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Source reference NI07801 :
According to the 1880 Sumter County, S.C. census Margaret was listed a boarder in the home of her brother A. Delay McCoy. Her age was listed as 59.
According to the 1870 Sumter County, S.C. Margaret was listed as age 46 and living with her brother A. Delay McCoy. (without occupation).
According to the 1860 Sumter County, S.C census Margaret is living by herself and working as a seamstress. Her age is listed as 35.
More About MARGARET M. MCCOY:
Fact 1: 1890, Buried at Bethel Methodist Church, Oswego, South Carolina

 

Source reference NI07802 :
According to the 1860 Sumter County, S.C. census William is living with his mother Mary. He is classified as a farmer with personal property and real estate property worth $300 each. His sister Susan is also living with them. William's age is listed as 40 years old.
According to the 1870 Sumter County, S.C. census William was living with his brother A. Delay and was listed as age 44. (without occupation).

 

Source reference NI07808 :
CENSUS YR: 1850 STATE or TERRITORY: SC COUNTY: Sumter DIVISION: Sumter REEL NO: M432-859 PAGE NO: 325A
REFERENCE: enumerated on 6th August 1850 by J W Stuckey
age 8 born in SC attending school

 

Source reference NI07809 :
Fact 1: 1890, Buried at Bethel Methodist Church, Oswego, South Carolina
Will of Mary Caroline McCoy
I Mary Caroline McCoy of Sumter County So Ca, do make, publish and declare my Last Will and Testament as follows: Indebtedness of Estate to be paid in full My Husband A. Delay McCoy to receive a life Time support from my Estate. My Sons at (first) under age to remain and support the place. Gift by me until thet become of Age, then to receive as their portion from my Estate a good substantial Horse with saddle and bridle. My Real Estate I leave to my Daughters Sarah
Sussannah and Annie Louise McCoy, but in case (Lastly) or both of my Daughters marry they forfeit their claims to my Real Estate. She or they receiving instead the same property in money value that my Sons received, hers or their portion of Real Estate forfeited to be divided porportionately between her or them and her or their surviving Brothers. My furniture I leave to my Husband A. Delay McCoy his life Time, at his death to be divided equally between my children now under Age. It is my wish that my Son John William McCoy be the Executor of this my last Will & Testament.
In testimony whereof I hereunto sign my name this the twenty first day of July 1890.
Witness Mary C. McCoy (sign & seal)
Sarah S. McCoy (signed)
S.D.M. LaCoste (signed)
John Montgomery (signed)
Filed August 6, 1890
Probated September 9, 1890
Recorded Journal #2 Page 149
Will Book Page 728 & 729
SC Dept of Archives & History, Bundle 182 Package 23
Transcribed and donated by:
Tim J McCoy
Austin, TX

 

Source reference NI07812 :
Headstone at Bethel Methodist Cemetery, Oswego, Sumter County, S.C. lists Edward's birthday as May 10, 1872.

 

Source reference NI07825 :
SS# 250-28-7725 Issue State SC birth 18oct1897 Death Nov 1977 Death State SC Last Known Residence;
Orangeburg, South Carolina 29121 Last Payment Location;Sumter, South Carolina 29150

 

Source reference NI07832 :
Eldridge occupation is laborer according to the 1920 Sumter County, SC census
SS records show Eldridge's birthday as September 28, 1893.

 

Source reference NI07840 :
Birthdate according to the 1910 Sumter County, SC census SD#7; ED#119; pg. 3

 

Source reference NI07845 :
http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/w/e/l/William-M-Weldon/BOOK-000 1/0002-0013.html?Welcome=1044219899

 

Source reference NI07853 :
1880 Census Darlington,Darlington County,SC has her born in SC,1876 ,age 4 , living with parents.
Family History Library Film # 125527,NA Film # T9-1227,page 60B.

 

Source reference NI07854 :
1880 Census Darlington,Darlington County,SC has her born in SC,1878 ,age 2 , living with parents.
Family History Library Film # 125527,NA Film # T9-1227,page 60B.

 

Source reference NI07855 :
1880 Census Darlington,Darlington County,SC has her born in SC,1880 ,age 5 months , living with parents.
Family History Library Film # 125527,NA Film # T9-1227,page 60B.

 

Source reference NI07856 :
1880 Census ,Providence,Sumter County,SC ,Family History Library Film # 1255241, NA Film#T9-1241,page #210A,
has him born in SC 1856 ,age 24, both parrents born in SC. living with parents.

 

Source reference NI07861 :

Endnotes
1. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index (R), Copyright (c) 1980, 2002, data as of March 9, 2003.
2. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index (R), Copyright (c) 1980, 2002, data as of March 9, 2003, Batch #: C506631, Sheet #: 00, Source Call #: 975.7 B2S V.17, Printout Call #: 0883821, Dates: 1758 - 1788.
Endnotes
1. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index (R), Copyright (c) 1980, 2002, data as of March 9, 2003, Film #: 1553493, Batch #: F511887, Sheet #: 013, Source Call #: 1553493, Printout Call #: NONE.
2. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index (R), Copyright (c) 1980, 2002, data as of March 9, 2003.
3. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index (R), Copyright (c) 1980, 2002, data as of March 9, 2003, Film #: 1553493, Batch #: F511887, Sheet #: 013, Source Call #: 1553493, Printout Call #: NONE.

 

Source reference NI07863 :
Contacts: La Marr Quarles Brooks
108 Elfwing Lane
Central,SC 29630
Faun "Tookie" Harrop
114 California Ave.
Monks Corner,SC 29461
Jenifer Mishoe
314 Kingston Rd
Knightdale,NC 27545
Vera Smith
7000 Bill Hughes Road
Austin, TX 78745
Jana Dyer
Kenton , Ohio 43226

 

Source reference NI07880 :
Endnotes
1. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral File (R), Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998.

 

Source reference NI11136 :
twin to Manassah

 

Source reference NI11168 :
grandson to Leonard Brown.

 

Source reference NI11170 :
Died at age 53years.8months,17days.

 

Source reference NI11174 :
He died at his prime in the Cival War at Richmond , Virginia. He was 21 years of age.

 

Source reference NI11196 :
Killed at the first battle of Manasas

 

Source reference NI12965 :
1860 Sumte County Census has him age 10, living with parents

 

Source reference NI12973 :
Dr. T.J. HarrelsonCOLUMBIA - Service for T.J. Harrelson will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at Trenholm Road United Methodist Church, with burial in Greenlawn Memorial Park. Visitation will be from 10-11 a.m. in the church parlor, immediately preceding the service. Dunbar Funeral Home, Devine Street Chapel, is assisting the Harrelson family. Memorials may be made to Trenholm Road United Methodist Church, 3401 Trenholm Road, Columbia, SC 29204, or to Kona Christian Academy, P.O. Box 1179, Kailua-Kona, HI 96745, or to Garden City Chapel, 316 Dogwood Drive, Garden City Beach, SC 29576.Dr. Harrelson, husband of Fay Whitfield Harrelson, died Wednesday, December 1, 2004. Born in St. Charles, S.C., he was the son of Dow and Mary Cummings Harrelson. A graduate of Columbia High School, he spent three years at the University of South Carolina, and received an honorary doctorate from Columbia College in 1983.Dr. Harrelson was the founder and president of T.J. Harrelson Roofing and Supply Company. He encouraged the founding of Kona Christian Academy in Kona, Hawaii, and was a strong prayer partner for Makua Lani Christian High School, also in Kona. He was board member emeritus of the Garden City Chapel, as well as one of the original organizers and first chairman of the board of Trenholm Road United Methodist Church. Dr. Harrelson was a board member and chairman of the finance committee of First Citizens Bank, a board member of Glassmaster, chairman of the board of Investors Corporation of S.C., and trustee emeritus of Columbia College. After the great fire at Columbia College during the 1960's, Dr. Harrelson was chairman of the fundraising committee that allowed for rebuilding.Dr. Harrelson was a member of the Medlock Sunday School Class at Trenholm Road United Methodist Church, and was the church's official greeter for many years. He was also a member of the Kiwanis Club, the Palmetto Club, and Forest Lake Club. He considered one of the highlights of his life a visit to the Holy Land, where he was baptized in the Jordan River. An outdoorsman, his three most memorable sporting moments were a hole-in-one (he was an avid golfer), shooting seven quail on the rise, and bagging two wild turkeys with one shot.Surviving are his wife of sixty-three years; daughters and sons-in-law, Fay J. and Jimmy Halford of Georgetown, Thaddea and Jim Pitts of Kona, Hawaii, and Ann and Dan Douglas of Chapin; six grandchildren, Andie Halford Robinson, Chrissy and Jim Pitts, and Angela, Ali, and Daniel Douglas; two great-granddaughters, Parker and Peyton Robinson; and brothers, James D. Harrelson of Sumter, and Harvey "Nook" Harrelson of Chapin."Obituary posted: December 3, 2004"

 

Source reference NI13092 :
Medical Notes: Betty Faye was adopted from the Bibb Masonic Home and lived in Dexter, Ga. for many years. She later found out who her mother really was and came to Macon, Ga. She was killed in a car collision on Eisenhower Parkway in Macon, Ga.

 

Source reference NI13274 :
January 20, 1820 Chesterfield District, Kershaw Co., : Jenny Watts was the
wife of Benjamin Watts and SARAH WATTS was the wife of ISAIAH
WATTS.
(Kershaw Co., Deed Book K, Pg. 248 _ Camden, SC.)

 

Source reference NI13276 :
January 20, 1820, Chesterfield District, Kershaw County : JENNY WATTS
was the wife of BENJAMIN WATTS and Sarah Watts was the wife of Isaiah
Watts.
Kershaw Co., Deed Book K, Pg. 248 - Camden, SC)

 

Source reference NI13287 :
1805 GA Land Lottery
James Watts of Washington County, was entitled to 1 draw and drew a blank. (One draw
indicates he was unmarried.)
From Records of Natchez District (MS) 1810:
Josiah Watts resided Wayne County.
James Watts resided Wayne County.
James was in Clarke County MS 1840
James WATTS - B, C, D, E, I; N2, P, S; AG4; CRW; slaves: 1M 10-24; 1M 55-100; 2F under
10; 1F 24-36
http://www.netpathway.com/~bennie/1840cen1.html#123
Margaret was the daughter of James and Nancy Watts. Her father was a native of South
Carolina who moved to Georgia; her mother, born in South Carolina, came with her parents to
Mississippi at an early day, locating in Wayne County.
Mr. Watts was a planter all his life, and lived in Clarke County from 1836 to 1862, when he
died, his wife having died the previous year.

 

Source reference NI13288 :
born Abt. 1780 in Georgia (Based 0n Jarrad 1880
Census);
Josiah Watts is almost certainly the son of John Watts of Washington County, GA. Georgia
Service Records (Vol. II, 1936 by Louise Frederick Hays) show a Josiah Watts served as:
Tax Receiver, Washington County, 1798
Justice of the Peace, Washington County, Feb 13 1798 - Feb. 1799.
Sheriff, Washington County, Dec. 23, 1800 - Oct. 30, 1801
Representative, Washington County, 1808, 1810
Senator, Washington County, 1809, 1811
There's a deed in Kershaw County in 1798 where Josiah Watts has land adjacent to land in the
estate of Thomas Watts. Maybe this explains why he's in SC when John is born.
1798 Deed shows he bought land adjacent to that owned by the estate of Thomas Watts. Thus,
he must have traveled back and forth a lot. This explains his marriage and the birth of John
Watts in Chesterfield District in 1805.
GA 1805 Land Lottery
Jacobs Watts, of Washington County, was entitled to 2 draws and drew 2 blanks. (2 draws
indicates he was married.) Need to see original of this document to determine if it's Josiah.
Need to check Washington County documents for a Jacob or Jacobus Watts.
Josiah Watts of Washington County, GA obtained a Headright and Bounty Grant in 1811
From a book titled simply _WATTS_. No date or publisher. Acknowledgments by Gladys
Page Carter and Mildred M. Watts
" HISTORY OF JOHN E. WATTS FAMILY [p. 1]
From 1785 to 1820 a passport signed by the governor of Georgia was required for all who
would travel through the Creek and Cherokee Indian lands. From the Georgia Archives in
Atlanta we have a copy of an application for a group John E. Watts was traveling with to cross
these lands on their trek westward. Copy of application is available in the Jackson Archives. A
transcript of this application follows:
Page 56 - Saturday, November 14, 1812
On application -- ORDERED:
That a passport be prepared for CAPTAIN JOSIAH WATTS with his wife, four children and
sixteen slaves. JOHN E. WATTS and JOSIAH EVANS, all from the County of Washington,
in the State to travel through Indian Nations to the Western County - which was presented and
signed.
From ages given on census reports, it is estimated John E. Watts was about seventeen or
eighteen years of age in 1812. It is further assumed that Josiah Evans was about the same age
as John E. Watts, and that they and
the family of Captain Josiah Watts were all related in some way.
The next account is taken from the book "Mississippi Territory in the War of 1812" by Mrs.
Dunbar Rowland. A list of officers "Carson's Regiment of Mississippi Militia, 1814-1815"
lists JOHN E. WATTS, Pvt., JOSIAH WATTS, Capt. and JOSIAH EVANS, Sgt. According
to "THE CREEK WAR OF 1813 AND 1814" by H. S. HALBERT and T. H. BALL,
The Regiment was under the command of Col. Joseph Carson in the Mobile Region.
Companies included:
Captain Peter Cartwright's Company
Captain Charles H. Devereux's Company
Captain Josiah D. Lister's Company
Captain Reuben Saffold's Company
Captain Josiah Watts' Company
From "Mississippi Genealogy and Local History," Volume IV, by Norman Gillis, the Wayne
County Tax Lists for 1818 and 1822 lists Jehu Watts and Josiah Watts, evidently jointly
owned property. Possibly this is where their families lived during the time they were fighting
with Carson's Regiment in 1814-1815 in the War of 1812. What is the relationship of Carson's
Regiment and Wade Hamilton's Regiment where the Clarke County Jehu Evans fought?
No account has been found of their travel through the 300 to 400 mile wilderness nor of what
route they traveled. The most likely route was "The Three Chopped Way."
The road traveled by most of the settlers who moved westward from the eastern seaboard
through Georgia and Alabama into or through Mississippi was known as "The Three Chopped
Way." It was so obscure in the early days that it was necessary to mark it some way so that the
traveler would not get lost. Three slashes were made with an axe -- three slashes, along the
way on strategically located trees. It was established about 1805, and extended from
Miledgeville, the capitol of Georgia, by way of St. Stephens in Alabama, to Natchez. At first
it was little more than a bridle path, but in 1807 it was widened into a wagon road. It is said
that even this improvement left much to be desired. It was a bad road and breakdowns were
frequent and serious. It was the only direct route from Georgia to the increasingly important
town of Natchez, however, and it was soon established as a Post road and mail passed back
and forth three times a week.
The road entered Mississippi Territory into what is now Clarke County and either passed
through or touched Jasper, Smith, Simpson, crossed Pearl River into Lawrence County at
Monticello, Copiah or Lincoln, Jefferson or Lincoln, Jefferson or Franklin and into Adams. "
Possible Birth places of Josiah Watts: VA, Iredell, NC, SC, GA
From the Bounty Claim of John Evans Watts, dated Sept 28,1850, and filed in Copiah County,
Josiah Watts commanded a Company attached to the Thirty Ninth Regiment of Regulars
commanded by Colonel Benton (If I read John's writing correctly)
Mississippi Territorial Census 1816
Josiah Watts - 4 males under 21 and 1 female under 21. This means there was a child born
between 1812 and 1816 in additiion to the four who moved from GA with them. Josiah Evans
is next in census listed with 1 male and 1 female.
Mississippi State Census 1820
Josiah Watts - 6 males, 2 females, 1 taxable person
This means a fifth son was born between 1816 and 1820
[Broderbund Family Archive #314, Ed. 1, Census Index: U.S. Selected Counties, 1820,
Page #: 113
1820 Census, Wayne County Page # 113
Josiah Watts
Age ranges in household: 10010-3110100
Males Females
1-103 1
10-151 0
16-181 0
18-250 1
25-441 0
45+0 0
3 male slaves, 12 female slaves, 1 foreigner, eight in manufacturing, 0 commerce, 0 agriculture
This indicates Josiah wasn't only in farming but in another business.
Either Peggy is dead or the female record is incorrect or maybe there is a second wife?
NEWSPAPER NOTICES OF MISSISSIPPIANS 1820-1860
Josiah Watts
Estate Notice. Oct. 1824 Term. Orphan's Court, Wayne Co, Ms. Miss Margaret Watts and
John Evans Admrs. Jackson Southern Luminary Feb. 9, 1825
1830 Census
1830 Wayne County Census reflects the following [Note: Surnames beginning with "W" all on
one page]:
Pg. 256, L10 James R. WATTS Family: this family moved to Clarke Co., MS
1 Male age 20-30, b. 1800-1810
1 Female age 20-30, b. 1800-1810
1 Male, age < 5 years, b. 1826-1830
Pg. 256, L10 WATTS, Margaret, living alone, age 40-50 b. 1780-1790
One source states that a son was named Jarred (probably after Jared Irwin). There is one on
the 1860 Census.
The following is probably Josiah Watts b. 1789, son of Thomas Watts and Hannah Rust
Boggess.
1845 State Census
Josiah Watts
1 male
2 female
total 3
1850 Census
Josiah Watts 60 SC
Margaret E.24 MS (Married Davis)
Jane 7 MS
Josiah 2 MS
Isaac Vernon Hodges & Mary Ann Watts m. in the Methodist Episcopal Church at
Garlandsville, Ms. 12 May, 1844. WHO IS MARY ANN?
Jarred and Thomas appear adjacent in the 1840 Census. James E. is two lines above.
1840 Census Jasper County, MS
179 29 Watts James E.16M Slaves (11 under 10) 5F Slaves Occupation Prof Eng.
1M 5-10
1m 20-30
2M 30-40
1F under 5
1F 20-30
1F 30-40
1F 40-50
180 1 Watts Jarred1M Slave No occupation listed
2M 15-20
1F 5-10
1F 20-30
180 2 Watts Thomas No Slaves No occupation listed
1M 10-15
2M 30-40
1F 10-15
1F 30-40
LA Public Library bk, "Tennessee Land Entries- Military Bounty Land, Martin Armstrong's
Office, Part 4, warrants first series (#2501-5312) Sept 1785-Dec 1797", by Dr. A. B. Pruitt,
1966, p age 668:
6876. Dec 17, 1785 warrant 3195 (no names) heirs of Sgt Thomas Watts 1,000 ac delivered to
Jno McNeese 84 months; file and grant [blank] (warrant in Tennessee Revolutionary War
warrants (roll 5), assigned May 14, 1797 by Josiah Watts, heir, to William Lytle (Jas Austin
witness);
(following after #3199): Nov 26, 1818John King assigns 28 ac to James Lockhart, blance of
185 ac assigned to me in 1809 or 1810 by John Strother deceased, of which 157 ac was
granted to me; duplicate warrant issued Feb 24, 1809 by A. Foster, grants onthis warrant:
#1565 for 300 ac to Matthew Jones, #1566 for 300 ac to Danl Havender, #1567 for 215 ac to
Thomas Hooker, #9171 for 107 ac to John King, & #3303 for 28 ac to James Lockhard;
warrant assigned May 15, 1797 by Josiah Watts, heir, to William Lytle (Jas "Austen" witness)
who assigned Mar 9, 1809 to John Strother (W Cannon witness) additional assignment
perhpas for 209 ac too dark to read; warrant not mentioned in Glasgow land fraud).

 

Source reference NI13290 :
born 1795 in Georgia birth after April based on 1855
doc;
He interchangeably signed documents Jehu or John.
From a book titled simply _WATTS_. No date or publisher. Acknowledgements by Gladys
Page Carter and Mildred M. Watts
" In the "History of Mississippi", Volume II, 1824-1827 by Dunbar Rowland, John E. Watts
was County Treasurer of Copiah County. This is verified in Book B pp 34 in the Court House
at Hazlehurst, Copiah County. It states: "John E. Watts was on this day of June, 1825
appointed County Treasurer for Copiah County fot the term of 2 years from date of
appointment." Oath, Page 35. "
An 1823 Tax roll in FTM Census Index 1820 shows the name spelled Gehue.
The 1830 census of Copiah County, Mississippi shows:
Jehu E. Watts, age between 30 and 40
Wife, age between 15 and 20
3 males under10
2 females under 10
1840 Copiah County Census
Age
J.U.E. Watts 40 to 50
wife 30 to 40
1 male 15 to 20
1 male 5 to 10
2 females 5 to 10
1 female under 5
1850 Copiah County Census Pg. 218B, HH No. 135/135
Age Born
John Evans Watts55 Georgia
Frances 45 South Carolina
Margaret 22 Mississippi
Lucy 15 Mississippi
Tabitha 11 Mississippi
Mary. F. 9 Mississippi
Amanda McVey25 Mississippi
1860 Copiah County Census
Age Born
John Watts65 Georgia
Frances 59 South Carolina
Margaret 35 Mississippi
Tabitha 20 Mississippi
Mary 18 Mississippi
John 12 Mississippi
1870 Copiah County Census
Age Born
Frances Watts67 South Carolina
Tabitha Smith27 Mississippi
G. L. Mansfield 22 South Carolina (Farmer)
Mary F. Mansfield 21 Mississippi

 

Source reference NI13308 :
"Who Married Whom" lists wife as Nancy.
Nancy was born in South Carolina, came with her parents to Mississippi at an early day,
locating in Wayne County.

 

Source reference NI13309 :
Elisha and Margaret were married in 1830. She was the daughter of James and Nancy Watts.
Her father was a native of South Carolina who moved to Georgia; her mother, born in South
Carolina, came with her parents to Mississippi at an early day, locating in Wayne County.
There, Mrs. Margaret Sumrall was born in 1815, and there married at the age of fifteen years.
Margaret continued to live with Jacob until her death. The six children born to Elisha and
Margaret were Jacob, Nancy, James, Elijah, Elisha and John. Jacob was reared and educated
in Clarke County.

 

Source reference NI13310 :
Evans is a patronmic form of the Welsh surname Evan, from the given name Ifan or Evan,
which was the Welch equivalent of John. Occasionally, when of Scottish derivation it is a
variation of Ewan, an Anglicized form of the Gaelic given name Eogann, a form of the Latin
name Eugene. Heavan, and Heaven are variations of the Welsh form, Even is a Breton
cognate. Patronymic forms include Evens, Evance, Ifans, Ivings, Avans, Heavans , and
Heavens.
1830 Census
Wayne County
Margaret Watts 1F 40-50, no other individuals shown.

 

Source reference NI13312 :
Neshoba County was established in 1833. In 1836 it was divided in half with the southern half
being Newton County. John was the first district attorney.
1850 Census
This census verifies state of birth and birth years of all family members then born. John Watts
appears on Page 1 Dwelling 1, Family 1 on this census of Neshoba County, MS July 31, 1850.
The census taker is his son James Watts, so the information is probably very correct. The
census shows R. A. Morris age 38, Male Farmer born in SC as living in this household. The
1850 census shows $2500.00 value of real estate.
Twelve slaves
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From: "History of Neuton County, Mississippi, from 1834 to 1894" A. J. Brown, p. 383:
"Hon. John Watts, whose portrait occupies the frontispiece in this book, was so nearly and
closely, and for such a long time associated with the people of Newton county, as to deserve
more than a passing notice.
Judge Watts was born in Chesterfield District, South Carolina, May 26, 1805. His father, a
prominent and influential citizen, came early to Wayne county, and his family was a very
conspicuous one in the same county. There were but few facilities for educating young men in
that new county; however, the best that could be provided was given to this rising young man.
After leaving school, which he did at a very early age, quite a preference was shown him by
his fellow citizens, and they first elected him to the office of justice of the peace, then captain
of a militia company; he then acted as deputy sheriff; was then elected circuit clerk, and during
the term he was clerk, studied law and was admitted to practice in the supreme court of the
State in the year 1831. He then opened a law office in the town of Winchester. Within a few
years he became a candidate for district attorney and was elected by the people for eleven
years. He was elected in that and other districts in which he lived, judge of the circuit court for
twenty-two years, and but for the conduct of the military in the reconstruction of the State,
would have remained until the end of his term. His last public service was in the State Senate
in the troublous times of Radical rule, where he did good work for his people.
It will be seen that for thirty-seven years he was a servant of the people, elected by the
suffrages of the people. These were places of honor and great responsibility. In all these years
he served the people of Newton county- as this was at all times in his district. He was the
district attorney who assisted in the first court ever held in this county, even before the county
was divided from Neshoba, and continuously so as attorney and judge, with the exception of
four years, up to 1868. He was also Brigadier-General of State militia at one time, and made a
fine commanding officer.
Judge Watts, as has been intimated, did not have the educational training that he would have
liked and appreciated, but he used well what he did have, and filled every position to which he
aspired in political life with honor to himself and justice to his constituents, He had the honor
of presiding over the bar at the State capital, when he considered it the best in the South. He
was always elected by the people, showing that they approved his course. For more than thirty
years he was in office, and was never defeated but twice.
Judge Watts felt proud of any position that his fellow-citizens conferred upon him. No pains
were spared to do his duty. He was a pattern of young men for sobriety and diligence in
official duties, feeling that the performance of these duties was his highest obligation and
reward. Judge Watts had great pride of character, was a fine looking man, of commanding size
and appearance, and always presided on the bench with a dignity befitting his honorable
position, He was a conscientious man, who tried to do his duty, and the people who placed
him on the high position set the seal of their approval on his conduct by keeping him in office,
He loved to mingle with his old friends, irrespective of party. It was well known that he was an
"old-Iine Whig," and for the greater part of his official life he was on the weak side of politics,
Yet such were his magnetic qualities among the yeomanry of the country as to win them to his
support, and by his consistent course of justice and care for their cause as to keep them with
him.
Judge Watts was a Methodist preacher for about thirty years, and amidst all his hard work and
active duties of his profession, found time to devote much good work to his church, He was
kind and sympathetic, a loving father and husband, a good neighbor, and great peace-maker
among those who had difficulties. He lived to the ripe age of seventy years, and died at
Newton, May. 1875 surrounded by his children and friends, and was very greatly mourned."
From: "History of Neuton County, Mississippi, from 1834 to 1894" A. J. Brown, p. 2:
"The court-house for the county of Neshoba, previous to the division of the county, was near
where the town of Union, in Newton county, is now situated. An old settler, who is now
living, says it was a black-jack oak cabin with dirt floor; that Judge Wm. Sterling as judge, and
Hon. Jno. Watts as district attorney held the first court for the new county of Neshoba." This
was in 1833 after the Choctaw removal.
From: "John Chapman of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, Thomas Powe of Cheraw, South
Carolina and Related Families" Elise Chapman Edmonds, 1971, p. 112:
"John Watts attended St. Stephen's Academy which was at that time the most flourishing
Institution near by. It was located on the Tombigby River. He later studied medicine but did
not persue the career although he was a fairly good doctor if there was a need. He returned
home and read law and obtained a license from the Supreme Court in 1831. and practiced law
in Winchester, Miss. He was elected District Attorney and held that office for 11 years. Judge
Watts rose to distinction in the State and held many public offices. He was a man of
commanding presence and great purity of character and had a remarkable dignity of manner,
but when to his great personal and intellectual advantages were added the graces of a sweet
and gentle nature this was his secret as of his popularity in East Mississippi. Having served the
people as a Senator and Representative in the Legislature and for many years Judge of the
Judicial District, he then joined the Methodist Church in Paulding, Mississippi in 1841 and in
1842 received a license to preach. He resided in the Counties of Wayne, Jasper. Neshoba and
Newton. He died in Newton in 1875. Judge Watts married 2nd Mrs. Martha Keegan wife of
Judge A. M. Keegan of Monticello. Miss. No Issue by this marriage."
He preached at the Methodist Episcopal Church in Newton, Mississippi.
There is a scrapbook kept by Misses Betty and Lizzie Watts who collected newspaper
clippings from "The Newton Record", "Mississippi Baptist", and "Meridian Star". This
scrapbook was last in the possession of Mrs. Heber Logan (Judy Watts). It appears from all the
information that John had land and homes in both Jasper and later Neshoba Counties.
Neshoba County was established in 1833. In 1836 it was divided in half with the southern half
being Newton County.
John was the first district attorney.
1840 Jasper County Census
This is confusing with what looks like a bunch of extra children living with them. (Samuel
Boykin Watts is one, maybe the student)
177 6 Watts John 24 M Slaves 10 F Slaves 40 in Agriculture 2 Prof/Eng 1 Student
1M under 5
2M 5 to 10
2M 10 to 15
1M 15 to 20
3M 20 to 30
1M 30 to 40
1M 40 to 50
1F under 5
0F 5 to 10
1F 10 to 15
1F 15 to 20
1F 20 to 30
1850 Neshoba County Census
This census verifies state of birth and birth years of all family members then born.
John Watts appears as Page 1 Dwelling 1, Family 1 on this census of Neshoba County, MS 31
July 1850.
The census taker is his son James Watts, so the information is probably very correct.
The census shows R. A. Morris age 38, Male Farmer born in SC as living in this household.
The 1850 census shows $2500.00 value of real estate. Twelve slaves
Slave Census AgesB=Black M=Mulato
65 MB
65 F B
30 MB
30 MB
30 F B
28 F B
15 MM
10 MB
8 F B
6 MB
3 ?BThe entry is double marked.
1 F B
From: "History of Neuton County, Mississippi, from 1834 to 1894" A. J. Brown, p. 383:
"Hon. John Watts, whose portrait occupies the frontispiece in this book, was so nearly and
closely, and for such a long time associated with the people of Newton county, as to deserve
more than a passing notice.
Judge Watts was born in Chesterfield District, South Carolina, May 26, 1805. His father, a
prominent and influential citizen, came early to Wayne county, and his family was a very
conspicuous one in the same county. There were but few facilities for educating young men in
that new county; however, the best that could be provided was given to this rising young man.
After leaving school, which he did at a very early age, quite a preference was shown him by
his fellow citizens, and they first elected him to the office of justice of the peace, then captain
of a militia company; he then acted as deputy sheriff; was then elected circuit clerk, and during
the term he was clerk, studied law and was admitted to practice in the supreme court of the
State in the year 1831. He then opened a law office in the town of Winchester. Within a few
years he became a candidate for district attorney and was elected by the people for eleven
years. He was elected in that and other districts in which he lived, judge of the circuit court
for twenty-two years, and but for the conduct of the military in the reconstruction of the State,
would have remained until the end of his term. His last public service was in the State Senate
in the troublous times of Radical rule, where he did good work for his people.
It will be seen that for thirty-seven years he was a servant of the people, elected by the
suffrages of the people. These were places of honor and great responsibility. In all these years
he served the people of Newton county-- as this was at all times in his district. He was the
district attorney who assisted in the first court ever held in this county, even before the county
was divided from Neshoba, and continuously so as attorney and judge, with the exception of
four years, up to 1868. He was also Brigadier-General of State militia at one time, and made a
fine commanding officer.
Judge Watts, as has been intimated, did not have the educational training that he would have
liked and appreciated, but he used well what he did have, and filled every position to which he
aspired in political life with honor to himself and justice to his constituents, He had the honor
of presiding over the bar at the State capital, when he considered it the best in the South. He
was always elected by the people, showing that they approved his course. For more than thirty
years he was in office, and was never defeated but twice.
Judge Watts felt proud of any position that his fellow-citizens conferred upon him. Ho pains
were spared to do his duty. He was a pattern of young men for sobriety and diligence in
official duties, feeling that the performance of these duties was his highest obligation and
reward. Judge Watts had great pride of character, was a fine looking man, of commanding
size and appearance, and always presided on the bench with a dignity befitting his honorable
position, He was a conscientious man, who tried to do his duty, and the people who placed
him on the high position set the seal of their approval on his conduct by keeping him in office,
He loved to mingle with his old friends, irrespective of party. It was well known that he was
an "old-line Whig," and for the greater part of his official life he was on the weak side of
politics, Yet such were his magnetic qualities among the yeomanry of the country as to win
them to his support, and by his consistent course of justice and care for their cause as to keep
them with him.
Judge Watts was a Methodist preacher for about thirty years, and amidst all his hard work and
active duties of his profession, found time to devote much good work to his church, He was
kind and sympathetic, a loving father and husband, a good neighbor, and great peace-maker
among those who had difficulties. He lived to the ripe age of seventy years, and died at
Newton, May, 1875 surrounded by his children and friends, and was very greatly mourned."
From: "History of Neuton County, Mississippi, from 1834 to 1894" A. J. Brown, p. 2:
"The court-house for the county of Neshoba, previous to the division of the county, was near
where the town of Union, in Newton county, is now situated. An old settler, who is now
living, says it was a black-jack oak cabin with dirt floor; that Judge Wm. Sterling as judge,
and Hon. Jno. Watts as district attorney held the first court for the new county of Neshoba."
This was in 1833 after the Choctaw removal.
From: "John Chapman of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, Thomas Powe of Cheraw, South
Carolina and Related Families" Elise Chapman Edmonds, 1971, p. 112:
"John Watts attended St. Stephen's Academy which was at that time the most flourishing
Institution near by. It was located on the Tombigby River. He later studied medicine but did
not persue the career although he was a fairly good doctor if there was a need. He returned
home and read law and obtained a license from the Supreme Court in 1831, and practiced law
in Winchester, Miss. He was elected District Attorney and held that office for 11 years. Judge
Watts rose to distinction in the State and held many public offices. Hi was a man of
commanding presence and great purity of character and had a remarkable dignity of manner,
but when to his great personal and intellectual advantages were added the graces of a sweet
and gentle nature this was his secret as of his popularity in East Mississippi. Having served
the people as a Senator and Representative in the Legislature and for many years Judge of the
Judicial District, he then joined the Methodist Church in Paulding, Mississippi in 1841 and in
1842 received a license to preach. He resided in the Counties of Wayne, Jasper, Neshoba and
Newton. He died in Newton in 1875. Judge Watts married 2nd Mrs. Martha Keegan wife of
Judge A. M. Keegan of Monticello, Miss. No Issue by this marriage."
He preached at the Methodist Episcopal Church in Newton, Mississippi.
There is a scrapbook kept by Misses Betty and Lizzie Watts who collected newspaper
clippings from "The Newton Record", "Mississippi Baptist", and "Meridian Star". This
scrapbook was last in the possession of Mrs. Heber Logan (Judy Watts).
Burial: Unknown, Garlandsville, MS
Education: Studied Medicine at St. Stephen's Academy
Fact 4: 1836, A Founder of Neuton County
Military service: Brigadier General of Militia
Occupation: District Judge

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