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Family of John of VERE and Maud of BADLESMERE

Husband: John of VERE (1312-1360)
Wife: Maud of BADLESMERE (1310-1366)
Marriage 1336

Husband: John of VERE

Name: John of VERE
Sex: Male
Father: -
Mother: -
Birth 12 Mar 1312
Occupation Earl of Oxford
Death 24 Jan 1360 (age 47)
Cause: died campaigning in France

Wife: Maud of BADLESMERE

Name: Maud of BADLESMERE
Sex: Female
Father: Bartholomew + * of BADLESMERE (1275-1322)
Mother: Margaret + * of CLARE (1287-to1334)
Birth 1310 Castle Badlesmere, Kent, England
Death 24 May 1366 (age 55-56)
Burial Colne Priory

Note on Husband: John of VERE

John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford (c. 12 March 1312 – 24 January 1360) was the nephew and heir of Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford. He succeeded as Earl of Oxford in 1331, after his uncle died without issue. John de Vere was a trusted captain of Edward III in the king's wars in Scotland and France, and took part in both the Battle of Crécy and the Battle of Poitiers. He died campaigning in France in 1360. Throughout his career he was closely associated with William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton, who was his brother-in-law.

 

John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford (c. 12 March 1312 – 24 January 1360) was the nephew and heir of Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford. He succeeded as Earl of Oxford in 1331, after his uncle died without issue. John de Vere was a trusted captain of Edward III in the king's wars in Scotland and France, and took part in both the Battle of Crécy and the Battle of Poitiers. He died campaigning in France in 1360. Throughout his career he was closely associated with William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton, who was his brother-in-law.

Note on Wife: Maud of BADLESMERE

Maud de Badlesmere, Countess of Oxford (1310 – 24 May 1366) was an English noblewoman, and the wife of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford. She, along with her three sisters, was a co-heiress of her only brother Giles de Badlesmere, 2nd Baron Badlesmere who had no male issue.

 

At the age of 11 she was imprisoned in the Tower of London along with her mother, Margaret de Clare, Baroness Badlesmere and her four siblings, after the former refused Queen consort Isabella admittance to Leeds Castle and ordered an assault upon her when she attempted entry.

 

[edit] FamilyMaud was born at Castle Badlesmere, Kent, England in 1310, the second eldest daughter of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 1st Baron Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare. She had three sisters, Margery, Elizabeth, and Margaret; all of whom eventually married and had issue. She had one brother, Giles.

 

Her paternal grandparents were Guncelin de Badlesmere and Joan FitzBernard, and her maternal grandparents were Thomas de Clare, Lord of Thomond and Juliana FitzGerald of Offaly.

 

On 14 April 1322, when she was twelve years of age, Maud's father was hanged, drawn and quartered by orders of King Edward II, following his participation in the Earl of Lancaster's rebellion and his subsequent capture after the Battle of Boroughbridge. Maud, her siblings,[1] and her mother had been arrested the previous October after the latter had ordered an assault upon Queen consort Isabella after refusing her admittance to Leeds Castle where Baron Badlesmere held the post of governor.[2] Maud's mother, Baroness Badlesmere, remained imprisoned in the Tower of London until 3 November 1322,[3] although it is not known when Maud and her siblings were released. Her brother Giles obtained a reversal of their father's attainder in 1328, and he succeeded to the barony as 2nd Baron Badlesmere. Maud, along with her three sisters, was Giles's co-heiress, as he had married but fathered no children by his wife, Elizabeth Montagu.

 

[edit] Marriages and issueIn June 1316, Maud, aged six, married her first husband, Robert FitzPayn, son of Robert FitzPayn. Welsh historian R. R. Davies relates in his book, Lords and lordship in the British Isles in the late Middle Ages how her father, Lord Badlesmere, when drawing up the marriage contract, sought to provide for Maud's future by ensuring that she would have independent means. He granted her land worth 200 marks per year, and her future father-in-law was constrained to endow her with three manors and their revenues.[4] The marriage did not produce children; and on an unknown date sometime before March 1335 Maud married secondly, John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford. Upon her marriage, Maud assumed the title Countess of Oxford. John was a captain in King Edward III's army, and as such participated in the Battle of Crécy and the Battle of Poitiers.

 

The marriage produced seven children:[5]

 

John de Vere (December 1335- before 23 June 1350), married Elizabeth de Courtney as her first husband.

Thomas de Vere, 8th Earl of Oxford (1336- 18 September 1371), married Maud de Ufford, by whom he had a son Robert de Vere, 9th Earl of Oxford

Aubrey de Vere, 10th Earl of Oxford (1338- 15 February 1400), married Alice FitzWalter, by whom he had three children, including Richard de Vere, 11th Earl of Oxford

Robert de Vere (died 1360)

Elizabeth de Vere (died 23 September 1375), married firstly in 1341, Sir Hugh de Courtney, by whom she had one son, Hugh de Courtney, Lord Courtney; she married secondly John de Mowbray, 3rd Lord Mowbray; she married thirdly on 18 January 1369 Sir William Costyn

Margaret de Vere (died 15 June 1398), married firstly Henry de Beaumont, 3rd Lord Beaumont (4 April 1340- 17 June 1369), the son of John de Beaumont, 2nd Lord Beaumont and Eleanor of Lancaster, by whom she had issue; she married secondly Sir Nicholas de Lovain of Penhurst; she married thirdly after 1375 Sir John Devereux, by whom she had issue.

Maud de Vere

In June 1338, Maud's brother Giles died without leaving any legitimate issue. A considerable portion of the Badlesmere estates was inherited by Maud and her husband.

 

Maud died at the de Vere family mansion Hall Place in Earl's Colne, Essex on 24 May 1366 at the age of fifty-six years. She was buried in Colne Priory. Her husband had died in 1360.