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George W. Bragg (M)
b. 16 February 1824, d. 19 February 1898
Last Edited=19 Feb 2004

     George W. Bragg was born on 16 February 1824. He married Mary Ann Childress, daughter of Isham Childress and Hannah Hughes, circa 1849. George W. Bragg died on 19 February 1898 at (near) Duncan, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, at age 74. He was buried at Abner Creek Church, Spartanburg County, South Carolina.
     George W. Bragg Ibera Oliver
His tombstone in the Abner Creek Baptist Church Cemetery has full dates of birth and death. The 1850 census shows that he and his wife and been married within the year.
George W. Bragg appeared on the census of June 1880 at Reidville Township, Spartanburg County, South Carolina. He is listed as a widower, age 50, with two daughters, Lizzie, age 20, and Jane, age 16.1

Children of George W. Bragg and Mary Ann Childress
James Crowell Bragg
Warren Drummond Bragg+ b. 23 Jul 1853, d. 5 May 1924
Elmira Jane Bragg b. 3 Apr 1864, d. 16 Sep 1908
Elizabeth Ann Bragg b. 25 Aug 1865

Citations

  1. [S295] 1880 federal census of Spartanburg County, SC. Microfilm image online.

Mary Ann Childress (F)
b. circa 1827
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=4 Feb 2001

     Mary Ann Childress was born circa 1827. She was the daughter of Isham Childress and Hannah Hughes. Mary Ann Childress married George W. Bragg circa 1849.

Children of Mary Ann Childress and George W. Bragg
James Crowell Bragg
Warren Drummond Bragg+ b. 23 Jul 1853, d. 5 May 1924
Elmira Jane Bragg b. 3 Apr 1864, d. 16 Sep 1908
Elizabeth Ann Bragg b. 25 Aug 1865

Elizabeth Ann Bragg (F)
b. 25 August 1865
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=18 Sep 2001

     Elizabeth Ann Bragg was born on 25 August 1865 at South Carolina. She was the daughter of George W. Bragg and Mary Ann Childress.
     REL! Ibera Oliver.

Elmira Jane Bragg (F)
b. 3 April 1864, d. 16 September 1908
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=18 Sep 2001

     Elmira Jane Bragg was born on 3 April 1864 at South Carolina. Ibera Oliver
DEATH: Ibera Oliver
REL! Ibera Oliver.
She was the daughter of George W. Bragg and Mary Ann Childress. Elmira Jane Bragg died on 16 September 1908 at South Carolina at age 44.

James Crowell Bragg (M)
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=21 Aug 2000

     James Crowell Bragg was the son of George W. Bragg and Mary Ann Childress. James Crowell Bragg was buried at South Carolina.

Isham Childress (M)
b. circa 1800
Last Edited=3 Nov 2006

     Isham Childress was born circa 1800. He married Hannah Hughes.
     Isham Childress is listed in the material from Ibera Oliver.

Children of Isham Childress and Hannah Hughes
Mary Ann Childress+ b. c 1827
Pernatha Childress b. c 1841
Anderson Crowell Childress+ b. 12 Aug 1841, d. 15 Feb 1923
Hannah Childress b. c 1844

Thomas Chapman (M)
b. circa 1815
Last Edited=18 Sep 2001

     Thomas Chapman was born circa 1815 at South Carolina. He married Charlotte (?).
     NAME! 1860c, Buenavista, Spartanburg Co., SC.

Children of Thomas Chapman and Charlotte (?)
Mary Chapman b. c 1838
James Chapman b. c 1840
Caroline Chapman b. c 1842
William Chapman b. c 1845
Henry Chapman b. c 1849
Thusey Chapman b. c 1849
Cornelia Chapman+ b. 13 Dec 1849, d. 27 Jun 1930
[Jessie?] Chapman b. c 1853
John Chapman b. c 1854

Charlotte (?) (F)
b. circa 1816
Last Edited=11 Sep 2001

     Charlotte (?) was born circa 1816. She married Thomas Chapman.
     NAME! 1860c, Buenavista, Spartanburg Co., SC.

Children of Charlotte (?) and Thomas Chapman
Mary Chapman b. c 1838
James Chapman b. c 1840
Caroline Chapman b. c 1842
William Chapman b. c 1845
Henry Chapman b. c 1849
Thusey Chapman b. c 1849
Cornelia Chapman+ b. 13 Dec 1849, d. 27 Jun 1930
[Jessie?] Chapman b. c 1853
John Chapman b. c 1854

Robert Lee Olds (M)
b. 7 March 1913, d. 15 August 1991
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=15 Feb 2007

     Robert Lee Olds was born on 7 March 1913 at Bureau County, Illinois. He was the son of Bryant Olds and Anna Maria Sophia Schmidt. Robert Lee Olds died on 15 August 1991 at White Oak Estates, Spartanburg, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, at age 78.1 He was buried at Walnut Grove Cemetery, near Parkersburg, Richland County, Illinois.1

Citations

  1. [S110] Personal knowledge, Dan W. Olds.

John Howard Poteat (M)
b. 1 December 1912, d. 17 June 2006
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=10 Sep 2006

     John Howard Poteat was born on 1 December 1912 at Bakersville, Mitchell County, North Carolina.1 He was the son of Frank Bela Poteat and Cora Viola Phillips. John Howard Poteat married Alma Ruth Whitlock, daughter of William Jacob Whitlock and Ella Mae Warwick, on 6 July 1934 at Bristol, Virginia.2 John Howard Poteat died on 17 June 2006 at 1501 Fairidge Drive, Kingsport, Sullivan County, Tennessee, at age 93.
     In 1949, John joined the Board of Directors of the East Tennessee Production Credit Association where he served for the next 27 years, retiring in 1976. An article, probably from the PCA magazine, introduced him among the new directors:
"John, son of F. B. Poteat, President of the Johnson City NFLA is one of your new directors. John is following in his Pap's footsteps as a leader in both Farmers Organizations and the Dairy Business. He lives in Kingsport and owns a farm in Sullivan County.
"John is Manager of Peters Co. of Kingsport, Gulb [i.e. Gulf] Distributors and was formerly connected with Pet Diary Products as an auditor. He was raised on a dairy farm near Jonesboro."3
     When he retired from this board in 1976, this was reported in several newspaper artlcles covering the nine area meetings which comprised the 42nd annual meeting of stockholders. One article, said, in part:
"John H. Poteat of Kingsport was honored by the group for his years of service to the stockholders. Robert A. Russell, Vice President of the Federal Intermediate Credit Bank of Louisville, Kentucky, presented Mr. Poteat with a Farm Credit plaque commemorating his 27 years of serving on the Board of Directors.
"During Mr. Poteat's tenure on the board, the famer-owned credit cooperative has grown into one of the areas largest suppliers of agricultural credit. The association has total assets of over 42 million dollars with a membership of 4800 farmers in East Tennessee. Mr. Poteat will be retiring from the board and stockholders will be voting during the series of meetings for his replacement. Joe Bowman and Darrel Rowe, both Washington County Farmers, have been nominated to replace him. ...
"Mr. Poteat, in the director's report, indicated money for agrcultural use would experience strong competition from business and industry as more demands are placed upon the nations available credit. Providing a dependable source of sound credit is the primary objective of P. C. A."4
     The 1975 East Tennessee P. C. A. annual report was dedicated to him, saying:
"Tribute to a Director
"This 1975 Annual Report is dedicated to John H. Poteat of Kingsport, Tennessee. Mr. Poteat is retiring from the board after 27 years of faithful and dedicated service.
"''Dean' of the Board for the past several years, Mr. Poteat's sound judgment and expertise in business have played a key role in the growth and development of East Tennessee P. C. A.
"During his tenure, beginning in 1949, the outstanding loan volume has grown from $879,000 to the present volume of near $40,000,000. Through this period of time, your association has matured and become a strong, thriving, financial organization. A tribute to all East Tennessee farmers that they can own and operate sucessfully their own credit association."5
     About 1954, John was president of the sixth annual East Tennessee Disrict Fair. According to the newspaper clippings he and Ruth kept, the attendance and the quantity and quality of the fair exhibits set new records. One undated clipping says:
John Poteat, Fair president, said Thursday that "enthusiasm shown by area citizens for this year's Fair far surpasses that shown in former years.
"We have had the largest gate attendance in the history of the Fair", he said, "and it is most gratifying to see.
"It's a tremendous success," he declared.
     In 1957, at least, John Poteat presented the Pure Oil sponsored award of a pen and pencil set to the winners of the Sullivan County winners of the 4-H public speaking contest.6
     In 1973, he was a founding director of the Bank of Tennessee. "Stockholders of Kingsport's newest bank, the Bank of Tennesee, held their first meeting late Tuesday afternoon at the Holiday Inn and elected 11 directors, who then chose the new bank's first officers.
"W. B. Greene, Sr. was elected chairman of the board; P. L. (Pat) Basinger, Jr., president and chief executive officer; Cham H. Percer Jr., executive vice president and cashier; and Dennis Phillips, vice president.
"Directors are: W. B. Greene, Sr., Herman Blevins, C. B. Duke IV, Dr. William A. Exum, Francis M. Herman, W. B. Greene, Jr., John H. Poteat, Judge Clifford Sanders, Holiday Smith, Basinger and Percer. ...
"Of 477 shareholders, approximately 200 attended the meeting, which began at 5:30 p.m. with the expectation it would be over shortly after 6. Nomination of a twelfth director from the floor, however, necessitated holding an election by secret ballot, and the ballots then had to be counted by the number of shares each represented. This prolonged the meeting until about 7:30 p.m.
"It was reported that 88,027 shares were represented in the balloting, either directly or by proxy.
"On the motion of Poteat, the stockholders voted not to pay any fees to the directors until the new bank is in full operation and showing a profit.
"Grand opening of the bank is scheculed for May 11 at the corner of Cherokee and Commerce Streets. Regular business will begin May 13, Greene said.
"This is the third site considered for the bank since organization began a little more than a year ago. It had first been proposed to locate in the vacant Earles Building at the corner of Center and Shelby Streets, across from the Port of Kings Motor Inn. Later a new building was proposed at the corner of Center and Cherokee Streets.
"A letter of intent to organize a new bank, with a capitalization of $1,875,000 consisting of 125,000 shares at $15 per share, was filed with the Tennessee Superintendent of Banks Feb. 26, 1973. Orignal incorporators of the state-chartered bank were Greene, Dr. Exum, Poteat, Smith, Blevins and James W. Cawood."7
     The first "annual" report, covering 233 days of operation, shows that by 31 Dec 1974, the bank operations had added $.27/share to the shareholder equity.8
          Interview with John H. Poteat — 23-25 Dec. 2000
[notes taken during his visit to Spartanburg for Christmas]
Grandparents.

When I was born, I had eleven living grandparents.
My father and mother were F. Bela Poteat and Viola (Phillips) Poteat. The eleven living grandparents, mostly on my mother’s side, were:
My father’s parents, John Spencer Poteat and Anna (Greene) Poteat
My mother’s parents: John Heap Phillips and Retta (Conley) Phillips
My great-grandparents: “Son” and Ella (Fortner) Conley
My great-grandparents: Jim Phillips and Eliza (Poore) Phillips
My great-great grandparents: Billly and Susan (Wiseman) Phillips
My great-great grandmother Nancy (Stewart) Fortner

John S. Poteat was born the 8th of May 1849, near Marion, NC. His father died in the Civil War. His mother married again but he never got along with his stepfather. He went to live with a Hawkins family and he raised flue-cured tobacco there. I’m not sure why he went to Bakersville, but he did start a business there as partners with a Mr. Berry. I think it was bad customer credit that caused them to go out of business. After that, I’m not sure what he did. My grandmother Poteat kept some boarders in Bakersville. Mr. Bill Greene, Sr., and his brother were among these boarders. They lived ten or more miles out on Rock Creek and came into town for school and so boarded in town. Bill Greene did his studies well but his brother ran around at night instead of doing school work. This is the Bill Greene who was later the other founder of the Bank of Tennessee.

Speaking of banking, Dad’s first cousin, Ernest Poteat, was a cashier and Vice President of the bank in Bakersville. This is the bank in which Grandma Cox had stock. When Mr. Duncan from Northwestern Bank wanted to buy them out, he gave stockholders the option of selling their shares for cash or getting shares in Northwestern Bank. Grandma Cox was the only one to choose to keep bank shares. I still have some of those shares. The bank is now First Union. I don’t remember when the Bakersville bank was founded but it was in the early 1900s.

John H. Phillips had a business at Wing, NC, which is on the rail road. He bought mica, feldspar, telephone poles and other things and shipped them out from there. His father, Jim Phillips, had a store off the rail road and had a water powered flour mill on the creek below his house and store. Both Jim and John Phillips had a drinking problem. This contributed to John’s early death in 1916. Jim owned quite a bit of land and several houses. These went to his son, Sam Phillips, when Jim died. We grandchildren (John, Ann and Jim Poteat) each got $100. I remember when my grandfather (John Phillips) came to visit us, he would go to his room, take a clock and set it on the table in front of him and just stare at it or reach for it. He sometimes suffered from DTs but I did not know then what his trouble was. We were living in Jonesborough when he visited.

I think I was 3-4 years old when he [John H. Phillips] had an order of shoes come in on the train. He had a pair of boots in the shipment for me. We went down to the train with a lantern and opened cartoons to find my boots. This is one of my earliest memories. I also remember that they had a cookstove of the type on which you lifted a lid to put in more wood. I was doing this when the lid fell back across my wrist and burned me pretty badly. The scar remained for years but does not show now.

Grandma Retta Phillips worked at the store and provided mail service. The mail train did not stop but caught the mail bag off a pole as it went by. This must have been before the start of RFD. John Phillips was a good trader. When he died, we were living at Jonesboro. Dad and my Mom went to Wing and stayed about two years. The store was sold to Sam Phillips (Jennie Rosenbaum’s father.)

With profits saved from the store, John and Retta Phillips bought a farm in Washington County, TN, below where the Poteat farm is. Viola and Bela lived there. After John Phillips’ death, Retta bought more land in Tennessee. Later, she sold it and lived in Jonesboro. She met John Cox who ran a store at Washington College. They were married and moved back to NC. He was a railroad superintendent and built the Clinchfield railroad. He also built the first paved streets in Kingsport. He built the Wexler Tunnel at Tennessee Eastman and John Cox’s son Clyde was the first one to crawl through the opening when the two tunnel segments from opposite directions met. John Cox was also General Manager of the Hoot Owl mine in NC. He built a narrow gauge railroad from the mine into Spruce Pine. To climb the steep grades, the trains went up along one track, threw a switch and moved onto another segment across the slope and continued to repeat the process up the steep grade. (See the railroad term, “switchback”). Uncle Claude Morgan was an engineer of this railroad and I used to ride with him on the train sometimes. They had a ramp from which they could dump their loads into gondola cars for the main railroad. Cox was also in the mica business. He traveled to places like Pittsburgh to sell and promote mica. “Son” Conley worked for him with the mica. He used to use a knife to separate the mica sheets taken from the big blocks from the mine.

Granddaddy Phillips liked to hunt. Near Ledger, he found a vein of mica while hunting. He tried to operate this mine with Sam Phillips but it never did really well. Sam managed it. I remember, when growing up, seeing this mine on the side of the mountain. Uncle Bob Phillips made his money from mica found on his property. Fletcher Phillips, Sam’s son, working on the mica, would say “This is from your Uncle Bob’s mine.” He could identify it by the quality. High quality mica sold for a very good price.

My Conley great-grandparents lived on the railroad. She fed the train crew who would stop the train at her house for meals. I slept in a featherbed when I visited them. It was very soft and quite different from my bed at home.

Boyhood – Bakersville and Jonesborough.
I was born in Bakersville in Aunt Betty Stafford’s house where my parents were living at the time.

Dad ran a furniture store in Bakersville. I think the business did not do really well. Then he traveled throughout North Carolina and sold gas heated irons. Retta and John Phillips bought a farm near Jonesborough when I was one year old. It was a 125-acre farm for which they paid $3000 and was our homeplace, the one you knew. This was purchased from the money received from my grandfather Phillips’s store and became my mother’s when her father’s estate was divided. Dad had a life interest in it after my mother died. Before they bought it, it had gotten very run down. It had grown hay and corn for years with no crop rotation and no fertilizer. The field “would not even grow weeds.” When we first moved to Jonesborough, we lived in town because the previous lease on the farm was not up yet. Later we moved into a tenant house on the place, then into the main house. We were living in town with Grandma Retta Phillips when my brother Jim was born. Dad worked at Keebler’s grocery in Jonesboro. It was not a self-service grocery; he weighed out beans, coffee, sugar etc. for the customers. He worked on the Phillips farm before that. Later he went to work as a bookkeeper in the Shipley hardware store. I guess that was back in the 20s. After that he worked as a teller at the First National Bank in Jonesboro. Mr. Patton was the bank cashier. Then Dad worked for Washington County as purchasing agent and bookkeeper. He ran for County Executive but lost by just a few votes. He had promises of enough votes but some men changed their minds.

Fred Hilbert, first cousin of Jessie, was a druggist in Jonesborough. Dad went into business with Fred. Dad ran the appliance business and Fred ran the drug store. Fred’s brother Lewis ferried planes from U. S. to England during World War II.

Fletcher Phillips boarded with us in Jonesboro to attend school. Jennie and her sister also lived with us for a while. We slept three and four to a bed at times. This was when we lived in the Phillips house. Jennie married Festus Rosenbaum at the time World War I was taking single men into the army by draft. She was still in high school then.

My mother had gone to a private school in Burnsville, NC. We used to have the love letters Dad wrote to her there, stored in a trunk at home, but Mama Jessie later burned them. My mother got sick; she had kidney problems. I was five on the first of December and she died on the 6th of December 1917. I remember my father took me to her room the night before she died and told me that he expected she would not last through the night.

Grandma Retta Phillips bought the 118 acre Edens farm in Washington County, with money from her husband’s estate, about 1917 but sold it in a year or so and bought the Deadrick home in Jonesborough and moved there.

The Hilbert family lived about 2 miles away. The father was a carpenter and had 12-13 kid which was almost more than they could feed. Some of them, including Jessie, Ada and Mary Sue came to live with us and help our family. I was in first grade and they were a few grades above me. My first year in school, I went to a one-room school near home (Grand View). Grandma Cox bought me a pony named Trixie. After the first year, we (Ada and I) went to school together by horse and buggy. Grandma Poteat also came to stay with us after my mother passed away. Grandpa Poteat and Florence stayed in Bakersville. Later Grandpa Poteat lived with us and Grandma lived in Bakersville. I don’t know why they stopped living together but I think she may have had some “very friendly” boarders. Aunt Betty Stafford, Grandma Poteat’s sister, got breast cancer and came to live with us until she died. Her husband was a judge.

Dad and Jessie Hilbert were married on 2 July 1919 by her uncle, the father of Fred and Lewis. They were married rather secretly. They headed for Washington, D.C. for their honeymoon but Dad got sick on the way and they stayed in Bristol. When they got back, Ada and Mary Sue prepared a big supper celebration. My brother “Dick” or F. B. Poteat, Jr., was born in April 1920.

One of my early jobs on the farm was hoeing corn – we had to chop out the extra corn plants so that they were properly spaced. There was a watermelon patch at the end of the field and we would eat watermelon after finishing a row. Later, I could drive the horses. I’d mow the field and Ada would rake. We used a McCormick Deering mower. It had a Pitman rod which was difficult to maintain and we would often have to go to town for a part and replace it. We stacked the hay in piles and hauled it to the barn. At first we used pitchforks to put the hay in the barn but later we had a hay fork. It was fixed up to a pulley and rope and we used horses to lift hay into the barn. That saved a lot of labor. I also did the plowing.

Dad had the road improved near our house when he was a magistrate. The work was begun before official approval by the highway department. I remember he carried a gun at the time, in anticipation that there might be trouble. They had about twenty mules which we boarded (for pay) in our barn.

A Mr. Carlew, who had been a Superintendent of Schools in Boston, came down to NC to teach at Penland, and later boarded with us. He had a teacher who was a good friend who sent him a monthly check which was his only support. He lived upstairs and had a wood burning heater. He took meals with us. When he died, I got his watch. Ruth traded it in on another one which I still have. He took mineral oil and I remember Mama complaining about having to clean up the bathroom after him. I was not a good speller in school. I’m still not. Mr. Carlew tried to teach me the phonics system of spelling but it did not take on me.

We had Guernsey cows and took the milk to town in ten gallon cans to the Pet Milk Company receiving plant in Jonesborough. It was shipped from there to Greenville, TN, and processed into canned milk. We only got less than $1 per can. I talked to Dad about getting a cooler and bottles. We built a block house and put in a separator and cooler. I still have one of our “Springdale Dairy” bottle caps at the house. Dad was working in the court house and ate lunch at Master’s restaurant. We worked out a deal to sell them milk in half-pint bottles, my first customer. We bottled our milk and sold it for ten cents per quart. I delivered it to homes in Jonesborough. I would leave samples of our bottled Guernsey milk with its thick head of cream, along with some of our apples, on the doorsteps in town and gained new customers and expanded my route that way. Southern Maid and Pet Dairy were also making deliveries but they eventually dropped out and I had a monopoly. I got up early, milked the cows, cooled and bottled the milk. While I ate breakfast, Jim and Dad loaded the truck and I delivered the milk before school. I picked up the bottles from the previous delivery and washed them up after school to be ready the next day. That was my first business venture. In the fall I also played football. I played right tackle at about 150-160 pounds.

I also raised a patch of tobacco and joined the 4-H club. I won a state contest and they sent me to Washington, D.C., and on Feb. 4, 1933, I gave a talk on the National 4-H Club Radio Broadcast from there. In the meantime, Ada had gotten married and Estes Kefauver had gotten her husband a job in D.C. as a plumber. In 1932 everyone was laid off in D. C. and Ada and Bill came to live with us. That is when we grubbed out the new ground. Bill worked in the field. They had an old Chevrolet car. Dad would not let me drive the milk truck to town on dates (he did like me date Ruth) and Bill let me use the car. Later Bill got a job building the John Sevier hotel in Johnson City and they moved into their own home.

Dad would call us to get up at 5:00 a.m. Sometimes I had been out until midnight the night before. I was dating Ruth. I would fall asleep in physics class. Although I had A’s on all my physics tests, I got a B for the term. When I asked the teacher about this, he said no one who slept in his classes could get an A.

I also raised 100 white leghorns and sold the eggs as well as milk. Jim took over the milk delivery when I went off to college. I paid my tuition at State with the egg money. I made quite good grades in my courses like history, physics, chemistry and French. I’d had some French in High School. I remember being asked to do some translation in German class – my sentence was supposed to say “I have a Mother” but it came out as “I am a Mother.” I remember that because the class gave me the “horse laugh” and I was embarrassed. In Zoology with Dr. Brown there were only two students, myself and Charlie van Gorder, both premeds. The class was mostly oral recitation with questions alternating between the two students. In order to get any degree from State, you had to complete your practice teaching. I was not interested in that but was preparing to go to Medical School, so I did not take all the teacher preparation work and did not get a degree there. I went to school straight through the summer as well and got three years of college work there in two years. This year, I was made an Honorary Alumnus of ETSU which was East Tennessee Teacher’s College when I was there. I am also now serving as a Director of the Endowment Fund and have given money to establish the Poteat Chair of Banking there.

I still had the $100 from Great-Grandpa Phillips’ estate (although Dad had used it to put a new metal roof on our barn in the meantime) and I used that to pay my tuition at Medical School. I sold my turkeys to buy my microscope, but the money ran out and I had to leave. I went into Nashville for a few days and found a place to stay for fifty cents a night while looking for work, but people were being laid off everywhere and I did not find any. I sold my microscope and got enough money to get home.
Tennessee Eastman.
I applied at several places for work but people were being laid off. I was sent to see Tom Warrick, employment supervisor at Eastman. He had five requests for employees and I was the fifth. I started distilling acetic acid to strengthen it, eventually to glacial acetic acid, by removing the water. I had to regulate steam flow in a still with a condenser that was was ten stories high. The steam was fed in on a low level, the controls were on the third floor and I had to also watch the top of the still for proper operation. There was an elevator but it was too slow. I had to run up and down stairs to keep up with all this. I worked shift work. Before the end of the shift, I would be sick from acetic acid fumes. My pay was $11/week, our rent was $2/week and it cost $1/week for a ride to work. Parnell Ellis, from Bakersville, was my foreman. He used to date Aunt Florence Poteat. He used to shield me when I made a mistake. I got a raise up to 35 cents/hour.

When Betty came along, Dr. Keene was the doctor. There was no hospital in Kingsport and that is why she was born in Bristol, Va. The doctor bill was $30 and I paid it off at $2/pay day until we had her paid for. We were living in a one-room apartment.

Pet Dairy.
Then I contacted Mr. Bellew, general manager for Pet Dairy in Johnson City and other locations. I applied in person in Johnson City and was given a job making milk deliveries in Kingsport. There were two horses, Amos and Andy. My horse, Andy, knew the route as well as I did. I would stop at the top of a street, get out to carry the milk to several houses in a row, and Andy would meet me at the next stop. There was a long run between two sections of the delivery and I could nap between them while Andy took me to the second. I got 10% commission on a delivery route in Kingsport. (As an extra job, I painted houses in the afternoon.) I started low but worked up to $100/month.

I took a bookkeeping course from LaSalle Extension University in Chicago. I got as far as some of the stock market stuff before I dropped out. I asked Mr. Bellew for office work in bookkeeping and they had an opening in Waynesville, NC. We went there and got an apartment. It was about 1937 that we went to Waynesville, in the spring or early summer. We were there during tourist season. We came back that fall and lived in Johnson City on Boyd Street. I started out in Waynesville at $90/month – I found out that bookkeeping paid less than I had been making but I did not have to go out on the routes or make sales calls. I was the cashier — collected the driver’s money, made deposits, kept books and made receipts for producers. They sold ice cream mix and shipped it to Georgia. Each customer had a separate discount arrangement and it was difficult system to keep track of. They claimed I would mess up the figures. By this time I was working from 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. I was working seven days a week although on Sundays we quit at 6:00 p.m. I asked Fred Yearout, general manager at Waynesville, to be made bookkeeper. Mr. Simmons, the current bookkeeper, began to train me but this was more like doing his work for him than it was training. This became too much and I went back to Johnson City as a cashier.

Then Mr. Key at Lynchburg, VA, needed a salesman for freezers, soda fountains, etc., and a good commission was offered. I went up there on a Monday to start on a new job. I was given a catalogue and sent out to the warehouse to learn about all the products, their parts etc. I seemed to be getting along all right and there was a territory available in North Carolina and some of the neighboring area. On Thursday night there was a company party which was mostly a drinking party. The next morning I was called in and told that I probably would not fit in and Mr. Key said “fill up your car with gas and go on back home.” Some time later, I saw Mr. Key in Kingsport. He was out of business with nothing to sell.

Ice Cream Parlor in Spruce Pine.
The first business I owned was an ice cream store in Spruce Pine. I was selling ice cream mix for Pet. When I visited Grandma Cox in Spruce Pine, we got a cone of ice cream for a nickel that had only about a tablespoon of ice cream in it. I knew I could offer more for the money. Granddaddy Cox put up a building on his lot and I went to Statesville for a freezer and got a rejected freezer that worked fine. We sold two dips for a nickel. Log truckers coming into town brought loads of hitchhiking kids with them. John Morgan worked in the store and wife Doris helped and Ruth helped. I’d dip ice-cream five cones at a time and pass the cones to them to sell. We would sell $100- $150 worth of nickle cones on a Sunday afternoon. The costs were about as follows: mix = 1/3, overhead = 1/3, and profit = 1/3. I’d leave work at Pet in Johnson City and drive to Spruce Pine and freeze ice cream all night, two and a half gallons per freezer run. It came soft from the freezer and I put it into the box to harden. A Highway Patrolman would come by in the early A. M. for some of the soft ice cream. I also sold hotdogs and ice cream at the Toe River Fair. I sold ice cream to Bob Phillips as Principal of the school at Bakersville. I had John Morgan come to Kingsport and work there to learn to make doughnuts and we sold them in winter when ice cream sales were slower.

Ice cream money bought Betty’s piano and the lot where our house is now.

Peters Oil.
Back in Kingsort, after trying out with Mr. Key in Lynchburg, VA, I checked with Homer Compton, who ran Goodrich, for a job. He sent me to Peters Oil (Gulf) and I also interviewed with Mr. Bill Greene who had no jobs. On Friday, I interviewed with Mr. Peters and started there on Monday. (So I really had not missed any work.) My job was sales and promotion — I cleaned up and decorated the stations and put up displays. I sold tires and called on customers.

I went to the Mason Dixon Line (trucking) to sell tires. I made them a good offer and sold fifty tires (I was used to selling one or two at a time). I was even told my bid was a little low and got paid a little more than I had offered. I worked at Peters Oil for eight years and then asked Mr. Peters about buying a half-interest in the company. More about that later.

During the war, some of my oil was shipped by tanker from Texas, around Florida, to Charleston, SC. Although there were never any news reports, I could tell when a tanker had been sunk by the Germans in the Atlantic because my shipments did not arrive when they were scheduled to. My order would be filled from a later shipment.

After World War II, I got into a good deal at Holston Defense Plant. Fuel oil was on a government regulated quota system but there was not a quota for Holston and they could not buy any fuel. They used #2 heating oil for heating in the process of making nitric acid. They needed one or two tank-truck loads a day. They even got the Pentagon to approve their purchases without the usual bid process in order to obtain the fuel. I found an Exxon dealer who could obtain fuel oil because he had more quota than he could use. [He had held the contract during the construction of Oak Ridge and, after the project was completed, still had the quota but not the sales.] I had no money to operate at this level and we had to get our money back to Exxon quickly. I was helped out by a friend, Red Hamilton, at Holston who arranged to pay quickly upon delivery and we were able to set up the deal. Once, one of my drivers to Holston lost the delivery hose out of the pipe on the truck where it was carried. I got another hose and took it out to the plant. There were restrictive security procedures in place at the Holston plant so I bypassed the gate and took the hose through a hole in the fence. However, I was caught by security and had a hard time talking my way back out. We built our house in 1951 while selling oil to Holston Defense.

Tires were also hard to get and were rationed by the government. We were using tires made of reclaimed rubber that were only good for 200-300 miles. Mr. Glascock got me a supply of tires and I began selling them everywhere. I guess he felt sorry for me and was able to supply me with more tires than were normally allowed. His sales figures were posted at a distributors’ sales meeting, but he called me aside to explain that my real sales numbers would not show there.

I did a lot of business at Eastman. One day, when bids were opened, I did not win any of them. I spoke to the manager who told me that he ”couldn’t put a sheet of paper” between my bid and the winner but that he had to go with the low bid. We stepped out of the office on the pretext of meeting someone else and he told me they could buy white oil without bids. I did not have any supply, but I located a source. They bought 10,000 gallons at a time. There was not much commission but I was glad to get the business.

Mr. Peters owned the farm I have now, but he bought a bigger one and wanted to sell this one. I researched it and found how much he had in it and offered him that much. I got it for $27,000. He still had $6,000 due on it and I had to pay that. I got a $21,000 loan from Mr. Greene and later got the Federal Land Bank to take the loan for less money and I paid it off in 8-10 years.


Blue Ridge Transportation Company.
I operated the first transit trucks in Tennessee while working with Peters. The trucking company was Blue Ridge Transportation. It was owned by Mr. Peters and Mr. Edwards. I kept the books while working for Peters and did this in his offices. While still working for Mr. Peters, I bought three trucks and had them paid for in six months. Oil came in tank cars to Bristol. The Interstate Commerce Commission controlled the transit permits and they controlled rail shipments. I went to an ICC meeting in Knoxville and argued that we needed a permit to haul by truck because there were several towns, such as Blountville and Tazewell, that had no railroads. We got the first such permit in Tennessee. We used an old Mack truck and went to Chattanooga, where the pipe line was then, to obtain our fuel supply.

When Mr. Peters and Mr. Edwards wanted to sell, I bought Mr. Peters’ half of the company and Mr. Bob Ivans bought Mr. Edwards’ half. When we bought the company, it was $20,000 in the hole. Mr. Peters put in $10,000 worth of tires and Mr. Edwards put in $10,000 worth of insurance coverage. Thus we started out in the company with zero net worth. Although Ivans and I were equal partners, I made it clear that I was to be the boss and make the operating decisions. I drew money from the company for this. I hired a manager, opened a service station, and hauled from Knoxville where the oil came in on barges. Eventually I had thirty trucks, having borrowed money from Mr. Bill Greene, Sr., at Northwestern Bank.

I had a strike once. The ICC set rates I could charge and costs were rising. The drivers asked for a rate increase, but government approval was slow in coming. I told my employees that I had applied for an increase in their pay rates but they did not want to wait. I took the drivers out to dinner at a hotel in Knoxville. I told them I appreciated their work and would like them to do me one favor before they left. That was to drive their trucks to a lot I had in Kingsport so the bank could pick them up there. They conferred for a while and then told me that they had decided to stay on the job.

After six or eight months, I sold my half to Bob Ivans for $11,000.

Oil Distributorship — Pure Oil and Union 76 – Poteat Oil Company.
When I could not buy in with Mr. Peters, because he did not want a partner at the time, I began contacting oil companies about a franchise. I was going to buy into a particular one but got beat out after I thought I had it. That is why I was not the Shell man. I had nothing in writing and a man’s word on the deal turned out to be not good enough.

I asked about Gulf at Johnson City but a Gulf employee got that. I went to a promotion for the opening of a new Phillips distributorship in Statesville, North Carolina, where several of the important company officials were in attendance. There were conflict and confusion about the control of the Kingsport franchise. It was claimed by both the Virginia and the North Carolina region. I then contacted Pure Oil Company. They liked my qualifications. Mr. Clark was a Buick/Olds dealer in Kingsport and GM wanted him out of the oil business which he mostly ran for his car business anyway. They gave me the franchise with one station but they thought I would go broke in a year because it was a strongly competitive situation. Ruth handled the phone calls and I did sales and deliveries. We sold heating oil even in five gallon quantities. Texaco had a good station location (on West Center Street) that might become available. Several companies wanted to get it. I would park my car there at 8:00 a.m. and see my competitors driving by, not stopping while I was there. Finally, the dealer said that he thought maybe no one else was interested and I got the station. I had worked out a deal with Pure Oil by which they would lease it at $300/month but the owner would not take less than $325/month. I arranged to pay the difference myself to get the station, but when I presented the deal to Pure Oil, they agreed to pay the $325. There was a good Gulf dealer down the street – Sam Simpson – and I moved him into the new Pure Oil station (combining a good location with a good dealer who brought most of his customers with him). I bought another lot on Stone Drive and moved Jack Tranbarger over there. Pure Oil did not think this was a good location on the new highway, 11W. I borrowed the money for the lot with a personal note and also bought and installed the pumps. At the time, 30,000 gallons/ month in gasoline sales would qualify you as a member of a top sales club. We got to 40,000 gallons right away and then Pure Oil liked this way of doing business. I had to give a presentation to two or three hundred people and the company used it as a model of the way their dealers should work. I also won a trip to the home office in Chicago for selling record amounts of motor oil; I flew from Knoxville. After the note for the station was paid off, I collected the rent on it.

I had built a little office — maybe eight by ten feet. I told the company I needed a better facility to stock inventory. They approved. I was still working on commission.

Another deal I made: The Exxon dealer in Gate City — he had the Scott County, VA, region — died and his daughters got the business. They did not want to run it and decided to sell out. They had a bulk plant and all, which I did not need (I already had that). They notified their customers on a Friday afternoon that they planned to sell. On Saturday, I contacted all their customers. Phillips 66 was dealing with the sisters for the business, but I dealt directly with the customers. I signed them all except one. One lady said she would sign with me because she could not tell the difference between 66 and 76 anyway! The 66 man then did not take the business because he did not need the plant with no customers.

In 1973, there was a big gas shortage. Cars would lineup and follow delivery trucks to the stations. We taped markers on the gas caps of our regular customers and had to turn others away. I did not have enough gas. I bought gas from the Mobile dealer who had only one station but plenty of gas allocation. I got the county school board quotas raised and I was able to sell to Scott and Sullivan County schools as a 76 dealer.

When I was 70 years old, I sold out of the oil business. I thought you were supposed to get out of business at that age, but I stayed on to run the business for a few years. I also went to work at the bank as director and administrative assistant to the president.

I always gave all my customers good service and the news spread from neighbor to neighbor among heating oil customers. So, I was soon selling more than anyone else. I would go out at any hour – getting two a..m calls for heating oil when people ran out. Once I got a call from a man at a card game, saying they were getting cold and needed oil. I said that I would be glad to bring him more oil when he payed his past bills. The next day he was in the office and paid up.

“Get ahead of your competitors. While they were sleeping, I was out delivering oil.”
East Tennessee Production Credit Association.
After I bought the farm, a director of the East Tennessee Production Credit Association got killed (his own car ran over him at a farm gate). They called me to be a director; I had borrowed some money from them. This was in 1947. They had about $300,000 in loans. I was director and sometimes chairman of the board. We got up to more than $100 million in the loans by the end of my time and lost mighty little money. We would even lend money to a tenant farmer and take a mortgage on the mule. One woman had a loan on her cattle and we went out to count them. She ran them through the barn for us to count. I knew how many she should have had but she tried to run the cattle through more than one time and get them to cover the shortage. She had sold some of the cattle on which we had made the loan.

Our money was from the Federal Bank in Louisville. We had an open note with them. Once we made three loans to highly successful men for quite a bit of money. Louisville did not approve the loans and we were in the hole. The board sent me to Louisville in person with the notes and I got them approved by the Federal Bank.

I worked for the PCA for twenty-seven years.

My Truck Stop.
I started my own truck stop in 1973-74. I had already rented a truck stop on Route 11W, but the new interstate, I-81, had opened and truck traffic began going that way. I located and bought a lot on the new route where I built a new truck stop, restaurant and truck repair service. I had not asked Union Oil about this. When one of their officials was driving on I-81 and saw the new place, he asked how that had happened since he had not approved it. I replied that I did not know their approval was required since I built this on my own.

I had planned to put in a septic tank but the environmental regulations required a sewage system because of the expected number of people. This was a $50,000 expense that I had not planned for.

We ran three shifts there and I had more than a dozen employees including waitresses, cooks, gas pumpers, clerks and mechanics. I had a strike here once also. Some of the people wanted to strike and some did not. They got into real fights among themselves. I finally got a court order that put an end to the strike.

Bank of Tennessee.
When I started the Bank of Tennessee with Mr. W. B. Greene, Sr., First American had turned down a loan to a church in town. Mr. Greene got it for them at Northwestern Bank. We talked it over and decided a local bank was needed and agreed to start one. We began to work on it, sold shares, got a charter, and started out with $200,000 in 1974. It took about six months to get this all set up and get FDIC and State Banking Commission approval. It has now grown to $383 million in assets. We hired a retired banker to operate it – be president of the new bank – and started with him and five “girls.” Mr. Greene had been a bond salesman for Merrill Lynch in Winston Salem before he came to Kingsport and bought a hardware store. Later he built a much bigger store.

When I sold my oil business, I went to work at the bank as director and administrative assistant to the president. I got no salary but was paid a fee. I already had Social Security and did not want to pay any more into that. I was also chairman of the loan committee. Once I approved a loan which the loan officer had worked up for the board and made it look good. However, the loan went bad and Bill Greene wrote me note saying “Why did you do this, John?”. I replied that I had gone on the officer’s word which I was not going to do again. I think we finally collected on the loan.

I have gotten several of the directors on the board from my nominations – Boots Duke, Dr. Stanton (President of ETSU) and Bill Garwood (President of Tennessee Eastman) are some of them

Roy Harmon interviewed with us for loan officer. Bill [Greene, Jr.] and I agreed on him immediately after the interview. He is doing a good job. He is now CEO and Vice President of the Bank of Tennessee.

We tried to have two or three different people come as president. We talked to one from Hamilton Bank in Johnson City but he decided to stay. Bill Smith, who had been in school with me, was at First Tennessee and decided not to change banks.

Real Estate Development.
In the last several years, I have been turning my two farms into residental lots, creating new subdivisions.

My Church.
I have been a life-long member of the Baptist Church. Our family attended the First Baptist Church in Jonesborough. I later moved my membership to the First Baptist Church in Kingsport where I attend now. In 1953, I was a Deacon and Secretary of the Board there.           John H. Poteat
John Howard Poteat, the first child of F. B. "Bela" and Viola (Phillips) Poteat of Jonesborough, TN, was born in Bakersville, NC, on 1 December 1912. Now approaching ninety he can look back with satisfaction over a successful career in a variety of business opportunities but he also looks forward to meeting continuing business challenges in farming, banking and real estate development.

Grandson John Olds says "Granddaddy represents the best in the tradition of American entrepreneurship." All the elements of this theme are contained in a story from his high school days. The Poteat family farm was producing milk and selling it to Pet Milk Company for one dollar per ten gallon can. Young John Poteat felt they could do better by delivering directly to the homes in Jonesborough and selling this milk for ten cents per quart. Arranging with his father for the necessary bottles and the use of a truck, John began rising even earlier in the mornings, bottling and loading the milk and delivering to customers in town. He soon acquired more customers for the rich Guernsey milk with a large head of cream floating in each bottle. At times he also left something extra, like farm apples, with his deliveries. Eventually, his competition withdrew and he was making all the milk deliveries in Jonesborough. He saw a need, recognized an opportunity, took action, delivered a quality product and beat the competition at service. These elements have been repeated in his many other business ventures since that time.

When he attended State Teacher's College in Johnson City, he paid tuition with egg money from the farm. By taking extra course work in summers, he finished his preparation for medical school in just three years. He then began study in UT medical school at Memphis but, during the first year, without funds for food or schooling, he was forced by the conditions of the Great Depression to return home and seek employment. His first job was at Tennessee Eastman for 27 cents/hour.

Some years later, while visiting his grandmother in Spruce Pine, NC, he bought an ice cream cone at the local drug store. It was only a small cone and cost a nickel. Again he recognized a need and saw a business opportunity. He furnished a small building as a production and sales site, obtained ice cream mix from his employer, Pet Dairy, hired a staff and began selling double-dip ice cream cones for a nickel. Although he had a full-time job, he went to Spruce Pine on weekends (weekend business was especially good), worked at night freezing the ice cream and by day dipping and selling ice-cream.

Still later, he began his career in the oil business, both in retail and wholesale operations. Living in Kingsport and working for a man with a successful oil business, he felt he could do better operating his own. Against the advice of his friend and employer about the difficulty of making it go on his own, he began operation. Many times he made sales contracts on small margins and demanding schedules but worked hard to meet customer's requirements. Many times he was called on weekends and late nights by people who had just run out of heating oil or other products. By meeting such needs quickly when no one else would, he built a growing base of loyal customers. One man, with a "private liquor distilling operation", even paid his heating bills a year in advance so that at least his family would be warm even if he ended up cooling his heels in jail.! John saw need and business opportunity, took action and outworked the competition.

In a 1973 conversation with another prominent Kingsport businessman, W. B. Greene, Sr., the topic turned to the need for a local bank. A friend of theirs had been unable to obtain a needed loan locally and Mr. Greene had helped to get the money from a NC bank. John said "We could start our own bank" and after some study this was done. The Bank of Tennessee initially had six employees, one trailer, and sold stock to obtain $ 1.8 million in assets. Today there are 155 employees and over $360 million in total assets. John Poteat continues to serve as Director and Honorary Vice-Chairman of the Board for the Bank of Tennessee and BancTen Corporation where he uses his business experience and knowledge to guide the process of expanding the bank operation and making loans to meet the financial needs of the area.

Later, after having provided well for his family, even including the creation of trust funds for the education of his great-grandchildren, John responded to his own need to expand upon his history of community and church service by giving back to his community some of the results of his success. He focussed on his church and on education. Tuition can no longer be paid with egg money from a family farm, but he felt the importance of making local quality education affordable to all students. Having experienced hard times himself, he wants to help avoid them for other deserving students will to apply themselves to getting an education. Acting upon this interest in education and his experience in banking, he took a leadership role in the development of a Chair of Banking at his alma mater, by now East Tennessee State University. Thanks to his leadership and generous financial support, that school is now a reality.

If asked for a capsule of advice for today's forward looking ETSU student, he might say: For a better life, persevere in your education. Work hard for your employer, client or customer; keep your commitments and deliver more; anticipate needs and outdo your competition. Enjoy the satisfactions of a job well done. Repeat for decades.
                               DWO/2002.09.14.9
     John Poteat - KINGSPORT

KINGSPORT — John H. Poteat, 93 of Fairidge Drive, died Saturday, June 17, 2006 at Holston Valley Medical Center.

Born in Bakersville, North Carolina on December 1, 1912, John Howard Poteat was the son of the late F. Bela and Viola (Phillips) Poteat. He was a graduate of Jonesboro High School, attended State Teacher’s College (now ETSU) and the Tennessee Medical School in Memphis.

Since coming to Kingsport, Mr. Poteat had been involved in several business and civic ventures and owned two farms. He was the owner of Poteat Oil Company, owned and operated a truck stop on I-81, and was a founding director of Bank of Tennessee where he served as vice chairman on the loan committee. He also served with the East Tennessee Production Credit Association for twenty-seven years. In recent years he had also been active in creating residential communities on his farms. ETSU, where he helped establish the Poteat Chair of Banking, Carson-Newman College, where he was a major donor to the Blye-Poteat Building for Consumer Sciences, and the First Baptist Churches of Jonesborough and Kingsport, were among his several philanthropic interests. He served as a senior deacon of the First Baptist Church of Kingsport.

Mr. Poteat was preceded in death by his loving wife Ruth Whitlock Poteat, who died in 2002, a sister, Ann Childress of Avon Park, FL and a brother, F.B. “Dick” Poteat of Jonesborough.

He is survived by his daughter, Betty P. Olds and husband Dan W. of Spartanburg, SC; granddaughter, Linda O. Burrell of Moore, SC; grandson, John R. Olds and wife Melinda of Dunwoody, GA; three great-grandchildren, Brandon Burrell, Maranda Burrell and Davis Olds; sister, Becky Sims of Jonesborough; brother, James M. Poteat of Johnson City; several nieces and nephews.

Calling hours will be from 12:30-2:00 PM on Tuesday June 20, 2006 at First Baptist Church of Kingsport.

Services will follow at 2:00 PM at the church with Dr. Marvin Cameron officiating. Entombment will follow in Oak Hill Mausoleum. Pallbearers will be Steve Poteat, Jerry Poteat, Paul Spears, Jeff Anderson, Walter Crough, Bryan Larkin, Jack Thweatt, James Stapleton, Robert Hilton, Bill Greene and Roy Harmon. Honorary pallbearers will be the Big Brothers Sunday School Class of First Baptist Church.

The family is grateful to his caretakers, Ernestine, Dale, Martha, Helen, Kay and Patti for the excellent care he received over the last few years.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in his name to the College Scholarship Fund of the First Baptist Church of Kingsport, 200 West Church Circle, Kingsport, TN 37660 or to the charity of one’s choice.

Condolences may be sent to the family online at www.cartertrent.com.

Carter-Trent Funeral Home, Kingsport, is serving the Poteat family.10

Citations

  1. [S566] John Poteat entry, Delayed Birth Record, delayed birth registration, filed 25 Nov. 1969, based on affadavit of father, Bible Record of father, and insurance policy issued to John H. Poteat in 1949 (1 Dec 1912).
  2. [S49] Poteat-Whitlock marriage.
  3. [S110] "Meet The New P. C. A. Faces", a one-page photocopy in the papers of John H. Poteat.
  4. [S1098] Kingsport Man Retires from Area PCA Board, Sullivan County News, 26 Feb 1976, p. 1.
  5. [S1099] PCA annual repoort, brochure, 1975 personal files.
  6. [S1083] (photo of presentation), Kingsport Times, 6 March 1957, p. 16.
  7. [S110] An undated clipping, probably from the Kingsport newspaper. An earlier article, announcing the selection of directors W. B. Greene, Sr., W. B. Greene, Jr., Herman W. Blevins, William Allen Exum, M. D., John H. Poteat, Charles B. Duke, IV, Frank M. Herman, Clifford E. Sanders, Holiday H. Smith, Pat Basinger, Jr., and Cham H. Percer to serve until the first annual shareholder's meeting, showed a drawing of a proposed main office building that never got built. An article from the Kingsport Daily News of Jan. 21, 1976, showed a drawing of an office building at the corner of Cherokee and Center Streets that was to be completed by June 1. This building became reality.
  8. [S110] "Our First 233 Days", Bank of Tennessee, 31 Dec. 1974.
  9. [S110] These are notes I prepared for use by ETSU when they honored John Poteat by the establishment of the John H. Poteat Chair of Banking. There were printed (essentially unchanged) in the program for this event, 24 Oct 2002.
  10. [S1063] John Poteat -- Kingsport, obit of John Howard Poteat, 19 June 2006, online.

Alma Ruth Whitlock (F)
b. 15 September 1911, d. 10 November 2002
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=11 Sep 2006

     Alma Ruth Whitlock was born on 15 September 1911 at Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee.1 She was the daughter of William Jacob Whitlock and Ella Mae Warwick. Alma Ruth Whitlock married John Howard Poteat, son of Frank Bela Poteat and Cora Viola Phillips, on 6 July 1934 at Bristol, Virginia.2 Alma Ruth Whitlock died on 10 November 2002 at Hawkins County, Tennessee, at age 91. On Sunday morning, 10 Nov. 2002, we received a call from the nursing home that Ruth had passed away. She had been unresponsive for about a year and we had been warned on Thursday that the end was near.3 She was buried at Oak Hill Mausoleum, Kingsport, Sullivan County, Tennessee.3
     
     Ruth was active in a Kingsport Child Guidance Group during Betty's time in school. Their members were mothers from all the elementary schools. The 1948-49 Yearbook lists her as past president for 1946-47. She was a member in 1947-49 and 1948-49 when her address was 1463 Garden Drive, Kingsport. In 1948, she was one of the hostesses for the May meeting (a joint meeting with a Child Study Club).
     Ruth served as president of the Junior PTA for the academic years 1948-49 and 1949-50. Her election was reported at the last meeting of the prior year, 8 May 1948. The theme for her first year was "Your Child is Growing Up" and many of the group activities for the year were reported in the Kingsport Times News. One article reported that there were 490 members. Meetings sometimes had as many as 500 mothers and fathers attending. At Ruth's final meeting as president, "Mrs. C. B. Duke [treasurer], presented Mrs. Poteat with past president's pin in recognition of her work as leader of the organization for the past two years." She had represented the Junior High School PTA in at least 13 outside group meetings during the 1948-49 year.4

Citations

  1. [S380] Whitlock, Alma Ruth, Birth Certificate, City of Knoxville, No. 123, Alma Ruth Whitlock, b. at 8 a.m. Sept 15, 1911, legitimate child of Wm. Jacob Whitlock and Ella May Warwick, of 311 McGhee Street, Ward 9, Knoxville, Tennessee. Her father was 27 years old, worked in a cotton mill, and was born in Tennessee. Her mother was 29 years old, born in Tennessee, and was a housekeeper. This was the first child born to this mother..
  2. [S49] Poteat-Whitlock marriage.
  3. [S567] Certificate of Death.
  4. [S110] Ruth kept a scrap book of news paper clippings of the Junior High PTA activities during her tenure. The 1948-49 annual report was a mimeograph list of events and programs.

John Jefferson Manion (M)
Last Edited=5 Apr 2004

     John Jefferson Manion married Frances Eleanor Morrison.

Frances Eleanor Morrison (F)
b. 27 August 1914, d. 26 November 1992
Last Edited=30 Mar 2005

     Frances Eleanor Morrison was born on 27 August 1914.1 She married John Jefferson Manion. Frances Eleanor Morrison appears in the Social Security Death Index as having died 26 November 1992 with the last place of residence listed as Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois. Frances Eleanor's SSN was issued in Illinois|27 Aug 1914.1

Citations

  1. [S97] Death report, SSDI, internet file.

Justin Hixon Olds (M)
b. 4 September 1806, d. 30 November 1878
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=3 Feb 2007

     Justin Hixon Olds was born on 4 September 1806 at Belchertown, Massachusetts. He was the son of Jonathan Olds and Lucy Wood. Justin Hixon Olds married Charity Louisa Bryant, daughter of Peter Bryant and Sarah Snell, on 15 June 1837 at Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois. Justin Hixon Olds died on 30 November 1878 at Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois, at age 72. He was buried at Oakland Cemetery, Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois.
     "Died.
"At Peoria, November 30th, 1878, of disease of the heart, Justin Hixon Olds.
"Mr. Olds was born in Belchertown, Mass., in September 1806.
"In the spring of 1836 he came to Princeton with Mr. Daniel King, and under the firm name of King & Olds opened a general stock of goods in a small building on Main street, near the present site of Winter & Cushing's drug store. Subsequently with Mr. John M. Gay, the firm of Gay & Olds kept a general country store on Main Street about where Gustin's now is.
"During the years 1839-1843 Mr. Olds resided on a farm in Lamoille, returning to Princeton in the fall of 1843, he formed a partnership with Mr. J. H. Bryant, continuing for two years. In the fall of 1848 he was elected clerk of the Circuit serving acceptably in that office four years.
"In 1852 he bought the 'Princeton Advocate,' changed the name to the 'Princeton Post,' and continued its publication as a weekly paper for two years. From 1852 to 1859 he was agent for eastern capitalists loaning money in this vicinity. In 1859 with Messrs. J. H. Bryant and Rufus Carey, he formed a partnership under the firm name Carey, Olds & Co., for the transaction of banking and exchange business, continuing until the financial troubles incident to the breaking out of the rebellion led to the winding up of the business.
"In 1863 he was appointed revenue inspector at Peoria, in which office he earned a reputation for honesty and accuracy that was evidenced by his continuance in that position under the changes of administration until his death.
"Mr. Olds was married on the 31st day of July 1837 to Louisa C. Bryant, sister of Mr. John H. Bryant. This marriage was the first solemnized in the new county of Bureau. Mrs. Olds died Dec. 13th, 1867. Five children were born to them of whom three survive.
"Such is the record of leading events in the live of Mr. Olds. Few are left who greeted the new comer in 1836, and there are probably not very many in the county who knew him during his later years of residence here.
"His was not a life marked by any conspicuous episodes, his temperament was retiring and although firm in his connections was not apt to attempt proselyting others.
"He was a member of the Congregational church and for several years one of the deacons of that church in this place.
"In politics he was an early and active antislavery man and later republican.
"Industrious in his business; honest and straightforward in his intercourse with his fellow men; liberal and public spirited, kind and obliging to all; he has left a memory that is a precious legacy to his family and friends."1

Children of Justin Hixon Olds and Charity Louisa Bryant
Sarah Snell Olds+ b. 1 Apr 1839, d. 16 Mar 1908
Julia Louisa Olds b. 7 Jul 1840, d. 18 Feb 1891
Bryant Olds b. 22 Oct 1843, d. 25 Apr 1851
John Hixon Olds+ b. 21 May 1847, d. 8 Jul 1901
Lucy Wood Olds b. 29 Apr 1849, d. 27 Feb 1868

Citations

  1. [S110] Bureau County Republican (Princeton, Illinois). 23 Jan. 1899, page 4, col. 4.

Charity Louisa Bryant (F)
b. 20 December 1805, d. 13 December 1868
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=3 Feb 2007

     Charity Louisa Bryant was born on 20 December 1805 at Cummington, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Peter Bryant and Sarah Snell. Charity Louisa Bryant married Justin Hixon Olds, son of Jonathan Olds and Lucy Wood, on 15 June 1837 at Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois. Charity Louisa Bryant died on 13 December 1868 at Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois, at age 62. She was buried after 13 December 1968 at Oakland Cemetery, Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois.

Children of Charity Louisa Bryant and Justin Hixon Olds
Sarah Snell Olds+ b. 1 Apr 1839, d. 16 Mar 1908
Julia Louisa Olds b. 7 Jul 1840, d. 18 Feb 1891
Bryant Olds b. 22 Oct 1843, d. 25 Apr 1851
John Hixon Olds+ b. 21 May 1847, d. 8 Jul 1901
Lucy Wood Olds b. 29 Apr 1849, d. 27 Feb 1868

Sarah Snell Olds (F)
b. 1 April 1839, d. 16 March 1908
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=25 Sep 2003

     Sarah Snell Olds was born on 1 April 1839 at Lamoille, Bureau County, Illinois. She was the daughter of Justin Hixon Olds and Charity Louisa Bryant. Sarah Snell Olds married Newell Mathews on 4 July 1868 at Illinois. Sarah Snell Olds died on 16 March 1908 at Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, at age 68. She was buried at Evergreen Cemetery, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California.

Children of Sarah Snell Olds and Newell Mathews
Julia Mathews b. 20 Oct 1874, d. 3 Dec 1951
Ellen Mathews b. 27 May 1877, d. 15 Jan 1933
Bryant Mathews b. 8 Jan 1881, d. 27 Oct 1931

Julia Louisa Olds (F)
b. 7 July 1840, d. 18 February 1891
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=25 Sep 2003

     Julia Louisa Olds was born on 7 July 1840 at Lamoille, Bureau County, Illinois. She was the daughter of Justin Hixon Olds and Charity Louisa Bryant. Julia Louisa Olds married James S. Barkman on 10 February 1886. Julia Louisa Olds died on 18 February 1891 at Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois, at age 50. She was buried at Oakland Cemetery, Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois.
     Julia Louisa Olds no children.

Bryant Olds (M)
b. 22 October 1843, d. 25 April 1851
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=25 Sep 2003

     Bryant Olds was born on 22 October 1843 at Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois. He was the son of Justin Hixon Olds and Charity Louisa Bryant. Bryant Olds died on 25 April 1851 at Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois, at age 7. He was buried at Oakland Cemetery, Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois.

John Hixon Olds (M)
b. 21 May 1847, d. 8 July 1901
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=3 Feb 2007

     John Hixon Olds was born on 21 May 1847 at Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois. He was the son of Justin Hixon Olds and Charity Louisa Bryant. John Hixon Olds married Anna Belle Krimmel, daughter of Samuel Krimmel and Hester Dunn, on 15 April 1869 at Bureau County, Illinois. John Hixon Olds died on 8 July 1901 at Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois, at age 54. He was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery, Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.
     
John Hixon Olds appeared on the census of 2 June 1900 at Waynet village, Bureau County, Illinois. The listing shows:
Olds, John H., head, b. May 1847, age 53, m. 31 years, b. Ill., parents b. Massachusetts
, Anna B., wife, b. Oct 1850, age 49, m. 31 years, had 9 children, 8 living, p. Penn., parents b. Penn.
, Guy M., son, b. Sep 1877, age 22
, Lucy W., dau., b. Oct 18??, age 19
, John C., son, b. July 1882, age 17
, Myra D., dau, b. Aug 1884, 1 age 15.1

Children of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel
Bryant Olds+ b. 17 Feb 1870, d. 14 Dec 1929
Infant Son Olds b. 9 Sep 1871, d. 28 Sep 1871
Howard Olds+ b. 26 Aug 1872, d. 12 Jul 1928
Edna Olds+ b. 14 Feb 1874, d. 29 Jan 1923
Blanche Olds+ b. 5 Nov 1876, d. 24 Dec 1942
Guy Melvin Olds b. 7 Sep 1877, d. 14 Feb 1916
Lucy W. Olds b. 23 Oct 1879, d. 23 Feb 1943
John Cullen Olds+ b. 8 Jul 1882, d. 20 Oct 1936
Myra Darlene Olds b. 1 Aug 1884, d. 10 May 1960

Citations

  1. [S701] 1900 federal census of Bureau County, Illinois. Microfilm image online.

Lucy Wood Olds (F)
b. 29 April 1849, d. 27 February 1868
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=25 Sep 2003

     Lucy Wood Olds was born on 29 April 1849. She was the daughter of Justin Hixon Olds and Charity Louisa Bryant. Lucy Wood Olds died on 27 February 1868 at age 18. She was buried at Oakland Cemetery, Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois.

Newell Mathews (M)
b. 1834, d. 30 January 1907
Last Edited=4 Dec 2000

     Newell Mathews was born in 1834. He married Sarah Snell Olds, daughter of Justin Hixon Olds and Charity Louisa Bryant, on 4 July 1868 at Illinois. Newell Mathews died on 30 January 1907 at Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California. He was buried at Evergreen Cemetery, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California.

Children of Newell Mathews and Sarah Snell Olds
Julia Mathews b. 20 Oct 1874, d. 3 Dec 1951
Ellen Mathews b. 27 May 1877, d. 15 Jan 1933
Bryant Mathews b. 8 Jan 1881, d. 27 Oct 1931

Julia Mathews (F)
b. 20 October 1874, d. 3 December 1951
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=11 Sep 2001

     Julia Mathews was born on 20 October 1874. She was the daughter of Newell Mathews and Sarah Snell Olds. Julia Mathews died on 3 December 1951 at age 77.
     BIRTH! may be 20 Oct 1875
MARR! died single.

Ellen Mathews (F)
b. 27 May 1877, d. 15 January 1933
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=11 Sep 2001

     Ellen Mathews was born on 27 May 1877. She was the daughter of Newell Mathews and Sarah Snell Olds. Ellen Mathews died on 15 January 1933 at age 55.
     MARR! died single.

Bryant Mathews (M)
b. 8 January 1881, d. 27 October 1931
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=11 Dec 2005

     Bryant Mathews was born on 8 January 1881. He was the son of Newell Mathews and Sarah Snell Olds. Bryant Mathews died on 27 October 1931 at age 50.
     Bryant Mathews no known children; none survived him. Gladys thought Bryant had
children. Need to check further, but none appear with him in the census records through 1930.
He registered with the World War I Selective Service System on 12 September 1918 at Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California. He described himself as living at 1843 N. Cahuenga Avenue, Los Angeles, California, age 37, born 8 Jan 1881, and his occupation was illegible, working for an investment company at 211 W. 7th Street in Los Angeles. He was medium in height, medium in build, with blue eyes and had black and grey hair. His closest relative was Jessie Gillmore Mathews, also of 1843 N. Cahuenga Avenue.1

Citations

  1. [S894] Ancestry.com, registration card images, used in Nov. 2005.

James S. Barkman (M)
Last Edited=11 Sep 2001

     James S. Barkman married Julia Louisa Olds, daughter of Justin Hixon Olds and Charity Louisa Bryant, on 10 February 1886.
     James S. Barkman of Baltimore attended the funeral of John Hixon Olds (per
obit). Julia and James had no childen.

Anna Belle Krimmel (F)
b. 2 October 1849, d. 21 May 1937
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=3 Feb 2007

     Anna Belle Krimmel was born on 2 October 1849 at Juniata County, Pennsylvania. She was the daughter of Samuel Krimmel and Hester Dunn. Anna Belle Krimmel married John Hixon Olds, son of Justin Hixon Olds and Charity Louisa Bryant, on 15 April 1869 at Bureau County, Illinois. Anna Belle Krimmel died on 21 May 1937 at Bureau County, Illinois, at age 87. She was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery, Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.

Children of Anna Belle Krimmel and John Hixon Olds
Bryant Olds+ b. 17 Feb 1870, d. 14 Dec 1929
Infant Son Olds b. 9 Sep 1871, d. 28 Sep 1871
Howard Olds+ b. 26 Aug 1872, d. 12 Jul 1928
Edna Olds+ b. 14 Feb 1874, d. 29 Jan 1923
Blanche Olds+ b. 5 Nov 1876, d. 24 Dec 1942
Guy Melvin Olds b. 7 Sep 1877, d. 14 Feb 1916
Lucy W. Olds b. 23 Oct 1879, d. 23 Feb 1943
John Cullen Olds+ b. 8 Jul 1882, d. 20 Oct 1936
Myra Darlene Olds b. 1 Aug 1884, d. 10 May 1960

Bryant Olds (M)
b. 17 February 1870, d. 14 December 1929
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=3 Feb 2007

     Bryant Olds was born on 17 February 1870. He was the son of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel. Bryant Olds married Anna Maria Sophia Schmidt, daughter of Wilhelm Henrich Theodor Schmidt and Wilhelmina Hopp, on 1 November 1893 at Wyanet Township, Bureau County, Illinois. Bryant Olds died on 14 December 1929 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, at age 59. He was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery, Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.
     His death certificate, Cook County, IL, for Bryant Olds, 410 West 60th Place, Chicago, with informant Milford H. Olds, shows Bryant Olds, b. 17 Feb. 1870, at Wyanet, IL, died 14 Dec. 1929 at age 59 years, 9 months, 27 days. He was survived by his wife Anna Olds and was born in Wyanet, IL, the son of John H. Olds, b. Princeton, IL, and Annabelle Krimmel, b. ______, PA. Bryant died of ulcerative endocarditis with arteriosclerosis.

Children of Bryant Olds and Anna Maria Sophia Schmidt
Milford Hixon Olds+ b. 21 Dec 1894, d. 28 Oct 1972
Austin Bryant Olds b. 17 Aug 1904, d. 8 Dec 1970
Robert Lee Olds+ b. 7 Mar 1913, d. 15 Aug 1991

Infant Son Olds (M)
b. 9 September 1871, d. 28 September 1871
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=11 Sep 2001

     Infant Son Olds was born on 9 September 1871. He was the son of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel. Infant Son Olds died on 28 September 1871 at age 0.

Howard Olds (M)
b. 26 August 1872, d. 12 July 1928
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=19 Jun 2005

     Howard Olds was born on 26 August 1872 at family farm, new Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois. He was the son of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel. Howard Olds married Eva Kennelly on 10 May 1897 at Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.1 Howard Olds died on 12 July 1928 at age 55. He was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery, Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.2
     The name of Howard Olds, along with Ora. R. Everett and John M. Wyatt, was on the “Women’s Specimen Ballot” for the Primary Election, Village of Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois, Tuesday, March 11, 1919. The three names were for members of the board of trustees and voters were to vote for three (write-in lines also provided).3

I have three newspaper clippings reporting the death of Howard Olds.

     “HOWARD OLDS, Prominent in Civic Life of Town for Years”
     “Spends entire life in Bureau County; Former Fire Dept. Chief”
(Special to Star-Courier)
“Wyanet, July 13. -- Howard Olds, one of our oldest and best known citizens, met the call of his maker at 3 p.m. Thursday. Mr. Olds was always active in civil and social life in this community, having served as trustee of the village board of Wyanet for fourteen years and as chief of Wyanet fire department for twenty-seven years, retiring five years ago when he reached the age limit and was voted an honorary chief for life by the members of the department.
“Mr. Olds was born in Wyanet township Aug. 26, 1872, and lived his entire life in the community. He was a member of the hardware firm of Olds & Hamilton for twenty-six years. Mr. Olds served as a helper to his father for fourteen years previous to his acquiring a share in the firm of Olds and Hamilton, after the death of his father in 1901.
“Mr. Olds was a kind and loving father, a pleasant neighbor and a loyal citizen, an enemy to none and a friend to all. Although his health had been very poor for the past few years he worked faithfully until a year ago, when he retired. His passing is a great shock to his many friends in and around Wyanet and he will be missed by all who knew him.
“Funeral arrangements have as yet not been completed."4
     ---     ---     ---     ---     ---     ---

           “OBITUARY
          “HOWARD OLDS
“Wyanet has lost one of its most beloved and loyal citizens. Howard Olds has closed his eyes in that dreamless sleep from which there is no awakening on this troubled earth. For months he had calmly and uncomplainingly suffered from a devastating illness which slowly wasted away his strength until Death mercifully relieved him Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock.
“He paused on life’s highway almost in the morning of his manhood and while the shadows were still falling toward the West. Loved and loving, brother, husband, father, friend, he was taken just at the point where life’s great beauties lay before him. During all his life, one of the busiest of men, he always found time to lend a helping hand, and were everyone for whom he had paused to do some loving kindness, to bring a blossom to his grave, he would sleep beneath a wilderness of flowers.
“Howard was the second son of John Hixon and Anna Belle Krimmel Olds, and was born on a farm three miles south of Wyanet on August 26, 1872. When he was seven years old, he moved with his parents to Wyanet where he lived until his death. He was educated in the Wyanet public school. When he was sixteen years old, he went to Galesburg to learn the tinner’s trade and after three years entered his father’s hardware store in Wyanet to ply his trade. After the death of his father in 1901, he entered partnership with W. H. Hamilton, and from then until about a year before his death continued in the hardware business at the same location. He was forced to retire last June because of failing health.
“All of his life he was active in local civic affairs and took a keen interest in the political affairs of his state and nation. For twenty-seven years he was chief of the Wyanet Fire Department and served on the Wyanet village board for eighteen years. He also served two terms as tax collector for the township.
“He was united in marriage at Wyanet with Eva Kennelly on May 12, 1897.5 To this union were born two children, Justin K. Olds, of Marseilles, and Miss Bernadine, at home. Besides his wife and children he is survived and mourned by his mother, Mrs. Anna Belle Olds, of Wyanet, one grandson, Richard Olds, of Marseilles, two brothers Bryant and John C., of Wyanet, and three sisters, Mrs. Monroe G. Whitney, of Couer d’Alene, Idaho, Mrs. Charles Webster, of Portland, Ore., and Mrs. George Dahl, of Wyanet.
“Howard Olds will be more than missed, not alone by his family but by all who knew him. His life was an exemplification of all that is good and wholesome and kindly. In his home life he personified to a remarkable degree the noblest type of husband, father, brother and son. In his community he was the sort of man to be pointed out as an example of right living to the young generation. He was indeed one of Nature’s noblemen. He sleeps but his memory lives and will continue to live in the hearts of all who knew him as long as love, virtue, faith, and righteousness guide our lives. There was -- there is -- no gentler, kindlier, nobler, manlier man.
“Funeral services were held at the residence Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, Father John D. Ring of Princeton, in charge of the services. The large assemblage of friends at the service and the beautiful floral tributes showed the esteem with which he was held in the community. Interment was at the Forest Hill cemetery.”6
     ---     ---     ---     ---     ---     ---

“HOWARD OLDS PASSES AWAY
“Funeral Services Last Sunday Largely Attended
(picture of Howard Olds)
“For the past two or three years we have known that our friend, indeed everybody’s friend, Howard Olds, was suffering from a stubborn ailment. Nevertheless when news passed around last Thursday afternoon that he was gone it was a distinct shock.
“The funeral service last Sunday afternoon from his former home was notable because of the great throng of people who desired to show their sincere regards for him and sympathy for the bereaved family. Father Ring, pastor of St. Margaret’s church, conducted the service, and paid eloquent tribute to the life and memory of his friend. His remarks were based on the 13th chapter of first Corinthians and he showed how in a remarkable degree the life of Howard Olds paralleled that beautiful passage.
“A quartet composed of Mrs. Con Brown, Mrs. J. W. Wyatt, John Calloway and R. C. Prettyman sang appropriate selections, accompanied by Mrs. Lee Oloffson. The floral tributes were numerous and beautiful.
“Preceding his remarks, Father Ring read the following Obituary."7
(Here follows a quote essentially identical to the obituary reprinted above, beginning ‘Wyanet has lost one of its most loved and loyal citizens’.)

(from the diary of Anna Schmidt Olds, 12 July 1928)
“Howard passed away at 3 p.m. Howard was the most patient sufferer I ever seen never groaned or moaned never complained Only if asked he would say “I have an awfull head ache.” and when he said that it was bad. I have lost one of the best friends I ever had. kind to every one, always the same one man quite.”.8

Children of Howard Olds and Eva Kennelly
Justin Kennelly Olds+ b. 10 Jun 1902, d. 10 Apr 1964
Bernadine Olds b. 17 Sep 1907, d. 25 Feb 1989

Citations

  1. [S110] This date is from his parents' Bible. His Bureau County Republican obituary gives the day as May 12.
  2. [S110] The tombstone gives the year of birth and of death (my photo).
  3. [S110] Review (newspaper, Wyanet, Illinois). Wednesday, March 5, 1919.
  4. [S110] Kewanee Star-Courier (Kewanee, Illinois). Friday, July 13, 1928. (I have presumed this to be the name of the paper from the internal evidence).
  5. [S110] But I have used the date taken from the Bible record, 10 May 1897.
  6. [S110] Bureau County Republican (Princeton, Illinois). Thursday, July 19, 1928.
  7. [S110] Wyanet Record (Wyanet, Illinois). July 19, 1928. I have this issue of the newspaper in my collection and on it some one has written Howards obituary written by Milford.'
  8. [S657] "Diary of Anna Olds,".

Edna Olds (F)
b. 14 February 1874, d. 29 January 1923
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=11 Sep 2001

     Edna Olds was born on 14 February 1874. She was the daughter of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel. Edna Olds married Elmer Sapp, son of Andrew Sapp and Ann Eliza Ziegler, on 15 October 1891 at Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.1 Edna Olds died on 29 January 1923 at age 48.

Child of Edna Olds and Elmer Sapp
Gladys Marguerite Sapp+ b. 13 Jun 1894, d. Sep 1981

Citations

  1. [S51] Unknown author, "Ziegler Family Bible".

Blanche Olds (F)
b. 5 November 1876, d. 24 December 1942
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=25 Sep 2003

     Blanche Olds was born on 5 November 1876 at near Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois. She was the daughter of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel. Blanche Olds married Monroe Gesner Whitney on 3 December 1899 at Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois. Blanche Olds died on 24 December 1942 at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, at age 66.

Children of Blanche Olds and Monroe Gesner Whitney
Dorothy Maxine Whitney b. 7 Dec 1900, d. 30 Mar 1990
Merrill Roderick Whitney+ b. 19 Oct 1903, d. 6 Aug 1958

Guy Melvin Olds (M)
b. 7 September 1877, d. 14 February 1916
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=25 Sep 2003

     Guy Melvin Olds was born on 7 September 1877. He was the son of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel. Guy Melvin Olds died on 14 February 1916 at 911 Fisher Street, Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois, at age 38. He was buried on 16 February 1916 at Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.
     His death record, with informant Mrs. Guy M. Olds, shows he was born 7 Sept. 1877, the son of John H. Olds, b. in IL, and Anabel Crimmel, b. PA. He was 38 years, 5 months, 7 days old when he died on 14 Feb. 1916 of interstitial nephritis and uremia. His last occupation was Government Storekeeper.

Lucy W. Olds (F)
b. 23 October 1879, d. 23 February 1943
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=26 Jul 2006

     Lucy W. Olds was born on 23 October 1879. She was the daughter of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel. Lucy W. Olds married Charles Jeremiah Webster. Lucy W. Olds died on 23 February 1943 at age 63.
     She is called Lucy W. in the death record of her father. If the W. stood
for anything, her name was probably Lucy Wood as it had been for earlier
members of the family. Her death date is from her obituary in the Oregonian
(Portland, OR) 25 Feb. 1943.

John Cullen Olds1 (M)
b. 8 July 1882, d. 20 October 1936
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=12 Feb 2007

     John Cullen Olds was born on 8 July 1882 at near Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois. He was the son of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel. John Cullen Olds married Dorothy Guthrie on 21 June 1914. John Cullen Olds died on 20 October 1936 at Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois, at age 54. He was buried on 22 October 1936 at Forest Hill Cemetery, Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.2
     His death certificate, with informant Dorothy Olds, states that we was born 8 July in Wyanet and died 20 Oct. 1936 in Wyanet, IL, at age 54 years, 2 months(?), 12 days. He was the son of John H. Olds, b. Princeton, IL, and Anna B. Krimmel, b. PA. He had been a hardware clerk for 34 years and died of cerebral hemorrage due to _____ hypertension after having chronic hypertension for several years.
He registered with the World War I Selective Service System on 12 September 1918. He described himself as living 199 Earl Avenue, Muscatine, Iowa, age 36, born 8 July 1889, and his occupation was Retail Clerk for Dethoff Hardware Company. He was medium in height, slender in build, with blue eyes and had light hair. His closest relative was Dorothy C[sic]. Olds, also of 199 Earl Avenue.3

Children of John Cullen Olds and Dorothy Guthrie
Ardeth Mae Olds b. 17 Apr 1915, d. 13 Sep 1983
Anna Elizabeth Olds+ b. 7 Aug 1921, d. 24 Oct 2001

Citations

  1. [S894] Ancestry.com, registration card images, used in Nov. 2005, which provides his middle name.
  2. [S1326] Tombstone, Forest Hill Cemetery, Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.
  3. [S894] Ancestry.com, registration card images, used in Nov. 2005.

Myra Darlene Olds (F)
b. 1 August 1884, d. 10 May 1960
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=11 Sep 2001

     Myra Darlene Olds was born on 1 August 1884. She was the daughter of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel. Myra Darlene Olds died on 10 May 1960 at age 75.

Anna Maria Sophia Schmidt (F)
b. 18 November 1874, d. 11 December 1966
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=3 Feb 2007

     Anna Maria Sophia Schmidt was born on 18 November 1874 at Searle's Ridge, Depue, Bureau County, Illinois. She was the daughter of Wilhelm Henrich Theodor Schmidt and Wilhelmina Hopp. Anna Maria Sophia Schmidt married Bryant Olds, son of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel, on 1 November 1893 at Wyanet Township, Bureau County, Illinois. Anna Maria Sophia Schmidt died on 11 December 1966 at Illinois at age 92.

Children of Anna Maria Sophia Schmidt and Bryant Olds
Milford Hixon Olds+ b. 21 Dec 1894, d. 28 Oct 1972
Austin Bryant Olds b. 17 Aug 1904, d. 8 Dec 1970
Robert Lee Olds+ b. 7 Mar 1913, d. 15 Aug 1991

Milford Hixon Olds (M)
b. 21 December 1894, d. 28 October 1972
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=27 May 2007

     Milford Hixon Olds was born on 21 December 1894 at Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois. From an autobiographical statement given to June Olds
!MARR: from autobio. statement given to June Olds
Myrle and Milford were divorced, remarrried, redivorced
Milford's wife Suzanne had at least one son by a previous marriage.
In Arizona a Mrs. Hazel "Sha" Thomas lived with Milford and eventually
got the Arizona homestead. She died in 1978 at the age of 90. [Pearle Olds, letter to Robert and Doris Olds, 20 Feb. 1985].
He was the son of Bryant Olds and Anna Maria Sophia Schmidt. Milford Hixon Olds married Myrle Elizabeth Schell, daughter of Charles Schell and Louise Banta, on 27 February 1919. Milford Hixon Olds died on 28 October 1972 at age 77.
     Milford Hixon Olds registered with the World War I Selective Service System on 5 June 1917. He described himself as living in Tiskilwa, Illinois, age 22, born 21 Dec 1894 in Wyanet, Illinois, and his occupation was farmer for Bryant Olds in Indiantown[ship, Bureau County]. He was medium in height, medium in build, with grey eyes and had brown hair.1

Citations

  1. [S894] Ancestry.com, registration card images, used in Nov. 2005.

Austin Bryant Olds (M)
b. 17 August 1904, d. 8 December 1970
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=30 Mar 2005

     Austin Bryant Olds was born on 17 August 1904. He was the son of Bryant Olds and Anna Maria Sophia Schmidt. Austin Bryant Olds married Pearle K. Fletcher on 30 August 1926.1 Austin Bryant Olds died on 8 December 1970 at Fort Myers, Lee County, Florida, at age 66. He was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery, Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.

Citations

  1. [S50] Doris Olds, birthdate book, 1954 Library and papers of Doris R. Olds.

Eva Kennelly (F)
b. 21 July 1873, d. 26 November 1951
Last Edited=19 Jun 2005

     Eva Kennelly was born on 21 July 1873.1 She married Howard Olds, son of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel, on 10 May 1897 at Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.2 Eva Kennelly died on 26 November 1951 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, at age 78.3 She was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery, Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.4,5
     “Aunt Ev”, as I called her, is buried in Forest Hill Cemetery, Wyanet, IL. She lived in a large house on an corner of the same block that my grandmother lived on and my early memories are that there were no other houses on the block.

Services Today for Mrs. Olds
" Funeral services for Mrs. Eva E. Olds, 78, Wyanet, will be held at 10 a. m. today at St. Margaret's church in Wyanet. The Rev. Fr. Edward Farrell, Princeton, the Rev. Fr. Leo Goggins, Chicago, and Rev. Fr. Wilber Brines, Chicago, will officiate. Burial will be at Forest Hill Cemetery.
"Mrs. Olds died at 7:30 p. m. Monday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. William Smith, in Chicago. Rosary was recited Wednesday evening in the Sutley Funeral home, Wyanet.
"Surviving are a son, Justin K. Olds, Wyanet; on[e] daughter, Mrs. William Smith, Chicago; two brothers, George and William Kennelly, Blue Island; one sister, Mrs. Ed Werner, Tiskilwa; one grandson, Richard Olds, Wyanet; and one great granddaughter, Janet."6

Children of Eva Kennelly and Howard Olds
Justin Kennelly Olds+ b. 10 Jun 1902, d. 10 Apr 1964
Bernadine Olds b. 17 Sep 1907, d. 25 Feb 1989

Citations

  1. [S658] Letter, Bernadine Olds Smith to Dan W. Olds, 11 April 1971.
  2. [S110] This date is from his parents' Bible. His Bureau County Republican obituary gives the day as May 12.
  3. [S658] Letter, Bernadine Olds Smith to Dan W. Olds, 11 April 1971, to which I have added the place of death from the obituary..
  4. [S654] Letter, Richard J. Olds to Dan W. Olds, 11 Apr 1971.
  5. [S110] The tombstone gives the year of birth and of death (my photo).
  6. [S659] Bureau County Republican, Thursday, Nov. 29, 1951, p. 5 Col. 3.

Justin Kennelly Olds (M)
b. 10 June 1902, d. 10 April 1964
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=19 Jun 2005

     Justin Kennelly Olds was born on 10 June 1902. He was the son of Howard Olds and Eva Kennelly. Justin Kennelly Olds married Loretta E. Stephen on 23 November 1926 at St. Raymond's, (where?).1 Justin Kennelly Olds died on 10 April 1964 at Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois, at age 61.2 He was buried at Forest Hill Cemetery, Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.3
     “A crowd that filled the M. E. church to overflowing listened to the 8th grade graduating exercises which were held on Tuesday evening of last week and all enjoyed every number on the program. Justin Olds was the first to appear and played a piano solo, Boy Scout March, in splendid manner and the member of the grammar room marched to the front of the church to seats reserved for them during the rendition of this piece.”4
“Justin Olds, student in St. Bede’s college, Peru, spend last week’s holidays at home.”.5

I may have the death date wrong. The Perry Hospital News section of the Bureau County Republican for Thursday, 6 April 1964 lists his death as "Thursday" which I presume to have been a week earlier. Several pages of this issue of the paper are missing from the microfilm at Matson Library in Princeton, Illinois.

Citations

  1. [S654] Letter, Richard J. Olds to Dan W. Olds, 11 Apr 1971.
  2. [S656] Letter, Betty Ehret to Dan W. Olds, Dec. 1995, in which she added the place of death..
  3. [S110] The tombstone there gives the year of birth and year of death (my photo).
  4. [S110] Wyanet Review (Wyanet, Illinois). Wednesday, 6 June 1917.
  5. [S110] Wyanet Review (Wyanet, Illinois). Wednesday, 3 Dec. 1919.

Hannah Hughes (F)
Last Edited=3 Nov 2006

     Hannah Hughes married Isham Childress.
     Hannah Hughes from Ibera Oliver.

Children of Hannah Hughes and Isham Childress
Mary Ann Childress+ b. c 1827
Pernatha Childress b. c 1841
Anderson Crowell Childress+ b. 12 Aug 1841, d. 15 Feb 1923
Hannah Childress b. c 1844

William Chapman (M)
Last Edited=11 Sep 2001

     William Chapman married Ella Childress, daughter of Anderson Crowell Childress and Elizabeth Hendrix.
     William Chapman Ibera Oliver.

Child of William Chapman and Ella Childress
Landrum Anderson Chapman+ b. 22 Mar 1901, d. 23 Sep 1933

Ella Childress (F)
d. 19 August 1940
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=14 May 2004

     Ella Childress was the daughter of Anderson Crowell Childress and Elizabeth Hendrix. Ella Childress married William Chapman. Ella Childress died on 19 August 1940 at Greer, South Carolina.1
     Ella Childress Ibera Oliver.
Obituary Notice: "Greer. August 20. -- Funeral services for Mrs. Ella Chapman, 60, who died suddenly at her home near Greer Monday night at 10:30 will be held Wednesday morning at eleven o'clock at the Abner Creek Baptist church of which she was a member, conducted by her pastor, the Rev. D. B. Hill, assisted by Rev. B. H. Tucker; the interment will follow in the adjoining cemetery.
"Pall bearers will be Boyd Hawkins, Randolph Smith, E. L. Davis, Will Odom, O. P. Anders and Walter DeShields.
"Mrs. Chapman was the daughter of the late A. C. and Elizabeth Hendrix Childress and has made her home in this section all her life. When a young lady she was married to William A. Chapman, who survives together with her three children Lee Chapman of Tigerville, and two daughters, Mrs. Harve Jones and Mrs. Paul Jones, both of Gree, route 1; also 10 grandchildren and one great grandchild; one half-brother, Cave Childress of New York City.
"Pending the hour to leave for funeral the body will be at the home."1

Child of Ella Childress and William Chapman
Landrum Anderson Chapman+ b. 22 Mar 1901, d. 23 Sep 1933

Citations

  1. [S383] Mrs. Ella Chapman, Spartanburg Herald, 21 Aug. 1940.

Bernadine Olds (F)
b. 17 September 1907, d. 25 February 1989
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=3 Jan 2007

     Bernadine Olds was born on 17 September 1907. She was the daughter of Howard Olds and Eva Kennelly. Bernadine Olds married William J. Smith on 12 June 1948 at St. Louis Catholic Church, Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois. Bernadine Olds died on 25 February 1989 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, at age 81.1 She was buried on 28 February 1989 at Cape Coral, Lee County, Florida.
     “Bill and I were married June 12, 1948. I never had any children but Bill had 2 boys by a former marriage. He has 5 grandchildren all in Chi. We moved to Cape Coral Fla in Aug. 1968. Rented at first but moved into our own home in Mar. 1969.
“We’re both well and play golf about 4 times a week. Love the climate here, as did Austin and Pearle.”

“Bernadine Olds becomes the bride of William Smith.
“Wyanet -- Miss Bernadine Olds, daughter of Mrs. Howard Olds, of Wyanet, became the bride of William J. Smith, son of Mrs. Anna Smith, of Chicago, Saturday morning at nuptial Mass read by Father Edward Farrel, in St. Louis Catholic church, Princeton. ...
“The bride, who was given in marriage by her brother, Justin K. Olds, wore a beige suit with pink accessories and a white orchid. The bridesmaid, Miss Marjorie Bryner, of Chicago, a cousin of the bride, wore a champaign color suit and harmonizing accessories and an orchid corsage”
“William J. Smith, of Chicago, son of the bridegroom, served as best man. Ushers were Dick Olds, of Wyanet, nephew of the bride, and Ed Smith of Chicago, brother of the bridegroom. ...
“After a motor trip to the Smoky mountains and other places of interest in the south, Mr. and Mrs. Smith will return to Chicago for the remainder of the summer where Mr. Smith is employed as an electrical engineer with Edison company.
“The bride has been a teacher in the primary department of Wyanet grade school and will return this fall to teach the coming year.”2
     ---     ---     ---     ---     ---     ---     ---
(unknown paper, Thursday, March 16, 1989, Obituaries, p. 2A)
“BERNADINE SMITH. Chicago -- Bernadine Olds Smith, 81, died Monday, Feb. 27, 1989, in St. Scholastica Priory Infirmary, Chicago.
“She was born on Sept. 17, 1907, in Wyanet, the daughter of Howard and Eva (Kennelly) Olds. She married William J. Smith on June 12, 1948 in St. Louis Church, Princeton. He died in June of 1980. Also preceding her in death were her parents and one brother.
“She taught school for many years in the Wyanet area.
“Surviving are one stepson, William J. Jr. and one stepdaughter, Sr. Jane Smith, OSB, both of Chicago; and one nephew, Richard J. Olds of Wyanet.
“The funeral mass was held at Queen of All Saints Basilica, Chicago, on March 1. Burial was in Fort Myers, Fla. Visitation preceded the funeral. Memorials may be sent to St. Scholastica Priory Infirmary, 7430 N. Ridge Blvd., Chicago, Ill., 60645.”.

Citations

  1. [S656] Letter, Betty Ehret to Dan W. Olds, Dec. 1995, which added the death and burial information..
  2. [S110] An unidentified newspaper clipping in my collection.

William J. Smith (M)
d. January 1980
Last Edited=19 Jun 2005

     William J. Smith married Bernadine Olds, daughter of Howard Olds and Eva Kennelly, on 12 June 1948 at St. Louis Catholic Church, Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois. William J. Smith died in January 1980.1

Citations

  1. [S110] The death date is from his wife's obituary.

Elmer Sapp (M)
b. 15 June 1866, d. 28 February 1937
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=25 Sep 2003

     Elmer Sapp was born on 15 June 1866 at Wyanet Township, Bureau County, Illinois.1 He was the son of Andrew Sapp and Ann Eliza Ziegler. Elmer Sapp married Edna Olds, daughter of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel, on 15 October 1891 at Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois.1 Elmer Sapp died on 28 February 1937 at age 70.1

Child of Elmer Sapp and Edna Olds
Gladys Marguerite Sapp+ b. 13 Jun 1894, d. Sep 1981

Citations

  1. [S51] Unknown author, "Ziegler Family Bible".

Gladys Marguerite Sapp (F)
b. 13 June 1894, d. September 1981
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=25 Sep 2003

     Gladys Marguerite Sapp was born on 13 June 1894 at Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois. She was the daughter of Elmer Sapp and Edna Olds. Gladys Marguerite Sapp married Warner Bernie VanAken on 25 December 1917 at Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois. Gladys Marguerite Sapp died in September 1981 at age 87; letter from Maxine Whitney, Dec. 1981
In June 1968, Gladys had 3 children, ten grand children and 2
great-grandchildren. By 1971, she had 4 great-grandchildren.
[letters from Gladys VanAken.].

Child of Gladys Marguerite Sapp and Warner Bernie VanAken
Elmer Frederick VanAken+ b. 2 Dec 1922, d. 21 Jan 2001

Warner Bernie VanAken (M)
b. 30 November 1893, d. 18 December 1972
Last Edited=12 Dec 2005

     Warner Bernie VanAken was born on 30 November 1893 at Coldwater, Branch County, Michigan. He married Gladys Marguerite Sapp, daughter of Elmer Sapp and Edna Olds, on 25 December 1917 at Princeton, Bureau County, Illinois. Warner Bernie VanAken died on 18 December 1972 at age 79; letter from Gladys, 12 Jan 1973.

     Warner Bernie VanAken registered with the World War I Selective Service System on 8 June 1917 at Coldwater, Branch County, Michigan. He described himself as living at 214 W. _______, Coldwater, Michigan, age 23, born 30 Nov 1893 at Coldwater, and his occupation was "Candidate E T (?) Camp, U.S. Govt., Fort Benj. Harrison". He was tall in height, medium in build, with blue eyes and had brown hair.1

Child of Warner Bernie VanAken and Gladys Marguerite Sapp
Elmer Frederick VanAken+ b. 2 Dec 1922, d. 21 Jan 2001

Citations

  1. [S894] Ancestry.com, registration card images, used in Nov. 2005.

Elmer Frederick VanAken (M)
b. 2 December 1922, d. 21 January 2001
Pop-up Pedigree
Last Edited=21 Oct 2004

     Elmer Frederick VanAken was born on 2 December 1922. He was the son of Warner Bernie VanAken and Gladys Marguerite Sapp. Elmer Frederick VanAken died on 21 January 2001 at age 78.1 He appears in the Social Security Death Index as having died 21 January 2001 with the last place of residence listed as Coldwater, Branch County, Michigan. Elmer Frederick's SSN was issued in New Mexico and his birth date is given as 21 Jan 2001.1
     He is known as "Fritz". They were living in Montpelier, OH, in 1983.
"Fritz is Van's brother and lives in Coldwater, MI, with his wife Mary
Ann. They have 2 children, Charles and Martha. Charles lives in Coldwater
with his wife Marie and one son, Ryan, 15yrs old. Martha lives in Mason,
WI and is married to George Hosek. They have 2 children, Aimee and Adam.
Adam is single and lives at home and Aimee is married to Scott Collins
and lives in Chicago." [email to Dan W. Olds from Jean and "Van" VanAken, 15 March 1999.].

Citations

  1. [S97] Death report, SSDI, internet file.

Monroe Gesner Whitney (M)
b. 7 November 1865, d. 13 March 1955
Last Edited=25 Sep 2003

     Monroe Gesner Whitney was born on 7 November 1865 at Limerick, Illinois. He married Blanche Olds, daughter of John Hixon Olds and Anna Belle Krimmel, on 3 December 1899 at Wyanet, Bureau County, Illinois. Monroe Gesner Whitney died on 13 March 1955 at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, at age 89.

Children of Monroe Gesner Whitney and Blanche Olds
Dorothy Maxine Whitney b. 7 Dec 1900, d. 30 Mar 1990
Merrill Roderick Whitney+ b. 19 Oct 1903, d. 6 Aug 1958

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Dan W. Olds
Spartanburg, S. C.
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