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Mary Davis

F, b. circa 1631
Mary Davis|b. circa 1631|p390.htm#i366504|Dolor Davis|b. circa 1599|p389.htm#i366494|Margery Willard|b. 7 Nov 1602\nd. before 16 Feb 1667|p389.htm#i366495|||||||Richard Willard|b. 6 Feb 1582/83|p389.htm#i366496|Margery Humphrie|b. 25 May 1572\nd. circa 11 Dec 1608|p390.htm#i366515|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Mary Davis was born circa 1631. She was the daughter of Dolor Davis and Margery Willard. Mary married Thomas Lewis, son of George Lewis, on 16-Jun-1653 at Barnstable, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.

Thomas Lewis

M
Thomas Lewis||p390.htm#i366505|George Lewis||p390.htm#i366506||||||||||||||||
     Thomas Lewis was the son of George Lewis. Thomas married Mary Davis, daughter of Dolor Davis and Margery Willard, on 16-Jun-1653 at Barnstable, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.

George Lewis

M

Child of George Lewis

Elizabeth Davis

F, b. circa 1634
Elizabeth Davis|b. circa 1634|p390.htm#i366507|Dolor Davis|b. circa 1599|p389.htm#i366494|Margery Willard|b. 7 Nov 1602\nd. before 16 Feb 1667|p389.htm#i366495|||||||Richard Willard|b. 6 Feb 1582/83|p389.htm#i366496|Margery Humphrie|b. 25 May 1572\nd. circa 11 Dec 1608|p390.htm#i366515|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Elizabeth Davis was born circa 1634. She was the daughter of Dolor Davis and Margery Willard.

Samuel Davis

M, b. circa 1640
Samuel Davis|b. circa 1640|p390.htm#i366508|Dolor Davis|b. circa 1599|p389.htm#i366494|Margery Willard|b. 7 Nov 1602\nd. before 16 Feb 1667|p389.htm#i366495|||||||Richard Willard|b. 6 Feb 1582/83|p389.htm#i366496|Margery Humphrie|b. 25 May 1572\nd. circa 11 Dec 1608|p390.htm#i366515|

Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
      Samuel Davis was born circa 1640. He was the son of Dolor Davis and Margery Willard. Samuel married Mary Meddowes on 11-Jan-1665/66 at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts. Samuel married Ruth Taylor on 18-Oct-1711 at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts.

Mary Meddowes

F
     Mary married Samuel Davis, son of Dolor Davis and Margery Willard, on 11-Jan-1665/66 at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts.

Ruth Taylor

F
     Ruth married Samuel Davis, son of Dolor Davis and Margery Willard, on 18-Oct-1711 at Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts.

Ruth Davis

F, b. 24 Mar 1643/44
Ruth Davis|b. 24 Mar 1643/44|p390.htm#i366511|Dolor Davis|b. circa 1599|p389.htm#i366494|Margery Willard|b. 7 Nov 1602\nd. before 16 Feb 1667|p389.htm#i366495|||||||Richard Willard|b. 6 Feb 1582/83|p389.htm#i366496|Margery Humphrie|b. 25 May 1572\nd. circa 11 Dec 1608|p390.htm#i366515|

Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=7th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
     Ruth Davis was baptized on 24-Mar-1643/44 at Barnstable, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Dolor Davis and Margery Willard. Ruth married Stephen Hall on 3-Dec-1663 at Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

Stephen Hall

M
     Stephen married Ruth Davis, daughter of Dolor Davis and Margery Willard, on 3-Dec-1663 at Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

Major Simon Willard

M, b. 7 Apr 1605, d. 24 Apr 1676
Major Simon Willard|b. 7 Apr 1605\nd. 24 Apr 1676|p390.htm#i366513|Richard Willard|b. 6 Feb 1582/83|p389.htm#i366496|Margery Humphrie|b. 25 May 1572\nd. circa 11 Dec 1608|p390.htm#i366515|Symon Willarde|b. 1530\nd. between 6 Feb 1585 and 26 Feb 1585|p390.htm#i366517|Elizabeth (Unknown)|d. circa 11 Apr 1587|p390.htm#i366518|Raynold Humphrie||p391.htm#i366566||||

Relationship=9th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
     Major Simon Willard was baptized on 7-Apr-1605 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England. He was the son of Richard Willard and Margery Humphrie. Simon married Mary Sharpe, daughter of Henry Sharpe and Jane Feylde, on 24-Sep-1630 at Horsemonden, Kent, England. Simon married Elizabeth Dunster, daughter of Henry Dunster and Isabel Kaye, at Massachusetts. Simon married Mary Dunster, daughter of Robert Dunster and Mary Gerrett, at Massachusetts. Major Simon Willard died on 24-Apr-1676 at Charlestown, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, at age 71. Simon was buried at Groton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.
     He immigrated to Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

"Early New England People...Some Account of the Ellis, Pemberton, Willard, Prescott, Titcomb, Sewall...": Simon, son of Richard and Margery Willard, was born at Horsmonden, probably in the early part of the year 1605, as he was baptized in the church at that place, April 7, 1605, by Edward Alchine, Rector. He married Mary, daughter of Henry and Jane (Feylde) Sharpe, of Horsmonden. In April, 1634, Capt. Simon Willard, with his wife and one or two children, his sister Margery and her husband, Capt. Delour Davis, embarked from England, arriving at Boston about the middle of the month of May, after a short and very prosperous voyage. The name of the vessel is unknown, but there is on the files at Hartford, Conn., the deposition of a Mrs. Elizabeth Bacon, who states that she arrived in New England in the month of May, 1634, and that Samuel Greenhill "was reputed, by those who were well acquainted with him in the ship, a man of considerable estate, and was accordingly entertained in the ship with Mr. Willard and Mr. Pantry, and Mr. Crayfoote, and others of good account." Capt. Willard settled in Cambridge, Mass. From the Proprietors' Record, we learn that he had one hundred acres on the Brighton side of Charles River, adjoining the land owned by his brother-in-law, Capt. Davis. He engaged in the purchase and exportation of furs, dealing extensively with the Indians of the interior. At the time of his arrival the inhabitants of Cambridge were complaining of "straightness for want of land, especially meadow," and it may have been owing to this fact that he soon decided to leave Cambridge, and in company with others, to found a new plantation at Musketaquid. In September, 1635, a grant of land six miles square, was made by the General Court, Winthrop says, to "Mr. Buckly and [Simon Willard] merchant, and about twelve more families." The place was named Concord. Rev. Peter Bulkeley, with whom Mr. Willard was associated, was a man "of great learning, and large heart, 'of noble family,' 'possessed of wealth,' and distinguished as a divine. He arrived in Cambridge early in the summer of 1635, and to him Willard attached himself with affectionate regard." The following is from Capt. Edward Johnson's account of their removal: "Upon some inquiry of the Indians, who lived to the north west of the Bay, one Captain Simon Willard being acquainted with them by reason of his trade, became a chiefe instrument in erecting this town: the land they purchase of the Indians, and with much difficulties traveling through unknowne woods, and through watery scrampes (swamps), they discover the fitnesse of the place, sometimes passing through the thickets where their hands are forced to make way for their bodies passage, and their feete clambering over, the crossed trees, which when they missed they sunke into an uncertaine bottome in water, and wade up to the knees, tumbling sometimes higher and sometimes lower; wearied with this toile they at end of this , meete with a scorching plaine, yet not so plaine but that the ragged bushes scratch their legs fouly.....Their farther hardship is to travell, sometimes they know not whither, bewildred indeed without sight of sun, their compasse miscarrying in crowding through the bushes. They sadley search up and down for a known way,--the Indians paths being not above one foot broad, so that a man may travell many dayes and never find one.... Thus this poore people populate this howling desert, marching manfully on (the Lord assisting) through the greatest difficulties and sorest labors that ever any with such weake means have done." Soon after Capt. Willard's arrival in Concord, he and Maj.-Gen. Gibbons, with some twenty men under their control, were sent by Gov. Winthrop to Connecticut with instructions "to take possession of the place and to raise some buildings." Upon the organization of the town of Concord, Capt. Willaard was chosen Clerk of Writs, and was continued in that office by annual election for nineteen years. The second year he was appointed Surveyor of Arms, having been a Captain in England. His first military commission in the colony was that of Lieutenant-Commandant. He was afterwards made Captain, and in 1653, was chosen Major of Middlesex, second in rank only to the Commander-in-Chief of the forces of the colony. The next year he was placed in command of an expedition against a tribe of the Narraganset Indians. At the earliest election made by the town, he was chosen a Representative to the General Court, and was re-elected fifteen times. In 1654, he was placed by the freemen of the colony in a "more distinguished, responsible, and widely useful position, as assistant, or member of the higher branch of the Legislature, which office he held continuously till his death." This embraced a very critical period in the history of the colony,--the earnest and exciting controversy with the Commissioners of Charles II. "The Commissioners were clothed with large powers, some of which were wholly inconsistent with the charter, while others were especially offensive to the people of Massachusetts, who had enjoyed so much actual liberty under its provisions." The Commissioners having perused the "Books of the Generall Lawes and Liberties," proposed, in the name of the King, no less than twenty-six alterations and additions. Gov. Bellingham, Major Willard and Messrs. Collins and Fisher were appointed a committee to peruse the Commissioners' exceptions to the laws of the colony. "The Commissioners met," says Mr. Joseph Willard, "with a spirit as decided as their own,--a spirit that would not submit to any infringement of the patent, and hardly willing to stop even at that point. Thence arose a long and earnest controversy, which ended in the Commissioners being baffled at all points; and they left the country in a very angry frame of mind, with abundant threats of Royal indignation." The Commissioners, having been authorized by the King "to hear and determine complaints and appeals in all cases, as well military, as criminal and civil," gave notice to the General Court, that on a certain day, they should sit as his majesty's Commissioners to hear and determine the cause of Thomas Deane and others against the Governor and company, "and," say they, "we do expect you will by your attorney answer to the complaint." They did answer, but not as the Commissioners intended. When the day for meeting came, they published a long declaration by sound of trumpet, declaring the proposed trial inconsistent with the maintenance of the laws and authority, and summoned Thomas Deane to appear and make good his charges. The Commissioners express unfeigned surprise, that, in a case wherein the Governor and company are impleaded, they should assume to themselves the hearing; "it being," say they, "unheard of and contrary to all the laws of christendom, that the same persons should be judges and parties." The General Court sent loyal addresses to the King, with a ship-load of masts for his navy, of which he stood much in need, "and the colony had rest for a time." Major Willard resided in Concord twenty-five years, and was a "leading and valued citizen." His mansion house was afterwards owned by Dr. Joseph Lee, "who, being a strong tory, was imprisoned during the Revolutionary war, and his house was taken by the patriots and used for a time as a boarding house for Harvard students, when the College in 1775 was removed to Concord, by order of the Provincial Congress, as the College buildings at Cambridge were needed for the use of the soldiers of the American army. (Note: Concord Guide Book" G.B. Bartlett) The house was burned some years ago. Major Willard removed from Concord to Lancaster, Mass., "being importuned by the inhabitants to come and instruct them in municipal affairs. When the place was destroyed by the Indians, he removed to Groton, and remained there until that place was destroyed by the Indians, when he removed to Charlestown, Mass. He was employed by the government in various transactions with the Indians, and was associated with Apostle Eliot, and Major Gookins, in their friendly missions. When a company was formed to encourage the trade in furs with the Indians, he was intrusted with the superintendence. He was chosen by the Indians about Concord "to record, and keep in writing," what they had generally agreed upon, touching their religious and civil government. Passaconaway, cheif sachem of the Merrimac, requested that the Apostle Eliot and Capt. Willard would live near his people to teach them. During the thirty-seven years that Major Willard was a member of the General Court, he was constantly engaged in the public service. "The records of the General Court and other archives show a large aggregate of assiduous and valuable labor." "He was much sought after to settle vexed questions of the boundaries of towns, to arbitrate in controversies on the administration of the internal affairs of towns, and to settle disputed claims." He was one of the committee chosen by the General Court to consider the subject of supplies. This resulted in a law requiring "that all hands not necessarily employed in other occasions, as women, boys and girls," should "spin according to their skill and ability." The office of surveyor was of very considerable importance in the early days of the colony, and Major Willard possessing of the qualifications required for it, was frequently called upon for its exercise. For years, Massachusetts had laid claim to the Province of New Hampshire, under the provision of her charter which granted on the north of the Merrimac; and, in 1652, when she was preparing to ward off the attack of Mason's heirs, and establish her claim to a wider jurisdiction, Major Willard and Captain Edward Johnson were appointed Commissioners to find out the most northerly part of Merrimac River. An interesting memorial of the survey still exists. About forty-five years ago, in consequence of a dam having been thrown across the head of the weirs at the point where Lake Winnipiseogee discharges its waters into the Upper Merrimac, a large rock was exposed to view, deeply embedded in the gravel, with its surface but little above the water. On this rock was the following inscription: EJ SW, WP JOHN ENDICOT, GOV This points back unerringly to the spot which the Commissioners in their return to the General Court, designate and establish as the north line of the patent. Endicott was then the Governor of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay, so his name was inscriber, with the abbreviation W.P., for Worshipful, together with the initials of Simon Willard and Edward Johnson. The rock is now called the Endicott Rock. "When King Philip's war began, Major Willard was summoned from the court he was presiding over, at the advanced age of 70 years, to lead the Middlesex Militia, and drive back the foe from the exposed towns of his district. This he did, and rapidly marched through the desert to Brookfield, just in time to relieve the garrison there." Bailies states, that "Major Willard so silently and skillfully managed his approach that he was perceived by the garrison before he was discovered by the Indians." Increase Mather says: "What a black appearance of death and ruin was before the poor people at Quaboag, when they were all cooped up in one unfortified house, and surrounded by a barbarious multitude of cruel Indians, who thirsted after their blood! But God by a strange providence sent Major Willard, who, with a small party of soldiers, came a few house or minutes before it was too late; by which means, the remaining inhabitants of that place had their lives given them for a prey." Hubbard, in his history of the war, gives abundant commendation to the Major, whom he entitles "that honoured person, that worthy patriot and experience soldier." Mr. Sidney Willard says: "For more than forty years he was a frontier commander with inadequate forces under his command, engaged with an enemy whose modes of warfare were of a kind to occasion the utmost perplexity, and who by sudden surprises and simultanious attacks on different places were enabled to accomplish their fatal purpose." Major Willard received a number of grants of land, making in all between four and five thousand acres, exclusive of this right to subsequent divisions in the lands of Lancaster. The towns of Acton, Stow, and a part of Groton, are on land that belonged to him. After his death, his six youngest children received a grant of one thousand acres in payment of money that was due Major Willard from the Indians. In 1686, a tract of land twelve miles square,--afterwards the township of Rutland,--was conveyed by the Indian proprietors to Henry and Benjamin, sons of Major Willard; Cyprian Stevens, his son-in-law; Joseph Rolandson, son of the former minister of Lancaster; and Joseph Foster of Billerica. Major Willard married for his second wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Dunster, of Balehoult, Lancashire, Eng. She was sister to President Dunster. She lived but six months after her marriage. His third wife was Mary Dunster, cousin to President Dunster. She survived him and married Deacon Noyes of Sudbury. Major Willard died April 24, 1676. While presiding at court, he was seized with an epidemic cold of a very malignant type then prevailing in New England, and after a few days' illness, died in the seventy-second year of his age. He had the pleasure of knowing a short time before his death "that a grateful public still acknowledged the value of his faithful labors, when the official count of the votes placed him among the highest on the list of the proposed assistants for the political year beginning in May, 1676; in fact, heading all others with the exception of the Govenor and Deputy-Governor." Rev. Ebenezer Pemberton says of him: "He was a sage patriot in Israel whose wisdom assinged him a seat at the Council Board, and his military skill and martial spirit entitled him to the chief place in the field." Rev. Horation Wood of Lowell, Mass., says: "Mr. Willard was a stalwart Puritan of the elder day, a conscientious, religious man, possessing strong religious convictions, a devout, humble and earnest spirit. He was a man of sound and enlightened understanding, of discreet wisdom and of a brave and enduring spirit, not boastful, but possessing that true courage which belongs to a modest and generous nature, and is ready, at the call of duty, to sacrifice ease and comfort, yea, life itself, in defense of the public weal. Never was motto on coat of arms more characteristic..." "Worcester County":Simon Willard was the pioneer ancestor of Mrs. Charles G. Cushing of Fitchburg...Major Simon Willard was baptized at Horsmondon, county Kent, England, April 7, 1605. He came to New England and settled in Cambridge; he was there in 1634 but in the following year removed to Concord, Massachusetts. He was a very prominent man. He had a long, honorable and eventful career, and during his long life no one was more distinguished and honored in Concord than he. He was a deputy to the general court in 1636 and 1649, assistant to the governor from 1657 to his death, lieutenant in 1637, captain in 1640 and major, the highest rank at that time, 1655. He married (first) Mary Sharpe, daughter of Henry Sharpe: (second) Elizabeth Dunster, sister of President Dunster of Harvard College; (third) Mary Dunster, cousin of the second wife. Major Willard died April 24, 1676, aged about sixty-eight years. He had sixteen children, of whom the first wife had six and the second and third wives ten in all. Pam Emerson Notes: (Source: "The Charles Book" by Arthur R. Tourtallot, published by Farrer and Rinehart; Chapter 11; Pages 130-145) Simon Willard came from Horsmonden, Kent Co. England the middle of May 1634, age 31 years. The name has been known on English soil for 800 years being 5 times in the Doomsday Book. He was one of the founders of Concord, Mass. and in one of its suburbs a granite boulder inscribed to his memory. He died in Charleston, April 24, 1676. The Charleston history states that he was buried in Groton but it is not found in the record there. Major Simon Willard married three times, his third wife was Mary Dunster, daughter of Harry Dunster. Major Willard and Mary Dunster were married in 1645. Her sister, Elizabeth Dunster, was this second wife. There was one daughter born of the second marriage but she died unmarried. (Scott Robinson Note: I doubt this last paragraph due to other sources.) (Source: "The Stevens Family" by E.H. Stevens) ...He had 3 wives (Source: "Willard Genealogy" by Joseph Willard) His father had arranged before his death for him to be apprenticed to learn some trade or business which was probably done but there is no record. It is probable that he had served in the army before coming to America as he was appointed to drill soldiers very soon after his arrival and was called the Kentish Soldier by historian Edward Johnson. It seemed that he was married in England but no record found nor the birth of any child. Joseph Willard says that he married Mary Sharpe in England and came with him to this country and had children before coming and several afterwards. He married secondly Elizabeth Dunster, a sister of President Henry Dunster of Harvard College. She died within a year and he married her cousin Mary Dunster. In his father's will it was stated that he was to get all the rest of the land not already promised. His father directed that Symon be placed with some honest man where he may learn some good trade and be instructed. In case of Symon's death before reaching maturity George was to have the land bequeathed to him. He was the elder of the two brothers who founded the American Willard line. There is no record of the other brother's life in America. Major Simon Willard came to America in the spring of 1634 as testified by a woman in Hartford, Conn. Saying that Simon Willard and others of good account were passengers on the same ship. This does not tell us whether he brought with him any of his family or not. It is simply inferred by this after history that his wife and at least one child came with him. It has been thought that his brother, George, probably came at the same time but there is no proof. The fourth of August 1634 he had a grant of land at Cambridge where he stayed for a year. the 25th of August 1635 he sold the property and with others founded the plantation of Concord the name meaning the home for aging men. They bought the land from Indians in 1636 and remained friends for many years. In 1636 he was chosen representative to the General Court. He performed eminent services on committees usually as chairman. These committees tried to settle differences between towns, groups of inhabitans and boundaries between towns. He helped lay out grants of land and was one of commissioner who supervised critical emergencies in Lancaster and other towns. He was a magistrate chosen as one of the assistant judges of the General Court in 1654 and disputed to hold court in Hampton and Salisbury in 1666 and in Dover and York in 1675. He was chosen sergeant major of Middlesex Co. in 1653, was commander in chief of the Narragansett expedition in 1654 and 1655. On the outbreak of the Indian horror known as King Philip's war in 1675 he performed valient service. In 1659 he sold his Concord homestead and moved to Lancaster. After 12 years he again removed to Groton and built a house and other buildings and enjoyed his fourth home. During the King Philip's war, Groton was attacked and the savages burned Major Willard's home in March 1676 so he had no home for his family. But he went on in his service, directing movements of troops and relief expeditions and bearing untold hardship and strains. He was 71 years old. The month after his home was burned in Groton he was in Charleston, probably resting from his tremendous labors when he caught an epidemic cold and died 24 April, 1676. He was probably buried there. No will was offered for probate and probably none was made. The widow struggled to care for the younger children and had a very difficult time. The Major had left great land possessions but very little ready money... It is believed that he has 17 children by his first and third wife. The town clerk did not record the death of the first and second wife or the marriage of either the second or third. (Source: "Willard Memoir - The Life and Times of Major Simon Willard") Major Willard had 17 children by three wives. Nine sons and five of eight daughters arrived to mature age. There is a lot of confusion as to the mother of various children. Before Sept. 1639 there was no law to make registration of births, marriages, and deaths. Since Major Willard was the town clerk from 1653 to 1653(?) the records during this period should be correct. He had children over 40 years, the first grandson, Samuel Edmunds, was older than eight of his aunts and uncles. His father dying early provided for his welfare. There were a lot of persons in England who were Puritans and did not want to worship in the Church of England. These views were illegal and probably were the reason for Simon willard to come to America. Watching the persecution of other Puritans by Bishop Laud influenced his decision. His decision to come to New England with his family was the only one he could make. It was difficult to leave England as the church and government demanded allegiance to church and country before you could embark. He arrived in the new world at the age of 29 with a young family and immediately identified himself with his religious views and his democratic feelings. He left England in April 1634 with his family and his sister Margery and her husband Captain Dolor Davis. No ship records of the passage has been found but it is believed that he came over on a Winthrop ship. They arrived in the middle of May after a short passage. He was mentioned by Governor Winthrop as a merchant. He immediately moved to Cambridge and started trading with the Indians buying and exporting furs. Immediately there was trouble as the leading Congregational clergy, Cotton, did not want anyone to leave the Boston area and there was crowding and a lot wanted to go to Connecticut. Willard was probably in favor of moving as he made preparations to do so. Another clergy, Hooker, who had lost influence to Cotton and was displeased with Governor Winthrop wanted to leave and eventually, with a party, Hooker went to Connecticut in 1635. Simon Willard showed no inclination to join the Hooker crowd but was dissatisfied in Cambridge. In 1635, a Rev. Peter Bulkeley came to the colony and Simon Willard and he became very close. On Sept 5, 1635 a grant was made to Mr. Buckley and Mr. Willard of thirty six square miles of land where Concord is today. Simon Willard in his trade with the Indians saw it as a rich area for farming. About 12 families were to move to this location through the tangle of brush and swamps. Mr. Willard led the group. The hardships endured were great. After getting there they bought the land from the indians paying in trade goods. Mr. Willard was one of the three men who met with the indians and made the trade. The complete satisfaction to both parties ensured friendship till the days of King Philip. Shortly after Willard founded the town of Concord, John Winthrop wanted to build a fortification at the mouth of the Connecticut river and sent 20 men under the direction of Gibbons and Willard to build a fortification. This was finished in December. Willard was a leading citizen in Concord and a leader in the church for about 25 years that he lived there. Immediately after the organization of the town, Willard was made clerk of the writs and continued for 19 years through annual elections. In this position, he had authority to grant summons and attachments in all civil actions, summon witnesses and take bond, etc. The next year after coming to Concord, he was appointed by the court surveyor of land and to exercise a military company at Concord. He must have had some military experience in England and one researcher states that he was a captain in England. He was granted a military commission in Corcord as lieutenant-commandant in March 1627. His military experience continued for 40 years until his death. He also filled various and important civil posts. In 1636 he was elected representative to the General Court and served till 1654 with the exception of three years. He was reelected in 1654 but refused to serve because of more important civic duties. Before the use of justices of peace, three freemen were appointed to serve in such proceedings. Any two could hear and determine such cases, Willard served in this capacity in the years 1639, 1641, and 1652. Since he was an special friend of the Indians he was assigned various tasks in dealing with them. He also assisted missionaries Eliot and Gookin in their missions. In 1641 a company was formed to trade for furs with the Indians and they were the only ones legally to trade with them. Simon Willard was a leader in this mission. They were to give one twentieth of the proceeds to the Treasury for their 3 year exclusive contract. He also was assigned to collect tribute from the Indians on Block Island and other tribes. The Indian tribes in the vicinity of Concord had accepted the missionaries and have watched the whites and their life style. The chiefs came to Concord and wanted to be treated as equals with the whites. The people of Concord accepted their offer and the Indians requested that Simon Willard draw up a contract to state their civil and religious intentions. Another chief, Passaconaway, was approached by the missionary, Eliot, and he wanted Eliot and Willard to move out to their village and live with them and teach them Christian and civil beliefs. It is possible that Willard accompanied Eliot on his visits between 1648 and 1651. He served as a medium of communication between the missionary and the chiefs. He was a member of the General Court in some capacity for 37 years. The office of surveyor was important and Willard was used in this capacity frequently. 1637 - The people of Watertown asked Willard and two other men to lay out a plat of land in Concord for 50 to 60 families. 1638 - Proceeded in helping the people of Watertown to move. He also was on a committee on Mr. Gurling's land. 1640 - One of a committee to assess the value of stock on the Colony rate of Lb 1, 206 1641 - Lt. Willard and three others to lay out bounds of the Colony. Willard was one of a committee to aly out Mrs. Marg Winthrop's 3000 acres of land granted to here after the death of her husband. 1642, June - 14 Simon Willard was one of the committee appointed to levy a rate of Lb 800 upon the various towns of the colony. 1644 - Simon Willard was one of a committee to survey property on the Sudbury River. 1645 - On a committee to draw up certain bills for positive laws against lying, swearing, sabbath-breaking, drunkenness Etc. 1649, May - On a committee of Deputies to draw laws regarding the dividing shires, counties, etc. 1649, May - An order was passed by the Board of Deputies to regulate the practices of physicians, phirugeons, midwives and others requiring them to be ethical. Simon Willard was one of 7 deputies who voted against the measure. 1649, May 4 - Captain Willard and Sergeant Wheeler, a committee to lay out a tract of land. 1650, May - Captain Willard is chosen Comptroller for the session. 1650, June - Captain Willard and Sergeant Blood ordered to lay out the grant of Samuel Haugh. 1650, October - Captain Symon Willard was chosen controller for the session. 1650, October - Captain Willard and two others, commissioners to settle the boundaries of Sudbury and Watertown. They also served here in 1651. 1651, May - Captain Willard and Lt. Goodenow returned to help lay out 2000 acres to be laid out of the town of Watertown. Civic work between 1651 and 1658 are not included here because I did not gather this material by mistake. (Pam's note) 1658, June 25 - Major Simon Willard and Thomas Danforth are appointed by the court to audit the account of the treasurer of the county and present what they find to the next County Court in Cambridge. 1658, October Sessions - They determined that the trade with the Indians belonged to the Colony and that they had full authority to regulate the trade. Major Willard was appointed one who could trade with the Indians. 1659, May Sessions - It is ordered the Major Symon Willard and two others shall hereby be appointed a committee to draw up the order which may prevent deceit in making and dressing of cloths and present the same to the next session of the court. 1659, November Session - Simon Willard was one of three judges of the county court to settle the controversy between the estate of Edward Goffe and his son, Samuel Goffe. 1659, November Session - Simon Willard was one of some who made return of the bounds of the Indian plantation called Niticke. Skipping to the year 1676, we find 4000 Indians in the field ready to attack the whites. King Philip and others killed some whites. The whites caught and executed them, one of them was Philips brother. This was the spark that brought on the war. The war started in Plymouth Colony where Philip's father as chief had sold the land to the colonists. Sources:NEHGS "Register," Vol 13, pg. 78 & "Gen. Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England," James Savage, 1860-1862 & "The Willard Genealogy," Charles Henry Pope, 1915. Title: Paine Ancestry, The Family of Robert Treat Paine Author: Sara.

George Willard

M, b. 4 Dec 1611, d. circa 1656
George Willard|b. 4 Dec 1611\nd. circa 1656|p390.htm#i366514|Richard Willard|b. 6 Feb 1582/83|p389.htm#i366496|Joane (Unknown)||p390.htm#i366548|Symon Willarde|b. 1530\nd. between 6 Feb 1585 and 26 Feb 1585|p390.htm#i366517|Elizabeth (Unknown)|d. circa 11 Apr 1587|p390.htm#i366518|||||||

Relationship=9th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
     George Willard was baptized on 4-Dec-1611 at Horsmonden, Kent, England. He was the son of Richard Willard and Joane (Unknown). George married Dorothy Dunster circa 1636. George Willard died circa 1656 at Willard's Purchase now Nottingham, Charles County, Maryland.
     He immigrated to Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

Child of George Willard and Dorothy Dunster

Margery Humphrie

F, b. 25 May 1572, d. circa 11 Dec 1608
Margery Humphrie|b. 25 May 1572\nd. circa 11 Dec 1608|p390.htm#i366515|Raynold Humphrie||p391.htm#i366566||||||||||||||||

Relationship=10th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=9th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover.
     Margery Humphrie was baptized on 25-May-1572 at Horsmonden, Kent, England. She was the daughter of Raynold Humphrie. Margery married Richard Willard, son of Symon Willarde and Elizabeth (Unknown), on 23-Sep-1601 at Westgate, Margate, Kent, England. Margery Humphrie died circa 11-Dec-1608 at Horsmonden, Kent, England. Margery was buried on 12-Dec-1608 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England.

Children of Margery Humphrie and Richard Willard

Catherine Willard

F, b. 30 Aug 1607, d. circa 1650
Catherine Willard|b. 30 Aug 1607\nd. circa 1650|p390.htm#i366516|Richard Willard|b. 6 Feb 1582/83|p389.htm#i366496|Margery Humphrie|b. 25 May 1572\nd. circa 11 Dec 1608|p390.htm#i366515|Symon Willarde|b. 1530\nd. between 6 Feb 1585 and 26 Feb 1585|p390.htm#i366517|Elizabeth (Unknown)|d. circa 11 Apr 1587|p390.htm#i366518|Raynold Humphrie||p391.htm#i366566||||

Relationship=9th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
     Catherine Willard was baptized on 30-Aug-1607 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England. She was the daughter of Richard Willard and Margery Humphrie. Catherine Willard died circa 1650.

Symon Willarde

M, b. 1530, d. between 6 Feb 1585 and 26 Feb 1585
Symon Willarde|b. 1530\nd. between 6 Feb 1585 and 26 Feb 1585|p390.htm#i366517|Richard Willard|d. between 18 Sep 1558 and 24 Oct 1558|p391.htm#i366556||||||||||||||||

Relationship=11th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandfather of David Kipp Conover.
      Symon Willarde was born in 1530 at England. He was the son of Richard Willard. Symon married Elizabeth (Unknown) circa 1560 at Horsmonden, Kent, England. Symon Willarde died between 6-Feb-1585 and 26-Feb-1585 at Kent, England.
     Symon's left a will on 6-Feb-1584/85

He mentons his wife, 2 sons, 2 daughters.

Elizabeth (Unknown)

F, d. circa 11 Apr 1587

Relationship=11th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=10th great-grandmother of David Kipp Conover.
     Elizabeth married Symon Willarde, son of Richard Willard, circa 1560 at Horsmonden, Kent, England. Elizabeth (Unknown) died circa 11-Apr-1587 at Horsmonden, Kent, England. Elizabeth was buried on 12-Apr-1587 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England.

Children of Elizabeth (Unknown) and Symon Willarde

Dorothy Dunster

F, b. 1620
      Dorothy Dunster was born in 1620 at Lancashire, England. Dorothy married George Willard, son of Richard Willard and Joane (Unknown), circa 1636.

Child of Dorothy Dunster and George Willard

Mary Sharpe

F, b. 16 Oct 1614
Mary Sharpe|b. 16 Oct 1614|p390.htm#i366528|Henry Sharpe||p390.htm#i366529|Jane Feylde||p390.htm#i366530|||||||||||||
     Mary Sharpe was baptized on 16-Oct-1614 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England. She was the daughter of Henry Sharpe and Jane Feylde. Mary married Major Simon Willard, son of Richard Willard and Margery Humphrie, on 24-Sep-1630 at Horsemonden, Kent, England.

Henry Sharpe

M
     Henry married Jane Feylde.

Child of Henry Sharpe and Jane Feylde

Jane Feylde

F
     Jane married Henry Sharpe.

Child of Jane Feylde and Henry Sharpe

Elizabeth Dunster

F
Elizabeth Dunster||p390.htm#i366531|Henry Dunster||p402.htm#i434042|Isabel Kaye||p402.htm#i434043|||||||||||||
     Elizabeth Dunster was the daughter of Henry Dunster and Isabel Kaye. Elizabeth married Major Simon Willard, son of Richard Willard and Margery Humphrie, at Massachusetts.

Mary Dunster

F, b. 5 Dec 1630, d. 28 Dec 1715
Mary Dunster|b. 5 Dec 1630\nd. 28 Dec 1715|p390.htm#i366532|Robert Dunster||p402.htm#i434040|Mary Gerrett||p402.htm#i434041|||||||||||||
     Mary Dunster was baptized on 5-Dec-1630 at Bury Parish, Lancashire, England. She was the daughter of Robert Dunster and Mary Gerrett. Mary married Major Simon Willard, son of Richard Willard and Margery Humphrie, at Massachusetts. Mary married Deacon Joseph Noyes on 14-Jul-1680. Mary Dunster died on 28-Dec-1715 at age 85.

Deacon Joseph Noyes

M
     Joseph married Mary Dunster, daughter of Robert Dunster and Mary Gerrett, on 14-Jul-1680.

Catherine (Unknown)

F, d. Mar 1597
     Catherine married Richard Willard, son of Symon Willarde and Elizabeth (Unknown), before 1591. Catherine (Unknown) died in Mar-1597 at Horsmonden, Kent, England. Catherine was buried on 11-Mar-1597 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England.

Children of Catherine (Unknown) and Richard Willard

Mary Willard

F
Mary Willard||p390.htm#i366542|Richard Willard|b. 6 Feb 1582/83|p389.htm#i366496||||Symon Willarde|b. 1530\nd. between 6 Feb 1585 and 26 Feb 1585|p390.htm#i366517|Elizabeth (Unknown)|d. circa 11 Apr 1587|p390.htm#i366518|||||||

Relationship=9th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
      Mary Willard was born at Kent, England. She was the daughter of Richard Willard.
      Her mother is unknown. She is mentioned in her father's will.

Rycharde Willard

M, b. 7 May 1591, d. before 1596
Rycharde Willard|b. 7 May 1591\nd. before 1596|p390.htm#i366543|Richard Willard|b. 6 Feb 1582/83|p389.htm#i366496|Catherine (Unknown)|d. Mar 1597|p390.htm#i366541|Symon Willarde|b. 1530\nd. between 6 Feb 1585 and 26 Feb 1585|p390.htm#i366517|Elizabeth (Unknown)|d. circa 11 Apr 1587|p390.htm#i366518|||||||

Relationship=9th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
     Rycharde Willard was baptized on 7-May-1591 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England. He was the son of Richard Willard and Catherine (Unknown). Rycharde Willard died before 1596.

Thomas Willard

M, b. 6 May 1593
Thomas Willard|b. 6 May 1593|p390.htm#i366544|Richard Willard|b. 6 Feb 1582/83|p389.htm#i366496|Catherine (Unknown)|d. Mar 1597|p390.htm#i366541|Symon Willarde|b. 1530\nd. between 6 Feb 1585 and 26 Feb 1585|p390.htm#i366517|Elizabeth (Unknown)|d. circa 11 Apr 1587|p390.htm#i366518|||||||

Relationship=9th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
     Thomas Willard was baptized on 6-May-1593 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England. He was the son of Richard Willard and Catherine (Unknown). Thomas was buried on 15-Jan-1606 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England.

Elizabeth Willard

F, b. 5 Jan 1594/95
Elizabeth Willard|b. 5 Jan 1594/95|p390.htm#i366545|Richard Willard|b. 6 Feb 1582/83|p389.htm#i366496|Catherine (Unknown)|d. Mar 1597|p390.htm#i366541|Symon Willarde|b. 1530\nd. between 6 Feb 1585 and 26 Feb 1585|p390.htm#i366517|Elizabeth (Unknown)|d. circa 11 Apr 1587|p390.htm#i366518|||||||

Relationship=9th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-grandaunt of David Kipp Conover.
     Elizabeth Willard was baptized on 5-Jan-1594/95 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England. She was the daughter of Richard Willard and Catherine (Unknown).

Richard Willard

M, b. 5 Sep 1596, d. 5 Sep 1596
Richard Willard|b. 5 Sep 1596\nd. 5 Sep 1596|p390.htm#i366546|Richard Willard|b. 6 Feb 1582/83|p389.htm#i366496|Catherine (Unknown)|d. Mar 1597|p390.htm#i366541|Symon Willarde|b. 1530\nd. between 6 Feb 1585 and 26 Feb 1585|p390.htm#i366517|Elizabeth (Unknown)|d. circa 11 Apr 1587|p390.htm#i366518|||||||

Relationship=9th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
     Richard Willard died on 5-Sep-1596. He was baptized on 5-Sep-1596 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England. Richard was buried on 6-Sep-1596 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England. He was the son of Richard Willard and Catherine (Unknown).

Richard Willard

M, b. 4 Sep 1597
Richard Willard|b. 4 Sep 1597|p390.htm#i366547|Richard Willard|b. 6 Feb 1582/83|p389.htm#i366496|Margery Humphrie|b. 25 May 1572\nd. circa 11 Dec 1608|p390.htm#i366515|Symon Willarde|b. 1530\nd. between 6 Feb 1585 and 26 Feb 1585|p390.htm#i366517|Elizabeth (Unknown)|d. circa 11 Apr 1587|p390.htm#i366518|Raynold Humphrie||p391.htm#i366566||||

Relationship=9th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover Jr.
Relationship=8th great-granduncle of David Kipp Conover.
     Richard Willard was baptized on 4-Sep-1597 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England. He was the son of Richard Willard and Margery Humphrie.

Joane (Unknown)

F
     Joane married (Unknown) Morehead before 1609. Joane married Richard Willard, son of Symon Willarde and Elizabeth (Unknown), on 17-Jan-1609 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England. Joane was buried on 25-Feb-1616/17 at Saint Margaret's Church, Horsmonden, Kent, England.

Children of Joane (Unknown) and Richard Willard

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