buxton extension which opened in 1863 with a station below Bank Hall.  The railway boom was instrumental in the rapid growth of Buxton at this time as a fashionable resort (85).

Henry Renshaw, the new owner, was a flax spinner from Broughton in Salford whose company, William Renshaw and Co. owned the large new Broughton Flax Mill (86). He purchased a country seat, buying the fishing rights to Combs Reservoir (87) and pulled down the greater part of the hall and rebuilt it in an improved and enlarged form (88). Estate maps suggest that he added the bay windows on the front and sides and “squared off” the footprint. This rebuilding, together with the moving of the farm to its present location and the building of Bank Hall Lodge and Top Lodge, cost a great deal of money.  Renshaw needed to mortgage the estate for £10,000 to allow him to carry out these works which included commissioning WE Nesfield, one of the most prestigious architects of the day, to design the dining room and furnishings at the hall and Bank Hall Lodge (89).

Renshaw was related to the great Wimbledon champions the twins William and Ernest Renshaw who were probably his nephews. William was the most successful man ever to play at Wimbledon and he and brother won sixteen All England titles between them.

Renshaw died in 1894. The Bank Hall estate was put up for auction (90) but failed to sell immediately, eventually being purchased in 1897 by Charles Joseph Wills (91). Wills was a civil engineer who was responsible for building the Barton swing aqueduct over the Manchester Ship Canal as well as various rail lines and as a partner in Price Wills and Reeves built Immingham and Bombay docks. Wills may not have had quite the numbers of staff that Renshaw had evidently employed or to have lived at the hall for any length of time.  Renshaw’s butlers had lived at the lodge but Raymond Unwin was renting the lodge by 1897 and in 1908 James Grimble Groves is recorded as living at the hall (92), presumably renting from Wills whose business interests in London may have caused him to move away from the area.

At some time during the first world war and up until 1919 the hall was used as a prison camp for German soldiers (93).  Local farmers, such as the Virtues at Rushup, collected prisoners on a daily basis and used them for additional labour on their farms (94).

Whilst still used as a POW camp the Bank Hall estate was purchased from Wills by Reginald Scott in May 1918 (95). Scott, who lived below the hall at Whitestones in 1916 (96), made money in the war from the steel wire made by his company which was used for anti-submarine defences (97). He sold his company and is understood to have first purchased Allstone Lee (98), a nearby farm at the foot of Combs Moss. He added to the estate, buying parts of Combs Moss (99) and appears to have lived the life of a country gentleman, keen on shooting and keeping a pack of beagles.

During the second world war the hall was again used to help in the war effort, this time as a school.  Westcliffe School for girls, from Essex, arrived in June 1940 (100) and the pupils were put to the same use as German soldiers in the previous war, the girls helping on local farms (101).  In the following year Chethams School of Music from Manchester took over use of the hall (102).

Reginald Scott died in 1947 and his wife in 1951. The estate was left to their two surviving sons, one of whom lived in the hall and the other in the lodge (103). In 1953 the Scotts sold the hall and at about this time the farms on the estate were sold to tenants (104). Since that time the hall has followed a typical path of many halls, being used as flats, a nursing home and a school but is now again a private residence. The Armstrong and Caldicott panels in the dining room, installed by Renshaw, were taken out and sold at auction in 1980 (105)

Conclusion 

The Friths appear to have been a family that acquired wealth fairly quickly.  John Frith was a husbandman when he jointly acquired the lease on the substantial Chamber property in 1670. Fifty years later his grandsons were ensconced at Bagshaw and Bank and described as gentlemen.

The Friths undoubtedly benefited from the enclosure of the commons and improved their lands and the agricultural output from it.  They were involved in lead mining and quarrying and invested in property.  It seems likely that lead mining, especially at Coal Pit Hole, produced profits in the second half of the eighteenth century but we have no evidence that later ventures either produced profits or losses.

By the 1830’s there seem to have been some reversal of fortunes. From 1766 to 1828 Squire Frith held his estates without interruption.  With his death, and those of his brother John in 1837 and his nephew Godfrey in 1855, considerable reductions in family wealth occurred.  Legacies totalling £3,500, Cracken Edge quarry and Castle Naze farm were all passed out of the direct line.  It may also be that the Peak Forest leases were not renewed, they are last recorded in 1828 in the documents calendared in the appendix. By 1837 John referred to the need to sell properties on his death and although the Websters rebuilt the hall they needed mortgages to allow them to do this.

We have found no evidence to support the oft-repeated suggestion that the Friths made money in the carrying trade, nor of their gambling.  Suggestions of their love affairs presumably relate to the two illegitimate children of Squire Frith and his brother John and the source of the tale of sacks of gold coming from Peak Forest could have derived from their duties in collecting rents for the Devonshire Peak Forest estate or the wealth derived from the family lands and mines there.

Bank Hall, after being sold by the Frith family in the 1860’s, continued until 1940 as a country seat for a new breed of gentleman originating from the towns. Since then, in common with many large country houses, it has had several uses. 

Copyright 2009

Appendix 1

Calendar of Bank Hall papers 

1. 20 July 1607

Thomas Bagshawe to Charles Kyrke – Shireoaks

Between Thomas Bagshawe of the Ridge, gent and Charles Kyrke of Shyreokes, yeoman  

Bagshawe, in consideration of the sum of £170 paid by Kyrke sold all that messuage or tenement of Shyreokes now or late in the tenure or occupation of Kyrke and lying or being in the parishes of Chappell in le frith and Glossop or in either of them with the yearly rents and service reserved payable to Henry Leigh Esq.(whose inheritance the premises late were).

No claim to be made by or under a lease made between Henry Leigh of Egington to Mathew Smale of Wadington in Middlesex esq. and Robert Hope of Burnaston in Derby gent by indenture of 19 November last between Henry Leigh on the first part; Mathew Smale and Robert Hope on the second part and Thomas Bagshaw on the third part.

(refers to Thomas Bagshaw’s wife Elizabeth)

Thomas Bagshaw appoints Robert Bagshaw and George Lowe the younger as his attorneys to deliver possession. 

Witnesssed by Nicholas Bagshawe; ////////; Henry Bradshaw; Thomas Barber; George Lowe; Raphe Cresswell; Richard Barber; Arnold Kyrke; Robt Lunstride?; Thomas Kyrke junior; John Buxton

Witness that possession was delivered to Charles Kyrke by George ? Thornfield; Nicholas Cresswell; Thomas Bodom?; Thomas Barber; John Lingard; Arnold Kyrke; Robert  /////; Raphe Cresswell; Thomas Kyrke; Thomas /////; Edward Cresswell; Richard Barber his mark; Richard Shore his mark; William Downes his mark; John Oliver his mark; John Buxton his mark and many others

2. 10 September 1683

Robert Bagshawe to Edward Bigland

Robert Bagshawe of Hollin Knowle, yeoman, release and quit claim to Edward Bigland Esquire, Serjeant at Lawe all claim to the messuage or tenement commonly called or known by the name of the Ridge or Bank Hall and now or late in the possession of one John Hesty and to all the pieces of land belonging to it (the Cow Croft, the Hussfield, the Barneyard, the Flatt, the Greate field, the Carr meadows, the Great Kingsbank,, the Little Kingsbank, the Wood  or the Sprinte Wood).

Witnessed by James Sherratt, Alex Brassington, Thos Hussman, Rich Lingard

3. 10 September 1683

George and Mary Bagshawe & Robert and Elizabeth Bagshawe to Edward Bigland 

George Bagshawe of Hollin Knowle, yeoman and Mary his wife one of the daughters of Randle Browne late of Marsh Hall Gent deceased and Robert Bagshawe of Manchester Dutch loom weaver and Elizabeth his wife another of the daughters of Randle Browne release and quit claim to Edward Bigland Esquire Serjeant at Law all the right which George and Mary Robert and Elizabeth have in the Ridge or Bank Hall and now in the possession of John Hesty

Witnessed by James Sherratt, Alex Brassington, Tho Hussman, Rich Lingard, Robert Bagshaw, Henry Kyrke, Henry Kyrke Junior 

4. 30 October 1683

Bigland to Gaskills 

Edward Bigland grants to John Gaskill and Peter Gaskill the Ridge or Bank Hall  with appurtenances for the term of one month.

Witnessed by Thos Bagshaw, James Sherratt, Jo Thompson, Alex Brassingham

5. 31 October 1683

Bigland and Browne to Gaskills

Edward Bigland on the first part, Thomas Browne of Marsh Hall , Gentleman on the second part and John Gaskill of Hanley, Prestbury, Cheshire yeoman and Peter Gaskill of Hanley tanner on the third part.

For £300 paid to Bigland and £190 paid to Browne by John and Peter GaskillBigland, by the direction and appointment of Thomas Browne, release and quitclaim unto John Gaskill and Peter Gaskill the Ridge or Bank Hall and Thomas Browne warrants against anyone claiming by from or under him or Randle Browne deceased late father of Thomas Browne or Nicholas Browne deceased late grandfather of Thomas Browne. Refers to Sarah the wife of Thomas Browne.

Witnessed by Thos Bagshaw, James Sherratt, Jo Thompson, Alex Brassington, Thos Hussman, Rich Lingard

6. 31 October 1683 

Browne to Gaskills Bond

Thomas Browne bonds with John and Peter Gaskill to perform the agreements in [5] above.

7. 26 March 1684

John Gaskill to Peter Gaskill

John Gaskill sells for £260 to Peter Gaskill all his interest in the Ridge or Bank Hall with parcels of land (two closes called the Cow Crofts; the Husfield; the Barneyard;  the Flatt; the Great Field; two closes called the Carr Meadows; the Great Kingsbank; the Little Kingsbank and the wood or the Sprint heretofore granted by Edward Bigland (at the request and by the direction and appointment of Thomas Browne).

Refers to John Gaskill’s wife Mary

Witnessed by James Sherratt, Henry Kyrke, William Gaskell (sic)  

8. 16 September 1684.

John Frith to Samuel Frith

John Frith of Peak Forest, yeoman, sells to Samuel Frith his son and heir apparent, husbandman for £60 his moiety being one half of the buildings and lands at or near the messuage of Thomas Barber of Malcalfe, yeoman being one half of the two bays of building of the barn standing in the field and next and nearest the aforsesaid messuage; the moiety of the third part of the field belonging to the said messuage in which the barn stands and the moiety of one half of several closes called the great Marshfield, the little Marshfield with the barn and shippon, the moiety of the great meadow and the little meadow and Barnfield below the Ploughland (which has lately been enclosed from it).

Refers to Mary, John Frith’s wife.

John Frith signs by mark.

Witnessed by William Wright (by mark); Thomas Aspinall (by mark) and Nich. Lingard 

9. 27 September 1684 

John Gaskill Bond to Peter Gaskill 

John Gaskill  bonds with Peter Gaskill to perform the agreements in [7] above.

Witnessed by John Gaskill; Francis Gaskill, Henry Booth

10. 7 January 1708

John Frith settlement on Hannah Snow  

John and Samuel Frith convey to William Oldfield of Peak Forest and William Walker of Peak Forest, yeomen, for making provision for John’s daughter Hannah now the wife of Daniel Snow of Chesterfield, gent and John Snow, Daniel Snow the younger, Mary Snow and Elizabeth Snow their children for Hannah’s life and on her death to the Snow children.

A messuage in East Retford, Notts in Carr Hill gate between the messuage of William Bollom to the north, the tenement of Mary Ogle widow to the south abutting on Towne Street on the west late in the occupation of Daniel Snow.

And a close of meadow of one acre in East Retford between the lands of Mrs Elizabeth Wooley on the north, East Retford Moor on the south abutting upon the lands of Richard Santoz esq on the east and now in the possession of Daniel Snow together with the dove house etc.

Witnessed by Jko Bagshaw? Jas Brentnall; Wm Bollom 

11. 24 June 1709

Bond Samuel Frith to Daniel Snow

Samuel Frith of Peak Forest yeoman affirms his obligation to Daniel Snow of Chesterfield for £80.

Witnessed by John Frith; John Frith jun.

Redeemed 24 Oct 1713 by John Snow who says Sam Frith is his uncle and Daniel Snow his father.

12. 2 May 1710 

Samuel Frith settlement on marriage of John Frith 

Between Samuel Frith of Peak Forest in the parish of St Charles the Martyr, yeoman and John Frith son and heir apparent; Anne Kirke widow and relict of Henry Kirke late of Martinside yeoman deceased and Joan Kirke youngest and third daughter of Henry and Anne; Arnold Kirke of Martinside son and heir of Henry Kirke and brother of Joan and Richard Broadhurst of ?Sooker in Prestbury; Thomas Kirke of Spire Hollins yeoman and Jasper Frith second son of Samuel Frith.

A marriage is shortly to be had between John Frith and Joan Kirke. A messuage in Hanley is conveyed pursuant to a marriage agreement made by Henry Kirke in his lifetime with Samuel Frith as marriage portion for Joan and for the provision of Joan and £150 to be paid to Samuel Frith.

Samuel Frith sells to Arnold Kirke and Richard Broadhurst the messuage at Bagshaw previously held by Robert Gibb deceased and lately in the possession of Robert Wainwright his grandson and now in the possession of Samuel Frith known by the several names ////, the Greenhead field, the bank, the bank beyond the water, the ////, the Kilns croft, ///// the Greatfield, the Lower Broadfield, the Steven croft, /////, the ?Toninge and the Great ///// to the use of Samuel Frith until the marriage and to John Frith during his life.

Then to be held by Thomas Kirke and Jasper Frith or their  executors for five hundred years to the use of the first son of John and Joan and of the male heirs of such first son and in default to the use of the second, third fourth, fifth and ensuing sons and in default of such issues to any daughters as tenants in common and in default to the issue of John to any after taken wife and in default of such issue to Samuel Frith and his heirs.

And Samuel Frith promises within eighteen months to surrender all that piece of copyhold land called the Greenhead croft part parcel of and enjoyed with the said messuage and land in Bagshaw to the same uses.

By indenture of 21 June 1695 between Peter Legh of Lyme in Hanley and Henry Kirke, Peter Legh for £50 and other consideration devised to Henry Kirke all that messuage or tenement in Hanley then in the possession of Henry Kirke for the lives of Henry, Anne his wife and Joan.

Henry Kirke bequeathed to Joan the messuage in Hanley to hold after the decease of Anne for the duration of the lease and the will appointed Anne his relict and Thomas Kirke his executor.

And Anne and Thomas have consented to the devise of the premises in Hanley whereby Joan becomes entitled during the remainder of the term after the death of Anne.

Anne and Joan sold the messuage in Hanley to Arnold Kirke and Richard Broadhurst for 99 years upon trust that they allow John Frith during his life or the life of Anne and Joan and after his death for Joan Kirke for her provision and maintenance which together with the yearly sum of £5 to be paid to her during her life out of the lands at Bagshaw is agreed to be her dower.

To let the children of John and Joan to enjoy the premises during the remainder of the term.  If no issue then to Henry Kirke or his executors.

If John Frith doesn’t pay to Samuel Frith £150 within three years of the marriage Jasper Frith and Thomas Kirke are to sell the property to raise the sum. And if John survives Joan and they leave a child and he then remarries pay to that child £150 on reaching the age of 21 (or split if several children).

If John dies before Joan then Thomas Kirke and Jasper Frith pay the £5 to Joan out of the Bagshaw lands for 500 years.

It is agreed that Samuel Frith and John can at any time, with the approval of Arnold Kirke, sell the land as long as it is reinvested in land in Derbyshire or Cheshire.

Witnessed by ?? Chas Bagshaw, Thos Mellor?, Samuel Frith, Edw  ?? Brocse, Mary Kyrke, Ruth Lomas (her mark), Samuel Frith

13. Will of John Frith 14 October 1714

John Frith of the Chamber in the Peak Forest, yeoman. Small monetary amounts to David Snow his son-in-law; Hannah Snow his daughter; John, Mary, Daniel, Elizabeth and Hannah Snow his grandchildren; Martha Frith his daughter-in-law; Jasper, Samuel, Mary, Hannah and Martha Frith his grandchildren; Edward Fletcher his godson; John Taylor the elder, carpenter.

Residue equally to Samuel Frith his son and John Frith his grandson.

Witnessed by Edward Fletcher; Thomas Fletcher (by mark); Edward Lomas

[NB  John Frith probably died 18 April 1720 aged 89  - C283 in Memorial inscriptions from the church of St Charles King and Martyr, Peak Forest, Derbyshire Ancestral Research Group. This document is not in the Bank Hall papers but is held at Lichfield Record Office].

14. Will of Samuel Frith 14 October 1714 

Samuel Frith of the Chamber in the Peak Forest, yeoman being indisposed in health. An annuity to my father out of the profits of Chamber farm according to my former contract by writing made with him. Small monetary amounts to his son John Frith, Joan Frith his daughter- in-law; Mary Frith his grandchild; Hannah Snow his sister; Thomas Longdon.

To son Jasper Frith £90; to daughter Mary Frith £150 to be paid in a year; to daughter Hannah Frith £150 to be paid in two and a half years and to daughter Martha Frith £150 to be paid in five years time.

To Martha his wife and Samuel his son, with the desire that they keep house together, Chamber house and farm; one third of Castleton Close and one quarter of Oxlowe all of which are held under the Duke of Devonshire, and the residue.

Once all the legacies are paid then Samuel gets the interest in Castleton Close and Oxlowe absolutely and two thirds of Chamber house and farm and the residue whilst Martha gets one third for life and then to Samuel.

If Samuel dies without issue then John and Jasper Frith (Samuel’s other sons) shall receive the farms and tenements bequeathed to him. Samuel has already paid £50 to Jasper so his legacy is to be £40.

Probate granted 11 August 1715 

[NB Samuel did die without issue on 6 November 1773.]

15. Charges of proving Samuel Frith’s will 

Itemised bill - a total of £6 8s 4d paid to Hugh Sheldon on 21 September 1715 by Jasper Frith.

16. 2 February 1718 – lease of Meadow

Between Jasper Frith of Tidswell tallow chandler; Henry Booth of Chalsworth in the parish of Glossop yeoman; Samuel Frith of Peak Forrest yeoman and Thomas Gaskell of Lime Handley yeoman

Jasper Frith sells to Henry Booth; Samuel Frith and Thomas Gaskell for a term of six months his messuage at the Meadow within the parochial chapelry of Wormhill in the parish of Tidswell now or late in the possession of William Fenton by estimation twenty one acres of land of forest measure and also all the tyth corn of and in the hamlets of Meadow aforesaid and of and in Tunstead and Greatracks arising from the premises whereof Sir Philip Gell bart. was lately seized of and by him sold to the Jasper Frith and also all the  parcels of land of Jasper Frith in Greenfairfield and Overend whether enclosed or not enclosed and in the holding of William Fenton which were lately purchased by Jasper Frith from Sir Phillip Gell.

Witnessed by Jos Gaskell; Thomas Lomas; J Lowe

[NB The Bank Hall papers also have a copy of this document, and document 17, dated 15 June 1731.]

17. 2 February 1718

Gaskill daughters` lease 

Between Mary Gaskell Ann Gaskell Elizabeth Gaskell and Amy Gaskell spinsters (daughters and co-heirs of Peter Gaskell late of Bank Hall yeoman deceased); Henry Booth, Samuel Frith and Thomas Gaskell 

The Gaskells convey Bank Hall heretofore in the possession of Peter Gaskell deceased now in the tenure or occupation of them or of George Lowe their tenant to  Henry Booth Samuel Frith and Thomas Gaskell for the term of six months.

18. 3 February 1718

Gaskill daughters to Frith

Mary Gaskill for £175 paid by Jasper Frith in lieu of her share of her late father’s messuage hereafter mentioned and Ann Gaskell in consideration of a marriage  intended to be shortly had between her and Jasper Frith and of a settlement made by Jasper Frith of a messuage at a place called the Meadow to Ann and her issue.

And Elizabeth and Amy [ The copy of 15 June 1731 says “Ann” not “Amy”] Gaskell for £200 apiece hereby secured in lieu of their shares of the said messuage.

Have sold to Henry Booth Samuel Frith and Thomas Gaskill the messuage at Bank known by the name of Bank Hall to hold upon the trusts hereafter mentioned.  

That is to say that they will out of the rents issues and profits of the premises pay the yearly sum of ten pounds by half yearly payments to Elizabeth Gaskill in discharge of the interest of her £200 portion until she marry or die; and similarly for Amy Gaskill and that their portions of £200 will be paid within six months of their marriage or deaths provided always that if Jasper Frith pay Elizabeth Gaskill and Amy Gaskill their £200 apiece and interest then the authority given to Henry Booth Samuel Frith and Thomas Gaskill shall cease and immediately after the marriage between Jasper Frith and Ann Gaskill the premises shall be appointed to the use of Jasper Frith and his heirs for ever subject only to the proviso following: 

that if the marriage between Jasper Frith and Ann Gaskell take effect and that Ann happen to die within six years [The copy of 15 June 1731 says “months” not “years”] without issue living at her death then and if Mary Gaskill Elizabeth Gaskill and Amy Gaskill her sisters or any of them within twelve months pay to Jasper Frith all sums of money as he shall then have paid to Mary Gaskill Elizabeth Gaskell and Amy Gaskell and also all he has laid out in improvements either by building fencing limeing or otherwise upon the lands and premises and not have raised and received back by and out of the profits or produce then the trustees will be seized of the premises to the use of Mary, Ann and Elizabeth.

19. 29 September 1724 – Cowper and Frith

Thomas Cowper of Over Owlgreave yeoman and Jasper Frith of Bank Hall gent.

For one year for the purpose of transferring title Cowper grants all that parcel of common land (now enclosed) at Peasleys or Peasleys Common of approx twelve acres set out allotted and meered as Cowper’s share of the common belonging to his Over Owlgreave estate; a large piece of land allotted to Mr Bradshaw of Brampton as his proportion of the commons lying to the south side thereof and now in the possession of Jasper Frith, eastwardly to a lane at Rushophead, and a piece of common allotted to Mr Barber of Edensor as his proportion on the west side, all of which granted premises are now in the possession of Joseph Lingard.

Witnessed by Amy Gaskell, Ann Bradbury

20. 30 December 1727 – Will of Laurence ?Vaws of Kenyon, Lancaster, yeoman

To my stepson Thomas Withington and my stepdaughter Elizabeth Withington £20 each if Thomas Kay of Worsley and my brother in law Thomas Seddon pay to my executors all money as was due and ought to be paid to me in the right of Sarah my late wife.

To Maraget Hampson my sister in law ten pounds; to Matthew Moulding of Winwick twenty shillings per year for life, and after his death (Catherine his wife surviving) the same to be paid to her during her life; to my aunt Maragaret Lowe one guinea; to Alice Rothwell of Manchester one guinea; to Margaret Spencer my servant twenty shillings.

My executors to put £5 to interest and the interest to go to the poor of Kenyon for ever, to be distributed on St Thomas day.

All the residue to my daughter Jane but of she dies before attaining 21 years of age or marriage I give unto Thomas and Elizabeth Withington a further £30 apiece (but if Thomas Kay and Thomas Seddon shall not pay the monies due to me in right of my late wife without suit in law then the legacies to Thomas and Elizabeth are void).

Also, after the death of my daughter (in case she shall be under 21 or married) I give half my estate to my sister Elizabeth and the other half to my sister Beatrice.

I appoint my brother in law Thomas Seddon, John Speakman of Culceth yeoman and Robert Speakman of Kenyon yeoman my executors.

Witnessed by John Urmeston; John Ridyard; Wm Boydell

Codicil 1 November 1729Thomas and Elizabeth Withington to now get £80 not £50

28 October 1734 – letters of administration granted to Thomas Seddon

[verso] 30 December 1727 – probate of Mr Lowe re Vaws wife 

21. 10 December 1730

Bond – Frith to Downes and Richardson

[Latin, refers to: Peter Downes of Lyme Handley, yeoman and John Richardson of Lyme Handley, yeoman. Jasper Frith of Bank Hall, Mary Gaskell of Lyme Handley, spinster, Elizabeth Gaskell of Lyme Handley, spinster and Amy Gaskell of Bank Hall].

Whereas Jasper Frith (and Ann his wife), Mary, Elizabeth and Amy Gaskell by their indentures of release of the same date as these presents at the request of bonder Downes and Richardson grant and confirm unto Henry Cork of Butterton, yeoman a messuage and lands in Cowdale and Kingsterndale.

Ann, Mary, Elizabeth and Amy are the only daughters and co-heirs of Peter Gaskell late of Bank Hall, yeoman deceased.

It is agreed by all parties that Downes and Richardson indemnify Jasper, Anne and the Gaskells from any claims arising out of the release.

Signed in the presence of Alex Hollinworth; Elizabeth Tanner (her mark)

22. 27 April 1748

Jasper Frith to Samuel Frith  - lease of Bank (abstract)

Between Jasper Frith of Bank in Combs Edge gent. and Samuel Frith of Chamber in the Forest gent.

Jasper Frith has granted all that messuage where Jasper now lives at Bank with all lands estimated at eighty acres.

And that parcel of enclosed land upon Peasley in Chapel known as Green Tongue otherwise Bank piece estimated at sixteen acres in the possession of Jasper Frith and which was lately part of the common there and was divided therefrom and laid out as a proportionable part of the commons belonging to Bank.

And the parcel of enclosed land on Peasley of twelve acres heretofore in the possession of Thomas Cooper of Owlgreave but now in the possession of Robert Doyle.

And the parcel of land at Stony Ford Clough of two and a half acres in the possession of Thomas Bower of the Ford.

And also the cottage and several parcels of ground adjoining called a Neighbourship at Rushop of thirty six acres. The cottage and closes are in the possession of William Coughing as tenant at the yearly rent of £16 and 6d.

And also the close of seven acres of inhand land meadow or pasture at Upper End in the parish of Tideswell and adjoining to Dove Holes Lime Kilns late in the possession of Thomas Rolleys and now in the possession of Jasper Frith.

To Samuel Frith for one year for the rent of one peppercorn to the intent that he may be able to accept and take a grant and release of the reversion and inheritance.

Witnessed by George Heathcote and John Goodwin 

23. Account to Frith from Hall 1750-56

Includes:

Dec 1750 – Journey to Brownside to get bond executed by Ward & son

March 6 1752Frith against Swinscoe warrant to prosecute

Nov 4 – Journey to Manchester to business Seddon`s title

Seddon & son to Frith drawing and ingrossing lease

Smith to Frith drawing and ingrossing special release

Seddon having given security out of lands purchased by Frith to indemnify against Young`s children`s portions, drawing and ingrossing a release of portion

Paid Mr Kay getting the same executed at Manchester

Agent attending Mr Townley to get the same executed who refused

Writing to Mr Townley. Seddon & son to insist upon part of the purchase money being returned to indemnify against claim of portion

Frith to Seddon bond to indemnify against Mr Smith`s claim

Oct 1 1755 – writing to Thos Rawlinson to pay debt

Dec 11 – writing to John Waterhouse to pay debt

1755 April 19  - received cash of Mr Seddon £10 10s 6d

24. 31 January 1787

Bellott to Frith – Bole Hills

Between Anthony Bellott of Ollerenshaw, yeoman, grandson and heir of Anthony Bellott deceased and Sarah his wife and Samuel Frith esquire of Bank Hall

In consideration of £111Anthony Bellott granted all the parcel of inclosed land called the Bolehill otherwise Bullhill being on the south west side of and above Bank Hall of eight acres formerly part of the commons meered and set forth for the King’s part and was purchased by Anthony Bellott of Castle Naze yeoman deceased from Thomas Eyre of Grays Inn.

Witnessed by Will Seddon, attorney Manchester and Elizabeth Brittlebank, servant to Samuel Frith

25. 27 April 1809

Bagshaw and Lomas

Between John Bagshaw late of Chapel yeoman but now a private in fifty ninth regiment of foot and James Lomas of Cock Yard yeoman. 

John  Bagshaw (son of Thomas Bagshaw shoemaker who was nephew of William Lingard and brother of Henry Bagshaw hereafter mentioned) is entitled to a share from certain lands and buildings at Waterside in Chapel in the event of the death of John Lingard Langworth without lawful issue and which was given by the will of William Lingard aforesaid yeoman dated 22 September 1801 to de divided equally among the children of the aforesaid Thomas Bagshaw.

John Bagshaw is entitled to a share from Allstone Lee after the death of Mary the widow of the late Henry Bagshaw innkeeper and also after the death of the said Thomas Bagshaw and on the youngest child of the said Thomas Bagshaw attaining the age of 21 which was given by the will of the said Henry Bagshaw dated 12 May 1797.

James Lomas contracted with John Bagshaw for all his right or title for the sum of £21.

Witnessed by John  Hutchinson; Ann Lomas

2 September 1819 James Lomas has this day released his interest to the Thorn Dole and Pumming hay to Joseph Green being part of the premises comprised within.

26. 15 March 1813

Land at Flagg

Between:

Thomas Roe of Battersea, gent. (administrator of the estate of Elizabeth his late wife one of the six children of John Frith late of Bank Hall who also died intestate and who was the only child of Jasper Frith gent. who also died intestate).

Richard Roe of Manchester only child of Elizabeth Roe and also grandson of Jane Frith deceased widow and relict of John Frith and Richard is one of the nephews of Mary Frith spinster deceased another of the six children of John Frith and Jane Frith.

Hannah Dixon of Manchester widow another of the six children.

Paul Webster of Derby colour merchant, administrator of the estate of Martha his wife deceased another of the six children.

John Frith of Manchester gent. another of the six children.

Samuel Frith of Bank Hall the oldest son and heir of John Frith and also grandson and heir of Jasper Frith also nephew and heir and devisee and surviving executor of Samuel Frith late of Peak Forest yeoman deceased and also the administrator of the said Jasper Frith left unadministered by Samuel Frith his late brother deceased and which said Samuel Frith party hereto is the administrator of the estate of John Frith his late father left unadministered by Jane Frith and is also the administrator of the estate of Jane Frith and the administrator of the estate of Mary Frith left unadminstered by the said Jane Frith her mother.

By indenture of demise 2 October 1722 between Henry Eyre of Rowta esq and Jasper Frith and Samuel Frith deceased Henry let to Jasper and Samuel land at Flagg known as Flagg pastures in the tenure of Thomas ?Blackden which was set out as part of the King`s part upon the division of the commons of Chelmorton and Flag for the term of 999 years one half to Samuel and one half to Jasper for £23 per annum.

Jasper Frith, having survived his wife, died intestate about September 1765 leaving John Frith deceased his only child who died on or about January 1766 intestate leaving the said Jane Frith his widow and the said Samuel Frith party ?eacto Elizabeth Roe (then Frith) Mary Frith (since deceased) Hannah Dixon (then Frith) Martha Webster (then Frith) and John Frith party hereto him surviving.

Letters of administration of the estate of Jasper Frith made on or about 19 April 1766 to Samuel Frith deceased the guardian of Samuel Frith, Elizabeth Frith, Mary Frith, Hannah Frith, Martha Frith and John Frith then minors for the use during the minority of the minors.

Letters of administration of the estate of John Frith granted 19 April 1766 to Jane Frith his widow.

Samuel Frith deceased and the late Jane Frith duly administered the estates of the intestates.

Samuel Frith became possessed of lands by indenture of 2 October 1722 for the residue of the term or under some assurance that it should be held for the long term by way of compensation for the money laid out by him and his family in the cultivation and improvement agreed with the Rt Hon Anne Countess Dowager Massareene who was the only relict and devisee of Henry Eyre deceased and was then entitled to the freehold, bought it by deed of 2 and 3 September 1777 made between Anne Countess Dowager Massareene and Samuel Frith.

The indenture not being considered good in law or it having been understood the freehold was merged and no assignment or surrender of the residue was taken.

Letters of administration of the estate of Jasper Frith left unadministered by Samuel Frith have lately been granted to Samuel Frith.

Letters of administration of the estate of John Frith left unadministered by Jane Frith have lately been granted to Samuel Frith.

Elizabeth Roe died 1779 leaving Thomas Roe and Richard Roe her only son and letters of administration have recently been granted to Thomas Roe.

Mary Frith died October 1780 leaving Jane Frith (her mother) Samuel Frith Hannah Dixon then Frith Martha Webster then Frith and John Frith surviving and also Richard Roe her nephew and letters of administration were granted to Jane Frith and since the decease of Jane to Samuel Frith.

Jane Frith died 1797 leaving Samuel Frith Hannah Dixon Martha Webster and John Frith her surviving children Richard Roe her grandson and letters of administration were recently granted to Samuel Frith.

Martha Webster died 1804 leaving Paul Webster her husband and letters of administration were recently granted to him.

Samuel Frith recently contracted for the sale of the land referred to in the indenture of 22 October 1722 and to make good title and to clear up all doubts as to the existence of the remainder of the term of 999 years and to obtain discharge of all interests and claims in respect of the land or relating to the estate of Jasper Frith John Frith Jane Frith and Mary Frith has requested that Thomas Roe Richard Roe Hannah Dixon Paul Webster and John Frith join and concur in the release and discharge.

In consideration of the promises and the distributions made by Samuel Frith deceased and Jane Frith of the estates of Jasper Frith and John Frith and for ten shillings apiece to the five parties paid by Samuel Frith they release and discharge all the estate comprised in the indenture of 2 October 1722.

Signed:  Thomas Roe; Richard Roe; Hannah Dixon; Paul Webster; John Frith

27. 21 October 1814

Gisborne to Frith

Thomas Gisborne the elder of Yoxall Lodge in the lately disaforested forest or chase of Needwood in Staffs, clerk and Thomas Gisborne the younger heretofore student of Trinity College Cambridge but now of Clifton in the parish of Derby esquire eldest son and heir apparent of Thomas Gisborne the elder of the one part and Samuel Frith of Bank Hall esquire on the other part.

For five shillings the Gisbornes sell the Far Hays together with the garden therefrom inclosed containing (including the garden) 8a 3r 11p adjoining to the west the lands of Samuel Frith and to the east the land next described.

Also land now inclosed from and being the western part of a certain close called Near Hays otherwise the Lime Piece of 6a 2r adjoining to the Far Heys to the west and to the east the land next described.

Also land now enclosed from and being the other part of the Near Hays of 6a 3r 13p adjoining to the west the land lastly mentioned and to the north by lands of Samuel Frith and on the south and east by lands of Thomas Gisborne.

Also all that land now inclosed from and being the north western part of a close called the Higher Barmes 7a 1r 24p adjoining to the north the Buxton Road lying between the land and the land last described part of the Lower Barmes.

In total 41a 1r 11p bounded to the north by lands of Samuel Frith, to the west by lands of Samuel Frith and Stephen Bealot and to the south and east by lands of Thomas Gisborne the elder and Thomas Gisborne the younger and of Samuel Frith for the term of one year for a peppercorn.

To the intent and purpose that Samuel Frith can accept a grant and release of the freehold already prepared and intended to be made the following day.

28. 22 October 1814

Exchange of land at Chapel and Flagg

Between Rev Thomas Gisborne and Thomas Gisborne the younger and Samuel Frith.

By an indenture (enrolled in chancery) of 5 November 1808 between Rev Francis Gisborne clerk of the one part, Thomas Gisborne the elder eldest son and heir of John Gisborne deceased of the second part, and Thomas Gisborne the younger of the third part, Thomas Babington esquire of the fourth part, Robert Baxter gent. of the fifth part and by a common recovery suffered in Michaelmas term in 49 Geo III by the Gisbornes;

And by indentures of lease and release dated 27 February 1813 between Christopher Heath of Duffield gent only brother and heir at law of John  Heath of Derby gent. deceased on the one part and the two Gisbornes on the other part;

among other hereditaments the lands hereafter first described were appointed to the Gisbornes, to the elder Thomas Gisborne for life and then to the younger.

And whereas by indenture of lease and release of 2 and 3 September 1777 between Anne Countess Dowager of Massareene in Ireland only child and heir of Henry Eyre then late of Derby deceased of the one part and Samuel Frith the land and hereditaments hereinafter described were conveyed to Samuel Frith.

And whereas the Gisbornes and Samuel Frith have agreed an exchange of their respective parcels of land.

And the Gisbornes in consideration of the exchange and of ten shillings paid by Samuel Frith to the Gisbornes and reserved to them by the indenture of 5 November 1808 convey the parcels of land and hereditaments (among other hereditaments) comprised in the sale of 5 November 1808 to Samuel Frith in exchange as afterwards mentioned (in the actual possession of Samuel Frith for five shillings in a bargain dated the previous day) all the Far Heys together with the garden therefrom enclosed of 8a 3r 7p (including the garden) etc  etc (see document 27).

A chief rent of £2 16s is payable to the Duke of Devonshire out of the lands of the Gisbornes in Chapel and also another chief rent of £3 out of the same lands payable to the poor of the parish of Chapel.

And for ten shillings paid by the Gisbornes to Samuel, Samuel conveys (in their possession for five shillings by a lease of the day before) the parcel of land now inclosed from and being the northern part of an enclosure called Near Flagg Pasture of 13a 12p adjoining towards the north and west the close called the Upper Pasture and the Nether Pasture and on the west to a parcel called Far Flagg Pasture also a piece of land now inclosed from and being the northern part of ten Acre Close together with the lane or road on the eastern side of 9a 3r 4p adjoining to the east the land last described  (the northern part of Far Flagg pasture and in part towards the north by a ?haug of land lately enclosed from Ten Acre Close and heretofore sold by Samuel to William Redferne) and the Upper Pasture of 4a 26p adjoining to the south the northern part of Near Flagg Pasture.

Also the Nether Pasture 3a 2r 4p adjoining to the south and south west the northern part of Near Flagg Pasture; also the narrow ?haug of land extending along the north east side of Upper Pasture and Nether Pasture lately used as a lane of 2a 2r 10p in the township of Flagg in the parish of Bakewell in total 43a 2r 9p bounded on the north and east by lands of Thomas Gisborne the elder and by lands now or late of Robert Aitken, Richard Levinge, William Ashbourne, Samuel Nailor, James Fidler, the feoffees of the Burton charity and John Robinson and towards the west and south by lands of Thomas Gisborne the elder now in occupation of John Webster and Francis Farmer.

The Ten Acre Close and the land on the eastern side to Thomas the elder, all the rest to Thomas the elder and younger.

Thomas the elder can assign rents issuing form the lands to Mary his wife or to lease out lands for up to 21 years.

29. 30 August 1820

Bagshaw and Langworth to Joule (Allstone Lee)

Between Thomas Bagshaw of Chapel (only brother and heir of Henry Bagshaw of Chapel, innkeeper deceased) and John Lingard Langworth of Sheffield, cutler, of the one part and Stephen Joule of Wardlow, gent.

For a year for five shillings for the purpose of taking a grant and release of eight parts to be entered into the next day Bagshaw and Langworth sell all that dwelling house and tenement late occupied by Henry Bagshaw deceased known as Allstone Lee and now tenanted by Joseph Green and the pieces of land known as Rough Hay, Corn Hay, New Meadow, Ralph Carr, Brook House Croft, Paddock, Wickin Hill, Coal Meadow, Broad Dole, Great Low Flat otherwise Further Low Flat, Little Low Flat otherwise Near Low Flat and Breedy Meadow totalling 45 acres.

Parties to the grant and release:

Thomas Bagshaw (1)

Thomas Bagshaw and John Lingard Langworth (2)

John Lomas of Chapel, nurseryman; James Lomas late of Cockyard now of Adlington yeoman; John Arnfield of Chapel, innkeeper and Mary his wife; Thomas Hobson of Chapel, shopkeeper and Ann his wife; Matthew Broadhead of Kettleshulme, yeoman and Margaret his wife; William Wright of Castleton, yeoman and Sarah his wife; Henry Bagshaw of Chapel, tailor (3)

Thomas Bagshaw (4)

John Orgile of Chapel, gent and Robert Unwin of Chapel, timber merchant and Elizabeth his wife (5)

Stephen Joule (6)

John Vaughan of Heaton Norris, gent (7)

Roger Rowson Lingard of Heaton Norris, gent (8)

30. Transcript of will of Samuel Frith 30 August 1828 [Extracted from the District Registry of Her Majesty’s Court of Probate at Lichfield]

Legacies to relatives detailed in 31 and 32 below plus legacies to godsons John and William sons of Asheton Asheton Shuttleworth of Hathersage; to Benjamin Crossland bailiff of my farm called Chamber; to Mary Heeley sister of Susan Heeley now living with me; to Mary Heeley daughter of Susan Heeley who now lives with me an amount on trust until she reaches the age of twenty one; an annuity charged on Castle Naze in the tenure of William Ollerenshaw for William Smith my servant.

31. 14 September 1829

Release by legatees

Release of the real and personal estate by the legatees of the estate of Samuel Frith to John Frith the executor.

Rev John Wakefield of Derby, clerk and Sophia his wife, Thomas Olivic Prout of Saint Agnes in Cornwall and Martha his wife, Samuel Webster of Duffield gent., Godfrey Webster late of Derby gent. but now of Heage and John Webster of Derby surgeon.

Samuel Frith by will of 30 August 1828 bequeathed all his real and personal estate to his brother John upon trust that he pay legacies and an annuity, being £500 to his nieces Sophia Wakefield and Martha Prout; £200 to his nephew Samuel Webster; £100 to his nephews Godfrey Webster and John Webster.

John  Frith and Samuel Webster were the executors and Samuel died 4 September 1828. The will was proved on 7 March 1829 by John Frith alone. The legatees acknowledge receipt of the legacies.

(this is a certified copy of 11 August 1845)

32. 25 March 1830

Release by legatees

Release of legacies charged on the real estate by the legatees of the estate of Samuel Frith to John Frith 

Hannah Dixon of Manchester, widow; Richard Roe of the same place gent. and John Frith the younger of Bank Hall, gent.

Samuel Frith by will of 30 August 1828 bequeathed all his real and personal estate to his brother John upon trust that he pay legacies and an annuity, being £100 to his sister Hannah Dixon; £100 to his nephew Richard Roe and £50 to his nephew John Frith the younger.

John  Frith and Samuel Webster were the executors and Samuel died 4 September 1828. The will was proved on 7 March 1829 by John Frith alone. The legatees acknowledge receipt of the legacies.

(this is a certified copy of 11 August 1845)

33. Stamp Office receipts for legacies and annuities

For the legacies recorded in 31 and 32 above dated 1830 plus an annuity of £20 paid to William Smith aged 60 (no relation) for three years 1830 and 1832-3.  

Plus a receipt for a legacy of £200 to Mary Healey, described as “a stranger in blood”, to be held by John Frith until she attained the age of 21.

34. Transcript of John Frith’s will 1 November 1837 [Extracted from the District Registry of Her Majesty’s Court of Probate at Lichfield]

John Frith of Bank Hall, gentleman the devisee of my brother Samuel Frith of the same place esquire deceased.

I give to my great niece Sophia Anne Webster the Hordern Field in Chapel en le Frith.  I give to my illegitimate son Nathan Woodroofe of Bamford near Hope schoolmaster  my messuage farm lands and hereditaments at the Dove Holes in the occupation of Jonathan Hulley as tenant from year to year and the slate quarries at Cracken Edge in Chinley. 

I give to George Withington of Broughton, Manchester, nephew of my late wife the sum of five hundred pounds.  

I give to my niece Martha Prout the sum of one hundred pounds.   

As to all the residue I give to my nephew Godfrey Webster and my personal estate.

It is my will that Godfrey sell my farms or estates called the Shireoaks and Upper Fold Farms [near Hayfield] and also the Kings Arms Public House [in Chapel-en-le-Frith] and with the money arising therefrom discharge all my debts and legacies.

Proved 14th May 1838 by Godfrey Webster the sole executor

35. 23 June 1838

Withington and Prout – release of legacies

Between George Withington of Broughton near Manchester gent; Martha Prout of St Agnes near Truro widow and Godfrey Webster of Bank Hall gent.

John Frith late of Bank Hall gent. by will dated 1 November 1837 gave to Withington, nephew of his late wife £500 and to his niece Martha Prout £100.

John Frith died 8 November last and the will was proved on 14 May last at Lichfield.

Withington and Prout acknowledge receipt of their sums.

36. 3 August 1842

Declaration of John  Rayner

John Rayner of Snowdenhill in Hunshelf in the parish of Penistone, farmer, declares he well knew Susannah Heley formerly of Marsh Green, spinster deceased, who was the sister of his present wife and that Susannah Heley had an illegitimate daughter named Mary Heley born 16 June 1825 and that Mary Heley was brought to his house at the age of one month and lived there until her marriage.

Mary Heley attained the age of 21 on 16 June last and that on 15 September last she married Samuel Ellis of Penistone.

Attached is Mary Heley’s marriage certificate (15 September 1845) giving her father as Samuel Frith and Samuel Ellis’s (solicitor’s clerk) father as Joseph P Hague

37. 25 August 1855

Copy will of Godfrey Webster

Personal effects and real estate left to his wife Hannah for her life. All then passed to his son Samuel Frith Webster except Castle Naze which is left to daughter Evelina Elizabeth and £1000 to daughter Sophia Anne de Jongh.

38. Inland Revenue legacy receipts

In respect of 37 above

Also succession duty forms on the death of Hannah listing Bank Hall valued at £2114; Bank Hall farm in the occupation of Ellen Wilcockson at £2045; the meadow of Great Bole Hill £283; a meadow in the occupation of Edward Frith £180; a cottage at Holehouse in the occupation of J Hopwood £45; Higher Owlgreave in the occupation of Isaac Lomas £1721; Lower Owlgreave in the occupation of James Handford £1685; Downlea in the occupation of Francis Hallam £1330.

39. 25 July 1860

Notice to treat – Buxton extension

For one rood of land (may be the path on the north side of the railway from Bank Hall drive towards Combs).

[also separate plans of lands acquired by the railway across Owlgreave and Downlee lands]                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

40. 24 August 1861

Declarations  as to the possession of Bank Hall Estate                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Thomas Carrington of Combs, farmer, being over 65, declares he has known the Bank Hall estate as shown on an annexed plan and now in the occupation of SF Webster and his tenants Ellen Wilcockson and George Turner for over fifty years during which time the estate has belonged to Samuel Frith, John Frith, Godfrey Webster, Hannah Webster and SF Webster.

Carrington became a tenant in 1821 of various meadows (largely the Heys).

Attached is a plan of the Bank Hall estate showing field names and areas. Higher Owlgreave is 52a; Lower Owlgreave 51a and Downlee 37a.

SF Webster also makes a declaration of his title for the purpose of securing a mortgage (see 41 below).

41. 21 September 1861

SF Webster – mortgage for £1400

Between Samuel Frith Webster of Bank Hall gent. and George Bowring of Manchester surgeon

Whereas Godfrey Webster late of Bank Hall, gent. deceased, being entitled at the date of his will 25 August 1855 and at his decease (30 September 1855) granted all his estate to his wife Hannah (since deceased) for her life and after her decease all except Castle Naze to his son Samuel Frith Webster (SFW) and Godfrey appointed his son and wife as executors and they proved the will on 9 November 1856.

Hannah died 11 August 1860.

In consideration of £1400 paid to SFW by George Bowring, SFW conveys to GB the Bank Hall Estate specified on the schedule and shown on the plan on the second skein edged in green.

SFW to pay on 21 March next £1400 plus interest at 5% or if not half yearly thereafter.

SFW to keep buildings insured for £500.

This document also has attached a map and  names of fields and acreages.

[note pinned to document – on demand for value received I promise to pay to George Bowring £200 with interest – SF Webster July 6 1863]

42. 21 September 1861 

de Jongh, EE Webster and Samuel Frith Webster

Between Sophia Anne de Jongh (widow), Evelina Elizabeth Webster (spinster of Bank Hall ) and Samuel Frith Webster of Bank Hall, gent.

Godfrey Webster of Bank Hall in his will of 25 August 1855 left all his estate to Hannah and after her death the same (except Castle Naze) to Samuel Frith Webster  upon trust to pay £1000 to Sophia Anne (then the wife of John de Jongh) and £200 to Evelina Elizabeth with remainder to Samuel Frith Webster.

A codicil 25 September 1855 did not alter the devise to Samuel Frith Webster, and Godfrey died on 30 September 1855 and Hannah died 11 August 1860.

Sophia and Evelina acknowledge receipt of their portions and release the real estate to Samuel Frith Webster.

[attached certified copy of p453 of parish register by George Hall incumbent giving date of burial of Hannah Webster of Bank Hall as August 16 1860]

43. Survey and valuation of SF Webster’s estates 1864

In hand Bank Hall of 17a valued at £2800 (including the house and buildings at £1400 and timber £925) ; Bank Hall farm (John Potter) of 80a £3071 (including the house and buildings at £252); Higher Owlgreave (John  Potter) 53a £1630 (house and buildings £170); Lower Owlgreave (Josh Handford) 50a £1603 (house and buildings £200); Down Lee (Francis Hallam) 31a £1522 (house and buildings £180); Great Bole Hill (George Turner) 8a £330. Total 240a worth £10,960.

44. 1864 proposition and agreement

Copy Mr Webster’s proposition: To let Bank Hall, gardens and 6 acres of land at £80 p.a. in its present state or at £100 p.a. in thorough repair, or to the sale of the whole estate at valuation of about £11,000.

[ handwritten] Memorandum of agreement made 23 April 1864 between SF Webster and HC Renshaw of Mount House, Higher Broughton, Manchester whereby Renshaw will buy the Bank Hall estate for £10,550.

Memorandum of agreement of 27 April 1864. Renshaw agrees to buy the Bank Hall estate in the occupation of SF Webster, Jonathan Potter, Francis Hallam, Hekiah Handforth, John Bonsall and George Turner of 240a for £10,550.  Possession of the house and grounds of 17a to be given to Renshaw on signing but he will not get title until completion.

45. 7 October 1864

SF Webster and his mortagees to HC Renshaw

Indenture of 7 October 1864 between Thomas Vernon Mellor formerly of Derby now of Ideridgehay near Wirksworth clerk in holy orders and Nathan Hubbersty formerly of Wirksworth now of Eastwell Hall in Leicestershire clerk in holy orders; George Bowring of Manchester surgeon ; Samuel Frith Webster; Henry Constantine Renshaw of Broughton.

By a mortgage of 8 August 1845 between Godfrey Webster and Hannah his wife and Thomas Vernon Mellor and Nathan Hubbersty the house and closes occupied by Thomas Wilcockson of 57a 16p known as Higher Owlgreave and the house and closes occupied by James Handford of 52a 29p known as Lower Owlgreave, except parts sold to the Stockport Disley and Whaley Bridge Railway Company and William Bradley Waterhouse, were mortgaged for £2500 at 4%.

Default was made. Godfrey made his will on 25 August 1855 leaving all his estate to his wife Hannah for life and after her death all except the Castle Naze estate to his son Samuel Frith Webster save for £1,000 to Sophia Anne the wife of John de Jongh of Glossop and £200 to Evelina Elizabeth Webster to be paid within twelve months of his death.

Godfrey died 13 September 1855. Hannah died 11 August 1860 and was buried at Chapel parish church on 16 August.

By indenture of 21 September 1861 between Sophia, Evelina and Samuel Frith Webster the legacies were acknowledged as paid.

By mortgage dated 21 September 1861 between SFW and George Bowring Bank Hall estate (edged in green on plan) was mortgaged for £1400 @5%. Default was made.

SF Webster has agreed with HC Renshaw for the sale for £10,500 of all the lands on the attached schedules. Mellor and Hubbersty are owed £1800 and Bowring £1400.

Out of the £10,500 Renshaw pays £1800 to Mellor and Hubbersty, £1400 to Bowring and £7,300 to SF Webster.

SF Webster grants the capital messuage or mansion house called Bank Hall and the lands noted in the first schedule of 98a 35p; also the farm of Down Lee in the second schedule of 37a 31p (edged in pink); also the two farms of Higher Owlgreave and Lower Owlgreave in the third schedule of 104a 1r 31p (edged in pink).

[Attached is a plan of the Bank Hall estate plus Down Lee and Lower and Higher Owlgreave with field names and acreages]

[verso]

Memorandum that by an agreement of 28 July 1888 between HC Renshaw; Richard and Henry Broadhurst; John Critchlow; The Hon Emily Wingfield Griffiths; London and North Western Railway Company that HC Renshaw and the Broadhursts allow the company to enter onto the land to make and complete a new footpath for the use of the public six feet in width in the position shown by a red colour between the points A and E and F and G on the plan annexed to the said agreement. The company should enclose the new footpath from the adjoining lands of HC Renshaw with a post and rail fence and that HC Renshaw after completion of such fence and the stopping up of the existing footpath will maintain and keep in repair the fence so far as it adjoins his land.

31 July 1888

46. 13 January 1865

Renshaw and LNWR

LNWR will allow Renshaw to connect with the down side of the railway station the carriage road he is forming through his lands ; so long as the company allow this connection all persons shall be allowed to pass over as a foot road.

Renshaw will metal certain roads affected by the construction of the railway and sell a strip of land to the LNWR.

47. 1 January 1866

Mortgage to Higgins and Broadhurst

Between HC Renshaw of Bank Hall on the one part and George Higgins of Red Hill, Anglesea and Richard Broadhurst of Broughton, merchant of the other part.

By indenture of 7 October 1864 between Mellor, Hubbersty, Bowring, Webster and Renshaw, Bank Hall was conveyed to Renshaw.

And by another indenture of June 1865 between HCR and The Midland Railway Company, Renshaw sold to the company a piece of land of two perches being part of the piece of land distinguished by the number 81 in the plans of the railway and the associated book of reference deposited in the office of the Clerk of the Peace for Derby and coloured red together with a right of road not less than fifteen feet in width for the owners of the fields numbered 74 and 82 from the public highway at point A to point B and from B along and outside and immediately adjoining the boundary fence of the company as shown by the blue dotted lines and of the field marked 82 to the point marked C.

Renshaw has pulled down the greater part of the said mansion house and is now rebuilding the same in an improved and enlarged form at a considerable expense and he has requested Higgins and Broadhurst to lend him £10,000 which they have agreed to do on joint account with interest at 4.5%.

In consideration of £10,000 Renshaw conveys to Higgins and Broadhurst all the lands referred to in the schedules (which are identical to the schedules of the 1864 deed) save for the small piece conveyed to the railway company.

Renshaw to pay interest 1 January and 1 July and to insure the buildings against fire in the sum of £1,000.

Indenture 21/12/1881 – the sum of £10,000 is still owed but interest has been paid. Higgins died 9 July 1881. Henry Broadhurst of Manchester, yarn agent joins Richard Broadhurst in the mortgage.

48. 22 December 1868

Heathcott to Ledley - Sale of Alstone Lee

Indenture of 22 December 1848 between Edward Heathcott of Sutton near Macclesfield relieving officer; John Taylor of Ollerset land surveyor; and John Bradley Ledley of Bollington gentleman.

Edward Heathcott is seized of a will entitled to the inheritance to a messuage (subject to a mortgage dated 19 November 1862 made between Heathcott and Taylor securing £1300). Heathcott has agreed with Ledley to sell for £1940 and £1300 is still owing to Taylor but interest has been paid. Ledley pays to Taylor £1300 and £640 to Heathcott.

The two closes at Alstone Lee, one commonly called the Thorndole of one acre two rods and thirty five perches on the west side of Alstone Lee house and bounded on the north by land formerly of Mr Bradbury on the south by church land on the east by the highway and on the west by the church land.

The other called Penning Hay of three acres twenty four perches situated on the east side of Alstone Lee house and bounded on the north by lands of George Heathcott (parcels of the land conveyed below) on the south by church land on the east  by lands now or formerly in the occupation of George Barrett and on the west by lands of George Heathcott (and now sold below).

The messuage of Alstone Lee sometime formerly in the possession of Edward Jackson, afterwards of William Swindells, since of George Heathcott and the lands known as the Rose Croft, the two Barn Crofts, the Pumin Hay, the two Nether or Lower Pumin Hays, the Broadlee Meadow, the Wickin Meadow (divided into two parts), the Wickin Hill meadow, the New Close, the Tom Clough and the Carr Meadow and the parcel of land of 20 acres known as the New Piece together with all that lane and herbage which led from Pumin Hay to the New Piece which are now better known as Homestead Garden (1a6p); Tom Clough (1a1r); New Close (4a29p); Far Wickin Hills (1a3r21p); New Wickin Hills (2a38p); Wickin Meadow (3r21p); Broadlee Meadow (3a1r3p); Piece (19a3r8p); Far Pemmin Naze (3a); Pemmin Naze (2a1r24p); Great Pemmin Naze (5a1r24p); Water Croft (20p); Carr (2a5p); Barn Croft with barn (2r12p); Lane (3r30p) and Common Land (20a).

And also Ralph Meadows (3a3r statute acres) and formerly in the occupation of Joseph Green the elder, afterward of Joseph Green the younger but now occupied by George Heathcott.

And JB Ledley who was married since 1 January 1834 declares that no woman who may become his widow shall be entitled to dower out of the property.

Edward Heathcott; John Taylor; JB Ledley

[verso] witnessed by FW Wheeton; Joh Stockport; Will ? Mair

Receipts for the £1300 and £640

49. Photocopy of a manuscript

Paul and Martha Webster married 22 April 1783 at Chapel-en-le-Frith.

Jane? Mary daughter of the above born at Chesterfield 26 Nov 1784 died 8 March 1803 buried in ? a vault in the centre aisle of All Saints Church Derby.

Elizabeth daughter of the above born at Chesterfield 5 August 1786 and died at Clifton near Bristol 29 Oct 1809. Buried at Clifton in a vault purchased and paid for which is P Webster’s for ever.

?Paul Frith son of the above born at Aston 30 March 1788 and died 24 July 1805 buried in the vault in All Saints church Derby.

Godfrey born at Aston 29 June 1789 died at Bank Hall (which descended to him on the death of his uncle John) aged 66 1855 buried in the churchyard Sept 12

John born at Breaston 3 March 1791 died 13 October 1844 buried in All Saints churchyard.

Mary Ann born Breaston 25 July 1792 died when about six months old.

Martha born at Breaston 8 November 1794 christened by the Rev Mr Hale 6 March 1796. Married to Tho Olivic Prout/St Agnes died Dec 18 1850.

Hannah born at Breaston 7 Feb 1797 died when a fortnight old.

Sophia born at Alvaston 26 January 1799; baptised and christened 27 January 1799 by Mr Bayley at All Saints Derby and died 18 May 1830 buried in the vault in the centre aisle. Married first to Edward ?Evans of Yeldersley then to Rev John Wakefield.

Samuel born in Derby 16 May 1804 died 6 Oct 1856. Grave 4311 at ? Nunhind Cemetery.

Martha his mother 14 May 1807

Paul the father died 22 August 1828 at West Newington and buried in West Hackney.

Hannah the widow of Godfrey Webster died 8 August 1860 aged 76 at Bank Hall buried in Chapel churchyard.

Sophia eldest daughter born July 27 1815 and married John de Jongh of Chapel second son of Francis de Jongh of Alsace 2 Oct 1851 at Chapel by Rev G Hall

Charles their eldest son born Jan 5 1853 baptised on 22 Jan and christened 15 July 1853 at Chapel

Henry their second son born Glossop 5 March 1855 and died Longsight 31 Dec 1875 and buried at Chapel 5 January 1876.

Samuel Frith only son of the above Godfrey born Jan 11 1817 and died 10 July 1870 at Chapel and buried at Chapel.

Elizabeth the younger daughter of the said Godfrey born 11 Sept 1818 and married William Talent Webster of the Isle of Man 8 August 1861 at Chapel. WT Webster died at Douglas 4 July 1871 and his widow on 17 June 1875 at Douglas and both buried at Kirk Braddan cemetery.

50. 10 March 189410 

Will of HC Renshaw

I, Henry Constantine Renshaw of Bank Hall declare this to be my last will and testament.

I appoint my two sons, James Renshaw and William Henry Renshaw, to be the executors and trustees.

I give all my wines, liquors and consumable stores and provisions to my son Arthur Renshaw absolutely.

I authorise my said son Arthur Renshaw to select out of my plate, linen, china, glass and household furniture such articles as he may desire to have to furnish a house to the value of £4,000.

I bequeath all my real and personal estate upon trust that my trustees shall sell and convert into money and pay the pecuniary legacies as to £6,000 for my daughter Agnes the wife of Charlie Henry Bayley and the said Charles Henry Bayley and their issue and as to the remainder of my moneys in trust for my four sons, James Renshaw, William Henry Renshaw, Arthur Renshaw and Edward Renshaw in equal shares but my trustees shall take into account and shall debit my sons with the following sums: James Renshaw with £16,970, William Henry Renshaw with £24,498, Arthur Renshaw with £12,950 and Edward Renshaw with £11,498 which amounts I estimate to be the aggregate value of the moneys or property already received from me in my lifetime and to be received by them respectively under the will of my late father and the will of the late Jonathan Constantine.

And part of my personal estate consists of about £28,000 owing to me by the firm of William Renshaw and Company Limited of the Broughton Flax Mills, Lower Broughton, Manchester now I that subject to the company paying off such money within a period of 14 years from the 29 September 1900 by annual instalments with interest at the rate of £4.50 per cent per annum it being my wish and intention that the said sum of £28,000 or such other sum as aforesaid shall be divided amongst my said sons rateably in the proportions in which they shall be respectively entitled to my residuary estate.

The legacy of £6,000 for my daughter Agnes Bailey and the Charles Henry Bailey and their children is upon trust to pay the income to my daughter during her life and after her decease to her husband and after the death of the survivor of them in trust for all the children of my daughter.

Of the share of my residuary estate bequeathed to Edward Renshaw £10,000 upon trust to pay the income to [him] during his life and after his decease in trust for his children and as to the remainder of the share of my residuary estate bequeathed in trust for Edward I direct my trustees to hold the same in trust for my son absolutely.

And I further declare that my trustees may postpone the sale and conversion of my real and personal estate or any  part thereof for so long as they shall think fit.

Fourth April 1895 probate granted to James Renshaw 

 

51. 1895

Sale particulars

[Extracts in Bellhouse 2006 not repeated here]

The dining room wall panels by T Armstrong and Randolph Caldecott can be purchased separately.

Owlgreave is listed as one farm of 103a in the occupation of John Royle under a ten year lease expiring 1899.

Part of the Bole Hills are in occupation of William Royle under a ten year lease expiring 1899.

Down Lee in occupation of Jas T Barlow as yearly tenant.

52. probably c 1895/6 

To let or sale notice  

Hall and lodge for rent at £300p.a.

Mentions that the Armstrong and Caldecott panels have been removed for safekeeping and that the lodge is in demand from tenants from Manchester and elsewhere as a summer residence.

53. 1919-21

Correspondence re footpaths

November 19 1919 TC Talent-Bateman to Secretary of War stating that Bank Hall was taken over by the war office a few years ago as an internment place and camp for German prisoners of war.  The camp was broken up and the prisoners removed a few weeks ago.  During the internment period the roads and paths through the estate were closed. He asks that the paths now be re-opened.

54. 8 August 1951

Sale of Down Lea

Sale to Peter Barlow of Down Lea of 34 acres by the executors of Reginald Scott for £2,850.

55. 6 October 1953

Sale of Bank Hall

Sale to Asher Locker of Bank Hall by Michael Scott for £4,250.

56. 11 November 1954

Sale of Owlgreave

Sale to AP Barratt of Owlgreave of 103 acres by Michael Scott for £4,750.

57. 1957 Abstract of title of Asher Locker to Bank Hall

10 May 1918 Charles Joseph Wills of Westcott House, Dorking sold to Reginald Scott of Whitestones, Chapel for £12,500.

Wills purchased Bank Hall, Owlgreave and Downlea on 13 April 1897. At that time Bank Hall Lodge was in the occupation of WH Collett; Top Lodge in the occupation of Dr John English Harburn as monthly tenant and Bank Hall Farm of 86a in occupation of Henry Oswald Earle Martin as yearly tenant.

30 November 1923 Reginald Scott made a will and appointed the public trustee as his executor. He died at Bank Hall 22 December 1947. His will left his estate to his wife Flora for life and then to his sons equally. Flora died 4 March 1951 in Blackpool.

David Scott took Bank Hall Lodge and grounds valued at £3,000 and Michael took Bank Hall at £12,350.

6 October 1953 Michael Scott sold to Asher Locker.

58. 1861 Abstract of title of SF Webster to Bank Hall Estate 

Refers to document 22 above, noting that the release cannot be found.

Refers to the will of Samuel Frith of Chamber of 6 November 1773 (noting that this abstract of title only relates to certain property and that the original will at Lichfield is dilapidated and cannot be fully deciphered) by which he left to Samuel Frith, son of his late nephew John Frith, all his property in Brownside and Chinley and the residue of his estate not otherwise disposed of.

Refers to documents 28, 30, 31, 32, 34, 35, 36, 37, 42 above.

59. 1864 Abstract of title of SF Webster to Bank Hall and other estates

Bank Hall and Bank

Recites 58 above and 41

24 August 1861 – declaration of Adam Fox of Martinside that he is ninety three years old and has known the estate for upwards of eighty years. He then refers to the exchange of lands referred to in document 28 and notes that the Heys had formerly formed part of the Ridge estate and that Samuel Frith divided the Heys into several fields.

Downlee Estate

30 and 31 October 1775 – lease and release between Robert Bagshaw of Catherine Hall, Cambridge, gentleman and Samuel Frith.

Reciting that by indentures of lease and release of 18 and 19 December 1772 between Robert Bagshaw, then of Tideswell, and Geo Taylor of Barmer within Peake Forest, yeoman, that Bagshaw sold to Taylor the messuage of Down Lee then in the occupation of Robert Lomas together with fields called the Green Field, Green Field end, Bell Lane, Great Hob Hill, Little Hob Hill, Harry Croft, the Hole, the Wood, Down Lee field and three other crofts.

The sale was subject to a right of redemption of the premises on payment of £200 (interest at 4.5%) and on 21 October 1773 Bagshaw increased the mortgage by a further £100.

 By other indentures of lease and release of 22 and 23 December 1774 between Taylor, Bagshaw and Samuel Frith it was noted that default had been made by Bagshaw and that he owed Taylor £405.  Bagshawe had asked Samuel Frith to lend him that sum, and a further £50. Frith paid Taylor the amount owed to him and £50 to Bagshaw and Bagshaw sold Down Lee to Frith with the right of redemption.

Default occurred with Bagshaw owing £471 and Samuel agreed to buy Down Lee for £1100 subject to the dower of Robert’s mother Ellen.

21 and 22 June 1826Ellen Bagshaw, widow and relict of Robert Bagshaw of Rainow, yeoman, sells her dower to Samuel Frith for £50.

The Owlgreaves

21 December 1751 – indenture between Robert Holdgate of Chapel, yeoman, and Hannah his wife and Francis Vernon of Fernileigh, yeoman and Edward Vernon of Smalldale, yeoman.

Recites that John Vernon late of Smalldale yeoman in his last sickness before he died declared that £300 of his estate should be placed out at interest for the benefit of his sister Hannah, wife of Robert Holdgate, and that interest at the rate of 4% should be paid to her until her eldest child reached the age of twenty one and that a moiety of the £300 should be paid to each of her children.  Francis Vernon is the administrator of John Vernon’s will.

Robert and Hannah agreed to take the £300 on trust and Robert took the £300 secured by a mortgage on the cottage or tenement called Upper Owlgreaves (in Robert’s possession) with related pieces of land, the Wood, Ashton Hay, Brocklehurst Croft, Two Crofts, Great Corn Hay, Middlemost Corn Hay, Little Corn Hay, Cow Hay and Cow Ends, altogether about 15 Cheshire acres.

22 and 23 October 1776Joseph Holdgate of Smalldale, yeoman, eldest son and devisee of Robert Holdgate deceased and Margaret Holdgate of Oldgreave, spinster one of daughters and devisees on the one part; Edward Vernon; Samuel Frith and Jno Gee of Chapel, clerk.

Francis Vernon has since died so the £300 and interest is due to Edward VernonRobert Holdgate’s will of 16 May 1772 gave Margaret for life the house he then dwelt in and then to Joseph HoldgateJoseph was also left all his other lands.

Interest has been paid.  Samuel Frith has contracted with Joseph and Margaret  Holdgate to purchase for £1,375 in total, including settling the mortgage, the cottages at Oldgreave with Bank Acre; Broad Bank with the house and barn thereon, Birchen Brow, the Fold, Calf Croft and the lower barn thereon, Little Meadows, Alder Dole, Great Meadow, Long Field, the Wiche, the Wood, Brocklehurst Croft, Ashton Hay, yard and gardens and the lanes, Great Croft, Little Croft, First Cows End, Middle Cow End, Farther Cow End, Cow Hay, Sapling Field, Little Corn Hay, Greta Corn Hay and the Marsh lands late in the possession of Arnold Dane or Francis (sic) or Margaret Holdgate.

As to the Lower Owlgreaves

By indenture of lease and release of 3 and 4 April 1776 between Josiah Bradbury of Lower Owlgreaves, yeoman and Martha his wife and Samuel Frith.  In consideration of £1,000 Bradbury sold to Frith the messsuage at Lower Owlgreave and the Hollins, Marsh lands, Urchin Park, Headland, Pearl Meadow, Oak Lee, Wicken Dole (formerly part of Oak Lee), Mean Meadow, Great Tinker Acre, Little Tinker Acre, Round Meadow, Cherry Field, Kill Croft, Hen Croft, Bank and Well Field subject to the life estate of Mary Cooper of a chamber of part of the outbuildings called Ralphs Chambers and a small garden called the Lower Garden. 

60. 1897 Abstract of title of HC Renshaw deceased to Bank Hall estate

Refers to document 45 above and includes a copy of the estate plan attached to that document. 

Refers to document 46, 47.

12 December 1872 HC Renhsaw bought 29p off LNWR (near Owlgreave).

28 July 1888 between HC Renshaw, John Critchlow and his mortgagor Hon Emily Wingfield Griffiths and LNWR to create a footpath six feet wide between the railway bridge at Owlgreave and the railway bridge near Chapel station and to extinguish the old path from Owlgreave to Downlee.

25 March 1889 Renshaw leased to William Royle, farmer, the Bull Hills or Great Bold Hills of 8a 2r 30p for ten years at £66 p.a.

Also a separate lease of Higher and Lower Owlgreaves plus the Brows (formerly in occupation of Harriet Turner and then her representatives) for £125 p.a. for ten years. Proviso that Renshaw should make certain alterations and additions to the farm buildings.

23 January 1890 Renshaw allows Joseph George Sington, whilst tenant of The Ridge to use his carriageway form the station and past Down Lee Barn.

7 May 1892 Renshaw lets to James Thomas Barlow, farmer and innkeeper, Down Lee Farm of 35 a late in the occupation of Harriet Turner and then her representatives on annual lease for £55 p.a.

Refers to document 50 above and that on 19 March 1895 WH Renshaw declined to act as executor.

27 June 1895 between James Renshaw and John Royle mentioning that five fields  intended to be included in 25 March 1889 lease had been inadvertently omitted numbered 1-5 and known as Bluefields Wood and Great Bluefields.

61. 1918 Continuation abstract of title of CJ Wills to Bank Hall estate

13 April 1897 –Indenture between James Renshaw of Salford, flax spinner, Richard Broadhurst of Bayswater, gent. and CJ Wills of Manchester, contractor. Wills paid Renshaw £1,000 and paid Broadhurst the outstanding mortgage of £10,000 to acquire Bank Hall, Owlgreave and Down Lee. (estate map attached)

Appendix 2 – Bank Hall Lodge

Bank Hall Lodge was built at the time that HC Renshaw rebuilt Bank Hall, in about 1873. [It has since been extended by a garage, with rooms above added in 1951 and an extension to the lounge in 1955]  Built of rough finished stone and a slate roof the house has black and white half timbered gables, part tile clad and part with decorated plasterwork. There is a fine brick chimney stack and distinctive Nesfield castellated gutterheads. [Andrew Saint, William Eden Nesfield, in “A Deuce of An Uproar: William Eden Nesfield’s letters to the rector of Radwinter in Essex”, 1988, p17]  It was already being described as picturesque in 1895. Within the grounds are the remains of a water driven saw-mill and many fine trees, including a wellingtonia.

Its architect was WE Nesfield, who, among many larger houses, was also responsible for lodges at Broadlands, Kew and Regent’s Park [Berkeley Creswell, William Eden Nesfield 1835-1888 an Impression, in Architectural Review pt 2 1897, p23-32].

Nesfield was, for a time in partnership with Norman Shaw, and also with his father, WA Nesfield, the landscape architect whose works include Kew Gardens.

In the 1881 and 1891 censuses the Lodge was occupied by Renshaw’s butlers [1881George William Elder; 1891Edward Berridge] but, following his death, it was let out.

One of the first tenants, from 1896 to 1904, was Raymond Unwin, the architect, who, with his brother in law Barry Parker, established a practice in Buxton. They were responsible for England’s first garden city, Letchworth, before Unwin moved on as the architect of Hampstead Garden City. Unwin later went on to be President of RIBA and was a major influence on town planning and housing design in Britain.

The lodge was extended by the Scotts in the 1950’s with the building of a housekeeper`s annex and living room extension.

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Baslow Glebe Tithe Land

10 October 1889

Approval of sale

By Board of Agriculture for not less than £1700 of @41 acres plus common rights on Combs Moss. Map attached of plots. 

November 1889

Queen Anne’s Bounty solicitors charges in connection with deducing title

7 November 1889

Conveyance to Henry Shaw (includes plan)

From Jeremiah Stockdale vicar of Baslow to Shaw. Subject to continuing annual payments of 10s each to poor of Chapel and poor of Peak Forest.

 

Bole Hills

Further abstract Bole Hills and small plot of land at Down Lee

31 January 1787 indenture of release between Anthony Bellott of Ollerenshaw yeoman grandson and devisee of Anthony Bellott decd and Sarah his wife and Samuel Frith (see Lumb deeds)

19 December 1853 between Edward Roe of Sutton; Samuel Bradburn of Upper Fold in Chinley draper; Godfrey Webster. By mortgage 23 February 1850 between Bradburn and Roe the plot of land described (with other lands) was appointed to Roe to secure £600 and for a further £250 on 29 May 1851. Bradburn agreed to sell to Webster for 5s and Roe concurred a plot of land at or near Marsh Green in the occupation of Webster bounded on the north side being 26 yards in length land belonging to Webster, on the west side of 41 yards by land belonging to Webster, south side 22 yards belonging to Webster and east side of 41 yards by Bradburn land in total 984 square yards. The land was subject to a lease for 930 years to the late Samuel Frith. [note in margin –the object of the purchase of this small plot of land appears to have been to make the carriage drive more direct].

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The Hurst or Hazelhurst Farm

16 March 1922

Bramwell to Agnes Ellen Lomas (with map)

Bramwell bought off AP Shaw 11 November 1919. Bramwell sells to Lomas for £1635. Lomas is the current occupier of the farm of 92a.

Schedule of prior deeds similar to 31 October 1928 re Whitehall

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Haylee rents

25 June 1687 

Thomas Eyre to John Shallcross

Feoffment of 100 acres in Fairfield and out of 100 acres in Shallcross and Fernileigh under yearly rent of £1 13s 4d

Thomas Eyre of Grays Inn and John Shalcross of Shalcross son and heir of the late Richard Shalcross who was the son and heir of the late John Shalcross.

By deed 3 May 20 Charles II between Eyre and Richard Shalcross. In consideration that John Shallcross discharges Eyre from his obligations to Richard Shallcross. Eyre assigns the commons and wastes in return for the discharge of £200 ???/ on the land and for the fee farm rent the common in Fairfield of 100a forest measure set forth as the kings part and bounded from Brown Edge before the Rennfield head and before Fairflield Green to the ancient ???/ land lyeing there taking equal breadth ???????????????? in the limestone

And 100a of forest measure of the commons in Shalcross or Fernileigh set forth as the kings part and bounded as follows: Fernileigh Clough lying on the south side a piece of ???? land called Overhill to the north and Fernileigh on the west and Within Lach being on the east. These lands conveyed 4 March 20 Ch II by letters patent to Eyre. Shalcross to wall dith and fence the land within two years. Eyre appoints William Brock of Shalcross and Alex Brassington of Tideswell his attorneys.

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25 January 1887

Abstract of appointment of a new trustee 

Richard and Harriot Hewetson appointed EC Brooksbank to be a trustee following death of EC York. The Trust funds consisted of, inter alia, certain chief rents amounting to £36 payable as to £19 from hereditaments in Haylee Marsh, Shalcross, Fernileigh and Fairfield and £17 by Edward Marsland.

Appended note of 12 Sept 1921 that RP Hewetson appointed a trustee. £27 11s 4d chief rents on the schedule payable £10 11s 4d and £17 Marsland

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16 March 1922

Bramwell to Lomas

Samuel Bramwell of London and Agnes Eileen Lomas of Hurst Farm, widow.

Refers to indenture of 3 January 1686  and the 93a of Haylee Marsh and Edge  and another 207a and the rent of £15 6s 8d which is now paid by Bramwell.

And by an indenture of 16 March 1922 between Bramwell and Lomas The Hurst or Hazelhurst farm in the occupation of Lomas of 92a is granted to Lomas’s use. Two fields on that grant formed part of the common referred to in the indenture of 3 January 1686 and Bramwell agrees to continue to pay the rent. 

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12 July 1922

Consent to the transaction from RP Hewetson

Which states the rents are held by the trustees of the Richard and late Mrs Hewetson’s marriage settlement

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13 July 1922

Brooksbank to Bramwell

Sir Edward Clitherow Brooksbank of Healaugh Manor formerly Healaugh Old Hall in York, Richard Hewetson of Boston Spa and Samuel Bramwell JP of Whitehall.

By an indenture of feoffment of 3 January 1686 between Thomas Eyre and John Shallcross a piece of common in Chapel called Haylee Marsh and Haylee Edge of 93a of forest measure and certain other pieces of common belonging to Shallcross and Fernileigh of 207a 1r 37p forest measure were granted to John Shallcrosss subject to the payment of the yearly rent of £15 6s 8d.

By an indenture of feoffment 2 July 1716 between John Shallcross and Thomas Bagshaw certain parts of the land at Haylee Marsh and Haylee Edge were granted to Thomas Bagshaw charged with the yearly rent four pounds (part of the £15 6s 8d).

By an indenture of feoffment 22 June 1687 between Thomas Eyre and John Shallcross certain pieces of common ground within Shallcross and Ferneleigh containing 100a forest measure was granted to Shallcross subject to a rent of £1 13s 4d.

By various acts and events and ultimately by the indenture in the schedule both yearly rents have become vested in Brooksbank upon trust by Hewetson to sell as mentioned in the indenture of 3 February 1880 specified in the schedule.

By an indenture of 11 November 1919 made between Arthur Pilkington Shaw and Samuel Bramwell portions of the lands charged with the rents have become vested in Bramwell subject to the payment of the rents but with the benefit of the rent of £4.

Brooksbank has agreed to sell the rents to Bramwell for £357 so that they are extinguished.

Schedule: 3 February 1880 – Grant between Hewetson, Harriot York, and Edward Christopher York and Edward Brooksbank

25 January 1887 – indenture between Hewetson and Harriot his wife and Edward Brooksbank

25 January 1887 – indenture (endorsed on the first schedule indenture) between Edward Brooksbank and Edward Clitherow Brooksbank

13 July 1922 – Abstract of Title of Brocksbank

EC Brocksbank as trustee of the settlement made on the marriage of R Hewetson and the late Mrs Hewetson to chief rents of £17

3 Feb 1880 between Richard Hewetson; Harriot York and Edward Christopher York of Hutton Hall and Edward Brooksbank of Healaugh Old Hall. Marriage agreed upon between Hewtson and York. York entitled to various chief rents conveyed to EC York and Brooksbank under trust and conveyed under trust the chief rents of £15 6s 8d and £1 13s 4d owed by Marsland

25 January 1887 endorsed on 1880 deed, between Edward Brooksbank of Healaugh Manor and EC Brooksbank of Healaugh Old Hall. EC York died 14 December 1885. By indenture EC Brooksbank became a trustee. (see below)

2 December 1916  Edward Brooksbank died.

25 January 1920 Harriot Hewteson died

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Shireoaks

Privately held

20 July 1607 Thomas Bagshawe to Charles Kyrke – Shireoaks 

Between Thomas Bagshawe of the Ridge, gent and Charles Kyrke of Shyreokes, yeoman

Bagshawe, in consideration of the sum of £170 paid by Kyrke sold all that messuage or tenement of Shyreokes now or late in the tenure or occupation of Kyrke and lying or being in the parishes of Chappell in le frith and Glossop or in either of them with the yearly rents and service reserved payable to Henry Leigh Esq.(whose inheritance the premises late were).

No claim to be made by or under a lease made between Henry Leigh of Egington to Mathew Smale of Wadington in Middlesex esq. and Robert Hope of Burnaston in Derby gent by indenture of 19 November last between Henry Leigh on the first part; Mathew Smale and Robert Hope on the second part and Thomas Bagshaw on the third part

(refers to Thomas Bagshaw’s wife Elizabeth)

Thomas Bagshaw appoints Robert Bagshaw and George Lowe the younger as his attorneys to deliver possession.

Witnesssed by Nicholas Bagshawe; ////////; Henry Bradshaw; Thomas Barber; George Lowe; Raphe Cresswell; Richard Barber; Arnold Kyrke; Robt Lunstride?; Thomas Kyrke junior; John Buxton

Witness that possession was delivered to Charles Kyrke by George ? Thornfield; Nicholas Cresswell; Thomas Bodom?; Thomas Barber; John Lingard; Arnold Kyrke; Robert/////; Raphe Cresswell; Thomas Kyrke; Thomas /////; Edward Cresswell; Richard Barber his mark; Richard Shore his mark; William Downes his mark; John Oliver his mark; John Buxton his mark and many others

John Rylands University Library

BAG/13/3/56 27 February 1752 Lease for 21 years by Samuel Kirk of Whitehough gent to John Walker of Shireoaks husbandman of a messuage with appurtenances at Shireoaks and Samuel’s right of commoning on a waste called Colborn and a pew in Chapel church

Also includes ?Bretland Carr. Appears that Walker is already the tenant. Rent of £46p.a. Kirk to keep buildings in repair. Walker to set out two hundred loads of lime a year on the land.

BAG/13/3/57 21 and 22 November 1753 Conveyance by Samuel Kirk of Whitehough and Jasper Frith of Bank Hall gent by the direction of Anthony Ward of Ashton under Line plumber to Thomas Kirke of Shireoaks yeoman of a parcel of common on Brownside common called The Grain

a) Indenture between Elizabeth Ward of Brownside, Anthony Ward of Ashton, Samuel Kirk and Jasper Frith of Bank Hall and Thomas Kirk of Shireoaks. For five shillings paid by Kirke the piece of land on or near Brownside Common called The Grain heretofore in the occupation of George Ward the Elder and now of William Carrington of 20a and allotted upon the enclosure of Brownside Common to GW the Elder as his proportion. For one year for the purpose of a grant and release.(signed by Jasper)

b) Indenture between the same parties. Elizabeth is described as widow and relict of George Ward yeoman of Brownside. Anthony Ward is brother and heir of George Ward late of Brownside yeoman deceased who was eldest son of George Ward.

George Ward the father is lately dead and left everything to his son George Ward deceased who died very soon without issue. Anthony’s wife is Mary. Anthony inherited from his brother. Two years ago (1751) Anthony conveyed premises to Nicholas Kirke of Laneside on trust. Kirke declined to act but Samuel Kirke and Jasper Frith acted. By articles of agreement by Henry Ward plumber of the Wash acting on behalf of Anthony the land is sold for £122 10s.

BAG/13/3/58 19 and 20 December 1753 Conveyance by Thomas Kirk to Samuel Frith of the Chamber of The Grain

a) Sam is described as gent. Lease with the intention to sell.

b) Samuel pays £94 1s for the 20a of the Grain

BAG/13/3/59 16 August 1753 Articles of agreement between Henry Ward of the Wash plumber and Thomas Kirk of Shireoaks for conveyance to Kirk of the Grain

See 13/3/57 for details but Ward binds himself to pay £245 if he doesn’t perform as does Kirk.

BAG/13/3/465 6 November 1773 Extract from Samuel Frith’s will respecting a bequest to the poor of Peak Forest

I give and bequeath unto the poor of Peak Forest 20s on St Thomas day for ever to be paid from a piece of common land lying in Brownside which I purchased of Thos Kirk of Shireoaks.

BAG/13/3/60 10 January 1777 Bond of John Walker of Shireoaks farmer to Samuel Frith of Bank Hall gent for performance of covenants

Bond for £200. Frith has lately purchased Shireoaks from Rev William Plumbe (Walker holding a lease from Plumbe with three or four years unexpired). Frith wants to have the estate into his own care for making improvements. Walker gets £52 10s for delivering his lease to Frith and promising to quit at next Lady Day. Bond refers to messuage, dwelling houses and buildings.

BAG/13/3/61 7 April 1777 Survey of Shireoaks

A list of fields and acreages. 147a plus the Grain added in pencil of 58a

Carr Fields; Farther Wood: Nearer Woof; Stacks; Calf Croft; Common Piece; Moorway Backwood; Further and Nearer Moorway Back; Upper Fields; Moorway Back Top; Folds etc; Garden, all in Brownside; in Chinley, Lower Green; Bretland Carr; Further Carr; Carr Tops; Lane leading to the common; Lower and Upper Bank Top; Marsh Meadow; [illeg]wood Park; [illeg] Marsh; Great Clough; Little Field; Upper Greene

BAG/13/3/62 9 and 10 April 1777 Conveyance by William Tatton of Withinshaw esq by appointment of William Plumbe of Liverpool rector of Aughton Lancs and Catherine his wife (only daughter and heir of the late Samuel Kirk of Whitehough) to Samuel Frith of Bank Hall of Shireoaks, all pews in parish churches of Glossop and Chapel belonging to the occupiers of the same and parcels of land lying at Brownside and within the herbage of Mainston Field otherwise Chinley and parcels of land on Colborne and common of pasture in Chapel

a) Lease for a year of the messuage of Shireoaks (now divided into two dwellings) including the Over Stack; the Lower Stack; the Stackyard; the nearer wood; the further wood; the trees wood; the middle piece; the over field; the corn field and the croft and also those closes in herbage of Chinley of 20a Cheshire measure viz Lower Green; the Carr; the Over Green; the Over Field; Bank Top; Moory Top; Middlemost Moory Hay Top; Middlemost Moory Bank; lowest Moory Hay; Moory Hay Wood; Marsh; Further Marsh; Little Field and the Great Clough. Altogether @120a.

Also the Carr, otherwise Bretlands Carr of two closes of 10a near to Shireoaks and lately held by Plumbe which abuts eastwards to a small water in Chinley called Carbrook and adjoining to the land of Mr Fenton and on all other sides to lands belonging to Samuel Kirk deceased who had purchased them from Samuel Frith of Peak Forest deceased gentleman. And also New Piece of 22a 21p in Chinley and also common land on Colborne lying between Rough Clough Head and Berry Clough of 14a being the part allotted to Henry Ward plumber called the Bowers Crofts and sold by him to Henry Kirke; and 60 cheshire acres on Colborne between Weston Clough and Berry Clough and an adjoining piece of 30a cheshire, all of which have usually been enjoyed with Shireoaks.

b) missing but presumably the conveyance

BAG/13/3/226 20 August 1778 Articles of agreement between Samuel Frith of Bank esq and Samuel Bagshaw of Ford for getting peat on waste land called Coobourne

Bagshaw desires to burn peat to improve his estates from the ashes has requested Samuel Frith to give him the privilege of getting peat from a tract of waste called Coobourne. Samuel consents to this for 6d p.a. for 99 years for any quantity upon such parts of Coobourne in the possession of Frith. In order for the pasturage of the premises be preserved or improved Bagshaw will dig up the soil on the surface whenever it is dug into for getting peat, to a depth of at least six inches, and lay it in heaps and then spread it on areas broken up in searching for peat.

BAG/13/3/63 25 March 1784 Lease for 21 years by Samuel Frith to John Bower of Chinley yeoman of Shireoaks

Rent of £63. 147a 8p. Reserves the timber and any mining to Frith.

BAG/13/3/64 15 and 16 June 1820 Mortgage and assignment by Samuel Frith to Stephen Bellot of Combs of an estate at Shireoaks

a) Lease for a year. Messuage divided into two dwellings of Shireoakes. Lands as in 62a above in tenancy of Thomas Lomas. Witnessed by Wm Barnes.

b) Mortgage for £1600 and assignment from Jonathan Taylor of Barmoor yeoman and Thomas Taylor of the same place yeoman  and Adam Fox of Martinside yeoman of residue of a term of 400 years affecting the freehold interest. Refers to an indenture of 12 March 1772 from Plumbe to Howard and Threlfall to secure £500 which was not paid (Howard and Threlfall may have been referred to in 62 above) and a term of 400 years. The term is now to be held by Fox as trustee for Bellot in succession to the Taylors.

BAG/13/3/65 13 and 14 April 1823 Further mortgage respecting the same and mortgage of a piece of land called The Grain

a) Lease for one year of the Grain in occupation of Thomas Lomas of 20a

b) £860. The Grain added to the mortgage

BAG/13/3/66 1816-38 Miscellaneous papers in a case respecting Shireoaks and The Grain [actually solicitors correspondence prior to sale]

Valuation Oct 1837 by Adam Fox. Lomas is tenant of Frith’s land of 205a enclosed; moorland 60a cheshire and 40a. Rent £125. 30 years value £4014.

5 Jan 1838 letter from Webster saying disposed to sell to John Watson solr of Sheffield. Frith has taken two valuations from local men and averaged at £4060. Greatest part of common is leasehold from Bagshaw. Webster’s attorney is Barnes of Manchester.

20 Feb 1838 letter from Barnes to Watson. Greaves has agreed to buy.

13 March 1838 letter from Barnes to Watson. John Frith’s will not yet proved but Webster intends to do so in next few months.

10 May 1838 letter from Barnes to Watson. From the will of Samuel Frith of Chamber the large field or enclosure called the Grain of 58a was by his will charged with the payment of £1 to the poor of Peak Forest.

Webster will have a clear income of £400 from the real estates of John Frith without including Bank Hall and its land, Shireoaks, Upper Fold and Kings Arms Inn.

21 May 1838 letter from Mander of Lincoln’s Inn  respecting title. Refers to a marriage settlement of 1769 affecting the estate [not a defect in title] [a later letter refers to the Plumbe marriage settlement of this date, vested in the Tattons]

7 June 1838 letter from Barnes to Watson. Webster doesn’t want to make an investment to secure the Mary Heeley legacy. Will Greaves accept a bond of indemnity against incumbrance?

31 July 1838 letter from Barnes to Watson. Refers to Withington and Prout releases.

7 August 1838 letter from Barnes to Watson. Refers to death certificates of John Frith, Mary Steel, Martha Dalton, Mary Dalton, Millesant Dalton annuitants under the will of Sam Frith of Chamber.

21 May 1816 copy will of Stephen Bellot. Refers to Grace Lomas wife of Henry Lomas of Allstone Lee and leaves her £116

25 March 1830 (copy of 1838) legatees of Sam Frith’s will to John Frith release of legacies. Hannah Dixon of Manchester widow, Richard Roe of Manchester gent, John Frith the younger of Bank Hall gent.

14 Sept 1829 (copy of 1838) legatees of Sam Frith’s will to John Frith release of legacies. Rev John Wakefield of Derby and Sophia his wife; Thomas Olivic Prout of St Agnes, Truro and Martha his wife; Samuel Webster of Duffield; Godfrey Webster; John Webster

1 May 1835 – copy will of Anthony Bellot of Black Brook

19 July 1838 declaration of Thomas Lomas. I Thomas Lomas of Shireoaks farmer aged 72 have lived here for 33 years. Says Shireoaks has a farmhouse. 205 a enclosed; 90a moor; 90a leasehold moor. Lists the fields.

March 1838 additional abstract of title of Shireoaks. Refers to John Frith’s will and selling Shireoaks etc etc. A marginal note by ‘WB’ says expects sales at market value to realise more than the debts.

6 September 1838 – bond of indemnity by Webster to Greaves re incumbrances created by Sam and John Frith’s wills. For £2000.

1838 – Abstract of title of Shireoaks. Starts in 1724 with Geo Kirke of Whitehough transferring in trust to Samuel Kirk his heir apparent. Shireoaks a capital messuage lived in by John Kirke with six barns, a stable, four shippons [lots of pages not looked at]

A Bellot family tree (two families, Brookhouses and Castle Naze)

List of judgements against Sam Frith, John Frith and Godfrey Webster:

Vaws 1826 £150

Hoyland £100

Edward Fletcher £600

1827 Faber £300

Hoyland £700

Sampson £150

And several others

But are these CELF Friths or just cases and names from registers (Middlesex; Yorkshire; Staffs; Derbys; Somerset)?

Also a paper (extract from memorial of chancery)? re John Frith of Knightsbridge and Martha Rose a spinster of Piccadilly referring to £500 (26 August) (annuity of £400?) and £1000 costs in 183320 and 21 August

BAG/13/3/67 6 September 1838 Release and assignment from Godfrey Webster and others to Henry Marwood Greaves of Hesley, Notts, esq respecting the same  

Release of Shireoaks and the Grain and a leasehold piece of ground in Brownside. £4060. The mortgages of £1600 and £860 are outstanding. Webster gets the net amount of £1600.

Refers to 14 Sept 1829; 25 March 1830 and 23 June 1838 indentures of legatees which we may have elsewhere but different dates.

Lease for a year 5 September 1838. Godfrey Webster; Samuel Jackson farmer of Brook Houses and Mary his wife (only child and heir at law of Anthony Bellot of Moss Side Manchester cousin and heir of Stephen Bellot the younger of Combs who was the only son and heir of Stephen Bellot) to Greaves. The messuage (formerly divided into two dwellings of Shireoaks) and all lands in 62 including the Grain.

An undertaking by Godfrey to give up a lease relating to Shireoaks. Land from Wheston Clough Head to Hen Knowl [between Bagshaw and Kirke of 30a] held under lease 25 March 1714 but is mislaid. Will be delivered when found.

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Whitehall

1 August 1849

Several pieces of land

Edward Reddish of Stockport; William Pass of Altrincham; Edward Hawell of Normanton upon Trent who survived John Walmsley his co-trustee; Joseph Mason of Hulme; Samuel Smith of Langley smallwear manufacturer.

By indenture of statutory release of 4 August 1845 between Pass; Hawell and Walmsley; and Reddish the pieces of land described, were, with other parcels, for £1560 advanced by Hawell and Walmsley to Pass conveyed to Reddish.

£78 owing and Reddish put up for auction by Nathaniel Pass at Royal Oak in Chapel last March. Smith purchased lot 2 for £125 and Mason lots 1and 3. Mason got the deeds as the largest purchaser therefore this deed is warranted as good title and deeds in schedule can be produced. Smith purchased the two pieces of common land formerly part of Greave House estate of 9a 33p now enclosed and a piece 9a 33p unenclosed once in the occupation of William Pass and now of James Atkin as tenant which were with other lands in lot 1 allotted to Pass on a partition of the Greave House estate.

Schedule: 10 December 1787 – Indenture between Henry Booth the elder of Marple yeoman and Susanna his wife, John Booth of Arden, Stockport, miller, Henry Booth the younger of Marple husbandman, James Booth of Marple, hatter, Mary Ardern of Disley Hanley and Sarah Booth of Marple on the one part and Stephen Bellott the younger, gent.

21 and 22 October 1805 – lease and release between John Booth eldest sons and heir of Susanna Booth and Hannah his wife; James Lowe of London; James Milne of Stockport gent

5 and 6 April 1790 – lease and release between Joseph Hadfield of Mellor cotton manufacturer and John Heginbotham of Mellor, yeoman

28 and 29 March 1811 – lease and release between Lettice Hadfield and Mary Pott  and William Pass

6 and 7 May 1812 – lease and release between Stephen Bellott and Mary his wife; William Pass; and Henry Kirk gent of Eaves

Six inch map of Whitehall estate - with some field numbers. No date but prepared in connection with a sale?

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28 March 1884

Two pieces of land (includes plan)

George Nott of Kingsbourne Green near Luton farmer; Anne Smith and Mary Lingard Fountain Smith of Sutton; and Henry Shaw, Samuel Smith late of Langley smallwear manufacturer dec’d was seized of the two pieces of land he left by will to AB Jackson and Charles Ball as trustees for sale. His son William Isaac Bradbury Smith to get one quarter and the other three quarters to be invested for his three daughters.

Smith died 7 December 1849. Ball died 20 April 1867. By indenture 26 January 1870 between Anthony Bellott Jackson of Rye Flatt and WIB Smith of Langley smallwear manufacturer and Nott, Smith and Nott became trustees in place of Jackson. Smith died 1 January 1884 and the three daughters were Anne Smith, Sarah Smith who married Nott 21 February 1868 and died 4 January 1880 and Mary Lingard Fountain Smith.

Nott as surviving trustee sells the two pieces of land for £200 formerly part of the Greave House estate, part of a common piece on Combs Moss now enclosed of 9a 33p and also the remainder of the common piece on Combs Moss unenclosed of 9a 33p which lands were once in the possession of William Pass and now or late in occupation of James Aitken as tenant and were allotted to Pass on a partition of the Greave House estate  

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16 November 1891

Mortgage

Henry Shaw to Sarah Maria Holmes and Emma Josephine Holmes of Buxton for receipt of £2000 at 3.75%. Security given on 45a in occupation of Thomas Mellor as tenant described in a deed of 7 November 1889 made between Rev Stockdale of Baslow and Shaw and also Alston Lee in occupation of George Heathcote as tenant described in a conveyance of 16 November 1891 between Ledley and Shaw.

Also includes indenture of 25 March 1911. AP Shaw has satisfied the mortgage.

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24 September 1894

Telegraph works

Letter to Captain Shaw to enable fixing of stays on the old coach road

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25 March 1895

Jowett and Shaw agreement to draw water (with plan)

Jowett of Mellor owns Hell Holes (no 2599) adjoining Shaws field (no 2605). Shaw wants to draw water from a spring in Hell Holes to supply White Hall by laying pipes.

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1899 plan of Hell Holes of 53a

20 July 1900

Disentailing deed

Arthur Pilkington Shaw of Whitehall, Henry Alfred Hubbersty of Burbage and Frank Drewery of Buxton.

By indenture 13 October 1899 Henry Shaw and his son AP Shaw granted property to Henry for life and afterwards to AP in tail. Henry died 28 May 1900 and buried at Taxal. AP wants to bar the entail to vest properties in himself in fee simple. AP grants to Hubbersty and Drewery the property in the townships of Fernileigh and Hartington Upper Quarter comprised in the indenture subject to the mortgage debts detailed in the indenture to the use of AP Shaw

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1901 – Certificate of payment of estate duty

On death of Henry Shaw 28 May 1900

The property included:

The freehold estate, farms, lands etc of 1221a in part 1 of settlement 13 October 1899 between Henry Shaw, AP Shaw and Hubbersty and Drewry

Farmhouse and land in part 2 of 217a

Two parcels of land of 9a in part 3

Freehold farmhouse and land at Alston Lee of 77a (part 4)

Combs Moss Farm of 106a (part 5)

Buildings and land 45a

Messuage buildings and land 22a at Long Hill

Lands at Alstone Lee 54a

Pyegreave 175a 

All of which (except 19a sold more than twelve months before death) are better described as follows:

Whitehall including lodges, moorland and Home Farm

Farmhouse and 80a at Alston Lee (William Lomas)

Farmhouse and 115a at Pyegreave (TE Ollerenshaw)

Farmhouse and 43a at Alston Lee (E Hartle)

Farmhouse and 160a at Broad Lee (Henry Morton)

Farmhouse and 90a in tenancy of George Lomas

Farmhouse and 45a in tenancy of Wood late Lomas (Baslow Church)

Farmhouse and 91a at Moss House (John Hibbert) and Rough Low Tors 51a in same occupation

Farmhouse and 163a at Long Hill (Joseph Bagshaw)

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1905 Land tax

1899 OS six inch map coloured showing White Hall estate

1905-08 Two certificates of redemption of land tax

Whitehall Farm (part) – Henry Martin 1a

Manley Farm (part) – Mrs Wood 2a

Wainstones Farm (part)  - John Bailey 12a

Allstone Lee Farm South – Joseph Wood 20a

Allstone Lee Farm East – William Lomas 61a

Broadlee Farm – Henry Morten 140a

The Hurst Farm (part) – George Lomas 6a

Allstone Lee Farm North  - Edward Hartle 55a

Whitehall 28a

Moorland 626a

Moss House Farm  - John Hibbert 90a

Whitehall Farm (part) – Henry Martin 119a

Long Hill Farm – Joseph Wain 46a

Wainstones Farm (part) John Bailey 50a

Whitehall 47a

Moorland 381a

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1 February 1911

Declaration of John Moult re Mrs SS Jowett decd

John Moult of Lower Cliffe in Mellor is 66 and is one of the children of John Moult of Mellor Hall.

Sarah Susannah Moult, a daughter of John Moult, was married to Jonathan Jowett, coal merchant

William Jowett of Manor House, Mellor, was their eldest son. Susannah died at Lower Hall 16 November 1890 intestate and did not exercise her executorship under the will of John Moult.

Jowett died at Lower Hall 22 March 1901.

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21 August 1923

Conveyance of rent charge of £8 10s issuing out of Combs Moss

Emily Cecilia Wykeham Fiennes of Yoxall Lodge to Samuel Bramwell of Warboro Lodge Rusthall Tunbridge Wells for £170 the rent charge issuing out of Combs Moss made by an indenture of 11 August 1720 between Thomas Bagshaw and John Shallcross issuing out of Combs Moss conveyed by Thomas Eyre to Thomas Bagshaw bounded on the north west and east by the brinks of the hills and on the south by a ditch made by Thomas Eyre and containing 420a 35p except a part formerly enclosed by Thomas Bagshaw at or near the Castle Ditches wt the time of enclosure called the Over or Upper Barmes then in the possession of Robert Yates of Ridgehall

Schedule includes indenture 9 January 1872 between Walter John Pelham and his wife Elizabeth Mary; Thomas William Evans and Henry Evans; and Emily Gisborne

30 March 1872 indenture between the said Emily Wingfield Gisborne; John Howard Griffiths; and John Fiennes, Thomas William Evans and Rev Frederick William Griffiths

30 March 1872 indenture between JH Griffths; EW Gisborne; and Fiennes, Evans and Griffths 

11 May 1886 indenture between Fiennes, Evans and Griffiths; and Emily Wingfield Griffiths (formerly Gisborne)

22 July 1919 consent by executors of EW Griffiths to the devise contained in her will to ECW Fiennes

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1923

Abstract of title of Emily Cecilia Wykeham Fiennes

20 April 1865 will of Thomas Guy Gisborne of Yoxall Lodge appointed as executors Thomas William Evans, FPD Astley and Henry Evans and gave them all his real estate for his wife for life or second marriage and then to his niece Elizabeth the wife of Walter John Lord Pelham for life

Gisborne died 12 September 1869 (FPD Astley having already died)

9 January 1872 indenture between Pelham son of Earl of Chichester and Elizabeth his wife, the Evans’s and Emily Gisborne of Yoxall Lodge (widow). Pelhams sold Emily Gisborne for £50,000 their interest in the will.

30 March 1872 indenture between Emily Wingfield Gisborne; JH Griffiths; John Fiennes, TW Evans and FW Griffiths. A marriage agreed upon by JH Griffiths and EW Gisborne in consideration of which Gisborne settled on Fiennes, Evans and Griffiths on trust.

16 September 1885 JH Griffiths died. The trustees conveyed back to EW Griffiths

28 May 1906 EW Griffiths appointed her nephews GC Wykeham Fiennes and GY Wykeham Fiennes and her niece Emily Cecilia Wykeham Fiennes to be executors and all left to ECWF.

11 October 1917 EWG died.

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31 October 1928

Bramwell (deceased) to JS Nuttall (includes plan of hall grounds)

Sale of the mansion house of White Hall to John Stafford Nuttall of Bonis Hall, Prestbury, timber merchant.

Bramwell died 2 November 1926 owning the hall. His executors sell it for £4750.

Schedule lists conveyance 31 March 1884Samuel Pearson, John Marsland and William Edward Marsland to Henry Shaw

Mortgage 13 December 1897 Henry Shaw from John Henry Orme, Edmund Orme, Stanley Orme and John Topham

Settlement 13 October 1899 between Henry Shaw, AP Shaw, HA Hubbersty and Frank Drewry

Disentailing assurance 20 July 1900 between AP Shaw and Hubbersty and Drewry

Transfer of mortgage 27 November 1907 between Stanley Orme and John Topham; and Orme, Topham, Charles Henry Glossop and William Henry Milnes Marsden

Transfer of mortgage 4 May 1908 between Orme, Topham, Glossop and Marsden; AP Shaw; John Topham, John Arthur Topham and Edwin Topham

Reconveyance of 1 August 1919 between the three Tophams and AP Shaw

11 November 1919 between AP Shaw and Samuel Bramwell

13 July 1922 conveyance between Brocksbank, Hewetson and Bramwell

21 August 1923 conveyance between Emily Cecilia Wykeham Fiennes and Bramwell

3 January 1927 probate of Bramwell’s will

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Whitehills Piece

24 October 1914 – WAB Jackson deceased to AP Shaw

Mary Jackson of Brook Houses widow and WB Jackson bank manager (the trustees); Mary Jackson; Eva Ellen Jackson, Mabel Bellott Jackson, Mary Georgina Jackson, Anthony Bellott Jackson farmer, Samuel Frith Jackson farmer and Ada Jackson all of Brook Houses; and AP Shaw

WAB Jackson owned at 25 March 1873 the land assured, by an indenture of 25 March 1873 he mortgaged, from Edward Brocklehurst of The Fence in Macclesfield, with other hereditaments forming an estate known as the Whitehills estate. By transfer at WABJ’s death the mortgage was held by the representatives of Elizabeth Shrigley and was for £1400.

Jackson died 6 February 1897 with the mortgage due to James Myott of Capesthorne. By indenture of 23 October 1914 the Whitehills estate is free of mortgage and vested in the trustees.

For £550 all that close of land numbered 2127, 2128 and 2395 of 27a described as common land formerly enclosed on the Edge adjoining Pye Greave which was allotted in lieu of the common right belonging to Whitehills. The sellers will continue to pay £1 pa charged on Whitehills estate in favour of the poor of Chapel and Peak Forest

Schedule : 25 March 1873 conveyance between Brocklehurst, Elias Crapper, Ann Smith and WABJ

[Abstract of title says Crapper formerly of Chinley, slate dealer, but now of Walsall, lime merchant; Ann Smith from Langley widow. By a release of 20 March 1840 between Josiah and Ellen Bradbury and William Barker for £1400 paid by Barker with a proviso for redemption on payment of £1400.

Bradbury died 27 May 1840 and left his estates in Derby and Lancs to Crapper on trust for life for Ellen and after her death a half share in Combs Head to his daughter Elizabeth Bullock and the other half to his daughter Ann Smith. Other property to his daughter Martha the wife of John Bates Chambers subject to her paying £300 to Ann to erect a house and buildings on her lands.

Ellen Bradbury died 19 December 1871 and Martha Chambers 20 October 1871

By various means and by indenture 7 November 1871 between WC Brocklehurst, PL Brocklehurst, TU Brocklehurst,Charles Brocklehurst and E Brocklehurst  the mortgage vested in E Brocklehurst. WABJ paid off Brocklehurst and the £300 to Ann Smith and a further £1150 to Crapper (£2850 in total) buying the farm house with mill formerly used as a corn mill at Whitehills, several closes not the subject of this abstract and the common land all of which totalled 76a and in the occupation of Thomas Carrington.]

25 March 1873 mortgage Brocklehurst and WABJ [abstract says for £1200]  and 26 January 1875 further charge [abstract says for a further £100]

25 March 1876 transfer and further charge, Brocklehurst, WABJ and Elizabeth Shrigley [abstract says Shrigley took over the mortgage and advanced a further £100. 22 August 1890 Shrigley died and her executors were John Shrigley and William Myott. 28 January 1909 Myott died]

23 October 1914 reconveyance John Shrigley to Mary and WA Jackson

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Sundry

1 February 1911Jowett and Moults

The certificates referred to by John Moult.

Marriage of Jonathan Jowett and Sarah Susannah Moult 20 Feb 1862

Birth of William Jowett 11 October 1862

Death of Sarah Susannah Jowett 16 November 1890

All places referred to are Mellor/Cobden Edge

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5 November 1919 – Jackson family

Declaration by WB Jackson as to family re WAB Jackson deceased

William Bradbury Jackson of Chapel, bank manager, declares:

He is the son of William Anthony Bellott Jackson of Combs by his first wife Mary Jackson who died 19 June 1874

WABJ then married Mary Frith of Norbury 18 July 1877(marriage cert attached)

Six children of that marriage, all born in Combs. Eva Ellen 28 July 1878; Mabel Bellott 5 April 1880; Mary Georgina 3 December 1884; Anthony Bellott 5 August 1887; Samuel 10 April 1889; Ada 3 August 1891. Samuel is always known as Samuel Frith Jackson. (birth certs attached)

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