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Infantry I: Regiments of Foot 1st through 50th

Infantry II: Regiments 51st through 104th

1st (Royal, Royal Scots) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1633 as a Scottish regiment, designated as 1st Regiment in 1751. Both battalions of the regiment were sent to America during the early part of the Seven Years' War. The regiment was at the capture of Louisburg in 1758 with a strength of 954. The 1st also participated In the expedition against Ticonderoga and in the conquest of Canada after the fall of Quebec.

The 1st Battalion, was at Guadeloupe in 1810. In 1812 the regiment was designated the Royal Scots Regiment and was stationed in Canada, serving throughout the American campaigns of 1812-14, its grenadier company being especially distinguished in the tough hand-to-hand fight at Niagara. The 2nd Battalion was actively employed in Canada during the troubles of 1838-9.

2nd (Queen's Royal) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1661,  designated as 2nd Regiment  in 1751. The regiment was in the disastrous attempt on Quebec, made by General Hill and Sir Hovenden Walker, in 1711, when through ignorance of the navigation, several thousand seamen and soldiers were lost in fruitless efforts to ascend the St. Lawrence. A second battalion was added to the regiment in 1858, and served for some years in the Ionian Islands, Nova Scotia, and Bermuda.

3rd (East Kent - The Buffs) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed for service in the Low Countries in 1572,  and designated as the 3rd Regiment in 1751. The regiment went to America (Charleston) in 1781, being described as a "very young" battalion; it made one campaign, that of Carolina. It was one of the regiments which, having escaped York Town capitulation, were the last to remain in the south, leaving Charlestown Harbour one  morning in December 1782, with a fleet of between 300 and 400 vessels carrying forth 15,000 Carolina loyalists and their slaves. From 1782 it served in Jamaica until 1790. The regiment shipped off from Bordeaux to America in 1814, and served on the frontier of Canada during the American War, returning to Europe in July 1815.

4th (King's Own) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed as 2nd Tangier Regiment in 1680 and designated the Duchess of York and Albany's Regiment [1684], then Queen's Marines [1685], King's Own Regiment [1715] and finally the 4th Regiment in 1751. In 1758 the 2nd Battalion became the 62nd Regiment. The regiment arrived in Boston in June 1774, and fought at Bunker's Hill, and in all the principal actions during the first three years of the War of Independence. In 1778 it was among the troops sent from New York to the West Indies. In 1780 it returned home. From 1787 to 1793 the regiment was in Canada and Newfoundland. It was in the Atlantic region of Canada in 1814.

5th (Northumberland Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed as a Holland Regiment in 1674, it became the 5th Regiment  in 1751. In 1774 the regiment arrived in Boston in July 1774, and the year after suffered terribly at the stubborn fight on Bunker's Hill. It fought at Long Island(1776), White Plains, Brandywine(1777), Germantown, and other early engagements during the War of Independence, and in  November 1778 was among the troops sent from New York to the West Indies. The regiment returned home in 1780. From 1787 to 1797 the regiment was in Canada. Around 1811 the first battalion went from France to Canada, and served on the frontier during the American War, afterwards returning to Europe.

6th (Royal First Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed as a Holland Regiment in 1673 and designated as the 6th Regiment in 1751. The regiment went to New York in October 1776, but  previous West Indian service had thinned its ranks, and the men were drafted into other regiments and the officers returned to England in December  1776. The regiment went to Nova Scotia in 1786 and was again stationed in Canada from 1799 to 1806. From Bordeaux, in 1813, it went to America, and was actively employed on the frontier, where it especially distinguished itself in the action at Niagara. It then returned to Europe. A second or "reserve" battalion, formed in Ireland after the regiment returned from Aden, was sent by way of Hudson's bay to the Red River during the dispute with America respecting the Oregon territory in 1846, to defend the British settlements in what was then known as Rupert's Land, in the event of hostilities. It subsequently joined the first battalion at the Cape.

7th (Royal Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed as Our Royal Regiment of Fusiliers in1685, it was designated as the 7th Regiment in 1751. In 1773 the Royal Fusiliers landed at Quebec in July 1773, and was speedily sent on to Montreal and the frontier. It saw much service on the Lakes during the early years of the American War before surrendering at St. Johns and Chambly [1775]. The regiment was then reformed in New York, and went through all the later campaigns under Clinton and Cornwallis down to the end of the war  such as Philadelphia [Winter 1777-78],  Charleston [1780] and Cowpens [1781]. In August 1782 the regiment returned to New York before sailing to England in 1783.

From 1790 to 1793 the Royal Fusiliers did garrison duty at Gibraltar and Quebec,  after which the regiment was in Nova Scotia. The first battalion having returned home in 1806 was employed in the expedition against Copenhagen in the following year, after which it was sent to Halifax, Nova Scotia. The second battalion was again sent to Halifax in 1809 and then was dispatched to Lisbon. Another second battalion, raised in 1858, served some time at Gibraltar and in Canada, whence it returned home in 1867.

8th (The King's) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed as Princess Anne of Denmark's Regiment in 1685 then designated the Kings Regiment [1715] and the 8th Regiment [1751]. The regiment went to Canada in 1768, and saw much hard service on the Lakes during the early years of the American War. The regiment remained in Canada  serving as garrison troops inMichimackinac, Oswego, Niagara, and Detroit through 1785. The first battalion went to Nova Scotia in 1808; to the West Indies in 1809, where it took part in the capture of Martinique; afterwards it returned to North America (1810), and was present in nearly all the engagements on the Canadian frontier during the American War of 1812-14. The second battalion went out to Nova Scotia and new Brunswick in 1810. During the winter of 1813-14 six companies of this battalion, with a party of blue jackets, performed a memorable march on snow-shoes through the back-woods from new Brunswick to Quebec. They afterwards took part in the expedition to Plattsburg. Both battalions were brought home after the peace. The regiment served in Nova Scotia from 1830 to 1833 and from 1839 until 1841.

9th (East Norfolk) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1685 and designated as the  9th Regiment in 1751. At the outbreak of the American War of Independence the regiment embarked for Canada arriving in Quebec in May 1776, and saw some rough service on the Lakes, and formed part of the army under General Burgoyne, which surrendered at Saratoga on October 1777.  In 1781 it returned home. From the south of France, in 1813, the first battalion proceeded to Canada, where it remained until June 1815. After the Crimea in 1854, the regiment proceeded to Canada, whence it returned home in November 1857.

10th (North Lincoln) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1685 and later designated as the 10th Regiment in 1751. The regiment went to America in 1767, and was in Boston in October 1774. It witnessed the first affairs at Concord and Lexington, and took part in the bloody fight on Bunkerís Hill, and at Long Island(1776), White Plains, Brandywine(1777), Germantown, and other engagements during the campaigns of 1776-8, and in all the minor operations in New York and New Jersey. The soldiers were drafted into other regiments and the officers returned to England in 1778

11th (North Devon) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1685,  designated as 11th Regiment  in 1751. It was with General Hill and Sir Hovenden Walker in the disastrous attempt upon Quebec in 1711, when so many lives were lost in fruitless attempts to ascend the St. Lawrence, the navigation of which was entirely unknown. From the Ionian Islands the service companies went to Gibraltar, and thence to Canada, where they were stationed during the troubles of 1838-9. They were in the backwoods of the Madawaska territory during the arrangement of the boundary question with the United States.

12th (East Suffolk) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1685,  designated as 12th Regiment  in 1751. Assigned to  Canada from 1858 - 1861. No mention of Canada is made in "Records and Badges", the regiment was in England in 1857 and went to India in 1864.

13th (1st Somersetshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1685,  designated as 12th Regiment  in 1751. In 1813 the regiment proceeded from Martinique to Quebec, and was employed on the Canadian frontier during the American War of 1813-15. The regiment, which had remained a single battalion corps throughout the war, returned home in 1815.

14th (Bedfordshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' document
Formed in 1685 and designated as the 14th in 1751. The Fourteenth went to America in 1766, and served there until 1771, when it was removed to the West Indies. It was transferred to Virginia in 1775  and sent to New York in 1776. The soldiers were drafted into other regiments and the officers returned to England in December 1776.The 14th served in Canada and Nova Scotia from 1841 to 1848.

15th (York, East Riding) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1685 and designated as the 15th in 1751.The regiment arrived in Halifax on April 15th, 1758 and took part in the siege and capture of  Louisburg that June at a strength of 859 . From Louisburg it went to Quebec with Wolfe, It fought in the great battle on the heights of Abraham, and after Wolfe's fall served at the defence of Quebec, and with the force sent against Montreal under General Murray, which completed the conquest of the Canada's. Next, it was at the capture of Martinique, and it the siege and conquest of the Havana in 1762, and was quartered for eleven months in Cuba, thence proceeding to New York, and afterwards back to Canada, where it served many years.

In 1776 the Fifteenth, then at home, went out to Charleston in 1776, and made the American Campaigns of 1776-8 under Howe and Clinton. In the November 1778 it went to the West Indies.

In 1827 the Fifteenth went to Canada, and served there until 1840, a period embracing the political riots at Quebec and Montreal in 1832 (suffering heavily in the visitation of Asiatic cholera), as well as the insurrection in Lower Canada in 1837-8. The first battalion was sent out to North America at the time of the Trent difficulty in 1861. It served there and in Bermuda until 1870, when it returned home.

16th (Bedfordshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1688 and designated as the 16th in 1751. The 16th arrived in New York in 1767, was sent to Florida in 1767 and participated in the defense of Baton Rouge (1779) and the siege of Pensacola (1781) before returning to England in March1782. The 16th went to Nova Scotia in 1790, and to Jamaica the year after. It arrived in Canada in 1814. It was in the West Indies and Canada during the period of the Russian War (1853-1855), and returned home from Canada in 1857. It was sent to Canada again at the time of the Trent difficulty in 1861, and served in North America and Bermuda until 1870, when it came to England from Nova Scotia.

17th (Leicestershire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1688 and designated the 17th in 1751. The regiment was sent to Nova Scotia in 1757, and after wintering in New York  took part in the famous siege and capture of Louisburg in 1758 with a complement of 741. In the following year it was in the expedition which captured Crown Point. In the summer, after the capture of Quebec by Wolfe, columns were dispatched to converge upon Montreal, whither the remainder of the French army had withdrawn.  The Seventeenth formed part of the southern column. With Lord Rollo the regiment was afterwards employed at the capture of Martinique, and subsequently at the conquest of Havana. At the peace of 1763 Cuba was restored to Spain in exchange for Florida, and the Seventeenth went back to North America.

At the outbreak of the American War of Independence the regiment was ordered out from Ireland, and landed at Boston in December 1775. It was actively engaged in all the campaigns of that struggle, during which it had the ill-luck to be twice captured, once at Stoney Creek in 1779, and again  at Yorktown in October 1781, but on each occasion it was  exchanged. After the last event it was sent to Nova Scotia in November 1783. It was then stationed in there and Newfoundland down to 1788.

In 1855 the battalion went to Canada, and served there until June, 1865. A second battalion was added to the regiment in 1858, and went to North America, remaining there until 1868, when it returned home.

18th (Royal Irish) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1684 and designated as the 18th regiment in 1751.The regiment went to America in 1767, and was at Boston in October 1774. It was present at the battle of Bunker's Hill, on Charlestown Heights on 17th June, 1775, but left Boston for Nova Scotia soon after where the soldiers were drafted into other regiments and the officers returned to England in July 1776.

19th (1st York, North Riding) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1688 and designated as the 19th regiment in 1751.The regiment went out to Charlestown, Carolina, in  June1781, and was present in the affairs at Monk's Corner, the relief of Fort Ninety-Six, and the action at Eutaw Springs, and went through much harassing work up to the departure of the troops and loyalists in December 1782, when it removed to Barbados. It served in the Ionian Islands, the West Indies (1845 -1848), and  Quebec (Montreal, 1848 - 1851).
Links - Regimental history extracts

20th (East Devon) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1688 and designated as the 20th regiment in 1751.The regiment was among the troops sent to the relief of Quebec in May 1776, and served in the operations under Burgoyne down to the surrender of Saratoga in October 1777. After being "interned" in America some time, it came home in 1781. From 1842 to 1853 the regiment, including a reserve battalion, was stationed in Gibraltar, Bermuda, and North America. From 1873 to 1881 it served in Bermuda, Nova Scotia, Malta and Cyprus, returning home in the latter year.

21st (Royal North British Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed before 1678 as the Earl of Mar's Regiment of Foot, designated the The Royal Regiment of North British Fusiliers [1707] and designated as the 21st regiment in 1751.The regiment was sent out to the relief of Quebec in May 1776, and made the campaigns under Burgoyne down to the disaster at Saratoga in October 1777.

It went to Nova Scotia from home in 1789, and served there for four years. From Genoa, in 1813, the regiment went to America (Atlantic region), and was engaged in the operations on the Chesapeake and Patuxent, including the battle of Bladensburg and the capture of Washington. Early in the following year it was engaged in the unsuccessful attempt on New Orleans, and in the attack on Fort Bowyer, Mobile. It arrived in England in June, 1815. 21st Regiment Grenadier

22nd (Cheshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1689 and designated as the 22nd regiment in 1751.The regiment was sent to Nova Scotia in 1757, and after wintering in New York  took part in the siege and capture of Louisburg in 1758 with a complement of 1007 and went into garrison there. Next year its grenadiers, with the grenadier companies of certain other regiments, were formed into a provisional battalion entitled the "Grenadiers of Louisburg," and accompanied Wolfe in his enterprise against Quebec. The grenadiers were in the subsequent defence of Quebec, under Murray, and the remaining companies of the regiment  arrived from Cape Breton, on the re-opening of the navigation. The regiment took part in the expedition against Montreal and the final conquest of the Canada's in 1760. In 1762 the 22nd was shifted to the West Indies to take part in the capture of Martinique and Havana.

 In May 1775 they were posted to Boston from England. and took part in the New York Campaign [1776], Rhode Island [1777-1779] before returning to New York [1780] prior to their 1783 departure to England.  In 1793 they took part in the West Indies expeditions.
Links - Regimental history extracts

23rd (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1689, designated the Prince of Wales's Own Royal Regiment of Welch Fusiliers [1714],  The Royal Welch Fusiliers [1727] and  as the 22nd regiment in 1751.In June 1773 the regiment arrived at New York but was transferred to Boston in 1774. It fought at Bunker's Hill, and suffered heavily.  For a while the regiment served as marines on board Earl Howe's fleet; after which it re-landed, and served under Howe, Clinton, and Cornwallis (New York Campaign [1776], Philadelphia Campaign [1777],  New York [1778], siege of Charlestown, SC [1780] and
Cornwallis' southern campaigns [1780-1781]) , down to the surrender at Yorktown, 19th October 1781. After Cornwallis's surrender it was "interned" in the Jerseys until the peace, when it returned to England, and spent eleven years at home. The 1st Battalion served inn Nova Scotia in 1808, and at the capture of the island of Martinique in 1809, where it was much distinguished. Having returned from the West Indies to Halifax, Nova Scotia, it proceeded thence to Portugal. A second battalion, raised in Cardiff in 1858, subsequently served for ten years at Gibraltar and in Canada.

24th (2nd Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1689 and designated as the 24th regiment in 1751. In 1776 the regiment was among the reinforcements sent to Quebec in May 1776 and served in the operations under Burgoyne down to the surrender at Saratoga, after which it was "interned" in America until the peace. After some years at home the regiment, in 1789, proceeded to North America, and was stationed for a good many years in Nova Scotia and Canada. According to one account - about which there seems to be a little uncertainty - part of the regiment was despatched from Halifax, Nova Scotia, during this period, to assist in quelling a dangerous riot of the blacks in Sierra Leone and Goree. The regiment returned from America in 1800. The first battalion served many years in Canada, where it was stationed during the troubles of 1837-8. In October 1837, the 24th Regiment was sent from Toronto to Lower Canada to suppress rebels, they return in January 1838. In 1846 it went to India.

25th (Sussex) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1689,  designated as 25th Regiment  in 1751. In 1805 became the King's Own Borderers Regiment with the Sussex title passing to the 35th Regiment. The regiment was ordered to Canada in 1838, but was sent to the Cape instead.

26th (The Cameronians) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1689 and designated as the 26th regiment in 1751. In 1767 the regiment arrived in New Jersey and sent in 1775 to Montreal. It surrendered at St. Johns and was exchanged in December 1776.It was reformed in New York and sent to Philadelphia in 1777. In 1778 it returned to New York. The soldiers were drafted into other regiments and the officers returned to England in December 1779. From 1787 to 1800 the regiment was stationed in Canada and Nova Scotia. In 1853 the regiment proceeded to Canada, and was stationed in Canada and Bermuda from 1853 to 1859.

27th (Inniskilling) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1689 and designated as the 27th regiment in 1751. At the beginning of the Seven Years' War, the 27th went out to America, and served in the operations at Ticonderoga and Crown Point, and afterwards in the expedition to Montreal, which accomplished the conquest of the Canada's. In 1761 it removed to Nova Scotia, and afterwards engaged at the capture of Martinique and Grenada, and at the siege and conquest of the Havana. From Cuba the regiment went to New York, and thence to Canada, where it served until 1767, when it returned home.

At the outbreak of the American War of Independence the Inniskillings again went to America, arriving in Boston in October 1775. They joined the forces under General Howe at Staten Island in July, 1776, and fought at Long Island, White Plains, and elsewhere. In November 1778 the regiment formed part of the armament sent from New York to the West Indies, which captured, and afterwards defended, St. Lucia.

In 1811 the first and second battalions of the regiment were sent from Sicily to the east coast of Spain, where they were actively employed up to the end of the war. These battalions afterwards joined the Duke of Wellington's army at Bordeaux, in April, 1814, when the three battalions of Inniskillings met for the first and last time. The first and third battalions then embarked for Canada, the second going home to Ireland. The first and third battalions were engaged in the expedition to Plattsburg, on Lake Champlain, and the first battalion was afterwards sent round to the mouth of the Mississippi, to reinforce the troops there after the disaster at New Orleans; but the news arriving that peace had been concluded with the United States, the battalion came home to Portsmouth, from whence, after receiving drafts from the Second battalion, it proceeded to Belgium, and was stationed at Ghent. The third battalion landed at Ostend from America on the 15th July, 1815.

28th (North Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1690 and designated as the 28th regiment in 1751.The 28th took part in the famous siege and capture of Louisburg in 1758 with a complement of 708, but arriving late, was held as a reserve unit. and was later used in the expedition against Quebec.  The regiment afterwards took part in the expedition against Montreal, and in the siege and conquest of Havana. The outbreak of the American War of Independence in 1776 saw the 28th again in America, where it fought at White Plains, Brandywine, and in other early encounters. It is said at this time to have acquired its nickname of "The Slashers," but the stories told to account for the name are evidently myths. The regiment went from New York to the West Indies in November 1778.

29th (Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1704 and designated as the 28th regiment in 1751.The 29th left Gibraltar in October, 1745, for Louisburg in Cape Breton where it remained until 1749, when it left for Chebuctoo Harbour, Nova Scotia and was employed in clearing the site of the present city of Halifax. They landed in Cork in 1750. In 1765 the 29th returned to Halifax, from Ireland, where it remained until September 1768, when posted to Boston. In 1773 they returned to England before returning in May 1776 to Quebec, at that time besieged by the Americans. In October, they embarked on board the Thunderer, Inflexible, Carlton, &c., and fought in several actions on Lake Champlain. In 1777 the flank companies were engaged at Hubberton, Stillwater,  and Saratoga. The headquarters and battalions companies were employed in Canada throughout the war and remained in Canada until 1787. In June 1802 they again embarked for Halifax, from England and remained there until June 1807, again returning to England. The regiment was in the Atlantic region of Canada in 1814. The regiment was again in Canada and the West Indies between 1867 and 1873.

30th (Cambridgeshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1702 and designated as the 30th regiment in 1751.During the early part of the American War of Independence the Thirtieth was in Ireland; but it sailed from Cork with other reinforcements in 1781 arriving in Charleston in June 1781 and made one campaign in Carolina. When the Carolina Loyalists abandoned their old homes, in December, 1782, the 30th accompanied part of the convoy to Jamaica. As a single battalion corps, the 30th arrived  in  Canada in 1842. From 1860 to 1870 the battalion served in Canada and Nova Scotia.
Links- Brief History of the 30th Regiment of Foot in India

31st (Huntingdonshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Raised as Villier's marine corps in 1702, reformed as a regiment of foot in 1715 and designated as the 31st regiment in 1751. In 1765 the regiment went to Pensacola, West Florida, where it suffered much from yellow fever. The regiment went to Quebec in May 1776, where the battalion companies helped to garrison Quebec during the War of Independence. The flank companies served in the operations under General Burgoyne, and were with the force that surrendered at Saratoga. After eleven years' service in Canada, the regiment returned home in 1787.

32nd (Cornwall) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1702,  designated as 32nd Regiment  in 1751 and became the Cornwall Regiment in 1782. A part of the regiment was with the Boston force which formed a settlement at Annapolis Royal in Nova Scotia (c. 1705), and was afterwards employed in the unsuccessful attempt against Quebec. During a stay of eleven years in Canada, from 1830 to 1841, the 32nd had some sharp work with the insurgents, and their American sympathisers, on the lakes during the winter of 1838-9. 32nd sent to Upper Canada in January 1838. 26 February to 3 March, 1838, Republicans occupy Pelee island, Lake Erie; routed by regulars of 32nd and 83rd Regiments and the Essex Militia by 3 March.
Links - The Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry

33rd (1st York, West Riding) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1702 and designated as the 33rd regiment in 1751. In February 1776, the 33rd embarked at Cork for America, with other regiments. The regiment too part in almost all of the campaigns including the operations at Long Island and New York(1776), the expedition to Philadelphia(1777), the siege of Charlestown (1780), and the campaigns in Virginia and the Carolinas(1780-81), down to the surrender at Yorktown, 19th October 1781. The regiment was then "interned" in America until the peace., then exchanged and sent to Halifax in September 1783. From 1840 to 1848 the regiment was in the West Indies and New Brunswick.

34th (Cumberland) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1702 and designated as the 34th regiment in 1751. After 1762 the regiment served for some time in Florida, where, on one occasion, at Mobile, it was in imminent risk of starvation, owing to the miscarriage of supplies from the Island of Jamaica. The 34th arrived in Quebec in May 1776 and during the American War of Independence, and saw much  service in the backwoods. The flank companies were with Burgoyne at Saratoga. The regiment remained in Canada on garrison duty until 1786, when it returned home. The 34th served in North America from 1830 to 1840, and during the disturbances in Lower Canada, in 1838, was one of the regiments dispatched on horse-sleighs from New Brunswick to Canada, over the snow, in the depth of winter. June 1838, 34th Regiment arrived in Upper Canada.

35th (Royal Sussex) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1701 and designated as the 35th regiment in 1751. The 35th initially  had some sharp work with the French and Indians on the frontier in 1756-7. The regiment was sent to Nova Scotia in 1757, and after wintering in Philadelphia took part in the famous siege and capture of Louisburg in 1758 with a complement of  627.  The year after it was with Wolfe at Quebec,  with Murray at the defence of Quebec, and at the capture of Montreal in 1760. It was at the capture of Martinique in 1761 and of Havana in 1762; after which it was some time in Florida. When troubles threatened in the American Colonies the 35th crossed the Atlantic again arriving in Boston in June 1775. It fought  at Bunker's Hill, on 17th June, 1775, and was afterwards engaged in the operations about New York(1776), where it was stationed during the greater part of the war. In November 1778 the regiment was removed to the West Indies.

36th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1701,  designated as 36th Regiment  in 1751 and became the Herefodshire Regiment in 1782. Having been re-formed in England, in 1707, the regiment went to Nova Scotia, and was engaged in the disastrous attempt against Quebec under General hill and Sir Hovenden Walker in 1711, after which it came home. From 1830 to 1839 the regiment was stationed in the West Indies and North America.

37th (North Hampshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1702 and designated as the 37th regiment in 1751.At the outbreak of the American War the 37th was sent to America, and fought at Long Island, at the capture of New York, and in other early affairs. It was at Charlestown in 1776, and in the expedition to Philadelphia in 1777. It was at New York during the latter part of the war. It returned to England in 1783.

After the peace of 1814 the regiment left Bordeaux for Pouliac, where it embarked with reinforcements for Upper Canada, and there served until 1825. (Montreal 1819 - 1824). They returned to England in 1825 and then to Ireland in 1826. In 1830 they returned to the New World (Bermuda and Jamaica, and finally Canada again in 1839). The original posting to Canada was at the conclusion of European hostilities and Napoleon's first abdication. Britain was then free to focus its attention on the American nuisance. The 37th was posted to Fort Erie and Amherstburg, both serving as defences against American invasion. In 1818, they moved to Quebec and spent most of their sojourn in Montreal. The 37th, served in Malta, the Ionian islands, Jamaica, and North America from 1830 to 1842, in which year it returned home from Nova Scotia.
Links-Richmond Military Settlement

38th (1st Staffordshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1702 and designated as the 37th regiment in 1751. When troubles threatened with the Colonies the 38th was one of the first corps despatched from Ireland to America, arriving in Boston in July 1774. It fought at Bunker's Hill, 17th June, 1775; but during the greater part of the war it was stationed in and about New York. It remained in Nova Scotia several years after the peace of 1783. From 1840 to 1851 the 38th did duty in the Ionian Islands, at Gibraltar, in Jamaica and Honduras, and in Nova Scotia.
 

39th (Dorsetshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1702,  designated as 39th Regiment  in 1751 and became the East Middlesex Regiment in 1782 Disbanded and drafted into the 104th Regiment in 1795. In 1807 it was reformed as the 39th (Dorsetshire) Regiment. The first battalion went from the south of France to Canada and served in the expedition to Plattsburg in 1814. Afterwards returning to Europe, it landed at Ostend a month after the battle of Waterloo had been fought. After 1855 the regiment was for some years in Canada and Bermuda, returning home from the latter station in 1864.

40th (2nd Somersetshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1702 and designated as the 40th regiment in 1751. It  to served in Nova Scotia, Maine, and Newfoundland for some thirty years After the breaking out of the Seven Years' War, the regiment went to Louisburg  and took part in the capture of that famous stronghold; its grenadiers, with the "Grenadiers of Louisburg," fought under Wolfe at Quebec in 1759. Arriving from Cape Breton in the following spring, the regiment, witnessed the surrender of the French at Montreal in September, 1760, and was afterwards at the taking of Guadeloupe in 1761, and at the conquest of the Havana in 1762.

After forty-six years' continuous foreign service, the 40th came home, and was for some years on the Irish Establishment. It went back to America in 1775 arriving in Boston in June 1775, and fought at Long Island, at the capture of New York, in the battles of Brandywine and Germantown, and other affairs. The regiment was dispatched to Antigua from New York in 1778, recalled to New York in 1781 and finally returned to England in 1783. It later returned to the West Indies serving there until 1798. After serving in the Peninsular War,  it took part in the attack on New Orleans in 1815.
Links - The Fighting 40th

41st (The Welsh) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1719,  designated as 41st Regiment  in 1751. In 1798 the regiment was in Ireland, and in 1800 embarked for Upper Canada, where it was left during  the Peninsular War. In the latter part of that period it had some most severe fighting when engaged on the Canadian frontier in 1812-14 (Detroit, Queenstown, Miami, Niagara). A considerable number of the regiment having been taken prisoners and interned in America, a 2nd Battalion was formed at home, which, however, was amalgamated with the remnant of' the 1st Battalion soon after at the peace. After the termination of hostilities with the United States, the regiment was retained for some time at Quebec before being sent home. They landed with other regiments at Ostend a month after the battle of Waterloo, and marched to join the Army of Occupation at Paris. At the end of 1815 the regiment returned home.
Links-41st - 41st Regiment: deserters and settlers in North America

42nd (Royal Highland) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed as The Highland Regiment in 1739, it was  numbered in 1751. At the beginning of the Seven Years' War the 42nd  embarked for America and was distinguished by its, "extraordinary gallantry " in the attack on Ticonderoga, 22nd July 1758. . A second battalion was formed at this time in Perthshire, and sent out to the West Indies; it served in the attempt on Martinique, and at the conquest of Guadeloupe, afterwards joining the forces on Lake Ontario in the fall of 1759. The two battalions were employed in the operations, ending with the capture of Montreal in 1760, and at the capture of Havana in 1762. From Cuba the two battalions, reduced to one, returned to America, and were for years employed on harassing service against the Indian tribes, who at this period made incessant raids on the frontiers of Maryland, Philadelphia, and Virginia. The regiment was particularly distinguished by its gallantry at a place called Bushy Run in July 1763.

It returned from New York to Cork in October, 1767. When the War of Independence broke out, the 42nd was again sent to America. At a review on 10th April, 1776, prior to embarkation, there were in its ranks 921 Highlanders, 74 Scotch Lowlanders, 3 English, 1 Welsh, and 2 Irish. Arriving at New York in July, it fought at Long Island, White Plains, Brandywine, Philadelphia (1777) the siege of Charleston(1780), and other engagements of that  struggle. In September 1783 the 42nd were posted to Halifax came home from Cape Breton in 1787. In 1786 the 2nd Battalion became the 73rd Regiment. After 1842 the regiment served at Malta, in Bermuda, and Nova Scotia until 1852, when it returned home.

43rd (Monmouthshire Light Infantry) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1741, it received its numeric designation in 1751. At the outbreak of the Seven Years' War the 43rd, which had been some years in Ireland, embarked for North America. In 1757-8. In 1759 it accompanied the expedition to Quebec. and fought under Wolfe in the memorable battle on the Plains of Abraham on 13th August, 1759. The regiment served at the subsequent defence of Quebec, and  the expedition against Montreal. It was afterwards at the capture of Martinique and in the expedition to the Havana. Less than 400 strong, it left Havana for Jamaica at the peace, and was, recruited by drafts from other regiments in the West Indies. It returned home in 1764.

When troubles were threatening before the commencement of the War of Independence, the 43rd was the first regiment. sent out to America. It was in camp at Boston in July 1774, and twelve mouths later, on 17th June, 1775, at Bunker's Hill. It saw much hard and varied service in  New York (1776),  Rhode Island (1777-79) and Virginia(1781), down to the surrender at Yorktown in October 1781. After the peace its scattered companies were brought home from America and Jamaica.

In 1812, the first battalion proceeded from the south of France to America, and took part in the desperate attempt on New Orleans, and subsequent capture of Fort Bowyer, Mobile. It was at Deal at the commencement of the Waterloo campaign. It went to New Brunswick in 1835, and was one of the regiments dispatched from New Brunswick to Quebec, on horse-sleighs, in the depth of the winter of 1838-39, on the occasion of the insurrection in Lower Canada. The regiment was employed in Canada until 1844, when it removed to Nova Scotia, and came home in 1846.
 

44th (East Essex) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1741, it received its numeric designation in 1751. In 1755, the regiment went with reinforcements to North America, and was with Braddock in the disastrous attempt on Fort du Quesne, on the Ohio, and afterwards in the attacks on Ticonderoga and Fort Niagara, and in the expedition against Montreal. It remained in Canada until 1765, when it came home.

In May, 1775, the regiment embarked for Boston, and arrived there in July  just after the battle of Bunker's Hill. It made the campaigns of 1776-8, and fought at Long Island, Brandywine, and Philadelphia (1777), after which it was at New York, whence, in 1779, it proceeded to Canada, and remained there until 1786, when it again returned home. In 1816, the first battalion proceeded from the east coast of Spain to America, and fought at Bladensburg and at the capture of Washington, and in the disastrous expedition to New Orleans. It returned home at the peace.
Links- East Essex Regiment

45th (Nottinghamshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1741, it received its numeric designation in 1751. The regiment was sent to Gibraltar, and afterwards to America, in 1746, to assist the New Englanders in their enterprise against the French settlement of Cape Breton, but, after the peace, was withdrawn from Louisburg to Nova Scotia, and there served many years. It was in Nova Scotia when the Seven Years' War commenced, and bore a share in the capture of Louisburg (with 956 soldiers) in 1758; after which it was stationed in Cape Breton and Nova Scotia until 1766, when it returned home, and was some years in Ireland.

The regiment was among the reinforcements sent out at the commencement of the American War of Independence arriving in Boston in July 1775, and was employed at Long Island and elsewhere near New York in 1776. The flank companies took part in the expedition to Philadelphia in 1777, and fought at Brandywine, Germantown, &.c. In November, 1778, the regimental officers returned to England while the soldiers were drafted into other regiments in North America.

46th (South Devonshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1741, it received its numeric designation in 1751. After fourteen years' home service the 46th went out to America, and suffered heavy loss in the desperate attempt upon Ticonderoga, on Lake Champlain on 3 July, 1756. Afterwards it was in the expedition sent against Fort Niagara, simultaneously with Wolfe's attack on Quebec, and in many other affairs, ending in the fall of Montreal and the conquest of the Canada's. Thence the 46th, went to the West Indies, and served at the capture of Martinique in 1761 and the conquest of Havana in 1762.

With the reinforcements for General Howe, the 46th went from Ireland to America, in 1776, and saw  service in the earlier campaigns of the War of Independence. They were involved at Charleston (1776) and Philadelphia (1777).  Leaving its light company behind in America, the 46th went from New York to the West Indies in November 1778, and was present at the capture of St. Lucia. On its return home it was stationed at Plymouth. In 1832 the regiment left India for home. After a few years at home the regiment went to Gibraltar and served in that garrison in the West Indies, in British Guiana, and in North America until 1848, when it returned to England. 46th Regiment Private

47th (Lancashire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
 Formed in 1741, it received its numeric designation in 1751.The regiment went to America in 1750. At the outbreak of the Seven Years' War it was still in America, serving in Nova Scotia. The regiment was at the siege and capture of Louisburg in June 1758. It went with Wolfe to Quebec the year after, and in the memorable battle on the Plains of Abraham on 12th September, 1759, together with the 43rd, formed the centre of the front line. The regiment was with Murray at the winter defence of Quebec, and in the expedition against Montreal in 1761 . It was, also at the conquest of Martinique in 1762. It returned home at the peace of 1763.

In 1773 the regiment went again to America arriving in New Jersey. Sent to Boston  in October 1774 it fought in the stubborn fight on Bunker's Hill, 17th June 1775. It was among the reinforcements dispatched from New York for the defence of Canada (Quebec) in 1776, and served with the force under General Burgoyne on the Lakes, which was compelled to surrender at Saratoga, 17th October, 1777. After being interned some time in America, it returned home in 1781. The 47th went to the West Indies  in 1790, and served there and in Bermuda and the Bahamas during the first part of the French War, down to the Peace of Amiens. The 47th Foot was dispatched to British North America (Canada) at the time of the Trent difficulty of 1861.  It remained in North America (Montreal 1863-66, Nova Scotia 1867-68) and Barbados in the West Indies in 1869, from where it returned home in that year.

48th (Northamptonshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1741,  designated as 48th Regiment  in 1751 and became the Northamptonshire Regiment in 1782. The regiment was one of those sent out to America under General Braddock in 1755, and served in the  expedition against Fort Duquesne. In 1756 it was among the troops sent from Virginia to Nova Scotia, and served at the  capture of Louisburg in 1758 (with its 1,029 troops), and with Wolfe at Quebec in 1759. It was in Quebec during the winter defence of 1759-60, and  the expedition against Montreal ; after which it was  at the reduction of Martinique and at the conquest of Havana in 1762. It returned home at the peace of 1763. The regiment was in America when the troubles with the mother country began; but it afterwards went to the West Indies, and served there throughout the period of the American War.

49th (Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1744, and numbered in 1751, the 49th was in Ireland when the troubles commenced in America, arriving in Boston in June 1775.. It fought in various engagements about New York(1776)  and  Philadelphia Expedition (1777) at Brooklyn, Long Island (1778), Brandywine, &c.  The battalion companies went with the expedition from New York to the West Indies in 1778. In 1803 it embarked for Quebec, and took a prominent part in the operations on the Canadian frontier during the American War of 1812-14, including the actions at Queenstown, at Fort George, Black Rock, Stoney Creek, &c. Its gallant chief, Sir Isaac Brock, who is still remembered in the Dominion as the "Hero of Upper Canada," fell at Queenstown. It returned home at the peace.

50th (West Kent) Regiment of Foot Soldiers' documents
Formed in 1755 as the 52nd Regiment, designated as 50th Regiment  in 1756 and became the West Kent Regiment in 1782. The regiment was sent from Jamaica to America at the outbreak of the American war, and the men who were eligible drafted to make up the strength of some of the regiments which had suffered at Bunker's Hill. It then came home, and was at home during the rest of the war.


Infantry II: Regiments 51st through 104th
December 08, 2003