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ADELAIDE RIVER PIONEER CEMETERYNORTHERN TERRITORY

 

Adelaide River is a small settlement found between Darwin and Katherine in the Northern Territory's Top End. It lies some 200 km north-east of

Katherine and the pioneer cemetery 150m south of the Adelaide River Railway Bridge. The cemetery contains a number of graves marked by

headstones, wooden markers and star pickets.

 

Photos kindly taken by ugly sister no 2

 

     

 

 

Above plaque - This Cemetery is thought to have been established in 1884 in conjunction with the survey for the route of the Palmerston & Pine Creek Railway.

Located alongside the railway reserve it was only 100 metres from the original police station and the Q.C.E Hotel.

The numbers of graves and extent of the cemetery are unknown as timber markers may have been used for earlier grave sites. In circa 1912-1913 the

grave yard was described as “..a few ancient crumbling stones, almost hidden by the long grass and weeds.”

 

 

 

Five grave sites remain within the cemetery, including those of John George Chapman and Alf Hatt, and Kitty Ah Quee who was buried on February 1976.

Others who may be buried here but whose graves remain unidentified are George and Fanny Allen.

 

Although the above plaque states that the cemetery was thought to have  been established in 1884,  it is believed that the first burial was of a young gold-miner,

Edwin Allen who died on 16 November 1874.

John George Chapman was buried on the 1 September 1971. He was buried in the grave occupied by his mate Alf Hatt,

hence the two grave markers for the one grave.

 

The plaque was provided by the National Trust (NT) in association with the Coomalie Community Government Council.

 

 

 

 

 

In memory of John George Chapman (Chappie) born Feb 23rd 1894 at Dover, Kent          the above headstone appears to have been defaced or a plaque removed from it.

Front wooden cross- Memory of Alf Hatt

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Territory Times and Gazette, Saturday 28 November 1874

Police Enquiry

Statements of witnesses touching the death of Edwin Allen at River Adelaide on November 18, 1874.

Ernest Peters, Carrier, stated – I came from the Stapleton Creek to the Adelaide River with Allen; he was intoxicated. We arrived at the Adelaide about 2.30pm.

Deceased had a nobbler of limejuice and a nobbler of limejuice and brandy at Hopewell’s in my company. We left, intending to go to Birrell’s Creek; he drove his dray in front

of my wagon about 100 yards, when it stopped. When I came up I saw deceased lying on the road about four feet from his dray. I jumped down and went up to him,

and said, “Come on, Allen, lets get into camp,” and shook him. He groaned and replied, “O, Peters.”  Anticipating nothing serious, I let him lie while I turned the horses out,

and then shook him again, and advised him to get up and come and stop the night at Hopewell’s. He got up with my assistance and I then attempted to get him over to

Hopewell’s, but had to get assistance. We carried him over and laid him under the verandah in a hammock on the ground, and as his clothes were wet we took them off; he was

then insensible and appeared to be in great pain. I saw no bruises on the body; didn’t see him fall off the dray. I think deceased died from excessive drinking, accelerated by

receiving a sudden chill.

 

Edward Prosper Hopewell, publican, stated-Allen came into my house about 2.30 this afternoon. He was not sober and could not walk straight. I served him with limejuice

and as the brandy was on the counter he helped himself. He remained in my house about 20 minutes. I saw him drive away. About half an hour afterwards Peters

(who left with him) returned and said “Hopewell, I don’t know what to do with that man; he is in a frightful state”. I took no notice as I knew he had too much to drink and

I’ve seen him drunk frequently.

Peters went away but sometime afterwards returned and asked me to help him carry Allen into my house. I went out and saw deceased lying in a pool of water, his trousers

were about his ankle, and his shirt was torn. I helped to carry him in, we took his clothes off and laid him in a hammock on the ground and covered him with a counterpane.

He appeared to be suffering great internal pain. This was about 4pm. I took no further notice of him, as I did not think he was seriously ill, only drunk. About 30 minutes 9

as I was on my way to Peters room, I placed my hand on deceased’s forehead; it was cold. I called Peters to turn out and look at him, and I then brought a light and discovered

that he was dead.

 

Richard Clark, laborer, stated-Was with Allen during the afternoon at Doherty’s public house; he was not sober. I live at Doherty’s. I served him with a bottle of beer.

He left after remaining about 10 minutes. The next time I saw him he was lying in a pool of water alongside of his dray. Peters and I attempted to carry him into the hotel,

 but deceased cried out “O, don’t, Peters”. We then called Hopewell who assisted us to carry him under the verandah.

 

George Thomas Doherty, stated-Deceased was in my public house about 2 o’clock this afternoon. I served him with no grog. I can’t tell whether he was drunk or sober, as I

was not very well. He stayed in the house but a short time.

 

Other possible burials at the cemetery.

 

Northern Territory Times and Gazette,Saturday 7 February 1880

South Australia

To all constables of the Province of South Australia and to all others whom these may concern.

I, the undersigned, George Montagu, being one of her Majesty’s Justices of the Peace for the Province of South Australia, having made enquiries respecting the death of one

Ah Tung, who died at Adelaide River on the 18th day of January, 1880 do hereby certify that there is not, in my opinion, any necessity for holding an inquest upon the body

of the said Ah Tung and that the body of the said Ah Tung may be buried. Given under my hand the 27th day of January 1880. George Montagu, J.P. Coroner

 

Northern Territory Times and Gazette, Saturday 24 September 1881

South Australia

To all constables of the Province of South Australia and to all others whom these may concern.

I, the undersigned R R Cruickshank, being one her Majesty’s Justice of the Peace ……………………………….etc, the death of one John Turner, who died at

Adelaide River on the 11th day of September 1881, ……..the body of the said John Turner may be buried.

Given under my hand the 8th day of November 1881. R R Cruikshank, J.P., Coroner

 

Northern Territory Times and Gazette,Saturday 19 November 1881

South Australia

To all constables of the Province of South Australia and to all others whom these may concern.

I, the undersigned R R Cruikshank, being one her Majesty’s Justice of the Peace ……………………………….etc, the death of one Lucie Caroline Chown, who died at

Adelaide River on the 8th day of November 1881, do hereby certify that there is not, in my opinion, any necessity for holding an inquest on the body of the said

Lucie Caroline Chown, and that the body may be buried. Given under my hand the 8th day of November 1881. R R Cruikshank, J.P., Coroner

 

 

 

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