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Sarah De Plancken

F, b. circa 1615, d. circa 1670
Sarah De Plancken|b. circa 1615\nd. circa 1670|p5.htm#i274|Jacques Deplancque|b. circa 1576\nd. before Apr 1617|p44.htm#i20269|Sara Fauconnier|b. circa 1579\nd. after 1636|p44.htm#i20270|Guillaume Deplancque||p44.htm#i20446|Vincentine Carlier||p44.htm#i20447|Pierre Fauconnier|d. circa 1585|p44.htm#i20456|Margriete d. P. Van Doornick||p45.htm#i20457|

Relationship=8th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover.
      Sarah De Plancken was born circa 1615 at Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands. She was born circa 1615 at Noord, Netherlands. She was the daughter of Jacques Deplancque and Sara Fauconnier. Sarah De Plancken published marriage intentions "Pierre Montfoor from Valenciennes age 20, attended by his father Jean Monntoor, lace worker (passementwerker), living on the Engelspadt," appeared before the civil authorities to record his marriage intention with Sara de Planq. on 1-Mar-1636 at Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands. Sarah married Pierre Montfort, son of Jean Montfort and Jacqueline Moreau, on 23-Mar-1636 at Walloon Church, Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands. Sarah married Lambert Janse Bosch on 1-Jan-1663 at Dutch Reformed Church, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York. Sarah De Plancken died circa 1670 at Brooklyn, Kings County, New York.
     She was also known as Sara Deplancque. She was also known as Sara De Planck. She was also known as Sarah Blanck. She was also known as Saartje (Unknown). She and Pierre Montfort emigrated on 16-Mar-1639 from Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands. Sarah De Plancken and Pierre Montfort resided at at New Netherland, New York, on 17-Sep-1639. Sarah De Plancken and Pierre Montfort became mambers at Dutch Reformed Church, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, 12-Mar-1660.

Children of Sarah De Plancken and Pierre Montfort

Gerret Wolfersen Van Kouwenhoven

M, b. circa 1610, d. circa 1648
Gerret Wolfersen Van Kouwenhoven|b. circa 1610\nd. circa 1648|p5.htm#i275|Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven|b. before 1 May 1579\nd. between 2 Mar 1662 and 24 Jun 1662|p5.htm#i279|Neeltgen Jacobsdochter|b. circa 1584\nd. circa 1658|p5.htm#i280|Gerritt J. Couwenhoven||p111.htm#i57982||||Jacob Petersz|d. before 1611|p128.htm#i71591|Metgen Jacobsdr|d. before 1611|p128.htm#i71592|

Relationship=8th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover.
      Gerret Wolfersen Van Kouwenhoven was born circa 1610 at Amersfoort, Utrecht, Netherlands. He was the son of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven and Neeltgen Jacobsdochter. Gerret married Aeltje Cornelis Cool, daughter of Cornelius Lambertse Cool and (Unknown) (Unknown), circa 1635 at Flatlands, Kings County, New York. Gerret Wolfersen Van Kouwenhoven died circa 1648 at Flatlands, Kings County, New York; Was probably after patent issued.
     He was also known as Gerret Wolphertse Van Kouwenhoven. He was also known as Gerret Kouwenhoven. He was also known as Garret Wolfert Van Couwenhoven. He was also known as Gerret Wolferse Van Couvenhoven. He was also known as Gerret Wolfertse Van Couwenhoven. He was also known as Gerret Wolfersen Couwenhoven. On 22-Aug-1639

1639. Document (MDC:10).
"This day, date underwritten, before me Cornelis Van Tienhoven, secretary, in the presence of the undersigned witnesses, appeared Wolphert Gerritsen and Gerrit Wolphertsen, as guardians of Lambert Cornelissen Cool, and at the request of said Lambert Cool, have permitted him to go with his cattle to his brother-in-law Claes Jansen, in order to take up together some plantation or farm, and we the principals in the capacity aforesaid have consented hereto as we are bound in the place of father and mother to promote the above named Lambert Cool's interest and we cannot perceive that he will earn anything, much less prosper so long as he remains with his father, Cornelis Lambertsen. We have therefore considered it advisable to permit him to do something for himself in company aforesaid. Done at Fort Amsterdam the 22 of August 1639.

This is the mark x of Wolphert Gerritsen
This is the mark x of Gerrit Wolphertsen

Maurits Jan and Frerick Lubbertsen ; witnesses
"Consent of the guardians of Lambert Cornelissen Cool to let Cool remove his
cattle and take up a farm with his brother-in-law Claes Jansen"
"Copied with slight variations from E.B. O'Callaghan's manuscript translation
of the original in the New York Colonial MSS., Vol. I, p. 155, which was
destroyed in the Capitol fire of March 29, 1911, Albany, October 4, 1933 ;
signed A.J.F. van Laer."
On 11-Mar-1647

On March 11, 1647, Gerrit Wolphertson (Van Kouwenhoven) received a patent for "a certain piece of land, gouat the (Ma) Rechawieck, both the maize and woodland, on the marsh of the Gouwanus Kil, between the land of Jacob Stoffelsen and Frederick Lubbertsen, extending from the aforsaid marsh till into the woods, till to the land of said Frederick, till to the land of Andries Huddle, northeast by north, a little northerly, 148 rods: behind through the woods, till to the land of the aforesaid Jacob Stoffelsen, southeast by east 80 rods next to the land of Jacob Stoffelsen aforesaid, till to the aforsaid marsh, southwest a little westerly 165 rods, along the marsh to the place of beginning 60 rods, with an oblique outpoint: amounting in all to 29 morgens, 341 rods." Pattents, GG, 172

This plot evidently fronted on the main road leading from Flatbush, through the village of Breuckelen, which was located at this point, to "the Ferry," andis inchluded in lands marked as G. Martense's on Butt's map. Wolphertsen sold this property to Nicholas Jans, baker, of New York.

Children of Gerret Wolfersen Van Kouwenhoven and Aeltje Cornelis Cool

Aeltje Cornelis Cool

F, b. circa 1615, d. 14 Jun 1683
Aeltje Cornelis Cool|b. circa 1615\nd. 14 Jun 1683|p5.htm#i276|Cornelius Lambertse Cool|b. circa 1588|p5.htm#i277|(Unknown) (Unknown)||p180.htm#i103695|||||||||||||

Relationship=8th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover.
      Aeltje Cornelis Cool was born circa 1615 at Gowanus, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York. She was the daughter of Cornelius Lambertse Cool and (Unknown) (Unknown). Aeltje married Gerret Wolfersen Van Kouwenhoven, son of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven and Neeltgen Jacobsdochter, circa 1635 at Flatlands, Kings County, New York. Aeltje married Capt. Elbert Elbertse Stoothoff on 27-Aug-1645 at Dutch Reformed Church, New Amsterdam, New York County, New York. Aeltje Cornelis Cool died before 1663. She died at Flatlands, Kings County, New York. She died on 14-Apr-1683. She died on 14-Jun-1683.
     She was also known as Aeltje Cornelius Cool. She was also known as Albie Cool.

Children of Aeltje Cornelis Cool and Gerret Wolfersen Van Kouwenhoven

Children of Aeltje Cornelis Cool and Capt. Elbert Elbertse Stoothoff

Cornelius Lambertse Cool

M, b. circa 1588

Relationship=9th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover.
      Cornelius Lambertse Cool was born circa 1588 at Of, Gowanus, Kings County, New York. Cornelius married (Unknown) (Unknown) before 1615. Cornelius married Aeltje Braconie, daughter of Eli Braconie, after 1624. Cornelius Lambertse Cool died between May-1642 and Dec-1643.
     He was also known as Cornelius Lanberts Cool. He was also known as Cornelis Lambertsen Cool. He resided at at New Amsterdam, New York County, New York, on 24-Jun-1638.
Cornelius Lambertse Cool purchased In 1639, he pruchased the property adjoinging the Bennet farm in 1639.

Children of Cornelius Lambertse Cool and (Unknown) (Unknown)

Aeltje Braconie

F, b. circa 1588, d. circa 1683
Aeltje Braconie|b. circa 1588\nd. circa 1683|p5.htm#i278|Eli Braconie|b. 1563|p87.htm#i35914||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover.
      Aeltje Braconie was born circa 1588 at Netherlands. She was the daughter of Eli Braconie. Aeltje Braconie was born circa 1600. Aeltje married Thomas Badie circa 1603; 1st marriage Aeltje. Aeltje married Cornelius Lambertse Cool after 1624. Aeltje Braconie married Willem Bredenbent on 4-Sep-1644, they had no issue. Marriage banns for Aeltje Braconie and Willem Bredenbent were published on 9-Oct-1644. Aeltje Braconie died on 22-Jun-1670 at Gowanus, Kings County, New York. She died circa 1683.
     She was also known as Aeltje Brookhange. She was also known as Altien Brackhonge. She was also known as Aeltje Braconye Eli Braconye's sister. She was also known as Altien Braconie. She was also known as Aeltje Brackoengie. She resided at at New Amsterdam, New York County, New York, between 1627 and 1637. She resided at at Gowanus, Kings County, New York, after 1637. She resided at at New Amsterdam, New York County, New York, in 1644. She and Willem Bredenbent resided at at Gowanus, Kings County, New York, in 1650.
Aeltje's left a will in 1670

states that Mary Badye was her daughter from a previou marriage.

Child of Aeltje Braconie and Thomas Badie

Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven

M, b. before 1 May 1579, d. between 2 Mar 1662 and 24 Jun 1662
Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven|b. before 1 May 1579\nd. between 2 Mar 1662 and 24 Jun 1662|p5.htm#i279|Gerritt Jansz Couwenhoven||p111.htm#i57982||||||||||||||||

Relationship=9th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover.
      Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven was born before 1-May-1579; when baptisms began in Amersfoort, Netherlands. He was the son of Gerritt Jansz Couwenhoven. Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven was born circa 1583 at Netherlands; he stated on October 8, 1638 that he was 54 years old. He was born circa 1584. He was born circa 1588 at Netherlands. Wolphert married Aeltje Jansdochter. Marriage banns for Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven and Neeltgen Jacobsdochter were published on 9-Jan-1605 at Amersfoort, Utrecht, Netherlands. Wolphert married Neeltgen Jacobsdochter, daughter of Jacob Petersz and Metgen Jacobsdr, on 17-Jan-1604/5 at Dutch Reformed Church, Amersfoort, Utrecht, Netherlands. Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven died between 2-Mar-1662 and 24-Jun-1662 at New Amersfoort, Kings County, New York.
     He was also known as Wulphert Gerritsz Van Couwenhoven. He was also known as Wolfert Gerritsz Van Couwenhoven. He was also known as Wulffer Geritsz Van Couwenhoven. He was also known as Wulpher Gerritsz Van Couwenhoven. He was also known as Wolfert Garretsen Van Couwenhoven. He was also known as Wolfert Gerretsen Van Kouwenhoven. He was also known as Wolfert Gerretson Van Couwenhoven. He was also known as Wolfert Gerretsz Van Kouwenhoven. On 15-Dec-1611 The first reference to WOLFER GERRITSE when Wulphert Gerrits signed an agreement with his stylized A. According to the terms of that document, he agreed to assume the property and debts of the deceased parents of his wive Neeltgen Jacobsdr from the other heirs for 100 guilders. Her brother Herman Jacobsz also signed this document as well as her brother-in-law Willem Dircx who was married to Aeltgen Jacobs Petergen Petersdr, the underage daughter of her brother Peter Jacobsz, had already received 50 guilders.

On 22-Mar-1612 Wulphert Gerritsz and his wife Neeltgen Jacosdr sold a bleachcamo outside the Coppelpoort of Amersfoort to Hendrick Janss and his wife Hasgenb Thonis fo 1,200 Carolus guilders, the occupation of Wolfert is not disclosed in this document.

On 14-Apr-1615
Wolphert took part in a curiious agreement with Herman Zieboltz of Amsterdam, before Johan van Ingen an officer of the court of Utrechet. The name of the Amsterdammer suggests that he was a German or that he was of German descent. His name is also spelled Syboelt and Zyeboltz in those documents. According to a "donatiaq iner vivos" (gift to a living person) Ziebolz gave Wolphert two morgans of turf ground near Cologne in recognition of services rendered )but not payment for them). No monetary amount is mentioned for the services or the turf ground. In a second document of the same date issued by the same officer of the court of Utrecht, Ayeboliz made a debt owed by mim by Henrick Adrianesz and Adriaen Adriansz over to Wulpher Gerrits baker and Cornelis Wynantsz inkeeper. This second document authorized Wulpher Gerritss and Cornelis Wynantsz to assume ownership of the two morgens of turfground mentioned in the first document. These documents create the impression thaqt Zieboltz was unable to pay Wolfert money that he owed him, that the Amsterdammer made over a debt on which he had not been able to collect, and that Wolfert may have agreed to these vague terms because he would otherwise not be able to retrieve anything from his business dealings with the Zieboltz.

On 16-May-1616 Wulpher Gerritss baker appeared as a witness before Johan van Ingen officer of the court of Utrecht, in a case in which Willem Gerritz miller testified that Griet Maes was evading the city grain tax. The document does not specify that Wulpher and Willem were brothers, and if such were the case, it is likely that this would have been discussed in the document.

On 28-Oct-1616 Hendrick Janss and Haesgen Thonis made the last payment on the bleach camp which they had purchased from Wolfert Gerretse and Neeltge Jacbsdr, and the property was made over to them.


Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven purchased from Aert van Schayck and his wife Anna Barents a house on the Langegraft in Amersfoort whch lay between the hosue of the aforesaid Aert on the one side and that fo Henrickgen Barents widow of Aelbert Conrneiss on the other side, while the breadt of the house lay on the Lieverrouwestraet (Dear Lady Street). Wolphert was listed as a baker.
on 30-Jan-1617 at Langegraft, Amersfoort, Utrecht, Netherlands.
On between Feb-1617 and Jul-1617 Within a short time, Wolpeher palced three mortgages on this house. Perhaps the transactions with Zieboltz were unprofiatble, and this was one of the causes fo his need for money. On Feb 15, 1617, Wulpher Gerritss baker and his wife Neeltgen Jacobsdr borrowed 100 guidlers from the Armen te Amersfoort on which he agreed to pay 6 guilders per year. On May 16, 1617, Wulpher Gerritss baker and his wife Neeltgen borrowed 200 guilders from Cornelis Baecx van der Tommen at a yearly interest of 12 guilders. On Jul 25, 1617, Wul;phur Gerritss baker and his wife Neelttgen Jacobsdr borrowed 250 guilders from Anna Goerts widow of Franck Frandkss at 15 guilders interest per year.
On 3-Jan-1618 Wulphert Gerritsz and his wife Neeltgen Jacobs purchased a bleachcamp outside the Coppelpoort of Amersfoort with Hubert Lambertsz Moll and his wife Geertgen Cornisdochter as thier partners. They borrowed 500 Carolus Guilders from Ghijsbert Cornelisz van Cuijlenburch, a citizen of the city of Utrecht, at an annual interest of 25 guilders and 20 stivers. In addition, Hubert Lamberts and his wife Geertje Cornelisdochter contracted a special mortgage ofr 400 Carolus guilders with the consent of Wulffert Gerritsz and his wife. On the no9rth side of the property lay the River Eem, on the east the city moat and on the south and west the heirs of Gerrit van Speulde. This propety came with two other mortgages: 200 guilders to the Poth and 600 guilders to Jo. Catharina van Morendael not yet conveyed to her. In a codicil, Wulpher Gerritsz baker and his wife Neeltgen Jacobs become party to the mortgage of Hubert Lambertsz Moll and his wife Geertge Cornelis for 400 guilders with interest on Ghijsbert Cornelisz van Culenborch with restriction that Wulpher would pay 150 guilders in the year 1618 and thereafter be free of oblicgation.

In the margin is a notation that Dirck van Cullenburch as heir of his father Gysbert van Culenburch acknowledged that the obligation on the mortgage was fully paid on Mar 5, 1628.

In the seventeenth century, a bleach camp was a capital intensive, seasonal business which required the labor of relatively many workers. Profits were meager because the buyers of the finished product and the suppliers of raw matierials such as lye were generally the same persons, and they acted to keep theri costs and thus the profits of the bleachers love. There were three types of bleaching activities, and the skills and experience reqiuired of workers was generally so high that each bleachery specialized in but one sort of material: Yarn (garenblekerij), woven cloth (lijnwaadblekerij), or clothing (klerenblekerij). In all three cases, the material was first generally cooked in a lye solution and later spread out on green grass for many weeks in small fields surrounding the bleach house where it was kept damp. Later, iot was cookled in a solution of wheat meal before being again spread on the field for a lenghtly period, the entire process requiring about three months. The consequences of this long procedure was that o9nly wealthy people were the customers of clothing bleachers because only they could afford to part with many items of clothing for so long a time. No equipment of the bleach camp listed in the purcahse document for Wolphert are given. So no indication of what type of bleachery Wolphert purchased. The bleach camp he sold in 1612 included a bleach table meaning it may have been a cloth bleach camp.
On 17-Sep-1618 Wulphert Gerritss baker and his wife Neeltge Jacobs contracted a mortgage with Coenraet Fransz, former mayor of the city of Amersfoort, for 100 guilders at an annual interest of 6 guilders, with the house of Wulphert on the Langegracht as security, which house lay between the house of Aert van Schayck and that of Hednrickgen Speldemaeckster.

It does not appear that Wolferts endeavor as bleacher met with great success, and this may have been caused by a general malaise in the weavers trade in Amersfoort in this period, which in turn lay on a lack of capital. Because Wolfert's work was dependent on this industry, he was limited as a businessman by the lack of sucess of the parent industry.

On 5-Nov-1622 Wolphert was appointed guardian over the five under aged children of Willem Gerritsz Couwenhoven.
From NYGBR
Wulffer Geridtz, bleacher residing by the Coppelpoort and Harman Willemsz citizen of Amersfoort as "bloetvoochden" (blood guardians) of the five sons of Willem Gerridsz Couwenhoven, namely Gerridt, Willem, Jan, Harmen, and Willem the Younger, none of whom had yet reached the age of majority, made an agreement with the mother of the children Neeltgen Willemsdr the widow of Willem Gerridtsz assisted by the owner of Cowenhoven the honorable Johan de Wijs.

This document indicates that Wolfert Gerritse had a brother Willem and that he was the tenant of the farm ouwenhoven which was owned by Johan de Wijs. This document indicates that Wolfert is connected to the Couwenhoven by Hoogland. It is at the same time possible that he was also linked to the Couwenhoven near Woudenberg because he was a son of Gerrit Willemsz van Couwenhoven, but documentation for this has not been discovered.

On 24-Mar-1623 Beermt van Munster made a deposition under oath before the lieutenant, the schout, and the schepenen Dam and Bronchorst at the request of the (police) officer. He stated that the previous Saturday afternoon he had caught a bucket of fish by the Coppelpoort bridge and had given half of it to Wulphert the bleacher according to an agreement which they had made, and that Beernt had caught a small number of fish threafter. Wulpher and Harmen
Teut then took these fish from Beernt, and they would not divide them with him. Wulpher took the net and tried to give it to his wife. Harman hit Beernt in the eye with a weight in the net, but by then, it was ripped. Beernt then went to the defense of his wife, and Wulpher drew his knife and threatened him without harming him. Dirck Gerritsz, stevedore, using well-chosen words, separated the people from each other. On April 1 1623, Dirch Gerrisz was heard at the request of the officer and made a similar deposition under oath.

On 11-Jun-1623 Hubert Moll and his wife Geertgen Cornelis sold a bleach camp to Wulpher Gerritsz bleacher and his wife in which they had been residing. This was situated in Amersfoort outside the Coppelpoort. The property description differs slightly from that given for the land transaction of 1618, but the mortgages are the same. It is likely that this is the same ground that Wulpher Gerritsz and Hubert Moll purchased then. On the date of purchase in 1623, Wulpher Gerritss sold this property to Monsieur Jacques Chiese Cuirass(ier) of the company of his Princely Excellency (Maurits?) and the purchser assumed the mortgages.

This is the last document pertaining to Wolfert Gerritse that has been discovered in the archives of Amersfoort.

He immigrated between 1624 and 1625 to New Amsterdam, New York County, New York. He and Neeltgen Jacobsdochter immigrated in Jun-1625 to New Netherlands; or July 1625, with his wife and family on a ship of the Dutch West India Company which saled in the expedidition that was comprsed of the ships Mackerel, Horse, Cow and Sheep. On 1629 Wolfert returned to the Netherlands.
On 24-May-1630 He retruned from the Netherlands on board "De Endracht" (the Unity).
There exists a letter from Kiiaen van Rensselaer to Wolfert which I have to get from sources. At this time Wolfert was in the Netherlands and the letter had to do with terminating Wolfert's contract with van Rensselaer and mentions that Wolferts wife was unhappy living in New Netherlands. In the letter van Rensselaer states he would not want someone who was not happy working for him to remain in his employ under the circumstances. It was a friendly letter. According to the source there are several letters fo Wolfert from Van Rensselaer. The letter above was read over the phone to me and I have yet to receive the exact copy and don't take short hand in 1632.


Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven purchased "Keskateuw" located on Long Island from the Indians. Here was established the first kown white settlement on Long Island. Wolphert called his "plantation" Achterveldt, shown on the Manatu Map of New Netherlands as farm No. 36 near the Indian long house to the Kestachau tribe. Wolphert's house surrounded by palisades, was the focal pont of the village of New Amersfoort, later called Flatlands.
on 30-Jun-1636.
On 18-Apr-1657 He got "Smal Civil Rights."
On 20-Oct-1661 Wolfert Gerritsen Van Couwenhoven was named in a suit filed by Frans Jansen regardin a dispute ofver a contract in which Jansen was to buy land from Wofert. This was the first time the name Van Couwenhoven was mentioned in reference to Wolfert.

In the October 2004The New York Genealogical & Biographical Society, Review, published and article titled Wolfert Gerritse in the Netherlands: Further Thoughts About the Van Couwenhoven Family This article follows.

WOLFERT GERRITSE IN THE NETHERLANDS: Further Thoughts About the Van Couwenhoven Family
BY WILLEM VAN KOUWENHOVEN
The purpose of this article. Several years ago, I made a study using documents about Wolfert Gerritse van Couwenhoven which Marcel Kemp had sought out at my request in the archives of the district Amersfoort in the Netherlands.[1] The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society was kind enough to publish this in THE RECORD as "Wolfert Gerritse in the Netherlands." (2] During the intervening time, I have developed several points of criticism about the article which pertain to the views which were expressed there about Wolfert's first wife Aeltge Jansdochter, the birth order of Wolfert and his brother Willem, the date on which the tenancy of Willem's son Jan on the farm Kouwenhoven was terminated, and the projected picture of Wolfert's childhood.
Wolfert Gerritse in recent literature. Additional information has been published in the meantime by Marcel Kemp and Gerard Raven as "Boerderij Kouwenhoven en de familie Van Kouwenhoven 1400-1650" in De Bewaarsman,[3] the publication of the Historische kring Hoogland, the Historical Society' of Hoogland. (The farm Kouwenhoven is located in the neighborhood Coelhorst within the former district Hoogland, which is now a part of the district Amersfoort.) Gerard Raven was co-editor of De Bewaarsman when the article was published. In addition to information about the early history of the farm that appeared in Kemp's article "De herkomst van Wolfert Gerritsz, stamvader van de Amerikaanse familie Van Kouwenhoven" in the 1996 Jaarboek van bet Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie[4] and in the above-mentioned article in THE RECORD, the article in De Bewaarsman contains information about a tenant on the farm in 1536, insights into the lives of the tenants in the period 1620-1650, and a report of the construction of a brick manor house on the farm during the eighteenth century by a new land owner, as well as the history of the farm to the present day. Only the material that pertains to the critique of the article in THE RECORD will be dealt with in this discussion.

Information about Kouwenhoven, its neighborhood Coelhorst, and the local Chapel Coelhorst were included in the booklet "Hoogland-West," the issue of De Bewaarsman for April 2001. The material about the chapel will be recounted in the portion of this critique that deals with Wolfert's childhood.

Aeltge Jansdochter, Wolfert's first wife. As first point of critique, the view of Aeltge Jansdochter which was set forth in the article in THE RECORD[5] should be revised - that it was uncertain that the Wolfert Gerritse who married Aeltge Jansdochter on 17 January 1605[6] was the same person as the Wolfert Gerritse who is found in numerous documents in the archives of Amersfoort in the period 1611-1623. M. Kemp expressed this opinion initially in the report of his impressively thorough search for documents regarding Wolfert Gerritse which was first given to this writer, and this opinion was used in the article for THE RECORD. By the time it was published, Kemp had expressed the same view in his article "De herkomst van Wolfert Gerritsz, ..."[7] Because other documents were not found which linked Aeltge Jansdochter to the baker/bleacher Wolfert Gerritse, Kemp hesitated to draw the conclusion that Aeltge was Wolfert's first wife.
This seems overly cautious. Only one Wolfert Gerritse has been found in the numerous other documents from more or less the same period that have been preserved in the records of the district Amersfoort. Although many documents from this period in the district have been lost for various reasons, those that have survived give no reason to surmise that there was at that time a second Wolfert Gerritse in the district to whom the entry in the marriage register might refer. It would then be better to reason that the Wolfert Gerritse of the marriage record is the same person who is found in all of the other documents. It then follows that Aeltge Jansdochter was Wolfert's first wife, that she died shortly after their marriage without bearing any children who survived, and that Neeltje Jacobsdochter, who is shown as his wife in the documents from the Amersfoort archives, was his second wife and the mother of his known children.
Willem Gerritse, Wolfert's younger brother. Secondly, there is a problem in the article with the estimated birth year that was given for Wolfert's brother Willem. While Kemp made no statements about Willem's birth year in his article in the Jaarboek, he and Raven estimated in the article in De Bewaarsman that Willem was born in the period 1580-1585.[8] Since Willem remained on the farm Couwenhoven as its tenant, it was assumed in the article for THE RECORD that he was older than Wolfert, who was born in 1584.1] Yet, none of Willem's five children had attained their majority when their father died in 1622. Thus, none of them were capable of succeeding him as tenant. The family was enabled to stay on the farm because Willem's widow Neeltge Willemsdochter married Peter Coenraetsz., apparently with the approval if not the instigation of the owner of the farm, Johan de Wijs of Amersfoort.[1]

If one of Willem's five sons was but a few months removed from attaining his majority, it would seem that it could have been arranged in one way or another that he become the tenant of the farm, if he was in other respects a suitable candidate for this work. That this did not occur suggests that the oldest son was several years removed from his majority, and this is the tenor of the agreement which the "blood guardians" Wolfert Gerritse and Harmen Willemsz. of Amersfoort (respectively the brother of Willem and the brother of Willem's widow) made with the mother of Willem's children on 5 November 1622.P 1] She was to care for the children and let them attend school and learn to read and write. Such stipulations suggest that some of the children were too young to have learned basic literacy skills at the time of their father's death.

Since Willem's children were not so old when he died in 1622, it would seem that the birth year 1580 that was assigned to him lies too far in the past and that it is likely that he was born several years later. If Willem's children are listed in birth order in the agreement between the "blood guardians" and the widow, Jan would be his third son. He became the tenant on Couwenhoven on 5 July 1636,02] and he married Nellitgen Henricxdr. five days later.[13] Assuming that both father and son married shortly after their twenty-first birthday and that there were three years between each child, results in an estimated birth date of circa 1587 for Willem rather than circa 1580, which was assigned in THE RECORD article.[14] Willem would have been legally eligible to enter into contracts as a tenant only when he reached his majority, which would seem to have been about 1608.

It should be emphasized that this is but an estimate that is based on reasonable assumptions about birth order and birth intervals that have been made in regard to two men. It should be expected that new documents about Willem and Jan could well require further slight corrections regarding their birth and marriage dates. Yet, Kemp's search in the Archives of Amersfoort was so thorough that it is unlikely that further documents about these persons will be found there. Perhaps a reference to them will by chance be discovered in one or more documents from other districts while other matters are being studied.

as the younger son who left home, learned a trade (perhaps with some parental support) and became a businessman. The thought that is being presented here is that although Willem was the younger son, he stayed on the farm, working it and perhaps initially serving as a caretaker for his parent(s) while the older brother Wolfert had years earlier left the homestead, even though it was customary in Hoogland that the oldest son succeed his father as tenant. Wolfert sought to survive in the business world of Amersfoort, where he already resided as a married man when he was twenty-one years old according to the entry in the marriage register of the Reformed Church of Amersfoort, which was located in the St. Joriskerk[15] (St. George's Church). This is a plausible explanation, yet it requires further refinement.

Jan Willemse's tenancy on Kouwenhoven ends. The other tenants on Kouwenhoven about which there is information were not able to labor there many years. Peter Coenraetsz. became tenant in 1622, and by 1638 he had died and was succeeded by Jan Willemsz van Kouwenhoven. While Kemp and Raven argue that Jan was deceased as early as 1646, it is certain that he was no longer living in 1656 when the estate of his mother Neeltge Willemsdr. was inventoried.[16

Kemp and Raven are of the opinion that Jan had died by 1646 since a police report from that year was made by Jan Bartz. who lived on Kouwenhoven.[17] Apparently the thought is that the farm Kouwenhoven was so small that the tenant farmer (pachter) could not have employed a resident worker (knecht), but only day laborers (dagloners) as they were needed. Thus, it could be reasonably concluded that a person who listed his residence as Kouwenhoven must have been the tenant farmer of that date.[18] It is noted that it is a problem that Jan Willemsz. and his wife Nelletge Hendrixdr. would then have had to have had eight children in ten years. Kemp and Raven conclude that Nelletge was forced to depart from Kouwenhoven following Jan's death because none of the children was old enough to become the succeeding tenant.

It would be more reasonable to consider that it would be bad for the health of the wife and the children which she bore if they came into the world made for a healthier farm. Although the `pill' was not yet then known, local populations generally had their own effective means of planning parenthood, even in the seventeenth century. It would then seem better to conclude that by 1646, Jan Willemsz. and his wife Nelletge Hendrixdr. had relocated, that five of their children or so had been born on Kouwenhoven and that the rest were born in their new location before Jan died somewhat more than fifteen years after he had become the tenant farmer on Kouwenhoven. [19]

As a third point then, there is no need to change the view which was expressed in THE RECORD article of 1998 regarding Jan's death date, but it would appear that the family's tenancy on Kouwenhoven likely had already ended by 1646, ten years earlier than was presented in that article.
Wolfert's childhood. What were the circumstances of Wolfert's childhood? Farm work was much harder and heavier than it is now, and it was often necessary to labor in a strong wind in cold, wet weather, which caused severe illnesses. Although it now seems strange, the life of a farmer was similar then to that of a contemporary professional athlete. The training or work began for both early in life, and by the time each was thirty years old, he was already past his peak. While it is now unusual to find an athlete older than forty-five on a team roster, it was then unusual to find a farmer older than forty-five years old on a landlord's list of tenants - not because the older tenant was enjoying retirement in his luxurious villa, but because he had died of exhaustion and illness. Although it would seem that the average lifespan of a tenant farmer in this region did not differ greatly during this period from that of the general population and that it thus was about forty-five years, Jan Willemsz. was younger when he died, and it would seem that this was also true of his father. It would seem that some tenants died several years before they reached forty-five while a similar number lived a few years beyond that benchmark.

It would seem unlikely that Gerrit the father of Wolfert and Willem would have been able to work as a tenant farmer for many more years than the documented tenants of Kouwenhoven Peter Coenraetsz. and Jan Willemsz.[20] It would thus have been unlikely that he would have been able to work as a tenant much more than fifteen years. If Willem became the tenant about 1608, it would then seem that his predecessor may have begun his tenancy about 1593. This is three years later than the estimate given in the above cited article in THE RECORD.
According to the above calculations, Wolfert would then have been nine years old, and Willem six. At first sight, this would seem to suggest that there is something wrong with the assumptions behind these figures, since this would mean that the children apparently were not born on Kouwenhoven, but it is more profitable to reason that insight is thus given into the complex and fragile world into which the boys were born.

There is no document in which Wolfert is listed as a resident of Kouwenhoven or as its tenant farmer, nor for the reasons enumerated above, does it seem likely that such evidence of his presence on the farm will be discovered. Yet, he used the name Van Couwenhoven,[21] and he worked as a farmer and as a farm supervisor. Why the choice for this name? Where did he learn farm work? If he lived and worked on the farm Kouwenhoven as a child, both questions would be answered. Thus, because no better explanation has yet been found, it is reasonable to assume that this farm was his home and work place for a time during his early years.

In the earlier article in THE RECORD it was mentioned that a director of the Dutch East India Company (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie) in the early seventeenth century bore the family name Couwenhoven,[22] and it was suggested that although this man was not a blood relative, his high position may have afforded Wolfert a further reason to use the name Van Couwenhoven in New Amsterdam rather than another reasonable choice of name such as Van Amersfoort or Van Coelhorst. In regard to this, Gerard Raven has commented[23] that the directors of the Dutch West India Company in Amsterdam would not necessarily know that a Couwenhoven was a director of the Dutch East India Company in Rotterdam. It is thus uncertain that it would have been professionally advantageous for Wolfert to use this name. This implies that he used it for personal reasons, that is to say, because he had lived and worked there during a significant portion of his youth.

It is possible that Wolfert and his brother Willem were born elsewhere and that their father only later became tenant on Kouwenhoven. If so, he probably was tenant for six or twelve years at their previous residence. If that is the case, the father likely died within five years of the start of his work on the farm, although he may have lived longer and have seen Willem become the tenant on the farm, in which event he may then have been able to do but limited work because he would already have reached the advanced age of 45 years. Still, there is a considerable likelihood that the father died before either boy attained his twenty-first year. This implies that there was a tenant intermediate between Willem and his father. If that was indeed the case, how were the children enabled to remain on the farm? And their mother? Other siblings? Because of the dearth of documents, it is not possible to answer these questions. There is for instance no testament or inventory for the estate of Wolfert's father in which his patronymic and that of his mother are disclosed with a list of their children, although it is reasonable to think that such documents once existed. It is not possible to ascertain precisely to what extent Wolfert's life and that of his father Gerrit and his brother Willem were in agreement or disagreement with the possibilities and probabilities which have been set forth here. The contours of the pieces of the puzzle do not come into clear view, and it is not possible to seen how they fit together.

Early change of family on the farm Kouwenhoven. Kemp and Raven list the tenant of Kouwenhoven about 1536 and in 1548 as Reyer Pot.[24l In 1564 the tenant was Gherit Jansz;[25] in 1619/20 Willem Gerritsz.[26] As noted above, the tenant in 1622 was Peter Coenraetsz., and in 1636 Jan Willemsz.,[27] while Jan Bartsz. apparently had become the tenant by 1646. Clearly a change of tenant families occurred sometime between 1548 and 1564 and again about 1646. Because of the short life expectancy and the disruptions of death, it is likely that other changes in tenant families on Kouwenhoven occurred during this period which are not disclosed because of the dearth of documents.

It is thus best to be cautious about drawing an easy conclusion that Gerrit the father of Wolfert and Willem succeeded his father on Kouwenhoven and that the family can be found on this farm much further back into the past. This accentuates the conclusion in the earlier article in THE RECORD that there is insufficient basis to conclude that there was a family relationship between Wolfert Gerritse and the Gherit (Gerrit) Jansz. who in 1564 was listed as the tenant of Kouwenhoven.[28] Kemp described him as a suitable candidate to be the father of Wolfert Gerritsz. and Willem Gerritsz. In his article, he placed brackets around the name [Jansz. Couwenhoven] in his "Genealogie Van Couwenhoven" to indicate that the names within the brackets were merely hypothetical for Gerrit Jansz.[29] He was certain that the father of Wolfert and Willem was Gerrit, and it was speculative if the father was Gerrit Jansz. Couwenhoven.[30] This thought is repeated in the article in De Bewaarsman with the cautionary observation that Gerrit Jansz. would have been unusually old if he were the father of Wolfert and Willem.[31]

A further weakness in the thesis that Gerrit Jansz. and Wolfert Gerritsz. were father and son is that the patronymic Gerritsz. (son of Gerrit) is largely the basis for asserting that this relationship exists while Gerrit together with Willem, Jan and Hendrik are the most common Dutch given names. Gerrit occurs as frequently as Willem in the registers of marriages and baptisms during this period. It is not surprising then that a tenant bore the name Gerrit Jansz., and without further documentary evidence, there is insufficient basis to assert that he was the father of Wolfert Gerritsz. It should be noted that Kemp has cautiously refrained from doing this.

Religious life in Wolfert's childhood, the Coelhorst Chapel. A discussion of religion and worship can be added to the treatment of Wolfert's childhood. The Coelhorst Chapel, which was built about 1350, stands just around the corner from the farm Kouwenhoven. This proximity evokes a picture of Wolfert trudging on Sunday mornings with other family members and residents of the neighborhood Coelhorst through the snow to worship services in this building. Yet, the historical story differs greatly from this.
About 1350, the residents of Hoogland no longer had to attend mass in Oud-Leusden, which was several miles south of Amersfoort while their hamlet then stood several miles northwest of the more northerly city.321 They received their own chapel, which was dedicated to St. Nicholas, who was not only the patron saint of farmers in areas that had just been placed under cultivation, but also the protector from floods. The Reformation brought a step backward to this little settlement. In 1580, Catholic services were forbidden by the provincial parliament of Utrecht, and the church was closed. It seems to have been the intention of the Protestants to hold their own services in this building, which during the intervening two centuries had been endowed with the income from several farms, but a pastor could not be found. It was not until 1655 that it could be arranged that Reformed pastors from the region would hold services in turn in the chapel. In the meantime, itinerant priests had offered the mass for the faithful without interruption at other places in the neighborhood such as the manor house Hoogerhorst, until Hoogland was again assigned its own priest in 1640.33 Ill feeling was likely generated when the chapel was close[d and its income was not used for many decades for services in that building or for pastoral care for the local residents. Perhaps as a result, the Protestant families gradually departed from Coel[horst in the seventeenth century so that the hamlet was almost exclusively Catholic in the eighteenth century as is noted in another source.[34] This has remained unchanged in subsequent years.

It seems unlikely that such negligence by the administrators of the local Reformed church would have generated interest for that church and its teachings in Wolfert. When he lived in Coelhorst, it would seem that there was little that would have attracted him to the Reformed church. This may explain why none of his children are to be found in the baptismal registers of Amersfoort or Leusden. In a later period when he cultivated contacts with Reformed businessmen such as Killiaen van Rensselaer, he may have found it expedient to affiliate with their church. Perhaps it is for this reason that he is listed on 13 August 1651 as a witness of the baptism of Albert, son of Albert Albertszen, at the Reformed church in New Amsterdam.[35]




October 31, 2007
A document described as the oldest surviving land deed for Long Island land was auctioned Wednesday for $156,000 in Manhattan.

The deed, signed by Dutch Colonial Gov. Wouter von Twiller at "Eylandt Manhatans" on June 6, 1636, confirms the purchase of 3,600 acres from the Lenape Indians. The land is known as Keskachauge, and constitutes a large portion of present day Brooklyn.

The winning bid was more than three times predicted, and for almost four times the opening bid of $40,000
"It is without question one of the oldest Dutch documents in private hands," said Jeremy Markowitz, head of Americana sales at Bloomsbury Auctions, a Manhattan auction house where the sale took place. "It is the first deed for land on Long Island."

Markowitz describes the deed as one of the earliest examples of private land ownership in the colony controlled by the Dutch West India Company.

"It is amazing it survived, being over 370 years old and preceding the first private land ownership in Manhattan."

Markowitz said the deed was signed a dozen years after the founding of the Dutch colony by von Twiller, the successor to the first and better known governor, Peter Minuit.

"We know from the records of the Dutch West India Company who received land deeds," Markowitz said. "There are only about a dozen land deeds that preceded this one" and they are for tracts north or south of present day New York City.

The 13-by-18-inch document, written in ink in Dutch, confirms the purchase of the land in the Flatlands section of Brooklyn from the Indians by Wolfert Gerritsz van Couwenhoven and Andries Hudde.

The auction catalog carries a price estimate of $50,000 to $75,000 but auction organizer Markowitz said that range was very conservative and there has been a lot of interest from institutions and private collectors.

On the reverse side, there is a reaffirmation of the original transaction in 1658 and signature of another more famous governor, Peter Stuyvesant, who amended it to say the sole owner of the property was Kouwenhoven. The endorsement was a result of the proclamation by the Dutch West India Company in 1652 that annulled all private land purchases and took all the land back

"It came from a private collector," Markowitz said. It has been auctioned several times after being held by the Kouwenhoven family for centuries.

The document has minor soiling and a small hole affecting two words where the deed is dated. The text reads:

"We, director and council of New Netherland, residing on the island of Manhattan at Fort Amsterdam ? herewith testify and declare, that today, date underwritten, before us personally appeared Tenkirau, Ketaun, Ararikan, Awackouw, Warinckehinck, Wappittawackenis, Ehettin, as owners; Penhawis, Kakappeteno being present as chiefs of the district, ? have transferred, ceded, surrendered and conveyed as lawful, true and free possession, as they therewith transfer, cede, surrender and convey to and for the behalf of Andries Hudde and Wolphert Gerritsz the westernmost of the flats called Keskateuw belonging to them on the island called Suan Hacky between the bay of the North river and the East River of New Netherland?"

According to Markowitz, on June 6, 1636, Wolfert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven and Andries Hudde purchased jointly the 3,600 acres. The same day Jacobus Van Corlear bought an adjoining tract, and 10 days later a third was purchased.

Together, these three tracts in present day Brooklyn constituted an area called 'Castuteeuw,' 'Kestateuw' and 'Casteteuw.'" The name is thought to be derived from the Lenape word for "where grass is cut."

The catalog notes "the sale of these lots was a significant event and constitutes among the earliest examples of private land ownership in New Netherland. At the time, it was highly unusual for land to be owned by anyone except the Dutch West India Company." And most land was leased rather than sold.

Colonial records show the first private purchase of land in the colony of New Netherland occurred in 1629, in present day Delaware. The 1636 purchases collectively are the seventh purchase of land in New Netherland, and the third in the present state of New York. The first private land sale on the island of Manhattan was recorded two years later.

Corlear purchased the land for speculation but Gerritsz van Kouwenhoven settled on the westernmost of the three plots and constructed a dwelling and laid out a plantation that eventually became the settlement and town of Flatlands. The pioneer called his estate Achterveldt and his dwelling stood near the junction of Kouwenhoven Place and Flatbush Avenue.

Occupation8-Aug-1612Amersfoort, Utrecht, Netherlands, In the settlement of the estate of Wolfert's wife in Amersfoort, it was declared before the court that his profession at the time was baker
Occupationbefore 1624a baker and then later a bleacher (bleaching laundry on a grassfield in the sun)

Children of Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven and Neeltgen Jacobsdochter

Neeltgen Jacobsdochter

F, b. circa 1584, d. circa 1658
Neeltgen Jacobsdochter|b. circa 1584\nd. circa 1658|p5.htm#i280|Jacob Petersz|d. before 1611|p128.htm#i71591|Metgen Jacobsdr|d. before 1611|p128.htm#i71592|||||||||||||

Relationship=9th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover.
      Neeltgen Jacobsdochter was born circa 1584 at Netherlands. She was the daughter of Jacob Petersz and Metgen Jacobsdr. Marriage banns for Neeltgen Jacobsdochter and Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven were published on 9-Jan-1605 at Amersfoort, Utrecht, Netherlands. Neeltgen married Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven, son of Gerritt Jansz Couwenhoven, on 17-Jan-1604/5 at Dutch Reformed Church, Amersfoort, Utrecht, Netherlands. Neeltgen Jacobsdochter died circa 1658 at New Amersfoort, Kings County, New York.
     She was also known as Aeltgen Jans. She was also known as Neeltje Janse. She was also known as Neeltje Jans. She and Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven immigrated in Jun-1625 to New Netherlands; or July 1625, with his wife and family on a ship of the Dutch West India Company which saled in the expedidition that was comprsed of the ships Mackerel, Horse, Cow and Sheep.

Children of Neeltgen Jacobsdochter and Wolphert Gerretse Van Kouwenhoven

Albert Garland Conover

M, b. 9 Sep 1868, d. 4 Aug 1945
Albert Garland Conover|b. 9 Sep 1868\nd. 4 Aug 1945|p5.htm#i281|William Stephen Conover|b. 31 May 1830\nd. 2 Sep 1888|p4.htm#i253|Nancy Philimin Martin|b. 15 Feb 1836\nd. 1926|p4.htm#i254|Stephen Conover|b. 17 Apr 1801\nd. 18 Dec 1838|p4.htm#i256|Margaret A. Reid|b. 28 Jan 1808\nd. 28 Apr 1880|p4.htm#i257|John H. Martin|b. 13 Dec 1811\nd. 1 May 1867|p4.htm#i255|Elizabeth Boyd|b. 10 Sep 1811\nd. Sep 1888|p299.htm#i214414|

Relationship=Granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th cousin 2 times removed of Virginia Ailene Swift.
Relationship=Uncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Albert Garland Conover was born on 9-Sep-1868 at Manalapan, Monmouth County, New Jersey. He was the son of William Stephen Conover and Nancy Philimin Martin. Albert married Estsella E. Edwards, daughter of Samuel Edwards and Carrie (Unknown), circa 1891. Albert married Ida May Davison, daughter of John J. Davison, in Oct-1903. Albert Garland Conover died on 4-Aug-1945 at Hightstown, Mercer County, New Jersey, at age 76. Albert was buried at Manalapan Cemetery Hwy 33 Milstone Twp., Manalapan, Monmouth County, New Jersey.
Census29-Jul-1870with parents, Monroe Twp., Middlesex County, New Jersey
Census11-Jun-1900Monroe Twp., Middlesex County, New Jersey, 4 children, 4 living
Census5-May-1910East Windsor Twp., Mercer County, New Jersey, she has 1 child, 1 living
Census12-Apr-1930East Windsor, Mercer County, New Jersey
Census-Occ11-Jun-1900a farmer
Census-Occ5-May-1910a farmer, dairy farm
Occupation12-Apr-1930a farmer

Ida May Davison

F, b. circa 1876
Ida May Davison|b. circa 1876|p5.htm#i282|John J. Davison||p5.htm#i283||||||||||||||||
      Ida May Davison was born circa 1876 at New Jersey. She was the daughter of John J. Davison. Ida married Albert Garland Conover, son of William Stephen Conover and Nancy Philimin Martin, in Oct-1903.
Census5-May-1910East Windsor Twp., Mercer County, New Jersey, she has 1 child, 1 living
Census12-Apr-1930East Windsor, Mercer County, New Jersey

John J. Davison

M

Child of John J. Davison

Francis Billington

M, b. between 1606 and 1609, d. 3 Dec 1684
Francis Billington|b. between 1606 and 1609\nd. 3 Dec 1684|p5.htm#i286|John Billington|b. circa 1580\nd. Sep 1630|p21.htm#i3591|Elinor Lockwood|b. circa 1580\nd. after 2 Mar 1643|p21.htm#i3592|||||||||||||

Relationship=9th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Francis Billington was born between 1606 and 1609 at Spaulding, Lincolnshire, England. He was the son of John Billington and Elinor Lockwood. Francis married Christian Penn, daughter of George Penn and Elizabeth (Unknown), in Jul-1634 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Francis Billington died on 3-Dec-1684 at Middleboro, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
     On an unknown date Francis nearly blew up the Mayflower while it was sitting in Provincetown Harbor. He shot of a gun near an open barrel of gun powder inside the Mayflowers cabin.

Children of Francis Billington and Christian Penn

Christian Penn

F, b. 1606, d. circa 1684
Christian Penn|b. 1606\nd. circa 1684|p5.htm#i287|George Penn|b. circa 1583|p104.htm#i42024|Elizabeth (Unknown)|b. circa 1587|p104.htm#i42025|||||||||||||

Relationship=9th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Christian Penn was born in 1606 at England. She was the daughter of George Penn and Elizabeth (Unknown). Christian married Francis Eaton circa 1624 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Christian married Francis Billington, son of John Billington and Elinor Lockwood, in Jul-1634 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Christian Penn died circa 1684 at Middleboro, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
     She immigrated in 1623 to Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts; aboard then "Anne." She was recieved one acre in 1623 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.

Children of Christian Penn and Francis Eaton

Children of Christian Penn and Francis Billington

Elizabeth Billington

F, b. 10 Jul 1635, d. after 22 Mar 1709/10
Elizabeth Billington|b. 10 Jul 1635\nd. after 22 Mar 1709/10|p5.htm#i288|Francis Billington|b. between 1606 and 1609\nd. 3 Dec 1684|p5.htm#i286|Christian Penn|b. 1606\nd. circa 1684|p5.htm#i287|John Billington|b. circa 1580\nd. Sep 1630|p21.htm#i3591|Elinor Lockwood|b. circa 1580\nd. after 2 Mar 1643|p21.htm#i3592|George Penn|b. circa 1583|p104.htm#i42024|Elizabeth (Unknown)|b. circa 1587|p104.htm#i42025|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Elizabeth Billington was born on 10-Jul-1635 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Francis Billington and Christian Penn. Elizabeth married Richard Bullock on 21-Sep-1660 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. Elizabeth married Benjamin Beere on 25-Jun-1673 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. Elizabeth married Thomas Patte in 1679. Elizabeth Billington died after 22-Mar-1709/10 at Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island.
     On 18-Apr-1642 She was bound apprenticed or "bound out."

Joseph Billington

M, b. before Feb 1636/37, d. between 1684 and 1692
Joseph Billington|b. before Feb 1636/37\nd. between 1684 and 1692|p5.htm#i289|Francis Billington|b. between 1606 and 1609\nd. 3 Dec 1684|p5.htm#i286|Christian Penn|b. 1606\nd. circa 1684|p5.htm#i287|John Billington|b. circa 1580\nd. Sep 1630|p21.htm#i3591|Elinor Lockwood|b. circa 1580\nd. after 2 Mar 1643|p21.htm#i3592|George Penn|b. circa 1583|p104.htm#i42024|Elizabeth (Unknown)|b. circa 1587|p104.htm#i42025|

Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Joseph Billington was born circa 1636/37 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He was born before Feb-1636/37 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He was the son of Francis Billington and Christian Penn. Joseph married Grace (Unknown) on 16-Sep-1672 at New Shoreham, Block Island, Rhode Island. Joseph Billington died between 1684 and 1692 at Probably, Block Island, Washington County, Rhode Island.
     On Jan-1642/43 He was bond out.
Plymouth town records relate that he oftern ran off from his master to return to his family. Since he was too young to be punished, the Court tried a preventative measure with his parrents, Francis and Christian. The records state that "if either the said Francis or Christian, his wyfe, do receive him, if shall againe dept from his said master without his lycence...the said Francis and Christian, his wyfe shalbe sett in the stocks...as often as he or shee shall so receive him". circa 1644.

Martha Billington

F, b. circa 1638, d. after 9 Jun 1704
Martha Billington|b. circa 1638\nd. after 9 Jun 1704|p5.htm#i290|Francis Billington|b. between 1606 and 1609\nd. 3 Dec 1684|p5.htm#i286|Christian Penn|b. 1606\nd. circa 1684|p5.htm#i287|John Billington|b. circa 1580\nd. Sep 1630|p21.htm#i3591|Elinor Lockwood|b. circa 1580\nd. after 2 Mar 1643|p21.htm#i3592|George Penn|b. circa 1583|p104.htm#i42024|Elizabeth (Unknown)|b. circa 1587|p104.htm#i42025|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Martha Billington was born circa 1638 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Francis Billington and Christian Penn. Martha married Samuel Eaton, son of Francis Eaton and Sarah (Unknown), on 10-Jan-1660/61 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Martha married Robert Crossman, son of John Crossman, after 7-Dec-1687. Martha Billington died after 9-Jun-1704.
     On 14-Jan-1642/43 Shw was bound out.

Mary Billington

F, b. circa 1640, d. after 27 Jun 1717
Mary Billington|b. circa 1640\nd. after 27 Jun 1717|p5.htm#i291|Francis Billington|b. between 1606 and 1609\nd. 3 Dec 1684|p5.htm#i286|Christian Penn|b. 1606\nd. circa 1684|p5.htm#i287|John Billington|b. circa 1580\nd. Sep 1630|p21.htm#i3591|Elinor Lockwood|b. circa 1580\nd. after 2 Mar 1643|p21.htm#i3592|George Penn|b. circa 1583|p104.htm#i42024|Elizabeth (Unknown)|b. circa 1587|p104.htm#i42025|

Relationship=8th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandmother of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Mary Billington was born circa 1640 at Probably, Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Francis Billington and Christian Penn. Mary married Samuel Sabin Sr., son of William Sabin and Mary Wright, on 20-Jan-1663/64 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. Mary Billington died after 27-Jun-1717 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts.
     On 14-Jan-1642/43 she was bound out.

Children of Mary Billington and Samuel Sabin Sr.

Isaac Billington

M, b. circa 1644, d. 11 Dec 1709
Isaac Billington|b. circa 1644\nd. 11 Dec 1709|p5.htm#i292|Francis Billington|b. between 1606 and 1609\nd. 3 Dec 1684|p5.htm#i286|Christian Penn|b. 1606\nd. circa 1684|p5.htm#i287|John Billington|b. circa 1580\nd. Sep 1630|p21.htm#i3591|Elinor Lockwood|b. circa 1580\nd. after 2 Mar 1643|p21.htm#i3592|George Penn|b. circa 1583|p104.htm#i42024|Elizabeth (Unknown)|b. circa 1587|p104.htm#i42025|

Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Isaac Billington was born circa 1644 at Probably, Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He was the son of Francis Billington and Christian Penn. Isaac married Hannah Glass, daughter of James Glass and Mary Pontus, before 1675 at Massachusetts. Isaac Billington died on 11-Dec-1709 at Middleboro, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.

Rebecca Billington

F, b. 8 Jun 1647
Rebecca Billington|b. 8 Jun 1647|p5.htm#i293|Francis Billington|b. between 1606 and 1609\nd. 3 Dec 1684|p5.htm#i286|Christian Penn|b. 1606\nd. circa 1684|p5.htm#i287|John Billington|b. circa 1580\nd. Sep 1630|p21.htm#i3591|Elinor Lockwood|b. circa 1580\nd. after 2 Mar 1643|p21.htm#i3592|George Penn|b. circa 1583|p104.htm#i42024|Elizabeth (Unknown)|b. circa 1587|p104.htm#i42025|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Rebecca Billington was born on 8-Jun-1647 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Francis Billington and Christian Penn.

Dorcas Billington

F, b. circa 1650, d. after 1 Aug 1707
Dorcas Billington|b. circa 1650\nd. after 1 Aug 1707|p5.htm#i294|Francis Billington|b. between 1606 and 1609\nd. 3 Dec 1684|p5.htm#i286|Christian Penn|b. 1606\nd. circa 1684|p5.htm#i287|John Billington|b. circa 1580\nd. Sep 1630|p21.htm#i3591|Elinor Lockwood|b. circa 1580\nd. after 2 Mar 1643|p21.htm#i3592|George Penn|b. circa 1583|p104.htm#i42024|Elizabeth (Unknown)|b. circa 1587|p104.htm#i42025|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Dorcas Billington was born circa 1650 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Francis Billington and Christian Penn. Dorcas married Edward May before May-1686. Dorcas Billington died after 1-Aug-1707.
     She was fined five pounds for committing fornication; the records show she was whipped, which indicates that she ws unable to pay the fine. on 7-Jun-1672. On 20-Jul-1683 Dorcas had an illigitimate son iwt was decided at the Middleboro twon meeting that her father Franis Billington "being in present want and for his relief they have left it to ye wisom and discretion of ye selectmen...to ye disposing of his daughter Dorcas her lad."

Mercy Billington

F, b. 25 Feb 1650/51, d. 28 Sep 1718
Mercy Billington|b. 25 Feb 1650/51\nd. 28 Sep 1718|p5.htm#i295|Francis Billington|b. between 1606 and 1609\nd. 3 Dec 1684|p5.htm#i286|Christian Penn|b. 1606\nd. circa 1684|p5.htm#i287|John Billington|b. circa 1580\nd. Sep 1630|p21.htm#i3591|Elinor Lockwood|b. circa 1580\nd. after 2 Mar 1643|p21.htm#i3592|George Penn|b. circa 1583|p104.htm#i42024|Elizabeth (Unknown)|b. circa 1587|p104.htm#i42025|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Mercy Billington was born on 25-Feb-1650/51 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Francis Billington and Christian Penn. Mercy married John Martin, son of Richard Martin and Elizabeth Salter, on 27-Jun-1681 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. Mercy Billington died on 28-Sep-1718 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, at age 67.

John Martin

M, b. 20 Jan 1652/53, d. 28 Aug 1720
John Martin|b. 20 Jan 1652/53\nd. 28 Aug 1720|p5.htm#i296|Richard Martin||p112.htm#i59492|Elizabeth Salter||p112.htm#i59493|||||||||||||
      John Martin was born in Jan-1651/52 at Devonshire, England. He was baptized on 20-Jan-1652/53 at Ottery St. Mary, Devonshire, England. He was the son of Richard Martin and Elizabeth Salter. John married Mercy Billington, daughter of Francis Billington and Christian Penn, on 27-Jun-1681 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. John married Abigail Read on 28-May-1719 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. John Martin died on 28-Aug-1720 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, at age 67.

Edward May

M, d. 10 Aug 1691
     Edward married Hannah King before 1670. Edward married Dorcas Billington, daughter of Francis Billington and Christian Penn, before May-1686. Edward May died on 10-Aug-1691 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.

Hannah Glass

F, b. 24 Dec 1651, d. after 30 Aug 1704
Hannah Glass|b. 24 Dec 1651\nd. after 30 Aug 1704|p5.htm#i298|James Glass||p112.htm#i59487|Mary Pontus||p112.htm#i59488|||||||||||||
      Hannah Glass was born on 24-Dec-1651 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of James Glass and Mary Pontus. Hannah married Isaac Billington, son of Francis Billington and Christian Penn, before 1675 at Massachusetts. Hannah Glass died after 30-Aug-1704.

Samuel Sabin Sr.

M, b. circa 1640, d. 23 Sep 1699
Samuel Sabin Sr.|b. circa 1640\nd. 23 Sep 1699|p5.htm#i299|William Sabin|b. 11 Oct 1609\nd. 17 Jul 1687|p19.htm#i3450|Mary Wright|b. circa 1620\nd. circa 1662|p19.htm#i3451|Richard Sabin||p19.htm#i3454|Mary Bushe||p19.htm#i3455|Richard Wright|b. circa 1598\nd. after 15 Mar 1667/68|p19.htm#i3452|Margaret (Unknown)|b. 1599\nd. 17 Dec 1678|p19.htm#i3453|

Relationship=8th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandfather of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Samuel Sabin Sr. was born circa 1640 at it is thought, Titchfield, Hampshire, England. He was born circa 1640 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. He was the son of William Sabin and Mary Wright. Samuel married Mary Billington, daughter of Francis Billington and Christian Penn, on 20-Jan-1663/64 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. Samuel Sabin Sr. died on 23-Sep-1699 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts.

Children of Samuel Sabin Sr. and Mary Billington

Samuel Eaton

M, b. circa 1620, d. before 29 Oct 1684
Samuel Eaton|b. circa 1620\nd. before 29 Oct 1684|p5.htm#i300|Francis Eaton|b. circa 1595\nd. before 8 Nov 1633|p104.htm#i42026|Sarah (Unknown)|d. after 11 Jan 1621|p132.htm#i73535|||||||||||||
      Samuel Eaton was born circa 1620 at England. He was the son of Francis Eaton and Sarah (Unknown). Samuel married Elizabeth (Unknown) before 10-Mar-1646. Samuel married Martha Billington, daughter of Francis Billington and Christian Penn, on 10-Jan-1660/61 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. Samuel Eaton died before 29-Oct-1684 at Middleboro, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.
     The Inventory of Samuel Eaton was taken on 29-Oct-1684 at Middleboro, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.

Grace (Unknown)

F
     Grace married Joseph Billington, son of Francis Billington and Christian Penn, on 16-Sep-1672 at New Shoreham, Block Island, Rhode Island.
     Grace (Unknown) was she was charged with theft on 13-Oct-1680 at Block Island, Washington County, Rhode Island.

Richard Bullock

M, b. 1622
      Richard Bullock was born in 1622 at England. Richard married Elizabeth Ingraham on 4-Aug-1647 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts; six children of this marriage. Richard married Elizabeth Billington, daughter of Francis Billington and Christian Penn, on 21-Sep-1660 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. Richard Bullock died before 22-Oct-1667 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts.
     He was also known as Isaac Bullock. The Inventory of Richard Bullock was taken on 22-Nov-1667.

Samuel Sabin

M, b. 27 Nov 1664
Samuel Sabin|b. 27 Nov 1664|p5.htm#i303|Samuel Sabin Sr.|b. circa 1640\nd. 23 Sep 1699|p5.htm#i299|Mary Billington|b. circa 1640\nd. after 27 Jun 1717|p5.htm#i291|William Sabin|b. 11 Oct 1609\nd. 17 Jul 1687|p19.htm#i3450|Mary Wright|b. circa 1620\nd. circa 1662|p19.htm#i3451|Francis Billington|b. between 1606 and 1609\nd. 3 Dec 1684|p5.htm#i286|Christian Penn|b. 1606\nd. circa 1684|p5.htm#i287|

Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-granduncle of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Samuel Sabin was born on 27-Nov-1664 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. He was the son of Samuel Sabin Sr. and Mary Billington. Samuel married Grace Ormsby, daughter of John Ormsby and Grace Martin, circa 1694 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts.

Marcy Sabin

F, b. 8 Mar 1666/67, d. 18 Jun 1728
Marcy Sabin|b. 8 Mar 1666/67\nd. 18 Jun 1728|p5.htm#i304|Samuel Sabin Sr.|b. circa 1640\nd. 23 Sep 1699|p5.htm#i299|Mary Billington|b. circa 1640\nd. after 27 Jun 1717|p5.htm#i291|William Sabin|b. 11 Oct 1609\nd. 17 Jul 1687|p19.htm#i3450|Mary Wright|b. circa 1620\nd. circa 1662|p19.htm#i3451|Francis Billington|b. between 1606 and 1609\nd. 3 Dec 1684|p5.htm#i286|Christian Penn|b. 1606\nd. circa 1684|p5.htm#i287|

Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-grandaunt of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Marcy Sabin was born on 8-Mar-1666/67 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Samuel Sabin Sr. and Mary Billington. Marcy married James Welch Sr. on 9-Nov-1683 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. Marcy Sabin died on 18-Jun-1728 at Killingly, Windham County, Connecticut, at age 61.
     She was also known as Mercy Sabin.

Israel Sabin Sr.

M, b. 8 Jun 1673, d. after 25 Mar 1718
Israel Sabin Sr.|b. 8 Jun 1673\nd. after 25 Mar 1718|p5.htm#i305|Samuel Sabin Sr.|b. circa 1640\nd. 23 Sep 1699|p5.htm#i299|Mary Billington|b. circa 1640\nd. after 27 Jun 1717|p5.htm#i291|William Sabin|b. 11 Oct 1609\nd. 17 Jul 1687|p19.htm#i3450|Mary Wright|b. circa 1620\nd. circa 1662|p19.htm#i3451|Francis Billington|b. between 1606 and 1609\nd. 3 Dec 1684|p5.htm#i286|Christian Penn|b. 1606\nd. circa 1684|p5.htm#i287|

Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=6th great-granduncle of Virginia Ailene Swift.
      Israel Sabin Sr. was born on 8-Jun-1673 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. He was the son of Samuel Sabin Sr. and Mary Billington. Israel married Mary Ormsby, daughter of John Ormsby and Grace Martin, on 20-May-1696 at Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts. Israel Sabin Sr. died after 25-Mar-1718 at Barrington, Bristol County, Massachusetts.
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