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Bethiah Mowry

F, b. 17 Jun 1638
Bethiah Mowry|b. 17 Jun 1638|p88.htm#i37505|Roger Mowry|b. 1610\nd. 5 Jan 1666/67|p20.htm#i3562|Mary Johnson|b. 31 Jul 1614\nd. 29 Jan 1678/79|p20.htm#i3561|Thomas Mowry||p87.htm#i37502|Elizabeth (Unknown)||p103.htm#i42013|John Johnson|b. 1588\nd. 30 Sep 1659|p87.htm#i37501|Mary Heath|b. 24 Mar 1593/94|p241.htm#i129171|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of Virginia Ailene Swift.
     Bethiah Mowry was baptized on 17-Jun-1638 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Roger Mowry and Mary Johnson. Bethiah married George Palmer on 30-Sep-1662.
     Bethiah Mowry was also known as Appia Mowry.

Joseph Mowry

M, b. 1647, d. 27 May 1716
Joseph Mowry|b. 1647\nd. 27 May 1716|p88.htm#i37506|Roger Mowry|b. 1610\nd. 5 Jan 1666/67|p20.htm#i3562|Mary Johnson|b. 31 Jul 1614\nd. 29 Jan 1678/79|p20.htm#i3561|Thomas Mowry||p87.htm#i37502|Elizabeth (Unknown)||p103.htm#i42013|John Johnson|b. 1588\nd. 30 Sep 1659|p87.htm#i37501|Mary Heath|b. 24 Mar 1593/94|p241.htm#i129171|

Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Joseph Mowry was born in 1647 at Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island. He was the son of Roger Mowry and Mary Johnson. Joseph married Mary Wilbur before 1672. Joseph Mowry died on 27-May-1716 at Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island.

Mary Mowry

F, b. 16 Feb 1639
Mary Mowry|b. 16 Feb 1639|p88.htm#i37507|Roger Mowry|b. 1610\nd. 5 Jan 1666/67|p20.htm#i3562|Mary Johnson|b. 31 Jul 1614\nd. 29 Jan 1678/79|p20.htm#i3561|Thomas Mowry||p87.htm#i37502|Elizabeth (Unknown)||p103.htm#i42013|John Johnson|b. 1588\nd. 30 Sep 1659|p87.htm#i37501|Mary Heath|b. 24 Mar 1593/94|p241.htm#i129171|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of Virginia Ailene Swift.
     Mary Mowry was baptized on 16-Feb-1639 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Roger Mowry and Mary Johnson.

Benjamin Mowry

M, b. 8 May 1649
Benjamin Mowry|b. 8 May 1649|p88.htm#i37508|Roger Mowry|b. 1610\nd. 5 Jan 1666/67|p20.htm#i3562|Mary Johnson|b. 31 Jul 1614\nd. 29 Jan 1678/79|p20.htm#i3561|Thomas Mowry||p87.htm#i37502|Elizabeth (Unknown)||p103.htm#i42013|John Johnson|b. 1588\nd. 30 Sep 1659|p87.htm#i37501|Mary Heath|b. 24 Mar 1593/94|p241.htm#i129171|

Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Benjamin Mowry was born on 8-May-1649. He was the son of Roger Mowry and Mary Johnson. Benjamin Mowry was baptized on 20-May-1649 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. Benjamin married Martha Hazard, daughter of Thomas Hazard and Martha (Unknown), in 1676/77 at Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

Elizabeth Mowry

F, b. 27 Mar 1642, d. after 1690
Elizabeth Mowry|b. 27 Mar 1642\nd. after 1690|p88.htm#i37509|Roger Mowry|b. 1610\nd. 5 Jan 1666/67|p20.htm#i3562|Mary Johnson|b. 31 Jul 1614\nd. 29 Jan 1678/79|p20.htm#i3561|Thomas Mowry||p87.htm#i37502|Elizabeth (Unknown)||p103.htm#i42013|John Johnson|b. 1588\nd. 30 Sep 1659|p87.htm#i37501|Mary Heath|b. 24 Mar 1593/94|p241.htm#i129171|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of Virginia Ailene Swift.
     Elizabeth Mowry was baptized on 27-Mar-1642 at Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Roger Mowry and Mary Johnson. Elizabeth Mowry died after 1690.

Thomas Mowry

M, b. 19 Jul 1652
Thomas Mowry|b. 19 Jul 1652|p88.htm#i37510|Roger Mowry|b. 1610\nd. 5 Jan 1666/67|p20.htm#i3562|Mary Johnson|b. 31 Jul 1614\nd. 29 Jan 1678/79|p20.htm#i3561|Thomas Mowry||p87.htm#i37502|Elizabeth (Unknown)||p103.htm#i42013|John Johnson|b. 1588\nd. 30 Sep 1659|p87.htm#i37501|Mary Heath|b. 24 Mar 1593/94|p241.htm#i129171|

Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Thomas Mowry was born on 19-Jul-1652 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island. He was the son of Roger Mowry and Mary Johnson. Thomas married Susanna Newell on 6-Sep-1673 at Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.

Nathaniel Mowry

M, b. 10 Jan 1644, d. 24 Mar 1717/18
Nathaniel Mowry|b. 10 Jan 1644\nd. 24 Mar 1717/18|p88.htm#i37511|Roger Mowry|b. 1610\nd. 5 Jan 1666/67|p20.htm#i3562|Mary Johnson|b. 31 Jul 1614\nd. 29 Jan 1678/79|p20.htm#i3561|Thomas Mowry||p87.htm#i37502|Elizabeth (Unknown)||p103.htm#i42013|John Johnson|b. 1588\nd. 30 Sep 1659|p87.htm#i37501|Mary Heath|b. 24 Mar 1593/94|p241.htm#i129171|

Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Nathaniel Mowry was born in 1644 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island. He was baptized on 10-Jan-1644. He was the son of Roger Mowry and Mary Johnson. Nathaniel Mowry published marriage intentions on 28-Aug-1666 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island. Nathaniel Mowry died on 24-Mar-1717/18 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, at age 74.

Child of Nathaniel Mowry and Johanna Inman

Hannah Mowry

F, b. 28 Sep 1656
Hannah Mowry|b. 28 Sep 1656|p88.htm#i37512|Roger Mowry|b. 1610\nd. 5 Jan 1666/67|p20.htm#i3562|Mary Johnson|b. 31 Jul 1614\nd. 29 Jan 1678/79|p20.htm#i3561|Thomas Mowry||p87.htm#i37502|Elizabeth (Unknown)||p103.htm#i42013|John Johnson|b. 1588\nd. 30 Sep 1659|p87.htm#i37501|Mary Heath|b. 24 Mar 1593/94|p241.htm#i129171|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Hannah Mowry was born on 28-Sep-1656 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island. She was the daughter of Roger Mowry and Mary Johnson. Hannah married Benjamin Sherman on 3-Dec-1674 at Portsmouth, Newport County, Rhode Island.

Timothy Brooks

M, b. circa 1625, d. 1712
      Timothy Brooks was born circa 1625 at England. Timothy married Mary Russell on 21-Dec-1659 at Woburn, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Timothy married Mehitable Mowry, daughter of Roger Mowry and Mary Johnson, after 15-Sep-1680 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island. Timothy Brooks died in 1712 at Swansea, Bristol County, Massachusetts.

Mary Russell

F, d. 15 Sep 1680
     Mary married Timothy Brooks on 21-Dec-1659 at Woburn, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. Mary Russell died on 15-Sep-1680 at Billerica, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

Rachel Vigne

F, b. 16 Mar 1623, d. 18 Feb 1663
Rachel Vigne|b. 16 Mar 1623\nd. 18 Feb 1663|p88.htm#i37548|Guillaume Vigne|b. circa 1586\nd. circa 30 Apr 1632|p87.htm#i35922|Adriana Cuveille|b. circa 1590\nd. 1655|p87.htm#i35923|Jean de la Vigne|b. circa 1560\nd. after 1622|p88.htm#i37549||||||||||

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
     Rachel Vigne was baptized on 16-Mar-1623 at Walloon Church, Leyden, Netherlands. She was the daughter of Guillaume Vigne and Adriana Cuveille. Rachel married Cornelis Van Tienhoven before 25-Jul-1639. Rachel married Cornelis Van Tienhoven on 18-Feb-1643. Rachel Vigne died on 18-Feb-1663 at New Amsterdam, New York County, New York, at age 39.

Jean de la Vigne

M, b. circa 1560, d. after 1622

Relationship=10th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover.
      Jean de la Vigne was born circa 1560 at Valenciennes, Nord, France. He died after 1622 at Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands.

Child of Jean de la Vigne

Rev Everardus Bogardus

M, b. 1607, d. 27 Sep 1647
      Rev Everardus Bogardus was born in 1607 at Woerden, Netherlands. Everardus married Anneke Jans in Mar-1638 at New Amsterdam, New York County, New York. Rev Everardus Bogardus died on 27-Sep-1647 at at sea off the coast of, Wales; on the ship "de Princess Amalia."
     He was also known as Domine Evardus Bogardus. He emigrated in Apr-1633; arrived in New Amsterdam aboard the ship "de Soutberg."

BOGARDUS, Everardus, clergyman, born in Holland; drowned in Bristol channel, 27 September 1647. He came to New Amsterdam in 1633, and was the second minister in the colony. He publicly accused Governor Van Twiller, whom he had accompanied from Holland, of real-administration, and in consequence was himself charged with unbecoming conduct, and was about to depart for Holland in order to defend himself, but was detained by Governor Kieft. In 1642 a new Church was built for him. The following year he warned Governor Kieft against making war upon the Indians, and in 1645 denounced him for drunkenness and rapacity. Kieft brought the clergyman to trial, but the dispute was compromised. When Kieft returned to Holland, after the arrival of Stuyvesant in 1647, Bogardus sailed in the same vessel, to answer charges brought against him, before the classis in Amsterdam. The vessel entered Bristol channel by a mistake, and struck upon a rock, going down with eighty persons, among them Bogardus and Kieft. *His wife, Annetje Jansen, corrupted into Anneke Jans, born in Holland about 1600; died in the village of Beverwyck, New York, 19 March 1663. She first came to America in 1630, with her first husband, Roelof Jansen, of Waterland, who had been sent out by Patroon Van Rensselaer as assistant steward at Albany. They afterward removed to New Amsterdam, among the earliest Dutch settlers. Here, in 1636, they obtained from Governor Wouter Van Twiller a grant of sixty-two acres of land, the present boundaries of which are the North river, Christopher street, Bedford street, West Houston street, Sullivan street, Canal street, West Broadway, Barclay street, Broadway, and Fulton street, around to the River again. Shortly afterward Jansen died, leaving Anneke with four children. In 1638 she married Everardus Bogardus. After the death of Dominie Bogardus, Anneke, again a widow, with four additional children, continued to reside in the City, and in 1654 she obtained from Governor Stuyvesant a patent in her own name of the farm above mentioned. In her will she named as her sole heirs Sarah Roelofson, Katrina Roelofson, Jannettys and Rachel Hartgers (two children of her deceased daughter Frytie), and John Roelofson, her children by her first husband, and William, Cornelius, Jonas, and Peter Bogardus, children of the second marriage. On 27 August 1664, the grant of land was confirmed by the English government, as may be found recorded in the office of the secretary of state at Albany in the "Patent Book," pp. 28-30. In 1670 part of the land, a salt meadow north of Canal street, was sold at public auction; but the sale was never carried out, on account of sortie alleged flaw in the title. In 1671 five of the heirs conveyed the whole farm (or bouwery) to Colonel Francis Lovelace, then governor of the province of New York. But one of the sons, Cornelius, did not join in this conveyance, and therefore his heirs have always claimed that they have a right to their share of the property. In 1705 the estate, then known as the "King's Farm," was leased or granted by the colonial authorities under Queen Anne to Trinity Church; and, in spite of numerous contests, that corporation has continued to enjoy all the benefits and revenues of the vast property to this day. Nicholas Brower, one of the heirs, brought a suit in ejectment in 1750, claiming that the title was not in Queen Anne. He was non-suited by default, renewed his suit in 1760, and was again beaten. In 1807 Colonel Malcolm, who had married an heir, brought an unsuccessful suit in the New York Supreme Court, to recover a part of the property. In 1830 three other heirs had a similar experience. Chancellor Walworth in 1834 dismissed a suit brought by Jonas Humbert. In 1847 Cornelius Brower brought nine suits, all of which were dismissed. In these Vice Chancellor Sanford, after examining every fact on both sides, decided that, waiving all other points, the Church had acquired a perfectly valid title by undisputed possession longer than the limitation at which title might be gained by possession in 1705, when the land came to the Church. The accompanying view represents New York at that time.



Child of Rev Everardus Bogardus and Anneke Jans

David Pieterse Schuyler

M, b. 12 Feb 1636, d. 2 Nov 1690
David Pieterse Schuyler|b. 12 Feb 1636\nd. 2 Nov 1690|p88.htm#i37667|Pieter Schuyler|b. 1601|p332.htm#i239141|Gertruyt Phillips Van Schuylder|b. 1603|p332.htm#i239142|||||||||||||
     David Pieterse Schuyler was baptized on 12-Feb-1636 at New Church, Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands. He was the son of Pieter Schuyler and Gertruyt Phillips Van Schuylder. David married Catalyntje Ver Planck, daughter of Abraham Isaacsen Verplank and Maria Vigne, on 13-Oct-1657 at Dutch Reformed Church, New Amsterdam, New York County, New York. David Pieterse Schuyler died on 9-Feb-1690 at age 53. He died on 2-Nov-1690 at Schenectady, Schenectady County, New York, at age 54. David's estate was proved on 11-Apr-1691.
     David Pieterse's left a will on 21-May-1688 at Albany, Albany County, New York.

David Schuyler of Albany City, merchant, mentions wife Catherine, children Peter, Geertruy, Abraham, Maritye, David, Myndert, Cobis, and Cantlyntje.

Catalyntje Ver Planck

F, b. Feb 1639, d. 8 Oct 1708
Catalyntje Ver Planck|b. Feb 1639\nd. 8 Oct 1708|p88.htm#i37668|Abraham Isaacsen Verplank|b. 1606\nd. circa 1690|p76.htm#i33055|Maria Vigne|b. 1613\nd. circa 1670|p76.htm#i33056|Isaac Ver Planck|b. 1580|p96.htm#i40575||||Guillaume Vigne|b. circa 1586\nd. circa 30 Apr 1632|p87.htm#i35922|Adriana Cuveille|b. circa 1590\nd. 1655|p87.htm#i35923|

Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Catalyntje Ver Planck was born between 1638 and 1640. She was born in Feb-1639 at Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands. She was the daughter of Abraham Isaacsen Verplank and Maria Vigne. Catalyntje married David Pieterse Schuyler, son of Pieter Schuyler and Gertruyt Phillips Van Schuylder, on 13-Oct-1657 at Dutch Reformed Church, New Amsterdam, New York County, New York. Catalyntje Ver Planck died in 1691. She died on 8-Oct-1708 at age 69.
     She was also known as Catalyna Verplanck.

Dirck Teunisse Van Vechten

M, b. 17 Feb 1633/34, d. 25 Nov 1702
Dirck Teunisse Van Vechten|b. 17 Feb 1633/34\nd. 25 Nov 1702|p88.htm#i37669|Teunis Dirckse Van Vechten|b. circa 1610\nd. 1700|p158.htm#i97909|Hester Dowes||p371.htm#i295927|||||||||||||
      Dirck Teunisse Van Vechten was born on 17-Feb-1633/34 at Vechten, Utrecht, Netherlands. He was the son of Teunis Dirckse Van Vechten and Hester Dowes. Dirck married Jannetje Vreeland, daughter of Michael Jansen Vreeland and Fitje Hartmans Wessels, in Dec-1659 at Greenbush, Schoharie County, New York. Dirck Teunisse Van Vechten died on 25-Nov-1702 at age 68. Dirck was buried after 25-Nov-1702 at family burying ground on the Van Vechten farm. Dirck's estate was proved on 30-Mar-1703.
     He was also known as Dirck Teunissen Van Vechten. He was also known as Dirck Tuenise Van Vechten. He resided at at Albany, Albany County, New York, circa 1660.
Dirck Teunisse's left a will on 4-Apr-1687 at Coxsackie, Greene County, New York.

Jannetje Vreeland

F, b. circa 1643, d. 11 Sep 1714
Jannetje Vreeland|b. circa 1643\nd. 11 Sep 1714|p88.htm#i37670|Michael Jansen Vreeland|b. 1610\nd. 1663|p87.htm#i37498|Fitje Hartmans Wessels|b. 1611\nd. 21 Sep 1697|p87.htm#i37499|||||||||||||

Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Jannetje Vreeland was born circa 1637 at Probably, Bergen County, New Jersey. She was born circa 1643 at Renselaerwyck, Albany County, New York; eldest child. She was the daughter of Michael Jansen Vreeland and Fitje Hartmans Wessels. Jannetje married Dirck Teunisse Van Vechten, son of Teunis Dirckse Van Vechten and Hester Dowes, in Dec-1659 at Greenbush, Schoharie County, New York. Jannetje Vreeland died on 11-Sep-1714 at Probably, Albany, Albany County, New York.
     She was also known as Jannetje Michaelse Vreelant.

Jan Roos

M
     Jan married Maria Vigne, daughter of Guillaume Vigne and Adriana Cuveille, before 1632 at New Amsterdam, New York County, New York.

Child of Jan Roos and Maria Vigne

Gerrit Jansen Roos

M, b. before 1632, d. 1698
Gerrit Jansen Roos|b. before 1632\nd. 1698|p88.htm#i37676|Jan Roos||p88.htm#i37675|Maria Vigne|b. 1613\nd. circa 1670|p76.htm#i33056|||||||Guillaume Vigne|b. circa 1586\nd. circa 30 Apr 1632|p87.htm#i35922|Adriana Cuveille|b. circa 1590\nd. 1655|p87.htm#i35923|

Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Gerrit Jansen Roos was born in 1625 at Harlem, North Holland, Netherlands. He was born before 1632 at Haarlem, North Holland, Netherlands. He was the son of Jan Roos and Maria Vigne. Gerrit married Aeltje Lamberts Wolf, daughter of Abraham Isaacszen Wolf and Emmerentje Gosens Van Nlwuqwezlys, circa 1651. Gerrit married Tryntje Arents, daughter of Arent Pietersz and Aechjen Heinrixdr, on 5-Sep-1659. Gerrit Jansen Roos died on 3-Sep-1697 at Albany, Albany County, New York. He died in 1698. He died in 1698.
     He was also known as Gerrit Roos.

Gelyn Ver Planck

M, b. Jan 1637, d. 1684
Gelyn Ver Planck|b. Jan 1637\nd. 1684|p88.htm#i37677|Abraham Isaacsen Verplank|b. 1606\nd. circa 1690|p76.htm#i33055|Maria Vigne|b. 1613\nd. circa 1670|p76.htm#i33056|Isaac Ver Planck|b. 1580|p96.htm#i40575||||Guillaume Vigne|b. circa 1586\nd. circa 30 Apr 1632|p87.htm#i35922|Adriana Cuveille|b. circa 1590\nd. 1655|p87.htm#i35923|

Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Gelyn Ver Planck was born in Jan-1637. He was the son of Abraham Isaacsen Verplank and Maria Vigne. Gelyn married Hendrickje Wessels on 1-Jun-1668. Gelyn Ver Planck died in 1684.
     He was also known as Guillaume Ver Plank.
Occupationa merchant and City Councilman

Isaac Ver Planck

M, b. 26 Feb 1651, d. 1729
Isaac Ver Planck|b. 26 Feb 1651\nd. 1729|p88.htm#i37678|Abraham Isaacsen Verplank|b. 1606\nd. circa 1690|p76.htm#i33055|Maria Vigne|b. 1613\nd. circa 1670|p76.htm#i33056|Isaac Ver Planck|b. 1580|p96.htm#i40575||||Guillaume Vigne|b. circa 1586\nd. circa 30 Apr 1632|p87.htm#i35922|Adriana Cuveille|b. circa 1590\nd. 1655|p87.htm#i35923|

Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Isaac Ver Planck was born on 26-Feb-1651. He was the son of Abraham Isaacsen Verplank and Maria Vigne. Isaac married Abigail Uytenbogart circa 1680. Isaac Ver Planck died in 1729.
Occupationcirca 1681a shoemaker

Susanna Ver Planck

F, b. 25 May 1642
Susanna Ver Planck|b. 25 May 1642|p88.htm#i37679|Abraham Isaacsen Verplank|b. 1606\nd. circa 1690|p76.htm#i33055|Maria Vigne|b. 1613\nd. circa 1670|p76.htm#i33056|Isaac Ver Planck|b. 1580|p96.htm#i40575||||Guillaume Vigne|b. circa 1586\nd. circa 30 Apr 1632|p87.htm#i35922|Adriana Cuveille|b. circa 1590\nd. 1655|p87.htm#i35923|

Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
     Susanna Ver Planck was baptized on 25-May-1642. She was the daughter of Abraham Isaacsen Verplank and Maria Vigne. Susanna married John Garland on 20-Apr-1669 at New York. Susanna married Melgert Wynantse Vanderpoel.

Jacomyntje Ver Planck

F, b. 6 Jul 1644
Jacomyntje Ver Planck|b. 6 Jul 1644|p88.htm#i37680|Abraham Isaacsen Verplank|b. 1606\nd. circa 1690|p76.htm#i33055|Maria Vigne|b. 1613\nd. circa 1670|p76.htm#i33056|Isaac Ver Planck|b. 1580|p96.htm#i40575||||Guillaume Vigne|b. circa 1586\nd. circa 30 Apr 1632|p87.htm#i35922|Adriana Cuveille|b. circa 1590\nd. 1655|p87.htm#i35923|

Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
     Jacomyntje Ver Planck was baptized on 6-Jul-1644. She was the daughter of Abraham Isaacsen Verplank and Maria Vigne.

Arientje Ver Planck

F, b. 2 Dec 1646
Arientje Ver Planck|b. 2 Dec 1646|p88.htm#i37681|Abraham Isaacsen Verplank|b. 1606\nd. circa 1690|p76.htm#i33055|Maria Vigne|b. 1613\nd. circa 1670|p76.htm#i33056|Isaac Ver Planck|b. 1580|p96.htm#i40575||||Guillaume Vigne|b. circa 1586\nd. circa 30 Apr 1632|p87.htm#i35922|Adriana Cuveille|b. circa 1590\nd. 1655|p87.htm#i35923|

Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
     Arientje Ver Planck was baptized on 2-Dec-1646 at Dutch Reformed Church, New Amsterdam, New York County, New York. She was the daughter of Abraham Isaacsen Verplank and Maria Vigne. Arientje married Melgert Wynantse van der Poel, son of Wynant van der Poel, on 4-Dec-1668.

Jan Jansen Damen

M, b. circa 1607, d. 18 Jun 1651
Jan Jansen Damen|b. circa 1607\nd. 18 Jun 1651|p88.htm#i37682|Jan Cornelisz Damen|b. circa 1555\nd. before 1627|p273.htm#i156325|Aaltje Jans||p141.htm#i87201|||||||||||||

Relationship=9th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-granduncle of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Relationship=9th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Jan Jansen Damen was born circa 1607. He was the son of Jan Cornelisz Damen and Aaltje Jans. A contract for the marriage of Jan Jansen Damen and Adriana Cuveille was signed circa 30-Apr-1632; Prenuptual agreement. Jan married Adriana Cuveille on 7-May-1638; Ariantje married Jan Jansen Damen on May 7, 1638. Damen, sometimes referred to as "Old
Jan," was employed as the church warden and also had a sizable tract of land west of the
Vigne's. This union combined their previously-held properties, giving Adrienne and Jan
ownership of a very large bouwerie. It extended from Pine Street north to Maiden Lane, and
from the East River to the Hudson River. The following is the translation of the prenuptial
agreement by Adrienne and Jan, concerning her children by her deceased husband, Guillaume
Vigne:

"Dirck Volgersen Noorman and Ariaentje Cevelyn, his wife's mother, came before us in
order to enter into an agreement with her children whom she has borne by her lawful
husband Willem Vienje, settling on Maria Vienje and Christina Vienje, both married
persons, on each the sum of two hundred guilders ... and on Resel Vienje and Jan
Vienje, both minor children, also as their portion of their father's estate, on each the
sum of three hundred guilders; with this provision that she and her future lawful
husband, Jan Jansen Damen, shall be bound to bring up the above named two
children until they attain their majority, and be bound to clothe and rear the aforesaid
children, to keep them at school and to give them a good trade, as parents ought to
do." This agreement was dated "the last of April 1632," but was not recorded until 7
May 1638. [New York Historical Manuscripts: Dutch, Volume 1, ed. and trans. by Arnold J. F. Van Laer. Baltimore, 1974, The editor, Van Laer, was of the opinion that the year 1632, given as the date of the document, is probably wrong and should be 1635 or later. The document was certified by William Wyman, blacksmith, and Jan Thomaisen Groen, and witnessed by Jacob Albertsen Planck who arrived in New Amsterdam in 1634 on the "Eendracht."] Jan Jansen Damen died on 18-Jun-1651 at at sea retruning to New Netherlands from the Netherlads.
     He immigrated between 1627 and 1635 to New Netherlands. On Feb-1643 Damen hosted a dinner at which the alcohol flowed steadily. The attendees were Maryn Adriansen, another former member of the council of 12, and step-sons-in-law Abraham Ver Planck and Cornelis Van Tienhoven. At a ripe moment Van Tienhoven pulled out a petition and had the others sign it. It was a petition to Kieft, urging him to attack a neighboring Indian tribe. Van Tienhoven took the signed petition to Kieft and then personally led the attack on the Indian village. That action led other tribes to retaliate and burn New Amsterdam. Abraham later denied knowledge of the incident, and Adriansen even tried to kill Kieft. [He had to pay a fine and was banished for 3 months.] Kieft appointed Damen to an 8-man council in 1644, but the other council members refused to accept him.
On before 1649 one of the owners of the privateer La Garce.
On 1649 went to Holland with C. Van Tienhoven, to defend Stuyvesant against the complaist of Van der Donck and others, and died on his return trip.

Jan Jansen's left a will on 12-Dec-1649 at Manhattan, New York County, New York.

Damen, Jan Jansen of Manhattan Island mentions: Wife?; son of deceased sister, Hendrickie Jans, now living with testator and called Jan Cornelissen Buys, alias Jan Damen; broters Cornelis Jansen Cuyper, Cornelis Hansen Damen and Willem Jansen Damen; sister Neltie Jans Damen; the poor of Bunick in the Diocese of Utrech, Mentions real estate and personal property. Witnesses: Thomas Hall, Cornelis Cornelissen Van Houten and Jacob Kip.

On 10-Mar-1651 The notarial deed mentioned above is dated ' 10th March 1651 and was passed before Hendrik Schaef, a notary public in Amsterdam. The facsimile is on the previous page. In English translation, the document says,

Ide van Voorst, a free man of Nieunederlandt but now present within this city of Amsterdam, declared in the name of his father-in-law, Jacob Stoffelsz, also a free man there, to have engaged and hired the person of Jan Cornelisz from Vechten in the bishopric of Utrecht, who from his side accepted the hiring to the aforementioned Jacob Stoffelsz, and this with consent of his, Jan Cornelisz' father, as Jan Jansz Damen, also free man in Nieunederlandt, also present here, declares to be true, as a farmhand or house-servant, for the time of three consecutive years, taking effect with his arrival in that land and his setting foot ashore. During which time the same Jan Cornelisz shall serve his aforementioned master or his master's wife as a farm hand, performing all work that makes part of that, with no exception, obediently, willingly, loyally and discreetly as becoming and fitting a good servant. For which he shall enjoy there from his aforesaid master in current money of that country, the first year sixty, both following years each year eighty Carolus guilders, in addition to free food, drink and lodging, as well as paid food and passage thither. But he must provide his own clothing. All this in good faith, signed by them in Amsterdam, at the day and year as written above.

Eijde vanVuerst     The sign + by Jan Cornelisz
Jan Jansz Damen      H. Schaef N.P.

"Father-in-law" is also used in 17th century Dutch for "stepfather", as in this case. Jacob Stoffelsz was the step-father of Ide van Voorst. Jan Jansz. Damen had a long-time connection with the Van Voorst family. When Cornelis Van Voorst died in 1639, he left two sons -- Jan and Hendrick -- by his first wife and Ide and Anneken by his second wife, Vrouwtje Ides. Jan Jansz. Damen was one of two guardians of Jan Comehsz. Van Voorst. Vrouwtje Ides then married Jacob Stoffelszen who must have raised her two minor Van Voorst children, since Vrouwtje was dead by April 1641 (Calendar of Dutch Historical Manuscripts, ed. by Edmund B. O'Callaghan, pages 6, 73, 76).
Occupationbefore 1649was elected on the the Twelve Men and also of the Eight Men

Cornelis Van Tienhoven

M, d. 1656
      Cornelis Van Tienhoven was born at Probably, Utrecth Prov, Netherlands. Cornelis married Rachel Vigne, daughter of Guillaume Vigne and Adriana Cuveille, before 25-Jul-1639. Cornelis married Rachel Vigne, daughter of Guillaume Vigne and Adriana Cuveille, on 18-Feb-1643. Cornelis Van Tienhoven died in 1656; drowned or absconded. He also left a great deal of property and three houses.

Van Tienhoven's hat and cane were found floating in the river on November 18, 1656. He
was presumed drowned, but there was reason to be suspicious that this was a planned
disappearance. The "drowning" occurred while he was pending an appearance before a court
of inquiry. He died circa 1664.
     He was also known as Cornelius Lucas Van Tienhoven. He was also known as Secretary Cornelis Van Tienhoven. He immigrated in 1633 to New Amsterdam, New York County, New York. "Cornelis van Tienhoven . . . in my capacity as husband and guardian of Ragel
Vienje, . . . acknowledge that I am fully satisfied and paid by Jan Jansen Damen the
sum of once three hundred Carolus guilders to which the aforesaid Ragel Vienjee . .
. was entitled by way of inheritance from her father Gulyn Vienjee, according to the
contract made between her mother Adriaenje Cuveljeers and Jan Damen. " in 1639.

A receipt dated July 25 1639 "Cornelis Van Tienhoven...in my capacity as husband and guardian of Tagel Vienje...acknowledge that I amy fully satisfied and baid by Jan Jansen Damen the sum of once three hunded Carolus guilders to which the aforesaid Ragel Vienjee...was etitled by way of inheritance from her father Gulyn Vienjee, according to the contract made between her mother Adraenje Cuveljeers and Jan Damen." In the spring of 1640, some parties of Raritan Indians attacked a Company trading boat near
Staten Island and stolen a canoe. They were also accused of stealing some swine. [The pigs were actually stolen by some sailors who blamed the Indians for the theft. ] In mid-July, Director
Kieft sent Van Tienhoven on an expedition (with 50 soldiers and 20 sailors) to confront the
Raritans. Their orders were to force a peace, or, failing that, to take prisoners and destroy the
Raritans' corn crop. On his arrival at their village, they refused Van Tienhoven's demand for
restitution of the alleged losses.

Van Tienhoven then turned to his troops, told them that he would not be responsible if they
violated his orders, and began to walk away. He hadn't gone far when the soldiers acted on his
hint and suddenly attacked the Raritans by surprise, killed a few and captured several others.
One captive, the chief's brother, was tortured "in his private parts with a split piece of wood. "
Within six weeks the Raritans responded with an attack on Staten Island colonists, killing four
and burning a house and some tobacco sheds. Kieft responded by contacting several other
tribes and letting them know he would pay a large bounty in wampum for every head of a
Raritan they brought to him. The Raritans made peace with the Dutch before the year was out. in 1640.

In February 1643 two bands of Algonquin Indians fled from attacks by their enemy the
Mohawks and, starving and homeless, sought refuge near New Amsterdam. Director Kieft
decided their helpless condition provided an opportunity to kill some more savages. Van
Tienhoven approached his father-in-law Jan Jansen DAMEN and brother-in-law Abraham VER
PLANCK, both members of the City Council. Over a hearty dinner and a lot of liquor, he coaxed
them into signing a petition to attack the Indians. Van Tienhoven then led 80 soldiers across
the Hudson at night to Hoboken, where they massacred a camp of sleeping Indians. The killing
continued through the next day, even of survivors who struggled out into the open to beg for
food or warmth. One witness who was opposed to the attack wrote:

Infants were snatched from their mothers breasts, and cut to pieces in sight of the
parents, and the pieces thrown into the fire and into the water; other sucklings were
bound to wooden boards, and cut and stuck or bored through, and miserably
massacred, so that a heart of stone would have been softened. Some were thrown in
the river, and when the fathers and mothers endeavoured to rescue them, the soldiers
would not let them come ashore again, but caused both young and old to be drowned.
. . Some came to our people on the farms with their hands cut off; others had their
legs hacked off and some were holding their entrails in their arms.


Within a few weeks 11 surrounding tribes joined in retaliation against the colonists. Farms in
Brooklyn were burned. Most of Manhattan was burned and looted as well. The colonists,
numbering only about 500, huddled in their dilapidated Fort Amsterdam at the tip of Manhattan
until the Indians left. A truce was signed in April, but that lasted only five months. Most of the
tribes felt New Amsterdam's reparations [in wampum] for the massacred Indians were not
sufficient to even the score. In September, 1,500 Indian warriors from seven tribes attacked
and sezed most of Manhattan and Long Island. The colonists were forced to remain in the
shelter of their fort for several months. The Dutch ended the immediate threat to Manhattan
several months later, with the help of English mercenaries, in the same bloodthirsty manner in
which the war had started. They attacked a village near Stamford, killing 20 Indians, then
moved on to a Canarsie village where they killed 120. Near Greenwich they attacked and
burned a big village at night, killing more than 500 Indians, most of them by fire. More than two
years passed before peace was restored. The war was a terrible setback for the New
Amsterdam and Long Island colonies. Manhattan's population dwindled to 250, less than it was
in 1630. Director Kieft was recalled to Holland, but his ship struck a reef near the English coast
and he never reached home. in Feb-1643.

He resided at at 227-229 Pearl St., New York City, New York County, New York, circa 1644. Cornelis was known as a womanizer. He dressed as an Indian "with a little covering" and
chased after the many "light women" of New Amsterdam. In 1649, long after he married and
began a family, he took a lengthy trip back to Holland to offer his explanation why the colony
was not progressing. While there, he "became engaged" to a young lady. The unsuspecting
girl accompanied him on his travels in Holland and on the two-month voyage back to America,
expecting to marry him at the end of the journey. When their ship, the Waterhont , tied up at
New Amsterdam, he suddenly became a family man again. Such was his influence among the
corrupt officials in the colony that no one would listen to the poor girl's tale of betrayal. in 1649.

Van Tienhoven could not give up the role of instigator. In September 1655, Director Peter
Stuvesant was on a visit to the Dutch colony in Delaware, so Van Tienhoven used the occasion
to begin yet another calamitous war with the Indians. The Indians apparently also knew
Stuyvesant was out of town. Members of the Esopus, Hackensack and Mohican tribes in 64
canoes stopped at Manhattan on their way to settle some old scores with the Canarsie tribes on
Long Island. They landed to get food, some planning on buying it and others on taking it. A
number of them began to raid the colonists' orchards. The war began when Hendrick VAN
DYCK shot an Indian woman who was taking some peaches from his garden. It became known
as "The Peach War. "

Hundreds of Indians swarmed throughout the city on the next day, harassing the citizens and
trespassing in their homes. One found and wounded Van Dyck with an arrow. In the evening
a band of Indians were gathered at the shore. Van Tienhoven led a contingent of armed
citizens to their location and called out, "Murder the savages who kill the Dutch. " Shots rang out
and the Indians fled in their canoes, but not before returning the fire and killing several of their
attackers. The Indians did not go far. Across the river at Staten Island they spent the night
putting fire to houses and farms. Over the next three days Indians swept through the Dutch
settlements along the East River and the Hudson, driving the Dutch from their homes and farms.


Stuyvesant returned to New Amsterdam at the end of September, to find almost the entire
population of New Netherlands in and around Fort Amsterdam. Forty colonists had been killed
and a hundred more were prisoners in Indian camps. Hundreds of houses and farms were
reduced to ashes and ruins. By the end of October, the Indians released 70 of their prisoners
in return for powder and lead. It was two years before they finished extorting Stuyvesant for the
return of the remaining 30.

Back in Holland, the Company's directors received evidence that Van Tienhoven had
committed a series of improper actions in his former role as Secretary. The "Peach War" was
the last straw. Peter Stuyvesant tried to defend him, saying the war was not Van Tienhoven's
fault. The company responded by ordering Stuyvesant to remove Van Tienhoven and not to
defend him, "as we are confident that the charges are true. Whoever considers his last
transactions with the savages, will find that with clouded brains filled with liquor, he was a prime
cause of this dreadful massacre. " By June 1656 he had been dismissed from office. in Sep-1655.

Occupation1633a Company accountant, working for Director Wooter VAN TWILLER until the latter's removal in 1638. With the arrival of Director Willem KIEFT he was promoted to the title of Secretary and in many instances served as the Director's "right hand man. " After Kieft's removal in 1647, Van Tienhoven continued as the Secretary to Peter STUYVESANT. In 1651 he was promoted to "receiver general" of the Company's revenues and domains (New Netherland then included the area from Albany to Delaware) and in the following year Stuyvesant made him Schout-Fiscaal (sheriff and attorney general) of New Amsterdam.

Jan Vigne

M, b. after May 1624, d. 21 Dec 1689
Jan Vigne|b. after May 1624\nd. 21 Dec 1689|p88.htm#i37684|Guillaume Vigne|b. circa 1586\nd. circa 30 Apr 1632|p87.htm#i35922|Adriana Cuveille|b. circa 1590\nd. 1655|p87.htm#i35923|Jean de la Vigne|b. circa 1560\nd. after 1622|p88.htm#i37549||||||||||

Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Jan Vigne was born after May-1624 at Probably, Manhattan, New York County, New York; he could have also been born at Alban or in Connecticut or Delaware ast the Nieu Nederlandt's passengers were scattered to all fo the places for a short time berore returning to the safety of Manhattan. He was the son of Guillaume Vigne and Adriana Cuveille. Jan married Emmerentje Gosens Van Niewerzluys. Jan married Weiske Huytes. Jan Vigne died on 21-Dec-1689 at New York City, New York County, New York. Jan's estate was proved on 7-Jan-1689/90; The will of "John Vigne", names "the children of my deceased sister Maria Ver Planck, the children of my deceased sister Cristinia Dircksen, the children of my deceased sister Rachel Van Thienhoven..."
     He was also known as Jean Vigne. He was also known as Jan Vinje. He held the position of of schepn of New Amsterdam between 1655 and 1663.
Jan Vigne purchased 170 acres along the Hudson River, probably near Bergen. on 19-Jan-1655 at New Jersey.

Jan Vigne purchased 30 acres on Hobookshe Creek, which was probably in the vicinity of Hoboken. on 31-Mar-1668.
He sold land 170 acres along the Hudson River, probably near Bergen. on 25-Mar-1670. Jan's honor to be the first-born male was well-known and is recorded in The Journal of Jasper Danckaerts, [ed. by Bartlett Burleigh James and J. Franklin Jameson.New York, 1913]. Excerpt from entry of 24 Sept. 1679, translation from Dutch: "We conversed with the first male born of Europeans in New Netherland, named Jean Vigne. His parents were from Valenciennes and he was now about sixty-five years of age." [ Danckaerts either overestimated, or miscopied, Jan VIGNE'S age: he must have been about 55, not 65, in 1679. Jan was still in school in 1635, according to a prenuptial agreement in which his future step-father promised to feed and clothe him and ensure he attended school. ] At one time there was also a bronze plaque in the Town Hall, naming him as the first-born. on 24-Sep-1679.


Jan's left a will circa 1689

"In the name of God, Amen. Know all
men whom it may concerne, that I, underwritten John Vigne, dwelling within this city of New York, considering the mortality of men." I leave to my cousin Gerritt Jansen Roos, ?56 as a legacy before any division is made. "I leave to Emmerantie Provost, daughter of Elias Provoost, procreated by Cornelia Roos, a parcel of ground, lying without the Wall of this city, in ye New Lots in ye streete called Thienhoven street, whereof I have sold the first lot to Johanes Ellsworth, the second to Peter Pangborn, and this lot being the third lot in order and must be broad in front at the street and after, 25 Dutch wood feet, and long to the ground, granted to the late Governor Thomas Dongan." With this express condition that if she die in her minority, then it is to go to her sister Aeltie, and if she die, then to her brother Johanes. If he die, then to his brother Geritt, and if he die in his minority, then to his mother Cornelia Roos, who has power to sell it. The remainder of the estate is left in 6 shares. To the children of my deceased sister Maria Ver Planck, the children of my deceased sister Christina Dircksen, the children of my deceased sister Rachel Van Thienhoven, Harme De Wolf, the children of Claas Wouterse Visser and the children of Aeltie Lamberts Wolf, on the express conditions that the three last shares, viz. Harme De Wolf, and the children of Claas Wouterse Visser, and the children of Aeltie Lamberts Wolf, shall be in room of 100 guilders made to them by the testament of my deceased wife, Emmerantie Van der Sluys, in case they will accept for it, which is left to their free choice. I leave to my cousin Isaac Ver Planck, my black cloth coat, and to my cousin Johanes Roos, my coat with silver buttons. And to the end that this my last will may be better performed, I have nominated and appointed my three cousins, Geritt Jansen Roos, Lucas Van Tienhoven, and Johanes Roos, executors. "These presents I declare to be my last will and testament, desiring ye same may be irrevocable. J. Vinge."

Witnesses, Johanes Kip, Wm. Bogardus, Notary Public.

The Inventory of Jan Vigne was taken "An inventory of goods and estate of John Vigne, who died in this city the 21
of December, 1689, and taken by us, Geritt Jansen Roose, Lucas Van
Thienhoven, together with John Roose, absent, living at Albany, December 30,
1689. A Parcel of land lying in the Clack Hook, by the Fresh water, 60 pounds.
A Parcel of land lying without the Fortifications of the city of New York, 140
pounds; 1 ditto garden; 1 ditto Bastine [ bastion? ], 120 pounds; 1 Silver
beaker, engraved with the name of Guysbert Lamberts, 1 pound 10 shillings.
Double Gold Ducat, 1 pound 5 shillings. Total, 352 pounds, 2 shillings 4
pence." on 18-Jan-1690.

Nicholas Van Brunt

M, b. 31 Aug 1684, d. circa Mar 1714
Nicholas Van Brunt|b. 31 Aug 1684\nd. circa Mar 1714|p88.htm#i37761|Nicholas Rutgersz Van Brunt|d. circa Aug 1684|p88.htm#i37774|Helena Cortelyou|b. circa 1663\nd. before 1726|p55.htm#i25169|||||||Jaques Cortelyou|b. 1625\nd. circa 1693|p55.htm#i25175|Neeltje Van Duyn|b. circa 1630|p55.htm#i25176|
     Nicholas Van Brunt was baptized on 31-Aug-1684. He was the son of Nicholas Rutgersz Van Brunt and Helena Cortelyou. Nicholas married Mayke Verkerk, daughter of Roelof Janse Verkerk and Catherine Simons, circa 1705 at New Utrecht, Kings County, New York. Nicholas Van Brunt died circa Mar-1714 at New Utrecht, Kings County, New York.

Mayke Verkerk

F, b. circa 1688, d. circa 1746
Mayke Verkerk|b. circa 1688\nd. circa 1746|p88.htm#i37762|Roelof Janse Verkerk|b. 6 Jun 1654|p254.htm#i136485|Catherine Simons|b. 1656\nd. circa 1718|p254.htm#i136486|Jan J. Verkerk|b. circa 1628\nd. 1688|p254.htm#i136493|Mayke Gisberts|b. before 1640\nd. 1688|p254.htm#i136494|||||||

Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=5th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Mayke Verkerk was born after 1684 at Flatbush, Kings County, New York. She was born circa 1688 at New Utrecht, Kings County, New York. She was the daughter of Roelof Janse Verkerk and Catherine Simons. Mayke married Nicholas Van Brunt, son of Nicholas Rutgersz Van Brunt and Helena Cortelyou, circa 1705 at New Utrecht, Kings County, New York. Mayke married Samuel Groenendyck before 8-Aug-1717; 2nd marriage Mayke. Mayke Verkerk died circa 1746 at New Utrecht, Kings County, New York.
     She was also known as Mary Verkerk.

Nicholas Rutgersz Van Brunt

M, d. circa Aug 1684
     Nicholas married Helena Cortelyou, daughter of Jaques Cortelyou and Neeltje Van Duyn, on 19-Aug-1683 at Dutch Reformed Church, New Utrecht, Kings County, New York. Nicholas Rutgersz Van Brunt died circa Aug-1684.

Child of Nicholas Rutgersz Van Brunt and Helena Cortelyou

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